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"JON" 2003 Obituary


JONATHAN  JONE  JONES  JONKERS  JONSSON 

JONATHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-27 published
POWLESS, Alex Ross September 29, 1926 - May 26, 2003.
Peacefully, surrounded by his loving family, at the Willett Hospital, in Paris, Ontario, at 5: 00 a.m., on Monday, May 26, 2003, Alex Ross POWLESS, in his 77th year, went to meet his creator after several months of illness. Ross was born in Ohsweken on the Six Nations Reserve on September 29, 1926. Ross was a devoted husband and loving father and was married to Margaret Wilma POWLESS (nee BOMBERRY) for 55 years. Together they raised 14 children, 27 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. Ross was predeceased by his sons: Victor in 1955, Gaylord in 2001 and Gregory in 2002, his parents: Chauncey and Jessie, and his siblings: Mary Ella and Alice Maracle, Amy and Maude Martin, and Raymond and Jean Powless.
Ross is survived by his loving wife Margaret Wilma POWLESS (nee BOMBERRY) and sister Vernice Maizie JONATHAN, and his children, including daughter in law Patti, Gail (Mark AYRES,) Gary, Audrey (Jim BOMBERRY), Harry, Arlene (Dan MARTIN), Richard (Effie PANOUSOS), Darryl (Naansii JAMIESON,) Karen (Jerry MARTIN,) Tony (Cheryle GIBSON,) Jeffery, and Jacqui baby (Ron LYNES.) Ross is a cherished uncle to many nieces and nephews.
Ross had a passion for hunting and also loved fishing, pool and playing cards. He demonstrated his love for his grandchildren in many ways. He's fondly remembered for making up nicknames for them. Ross' sense of humour and storytelling was renowned and he was often asked to speak at public functions because of it.
Ross POWLESS distinguished himself in lacrosse both as a player and a coach. He was a member of the Ontario and Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame and won four Mann Cups (Canadian Lacrosse Championships) with the Peterborough Timbermen from 1951 to 1954, including an Most Valuable Player award in 1953. Ross coached the Brantford Warriors to the Canadian Senior B Championship in 1968 and the Rochester Chiefs to a Can-Am Lacrosse League Championship in 1969. In 1974, Ross coached six of his sons on the Ontario First Nations Team, which captured the All Indian Nations Championship Cup.
The family will honour his life with a visitation at Styres Funeral Home, Ohsweken after 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 27. Evening prayers 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 28 where Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Thursday, May 29, 2003 at 2 p.m. Interment: St. Paul's Anglican Cemetery, Sour Springs Road. Memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association, the Iroquois Lodge or the Canadian Cancer Society can be made in lieu of flowers.

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JONE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-23 published
Moses LAVALLEE
In loving memory of Moses LAVALLEE, 77 years, who died peacefully at his daughter Karen's home in Wikwemikong, Thursday, July 10, 2003.
Moses LAVALLEE began his journey through life on March 10, 1926. At the young age of 16 he worked for the Canada Steam Ship Lines. At the age of 22 he journeyed to Toronto and worked on the construction of the Toronto Subway Line. He subsequently obtained a job with the City of Toronto and retired as a heavy equipment operator after 30 years of service in 1983. Moses had many interests including repairing old lamps, bed frames and chairs, to name a few. He worked with deer hides and made many beautiful pairs of men's and ladies' gloves. He also enjoyed traveling to pow-wows to watch his children and grandchildren dance.
Beloved husband of Rosemary (MISHIBINIJIMA) LAVALLEE of Sudbury. Loving father of Karen J. PHEASANT of Wikwemikong, Sharon LAVALLEE (Harvey BONDY) of Manitowaning and Tim LAVALLEE of Toronto. Survived by son-in-law Isadore PHEASANT Jr. of Wikwemikong, and his son Lloyd COOPER of Wikwemikong. Dear grandfather of Sophie PHEASANT (friend Peter JONES), Matthew PHEASANT (friend Jodi FOX), Jesse OSAWAMICK, Lisa LAVALLEE and Jenmee BONDY and great grand_son Ezra JONE. Dear son of the late Michael and Sophie LAVALLEE (both predeceased.) Dear brother of the late Liza PELTIER and the late Eva EWIIWE. Funeral mass was held in Holy Cross Mission in Wikwemikong on Monday July 14, 2003. Interment in the Buzwah Cemetery.

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JONES o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Albert Jeffrey MICHIE
(United Steel Workers of America Local 2784 Associate Member, RCL #43) In Oshawa on Sunday, January 12, 2003 in his 65th year.
Beloved husband of Carrollynn. Predeceased by his wife Theresa ROCHON. Loving father of Carol FILLION, David MICHIE (Sherri), Louise (Sue) MAY, Danny MICHIE (Andrea). Step father of Candy SHELLEY, George ATKINSON (Dianne) and Paul ATKINSON (Jennifer.) Dear brother-in-law of Bernard and Linda JONES. Lovingly remembered by his grandchildren James, Matthew, Tara, Tanya, Jennifer, Cheyenne, Chantelle, Amanda, Philip, Tess, Lisa, Corey, Renne, Danielle, Eric and by his great granddaughter Jennifer. Predeceased by his brothers Bill, John "Bud", Orton, Roland, Austin and Edward. Sadly missed by all of his family and Friends. Funeral service was held at Thornton Cemetery Chapel on Saturday, January 18, 2003. Cremation. Armstrong Funeral Home Oshawa.

