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"JAR" 2003 Obituary


JARVIS 

JARVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-03 published
Valetta May ROSE
By Jim PATTERSON Thursday, April 3, 2003 - Page A22
Valetta May ROSE
Domestic worker, farmer and comic writer's muse. Born in Warsaw, Ontario, January 9, 1912. Died January 16, in Toronto, of a stroke, aged 91.
On January 16, 2003, Valetta ROSE, 91, spoke with her brother, Ken DRAIN, and her niece, Dora BARR, by phone from her home in Norwood, Ontario Then she got into a limousine to go to a large family party in Toronto, to celebrate her nephew David PATTERSON's birthday. On the way, she sat with her great-nephew Paul, his partner Cathy and their six-week-old daughter, Kira, and was delighted to have the baby beside her for the trip.
There were more than 100 people at the party, but Valetta held court, greeting family members. Then, at 7 p.m., she suffered a stroke, and died instantly in her daughter Beattie's arms.
Born on January 9, 1912, Valetta was the second child of David DRAIN and Christina EDWARDS, who farmed near Warsaw, Ontario The DRAIN household was full of fiddle, piano and song; people arrived by horse and sled for music in the parlour, food in the kitchen and children everywhere. When Valetta's mother went into labour to deliver her sister Cora, Valetta's older brother Ivan was told to take his 20-month-old sister to grandma's house. Ivan was 3 and the house was two kilometres away -- but those were different times. Off the pair toddled, perfectly capable and perfectly safe.
As teenagers, Valetta and Cora set off for Toronto to work as domestics, eventually earning a respectable $25 per month plus room and board.
In 1943, Valetta married the love of her life, Ted ROSE. They farmed together outside Warsaw for 32 years. One night just after they were married, they went to Peterborough to see a movie. Afterward, walking up George Street, Valetta mused aloud about how lovely it would be to own a bedroom suite like the one in a store's display window. The next day, Ted came home with the furniture. Valetta never did discover how he'd afforded it.
In 1975, Ted and Valetta sold the farm and retired to Norwood. Ted died in 1987.
Last year, Valetta set off for Scotland with her daughters Beattie and Judy, their husbands, Bob BECHTEL and David GORDON, and Judy and David's two sons, Ian and Paul. Valetta announced, "On this trip, I just want to enjoy being all together." For three weeks, they drove around staying at bed and breakfasts and exploring the islands off the north coast. She was planning another trip this year -- to Judy's home in Vancouver.
For 40 years, Valetta followed the advice of one Dr. JARVIS, whose book Folk Medicine taught the benefits of lecithin, and she followed his prescription for a daily teaspoon of apple cider vinegar mixed with honey in a half glass of water to keep herself free from the worst of arthritis and other afflictions. Valetta knew that the secret of caring for others was simply to enjoy their company and, as the family "Information Central," loved to share stories of their successes.
She had her own place in Canadian cultural history. Filmmaker Norman JEWISON, a cousin, mentioned Valetta to writer Don HARRON, who immediately claimed her for use as the wife of his fictional character Charlie FARQUHARSON. Soon Valetta was credited with writing down Charlie's Hist'ry of Canada on those days when it was "too wet to plough." A highlight of Valetta's 90th birthday party was a card and framed photo from her "second husband."
Valetta made the best of every minute. She spent her last night on the bed that Ted had bought for her so many years before. Her spirit will delight family and Friends for years to come.
Jim PATTERSON is Valetta's sister Cora's youngest son. He was helped by Beattie, Ken, Cora HENDREN and Stephen PATTERSON.

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JARVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-04 published
DEVLIN, Major