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JONES o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-23 published
Moses LAVALLEE
In loving memory of Moses LAVALLEE, 77 years, who died peacefully at his daughter Karen's home in Wikwemikong, Thursday, July 10, 2003.
Moses LAVALLEE began his journey through life on March 10, 1926. At the young age of 16 he worked for the Canada Steam Ship Lines. At the age of 22 he journeyed to Toronto and worked on the construction of the Toronto Subway Line. He subsequently obtained a job with the City of Toronto and retired as a heavy equipment operator after 30 years of service in 1983. Moses had many interests including repairing old lamps, bed frames and chairs, to name a few. He worked with deer hides and made many beautiful pairs of men's and ladies' gloves. He also enjoyed traveling to pow-wows to watch his children and grandchildren dance.
Beloved husband of Rosemary (MISHIBINIJIMA) LAVALLEE of Sudbury. Loving father of Karen J. PHEASANT of Wikwemikong, Sharon LAVALLEE (Harvey BONDY) of Manitowaning and Tim LAVALLEE of Toronto. Survived by son-in-law Isadore PHEASANT Jr. of Wikwemikong, and his son Lloyd COOPER of Wikwemikong. Dear grandfather of Sophie PHEASANT (friend Peter JONES), Matthew PHEASANT (friend Jodi FOX), Jesse OSAWAMICK, Lisa LAVALLEE and Jenmee BONDY and great grand_son Ezra JONE. Dear son of the late Michael and Sophie LAVALLEE (both predeceased.) Dear brother of the late Liza PELTIER and the late Eva EWIIWE. Funeral mass was held in Holy Cross Mission in Wikwemikong on Monday July 14, 2003. Interment in the Buzwah Cemetery.

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-11 published
The nurse and the little princess
The Dutch royal family, sheltering in Ottawa during the Second World War, never forgot the Ottawa nurse who helped deliver Princess Margriet
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, February 11, 2003, Page R7
For years, an autographed photograph of the Dutch royal family was one of Janet JONES's most prized possessions. Another was a picture of Princess Margriet of the Netherlands.
Both were given to Mrs. JONES, an Ottawa nurse, for helping deliver the Dutch princess, who was born during the royal family's stay in Canada during the Second World War.
The last of three surviving nurses who assisted with the delivery at the Ottawa Civic Hospital on January 19, 1943, Mrs. JONES has died in Ottawa after a struggle with Alzheimer's disease. She was 91.
She was a young nurse at the hospital when Princess Juliana sought refuge with her two daughters in Ottawa to escape the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands.
Princess Juliana, who later became Queen Juliana, delivered her third daughter during her stay and three special nurses, including Mrs. JONES, were appointed to care for her.
A four-room suite and a sun room were cordoned off for the royal mother and were guarded by Dutch security officers.
So that the child could be born on Dutch territory, Canada declared the delivery room a part of the Netherlands. At the time, and for the first and only time in Canadian history, a foreign flag flew on the Peace Tower on Parliament Hill.
"It was rather fun to be in the midst of it," Mrs. JONES said in a 1995 interview.
On the day of the birth, Mrs. JONES ran to alert the princess's husband, Prince Bernhard, of the imminent delivery, but when they arrived in the suite, Princess Margriet, dubbed "Canada's Princess," had already been born. She was named after the marguerite, the flower worn by the Dutch during the war as a symbol of the resistance to Nazi Germany.
Mrs. JONES is remembered as a loving nurse and tireless volunteer whose career began in the early 1930s when she was determined to leave the family dairy farm near the Eastern Ontario community of Maxville, her son Eric JONES says.
"On the farm back then, it was said you could do one of three things: Marry a farmer, be a teacher or become a nurse," says Mr. JONES, an Ottawa police officer. "She had nursing in mind as a teen, and nursing is what she decided to do."
At 18, she left Baltics Corners and trained at the Ottawa Civic Hospital, where she worked as a nurse for many years. In 1977, at age 66, she retired as head nurse at the hospital's cancer clinic but continued to do volunteer work at the clinic and the Ottawa Heart Institute until she was 83.
"She only gave up the volunteering because her hearing was bad," Mr. JONES says. "She had trouble pronouncing the names of new Canadians and it embarrassed her."
Mr. JONES said that for many years the Dutch continued to thank his mother for helping deliver Princess Margriet.
In the mid-1990s, when the princess visited Ottawa to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of the liberation of the Netherlands by Canadian soldiers, Mrs. JONES was invited to the event as a guest of honour. For years, she kept a pass that would allow her to enter the royal family's palace in the Netherlands.
"All she had to do was present the card at the front gate of the palace and she could get in -- but she never went," Mr. JONES says.
When the royal family returned to the Netherlands after the war, Mrs. JONES was given the autographed photograph of the family, which hung in her bedroom, as well as a decorative plate from the Royal Dutch Historical Society, which featured a map of the Netherlands. The plate was displayed on a wall in her dining room for many years.
On several occasions over the years, a large limousine arrived at Mrs. JONES's home and out would jump a representative of the Dutch embassy in Ottawa with a vase full of tulips.
"He'd tell her exactly how to keep them looking fresh," Mr. JONES recalls.
Ottawa's and Mrs. JONES's connection to tulips began when Princess Margriet's mother gave Ottawa thousands of Dutch tulip bulbs to thank Canada for its hospitality while the royal family lived here from 1940 until the end of the war in 1945. The gift led a few years later to the launch of the Canadian Tulip Festival in Ottawa. The original gift was part of a lifetime bequest, and every year since, the capital receives new bulbs from the Netherlands.
The gift was to acknowledge the wartime sanctuary the family had experienced in Rockcliffe, a suburb of Ottawa. The long and dangerous journey there began on May 9, 1940, the night before the German invasion. The palace received its first warnings and plans to relocate to England swung into action. Early the next morning, the whole family, including Prince Bernhard and Queen Wilhelmina, were taken to a secret hiding place for three days and from there they were escorted to the only Dutch port not in German hands and spirited aboard a British frigate.
Prince Bernhard returned briefly to the Netherlands but within four days the Dutch forces, faced with overwhelming German superiority, surrendered and the Prince again escaped to England. The Queen and Prince Bernhard remained in Britain to keep in contact with the Dutch government-in-exile, but Princess Juliana and her children, along with a nurse, boarded a Dutch warship and headed for Canada. Prince Bernhard, who remained in London with Queen Wilhelmina, visited his family in Canada on several occasions during the war.
Although the royal family returned to the Netherlands soon after the war in Europe ended, Princess Margriet reinforced her links to Canada over the years. In 1980, her mother abdicated and her sister Princess Beatrix ascended to the throne, an event that saw an increase in Princess Margriet's palace duties. Her last royal visit to Canada occurred in May when she opened the 50th anniversary of the tulip festival. She stayed at Government House, a stroller ride from the house in Rockcliffe that had been her home as a young child.
Sadly, Princess Margriet's festival visit went unnoticed by Mrs. JONES, who was ill. After her death, her family received a letter of condolence from a representative of the Dutch embassy in Ottawa.
Mrs. JONES leaves her husband Chris and son Eric.
Janet JONES, nurse; born Baltics Corners, Ontario, February 11, 1912; died, Ottawa, January 14, 2003.

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
MORGAN- JONES, John Frederick (April 9, 1918 - March 1, 2003)
Suddenly, at Mount Sinai Hospital, on March 1, 2003. Born in Winnipeg in 1918, Dr. MORGAN- JONES was the younger son of John Samuel MORGAN- JONES and Elizabeth Madeline (BROWNRIGG) MORGAN- JONES. Dr. MORGAN- JONES obtained his doctoral degree in microbiology from Uppsala University in Sweden in 1960. He served as a professor in the Botany Department at the University of Toronto from 1953 to 1983 where he specialized in microbiology and created new courses in industrial and medical mycology. His film ''Penicillin: First of the Miracle Drugs'' won the top award in the medical and health category at the 1989 Houston International Film Festival. He will be missed by his niece Lynda JONES, his niece Sybil JONES, and her husband Stephen Cox THOMAS. Memorial Service to be held on Saturday, March 8, 2003 at 2 o'clock in the Chapel of the Missionary Church of St. Francis of Assisi, 817 O'Connor Drive. In lieu of flowers, please send a donation to the Animal Rescue Mission of Canada, 821 O'Connor Drive, Toronto, Ontario M4B 2S7. Arrangements by Aftercare Cremation and Burial Service 416-440-8878.

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
JONES, Hazel Ethyl
85, of Brooklyn, Hants Co., Nova Scotia, passed away Wednesday, March 5, 2003, at Queen Elizabeth 2nd Health Sciences Centre, Infirmary Site, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Born in Elora, Ontario, she was a daughter of the late Gilbert and Daisy WHEELER. Hazel is survived by her husband, Harrison 'Gray' JONES, Brooklyn daughters Judith 'Judy' (Gerry) JOHNSTON, Rawdon, and Wendy JONES, Brooklyn; granddaughter, Jenni JOHNSTON; great-granddaughter, Moira JOHNSTON; a sister, Helen WILSON, Peterborough, Ontario Besides her parents, she was predeceased by a brother, Blake. Cremation has taken place. Memorial service will be held Sunday, March 9, 2003 at 3: 00 p.m. in Windsor United Church, Windsor, Nova Scotia, Reverend Bill GIBSON officiating. Private interment at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Lohnes-Beazley Funeral Service Ltd., 419 Albert Street, Windsor, Nova Scotia Messages of condolence may also be made on-line at www.familycare.ca

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-13 published
LEIGHTON, Frances Marie (IVISON)
After a long decline due to Alzheimer's Disease, Frances died on Tuesday, March 11, 2003, at Chelsey Park Nursing Home, London, Ontario, where she had lived for the last year. She is survived by her children Douglas and his wife Phyllis of London, Gordon and his wife Martina of Minnetonka, Minnesota, and Beverly of Ingersoll, Ontario; by eight grandchildren and one great-granddaughter by her sister-in-law Margaret BRIGHT; and by a number of nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her husband James A. LEIGHTON in 1986 and by her second husband Clifford JONES in 1999. The youngest child of Russell and Eva IVISON, Frances was born in Zone Township on December 9, 1919 and was the last surviving member of her family. Educated in London, she was a member of a remarkable generation which matured through ten years of economic depression and six years of war. Following her marriage to Jim LEIGHTON in 1941, she lived in London, Hamilton and Dundas before returning to London in 1983. Always active in community affairs, Frances' presence made a difference to many organizations such as the Dundas Baptist Church, Information Dundas and Mission Services of London. Intellectually and musically gifted, she was an excellent pianist and possessed a fine alto voice. Her energy, organizational skills and commitment to family and community will be greatly missed. Friends may call on Friday from 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, Richmond Street at St. James, London. Visitation will continue during the hour preceding the funeral service which will be conducted at Bishop Cronyn Memorial Church, 442 William Street at Queen's Avenue, London on Saturday, March 15 at 2: 00 p.m. Private interment later in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Memorial contributions to the Alzheimer's Society or Bishop Cronyn Memorial Church would be gratefully acknowledged.

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
He founded Readers' Club of Canada
Nationalist visionary struggled financially to publish Canadian writers
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page R7
In the early 1960s, when writers asked Peter and Carol MARTIN where to publish their manuscripts on Canada, the couple realized how few choices there were. Inspired, the Martins, both voracious readers, staunch nationalists and founders of the Readers' Club of Canada, decided to start their own press. In 1965, Peter Martin Associates came into being. Last month, Peter MARTIN died of lung cancer in Ottawa.
In an industry overshadowed by American companies, Peter MARTIN Associates was among the first in a wave of independent publishing houses to open during a time of rising Canadian nationalism.
Launched in a downtown Toronto basement on a shoestring budget, skeleton staff, idealism and enthusiasm, the company flew by the seat of its pants. Its employees were often young and new to the business. But many, including Peter CARVER, Michael SOLOMON and Valerie WYATT, went on to become Canadian mainstays.
"It really was a time of Canadian nationalism and those of us who believed in that cause could see what Peter and Carol were doing," said Ms. WYATT, a children's editor who spent four years with the company in the seventies.
During the 16 years before its sale in 1981, Peter Martin Associates published approximately 170 works, mainly non-fiction. Its presses put out I, Nuligak, the autobiography of an Inuit man; The Boyd Gang by Marjorie LAMB and Barry PEARSON; Trapping is My Life by John TETSO; and the Handbook of Canadian Film by Eleanor BEATTIE. Others who came through their doors included Hugh HOOD, Robert FULFORD, John Robert COLOMBO, Douglas FETHERLING and Mary Alice DOWNIE -- all to have their works published.
Started with small amounts of seed money from private investors and no government funding, Peter Martin Associates constantly struggled financially. At one point, for a bit of extra cash, the office became the designated nuclear-fallout shelter for the street. Pat DACEY, once the firm's book designer, lugged suitcases of books up the street to sell at Britnell's bookstore with summer employee Bronwyn DRAINIE.
Working at Peter Martin Associates was always fun, Ms. WYATT said. "You went in to work happy and you stayed happy all day."
Still, in a time when Canadian works received little recognition, she remembers finding it difficult to get media interviews for the author of Martin-published book.
Yet another title caused trouble with its subject. The company was putting out a collection of previously published sayings of former prime minister John DIEFENBAKER, called I Never Say Anything Provocative, edited by Margaret WENTE. Mr. DIEFENBAKER heard about the project, called Mr. MARTIN and threatened to sue. Mr. MARTIN stood firm.
"He handled it with such élan," said writer Tim WYNNE- JONES, then in the art department. "He was suitably dutiful, but not in awe. Mr. DIEFENBAKER was just over the top, as was his wont."
The book went to press and Mr. DIEFENBAKER did not go to court.
Once listed along with Peter GZOWSKI in a Maclean's magazine article on "Young Men to Watch," Mr. MARTIN was born on April 26, 1934 in Ottawa to a dentist father and a mother who drove an ambulance in the First World War. The younger of two sons, he attended Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario and the University of Toronto, where he earned a degree in philosophy.
During a year in Ottawa as the president of the National Federation of University Students, Mr. MARTIN met his first wife Carol. They married in 1956 and moved to Toronto. Three years later, they founded the Readers' Club in Featuring one Canadian book a month, it distributed works by Mordecai RICHLER, Irving LAYTON, Morley CALLAGHAN and Brian MOORE among others, and supplied its members with coupons. While continuing to run the Readers' Club (sold in 1978 to Saturday Night Magazine and closed in 1981), the MARTINs started Peter Martin Associates.
Throughout his career, Mr. MARTIN spoke out for Canadian publishing. Alarmed by the sale of Ryerson Press and Gage Educational Press in 1970 to American firms, he called a meeting of publishers to discuss problems in the industry. Named the Independent Publishers Association, the group started in 1971 with 16 members and with Mr. MARTIN as its first president. In 1976, it was renamed the Association of Canadian Publishers and continues today with 140 members. As a result of the group's efforts, Canadian publishing began to receive federal and provincial funding.
In the late 1970s, the MARTINs went their separate ways. Afterward, Mr. MARTIN published a small newspaper, The Downtowner, and owned a cookbook store with his second wife, Maggie NIEMI. In 1983, they moved near Sudbury, Ontario, where Mr. MARTIN did freelance book and theatre reviews, then moved to Ottawa in 1985 to work as president for Balmuir Books, publisher of the magazine International Perspectives and consulting editor for the University of Ottawa Press.
After a spinal-cord injury in 1997, Mr. MARTIN was left a quadriplegic, except for limited use of his left arm. Even so, he remained active, maintained a heavy e-mail correspondence and spent time in the park reading while seated in a bright-yellow wheelchair.
Mr. MARTIN leaves his children Pamela, Christopher and Jeremy and his wife Maggie NIEMI. He died on March 15.

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-02 published
INGHAM, Albert
Ab died suddenly on Sunday, June 29, 2003 in his 86th year, on a fine summer day at the family cottage at Lime Lake, a bright and active man. Beloved husband of Anne (KUZ) and father of Paula BUTTERFIELD and husband David, Dyan JONES and partner Randy MARTIN, Thomas INGHAM and daughter-in-law Janet WHITE/WHYTE. His grandchildren Isaiah WALTERS, Rachel WALTERS, Adam BUTTERFIELD, Jonathan BUTTERFIELD and Samuel INGHAM will always cherish their Friendship with him. Survived by his brother Robert INGHAM and brother-in-law Walter KUZ and dear nieces and nephews.
A fine man of jovial spirit, he embodied so much to be admired. May we all live such a full and loving life. Family and Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.) Weston, from 6-9 p.m. Thursday. Funeral Service in the Ward Chapel on Friday, July 4, 2003 at 11 a.m. Interment Prospect Cemetery. Donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, Breast And Gynecology Research Teams, would be appreciated.

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-05 published
JONES, Carolyn (( DUNCANnée) McKAY)
Born in Halbrite, Saskatchewan, December 5, 1908. Carol died in North Vancouver, British Columbia on June 24, 2003. She was predeceased by her first husband Lewis DUNCAN, Picton, Ontario., and her second husband William JONES of Merrickville, Ontario. Also predeceased by her brother Eric McKAY, her sisters, Doris ADAM/ADAMS, Marion SARKISSIAN and Elizabeth LEE, her niece Elinor BREWERTON and nephew Don McKAY. Carol is survived and will be sadly missed by her nephews Peter HEPPLEWHITE and Ted McKAY, her niece Shirley ATKINS and all of their families as well as many Friends throughout Canada, U.S. and Great Britain. In lieu of flowers, donations in Carol's memory to a charity of their choice will be gratefully acknowledged. Arrangements entrusted to First Memorial Funeral Services, North Vancouver, British Columbia 604-980-3451.

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
Toronto's musical Mr. Chips
Headmaster of private Crescent School took over a rundown building and fixed its wiring, plumbing and even its furnace until a newer structure could be found
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, July 10, 2003 - Page R5
He was the first Canadian-born principal of a Toronto boys' school that for its first 50 years had hired only British headmasters. Bill BURRIDGE, who has died at the age of 79, remained at Toronto's Crescent School until 1986.
The boys at the school both respected him and feared him. The father of one former head boy remembers "Mr. BURRIDGE" as a man who could "cut through the BS. The boys knew they couldn't get away with anything with him. But he was a wonderful teacher."
Mr. BURRIDGE was an unlikely Mr. Chips. If you looked back at his early school career, no one would have picked him for the job as a headmaster at a private school.
William BURRIDGE was a working class boy who was born in Toronto on August 16, 1923. His father, an English immigrant, was a painter for Imperial Oil. Young Bill went to Western Technical-Commercial School to become an electrician.
But like many of his generation, the Second World War wrought changes in his life.
He went into the Royal Canadian Air Force as an electrician. One of his first postings was to Dorval Airport in Montreal, a military field during the war, where one of his fellow electricians, Phil JONES, remembered they worked on odd planes for the Royal Canadian Air Force, odd because they were not the standard aircraft flown by Bomber Command. They were American planes, twin-engined B-25 bombers and the long range four engine B-24 Liberators.
One big B-24 was unique. It was named Commando and its bomb racks had been stripped out to make it into a passenger plane, with two private bunks for Winston Churchill, the wartime British Prime Minister and his doctor. The plane was parked at Dorval a lot of the time, from where it could easily head out to Bermuda, West Africa or to Cairo, or across the Atlantic to Britain. The aircraft was serviced by Royal Canadian Air Force electricians, including Mr. BURRIDGE. The posting provided interesting stories for him to tell in later life.
Mr. BURRIDGE and the other electricians were sent to different bases, including one just outside Vancouver. While there they used to pick up extra money on their leave by hitchhiking across the border to Seattle to work as drivers and warehousemen at a fruit-packing plant. The war meant a shortage of men and the Canadian airmen were given weekend work, no questions asked.
A professional musician on the double bass since the age of 17, through the war Mr. BURRIDGE played in pickup bands and an Royal Canadian Air Force band, along with Mr. Jones and others.
When Mr. BURRIDGE came home from the war he kept playing. During the late forties he played at dances at the Young Men's Christian Association and at clubs such as the Rex. In the fifties he played in the Benny Lewis Orchestra at places such as the Casa Loma and the Palace Pier, then a dance hall, now a family of condos on Lake Ontario. He played with the jazz great Moe KAUFMAN and did some session work with the jazz singers Peggy LEE and Pearl BAILEY.
Mr. BURRIDGE also played during the summers at resorts in the Muskokas. To get there he had to book an extra seat on the lake steamer Segwun for his big bass.
A short time after the war Mr. BURRIDGE decided to take advantage of the free education earned by his wartime service. He went to the University of Toronto and graduated in 1950 in arts and sciences. He worked as a salesman for General Foods for a year and then started teaching school, first in Coppercliff in northern Ontario and then in Scarborough near Toronto.
By the late fifties he was a principal in Whitby, just outside Toronto. But a car accident on the way to school influenced his view of things. His car slipped on ice and broadsided a telephone pole. Although unhurt, the crash made him ready for a change. One day he was on jury duty at a courtroom in downtown Toronto and spotted an ad in the Globe and Mail for a grade 5 teacher at Crescent School. He applied and got the job.
Crescent School was then on the old Massey estate on Dawes Road at Victoria Park. When he started there were only nine teachers, 100 students and the school went from kindergarten to grade 8.
Mr. BURRIDGE introduced music to the curriculum and became a popular teacher. When the headmaster was ill he took over on a part-time basis, becoming headmaster on his predecessor's death in 1966.
At the time, Crescent School was a mess. The building was falling apart and the headmaster was called on to fix the electrical work, the plumbing and even the furnace. He helped in the search for a new building and in 1972 the school moved to the old Garfield Weston Estate at Bayview Avenue and Post Road.
Over the years Crescent School changed and dropped the lower grades and expanded as far as the last grade of high school. Mr. BURRIDGE remained headmaster until 1971 and stayed on teaching and as assistant director of the Lower School until his retirement in 1986.
In private, Mr. BURRIDGE was also a Mr. Fixit. He helped keep up some family rental properties and often workered on his old Buicks or his house in suburban Ajax, Ontario, on a lot of almost half an acre. His other hobby was keeping bees.
Bill BURRIDGE leaves his wife Faith, to whom he was married for 54 years, and his three children, Reid, Rob and Hope.

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-09 published
Mary Catharine JONES (née STALEY) Died 3 August 2003
Peacefully, in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, at home surrounded by her loving family.
She gave unending, unconditional love and encouragement to her children and their spouses: Sharon GLOVER (Douglas WILKINS) of Salt Spring Island, British Columbia; Christopher JONES (Susan) of Dartmouth; and also to her deeply beloved grandchildren: Jason (Alessandra) of L'Aquila, Italy; Nicholas (Erin); and Jennifer of Dartmouth.
Mum was predeceased by her loving and beloved husband Owen in She is survived by her dearest sister Barbara MANNING of Ottawa.
She leaves us a rich legacy: love, courage, common sense, acceptance and a zest for life that was never-ending. She is deeply cherished by all of us who loved her, and she will be held in our hearts and minds forever.

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
'Nobody beats Arthur'
Victoria native left mark on Ottawa's business scene, while setting swimming records when he was over 70
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, November 5, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- When Arthur INGLIS moved to Ottawa from Victoria in the late 1960s, his goal was to leave his mark on the nation's capital. By all accounts, he succeeded, both in the world of business and in the swimming pool.
"When he arrived he thought he could make a difference," said his partner of 20 years Kimberly CROSS. " The place was a wasteland back then, but he did manage to leave an imprint."
Mr. INGLIS, who as recently as May set a world swimming record, died on September 1. He as 71.
After moving to Ottawa, Mr. INGLIS, who was born in Victoria on March 28, 1932, worked as director of store design for Hudson's Bay Co. and redesigned a handful of department stores purchased from their local owner by the Bay.
In 1976, he started two Vanilla Boutique clothing stores and later operated the Ecco Restaurant in downtown Ottawa. He founded the Mags and Fags newsstand that same year after he realized Ottawa didn't have an outlet with the variety of magazines and newspapers available in New York or London. The business also included Immigration and Naturalization Service News Service, which distributes newspapers and magazines to Ottawa's business and government sectors.
With a reputation as an innovative member of Ottawa's business community, Mr. INGLIS and a partner built Mags and Fags into one of the biggest newsstands in Canada, said Mr. CROSS, who added that local media individuals often visited the Elgin Street shop.
During the early 1980s, Mr. INGLIS and a business partner designed a bar named Shannon's in honour of Shannon TWEED, Miss Ottawa Valley of 1977 and Playboy Magazine's 1982 Playmate of the Year. TWEED, partner of Gene SIMMONS, bassist for rock band KISS, named her dog Vanilla after Mr. INGLIS's women's fashion shops.
His boutiques carried innovative lines of clothing from France and Italy that couldn't be found elsewhere in Ottawa. His Ecco restaurant and club was a downtown hotspot known for its elegant yet homey setting.
"It was hot, hot, hot with a library and outdoor terrace on the second floor, like something you'd find on 3rd Avenue in New York," Mr. CROSS said. "It was the place where all of the city's movers and shakers went, real estate people, fashion people -- you name it."
Mr. INGLIS and a partner also designed and introduced several Ottawa shopping centres to the sales kiosks that are now commonplace in most malls.
In 2000, when Mr. INGLIS was 68 and still operating the newsstand, his life took a dramatic turn because of cholesterol and blood-pressure problems. His doctors placed him on medication but instead of relying on pills, he quit drinking, adopted a healthier diet and started swimming and weight-training.
In 2002, he sold his share in Mags and Fags to concentrate on travel and competitive swimming, which he had excelled at as youngster and into his teens.
Mr. INGLIS's athletic prowess in his younger days also included skating with the Ice Capades, touring North America with his sister May in the 1950s.
To pursue his interest in swimming and to improve his fitness, Mr. INGLIS joined the Technosport masters swim and triathlon team in Ottawa and was soon setting Canadian and world swimming records in the 70-and-over age group. As his health problems eased, he challenged the best in the world in masters swimming in various locales, including New Zealand and Hawaii.
When he died, he held 17 Canadian or Ontario records in backstroke, breaststroke, freestyle and individual medley, including all Canadian backstroke records in all distances in the 70 to 74 age group, said teammate Pat NIBLETT, who keeps track of records set by members of the Technosport team. Mr. INGLIS was also a member of an Ontario swim relay team that set a world record in New Zealand in 2002.
Ms. NIBLETT, who often travelled to swim meets with Mr. INGLIS, remembers her teammate as a "tall slim man with the twinkling eyes and wonderful sense of humour. I only had the privilege of knowing Arthur for three short years. I felt as if I had known him for a lifetime. There is a saying in our house that 'nobody beats Arthur.' This is true of everything that Arthur did."
At the Canadian National Masters Swim Championships in Montreal in May, Mr. INGLIS broke his own 200-metre backstroke record and set Canadian records in the 100 and 200 individual medley events.
Technosport coach Duane JONES, who was among those shocked by the incredibly fit Mr. INGLIS's death, said the swimmer worked out about five times a week.
"When we first met, he was 30 pounds overweight, he was not a healthy eater and he was lethargic. But soon after, he was setting records; when he was 71-years-old he had the body of a 35-year-old. He paid attention to detail and did his workouts, swimming, biking and weight-training consistently.
"The first time he dove into the water I could not believe how beautiful his strokes cut the water. I've coached more than 6,000 athletes during the past 35 years and have never seen a guy like Arthur INGLIS."
Ramona FIEBIG, manager of Mags and Fags for more than 14 years, said Mr. INGLIS was a dedicated businessman who did his best to ensure the newsstand had the best selection of titles in the city. He often showed up for work on weekends as early as 3 a.m.
"There are thousands of titles in the store. It was no small chore to keep on top of what was new, to find new magazines and locate suppliers."
To the day he died, Mr. INGLIS was an innovator, Mr. CROSS said, adding that as his health deteriorated, he wanted to try a novel drug treatment to prolong his life.
"After his stroke, the options were paralysis on his left side or trying a new drug," Mr. CROSS said, adding that the side effect was a 16-per-cent chance he would suffer massive bleeding in his brain. "His feeling was that if he didn't survive, the next person who came down the shoot might have a better chance."

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-18 published
Black pride of Canadian track and field
First Canadian-born black athlete to win an Olympic medal was member of relay team at 1932 Los Angeles Games but could find work only as a railway porter
By James CHRISTIE, Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - Page R9
Ray LEWIS's event in Olympic track and field was officially the 400-metre sprint, a flat race. His enduring place in Canadian sport history, however, was earned for hurdling a barrier.
Mr. LEWIS, who died in his native Hamilton at age 94 on the weekend, was the first Canadian born black athlete to stand upon the Olympic medals podium. He won a bronze medal as a member of the Canadian 4 x 400-metre relay at the Los Angeles Games in 1932.
At a time where racial discrimination was the way of the world, Mr. LEWIS didn't get to live a hero's life. Viewed today as a pathfinder for talented black athletes, in the 1930s Mr. LEWIS had to all but quit his athletics training because of the demands of his job as a railway porter with the Canadian Pacific Railways. He spent 22 years on the trains making 250 trips from Toronto to Vancouver. To try and stay fit, Mr. LEWIS would train by running alongside the rails when the train stopped on the prairies.
"He deserved so much more than he ever received," said Donovan BAILEY, who won two gold medals at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics in the 100 metres and 4 x 100-metre relay. "I benefited from his going before.
"I had the honour and good fortune of having lunch with Ray LEWIS and talking with him. I couldn't imagine what it was like in his day. It was so different. Ultimately, he's one who inspired me."
Raymond Gray LEWIS was a Hamiltonian, cradle to grave. James WORRALL, honorary member of the International Olympic Committee and Canada's Olympic flag bearer in 1936, recalled the family roots in the area went back to the 1840s when his great grandparents escaped slavery in the United States and settled near Otterville, Ontario
The youngest child of Cornelius LEWIS and Emma GREEN, Ray LEWIS was born October 8, 1910, at 30 Clyde St. He began running races for fun at age 9 when he entered as contest at a local picnic. He began formal training in track and field at Central Collegiate where the autocratic John Richard (Cap) CORNELIUS was his coach. In 1929, he established a Canadian high-school track-and-field record of four championships in one day, taking the dashes at 100, 200, and 440 yards as they were measured then, and anchoring the one-mile relay. In 1928 and 1929, Mr. LEWIS was part of the Central relay team that won the United States national schoolboy title.
He briefly attended Marquette University in Milwaukee but returned to Canada during the Depression and joined the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Besides his Olympic medal performance with teammates Phil EDWARDS, Alex WILSON and Jimmy BALL, Mr. LEWIS was also a Canadian champion several times and competed in the inaugural British Empire Games in 1930 in Hamilton and the 1934 Empire Games in London. where he won a silver medal in the mile relay. Mr. EDWARDS was actually the first black athlete to win an Olympic medal for Canada in 1932, getting the 800-metre honour about a half-hour before the relay with Mr. LEWIS. Mr. EDWARDS, however, was native of British Guyana, while Ray LEWIS was a local.
Mr. LEWIS, who in 2001 was awarded the Order of Canada, had a life-long attachment to the Empire Games, later renamed the Commonwealth Games. He was an adviser to the bidders who recently sought the 2010 Games for Hamilton and vowed that if the Games were coming back, he'd be there to greet them at the official opening at age 100. The Hamilton bid lost out last week to one from New Delhi, India. He lit the torch during the opening ceremonies at the International Children's Games in Hamilton July 1, 2000.
Mr. LEWIS wrote an autobiography entitled Shadow Running in which he detailed his life "as porter and Olympian." He was featured in a 2002 TVOntario documentary series on racism, Journey to Justice. "It [racism] felt worse here, because it wasn't supposed to happen here," he recalled in the video.
Whereas white athletes had an opportunity for coaching jobs after their careers, Mr. LEWIS did not. His position as a porter was one of the few jobs open to men of his race.
"The first time I met him, the Canadian team was on its way to Fort William, Ontario, for the Canadian championships in 1933. They travelled by Pullman and Ray was the porter. He couldn't get the time off to compete. But he did make the 1934 Empire Games team and was presented to the Prince of Wales, something that was a point of honour for him. He felt it was something to rub into all those people who had kept him off teams and out of places because he was black," Mr. WORRALL said.
Mr. LEWIS married Vivienne JONES in 1941, and they adopted two children, sons Larry and Tony.

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
JOHNSON, E.D. Julianna "Julie" (née TOOLE) (March 27, 1912 - November 13, 2003)
Julianna (TOOLE) JOHNSON died comfortably and peacefully at Lake of the Woods District Hospital on November 13th, 2003, age 91½, having lived a full and happy life.
Born March 27, 1912 to George and Eleanor TOOLE, she was a lifetime citizen of Kenora except for her upper schooling years in Toronto (Havergal College graduate with the Herbert Mason Gold Medal for high character, 1931; University of Toronto B.A. 1934) and Vancouver (Vancouver General Hospital, R.N. 1938). She married Larry P. JOHNSON (Johnson's Pharmacy 2nd Street,) on June 28th, 1939. They produced 8 children and had a busy, happy 58 years together.
Julianna was predeceased by her parents, her husband L.P. JOHNSON, brother Laurence (Donalda) TOOLE, brother Michael TOOLE, sons Paul JOHNSON in 1952 and Terry JOHNSON in 1996, great-grand_son John WAGENAAR in 2001. She is lovingly remembered and survived by son Larry (Lyn) JOHNSON, Calgary, daughter-in- law Sue JOHNSON, Kenora, daughter Eleanor (Bill) KYLE, Kenora, daughter Mary Pat (Rob) DICKSON/DIXON, Winnipeg, son Bill (Janet) JOHNSON, Winnipeg, daughter Elizabeth/Honey (Tony) JONES, Mississauga, son Kevin (Deborah) JOHNSON, Calgary; grandchildren from Australia to England to the U.S. and all across Canada -- Peter, Tim, Paul and Stephana, Joe and Jaye, Beth, Mark Johnson, Nancy and Kevin WAGENAAR, Rob and Melissa JOHNSON, Larry and Susan KYLE, Shannon and Phil EDGELL, Dave and Dominique, Brad KYLE, Chris, Susie and Billy DICKSON/DIXON, Diane and Eric JOHNSON, Trevor and Evan JONES, Charlie, George, Andy and Julie JOHNSON; great-granddaughters Hailey JOHNSON, Beth WAGENAAR, Ericka EDGELL, Olivia JOHNSON; brother Ned (Anne) TOOLE, Edmonton; sisters-in-law Evelyn INGO and Marjorie Merceline PIGOTT, Vancouver; many kissing cousins, nieces, nephews and Friends.
Julianna's main focus in life was her large family to whom she devoted vast amounts of time and energy. She was a patient, wonderful, caring mother and grandmother, a whiz at accomplishing many tasks in a calm and unflappable manner, an excellent cookie and pie maker, and a gracious hostess. Over the years her fingers were rarely idle as she created items for the Hospital Gift Shop or knitted goods, especially sweaters, for her own family. She was active in the community being a lifetime member of St. Alban's Cathedral and St. Alban's Altar Guild. Of her many volunteer activities she really enjoyed helping children from Kin Valley School at their swimming classes in the (now) Lakeside Inn and delivering Meals on Wheels with daughter Eleanor. She was a member of the Ladies Hospital Auxiliary for many years taking a turn as President. She enjoyed Friendships with many people including her square dancing group and her afternoon Bridge Club with whom she played bridge until she was 89. Truly her favourite time of year was summertime when she loved sharing the family island on Lake of the Woods with her ever growing and changing family. She took great pleasure her whole life long in boat rides, picnics and sunsets on beautiful Lake of the Woods. Julianna will long be remembered as a kind, considerate and dear person.
Immediate cremation has taken place. A memorial service and celebration of her life will be held at St. Alban's Cathedral, 312 Main Street South, Kenora, on Saturday, November 22nd, 2003 at 1: 30 p.m. A reception downstairs in the church hall will follow immediately afterwards.
As an expression of sympathy, those who wish may make a donation in Julianna's memory to the Lake of the Woods C.T. Scanner Fund, 21 Sylvan Street West, Kenora, Ontario P9N 3W7 or to St. Alban's Cathedral, 312 Main Street South, Kenora, Ontario P9N 1T2, or to a charity of one's choice.

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JONES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
FOSTER, Douglas Mortimer
Died peacefully at the South Muskoka Memorial Hospital in Bracebridge, on Saturday, November 22nd, 2003 at the age of 88. Beloved husband of Mary Jean (née LYALL.) Predeceased by his first wife Marnie (née KERR.) Lovingly remembered by his children Lynn ARMSTRONG (Brock,) Wendy SHELLEY (Steven,) Doug FOSTER (Nancy,) Lesley FOSTER (Leslie HENDY), his stepchildren Susan BELL, Sharon JONES, Donald BELL and Lyall BELL. Loving grandfather of Craig, Carolyn, Stuart, Adam, Katelynn, Samantha, Marcella, Natalie, Alexandra, Sachi and Hunter. A private memorial service was held at the Reynolds Funeral Home ''Turner Chapel'' in Bracebridge 877-806-2257. Donations in memory of Doug to the South Muskoka Hospital Foundation would be gratefully appreciated by the family.

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JONKERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-17 published
CRANSTON, Lynda Lee (née HOFFMAN)
''A Truly Great Mother and Wife''
Died peacefully September 14, 2003 in her home after a long and courageous battle with cancer. Her 51 years were too short and she will be missed. Beloved mother to Jarrett, Galen and Jocelyn (deceased) and cherished wife of Goldie CRANSTON. All of us are better people for having had the privilege of sharing her life with us. Predeceased by her parents, Charles (Bud) HOFFMAN and Irene HOFFMAN (CONNOR,) both originally of Montreal. Lynda is survived by her brother, Barry HOFFMAN and his family of Burlington. Lynda is also predeceased by her parents-in-law Monte ''Mr. C.'' and Stuart CRANSTON of Pakenham, Ontario. Also survived by her brother-in-law, Toller CRANSTON of Toronto and San Miguel, Mexico, who admired her zest for life and shared his quest for colour. Friends and loved ones may pay their respects at the Garden Chapel of Tubman Funeral Homes, 3440 Richmond Road (between Bayshore and Baseline Road), Nepean on Wednesday, September 17th from 5 to 8 p.m. A celebration of her life will be held in the chapel on Thursday, September 18th at 2 p.m. As an expression of profound gratitude, the family would appreciate donations be directed to the Victorian Order or Nurses, without whose help we could not have coped, and with Lynda, fought side by side against this most evil disease. A special thank you to Marsha, who should be sainted. Alternatively donations may be sent to the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre. Thank you to Dr. JONKERS and the entire staff of O.R.C.C. who gave Lynda both the weapons and the support to fight the battle she did.

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JONSSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-11 published
Pint-sized scrapper 'liked wrestling more than eating'
Stellar career in the ring was marred only by the near-miss loss of an Olympic medal
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 11, 2003 - Page R11
He was a Regina stonecutter who used his strength to good effect in the wrestling ring. Vern PETTIGREW, who has died at 95, was an athlete whose career was marred only by the near-miss loss of an Olympic medal.
Competing for Canada, Mr. PETTIGREW finished in fourth place in the featherweight division of the freestyle-wrestling competition at the Berlin Olympics in 1936. The 28-year-old stonecutter with a chiselled physique had dominated his Swedish opponent when the match suddenly ended with Mr. PETTIGREW disqualified for using an illegal hold. The Swede went on to claim the bronze medal, while Mr. PETTIGREW spent the next 67 years contemplating the unfairness of a verdict that denied him Olympic glory.
"One call made all the difference," he told The Regina Leader-Post in 1996. "You can't quarrel, but it was terrible. It was a legal hold, but they said it was illegal. I could have been standing on the podium, but you can't cry about it."
Even before the devastating verdict, Canadian wrestlers had expressed their unhappiness with the officiating at the tournament.
The team felt European officials, versed in the more rigid dictates of the Greco-Roman discipline, were unfamiliar with the rules of freestyle, or catch-as-catch-can, wrestling. For instance, the Canadians relied heavily on leg holds, only to discover the judges did not award points for the manoeuvre. Canada claimed only one of 18 freestyle medals awarded at the 1936 Games, a bronze for Joseph SCHLEIMER, a lightweight from Toronto.
Mr. PETTIGREW retained his amateur status after returning from the Games, continuing to dominate his weight class in Canada. He stepped away from the mat as a competitor in 1940, having won five national championships. He was also known as an eager participant in exhibition matches, willing to take on all comers.
"I liked wrestling more than eating," he once said.
John Vernon PETTIGREW was born on March 30, 1908, in Durham, Ontario He moved with his family to Biggar, Saskatchewan., two years later, before settling in Regina in 1919.
Wrestling was perhaps a natural sport for a pint-sized boy born as part of a baker's dozen brood of PETTIGREWs. He learned the formal rules and tactics of the sport at the old Young Men's Christian Association in Regina, "a stinkin' Y with a pool as big as my kitchen," he told the Leader-Post.
Wrestling was conducted in a small basement room reached by a long flight of stairs. "It was never washed. No wonder we got big scabs on our knees."
He claimed his first Dominion featherweight crown in 1933 and dominated his weight division in Saskatchewan, where he won 10 provincial championships.
He was accompanied on the long journey by train and ocean liner to Germany in 1936 by fellow Regina wrestler George CHIGA. A 210-pound (95-kilogram) heavyweight, Mr. CHIGA dwarfed his featherweight friend, who weighed closer to 134 pounds (61 kilograms).
One of the more memorable experiences in the athlete's camp was Mr. PETTIGREW's first viewing of that science-fiction dream called television. He also met the great American track athlete Jesse OWENS, whose humility and friendliness in trying circumstances Mr. PETTIGREW never forgot. Like many of the athletes, however, Mr. PETTIGREW remained unaware of, or unconcerned about, the intentions of the Nazi regime, for which the Games were a propaganda exercise.
A first-round victory over Karel KVACEK of Czechoslovakia impressed Canadian Press correspondent Elmer DULMAGE, who wrote that Mr. PETTIGREW "gives a pretty fair imitation of lightning."
The Regina wrestler defeated Marco GAVELLI of Italy and Hector RISKE of Belgium, but was pinned at two minutes, 13 seconds of a fourth-round match by Francis MILLARD of the United States. The controversial disqualification against Gosta JONSSON of Sweden eliminated Mr. PETTIGREW from the medals. Kustaa PIHLAJAMAKI of Finland won the featherweight gold, while Mr. MILLARD took silver and Mr. JONSSON got bronze.
Mr. PETTIGREW retired from wrestling not long after joining the Regina fire department in 1939. He retired as battalion fire chief in 1973. He then worked part-time at a local funeral home, which years later would handle his remains.
Mr. PETTIGREW, who died in Regina on October 29, leaves a daughter and two sons. He was predeceased by his wife Jean; by his eldest son, Robert; and by all 12 of his siblings.
In all the years since leaving Berlin, he never quite overcame the sense that he had been robbed of a chance for an Olympic medal. "It always bugs you," he said.

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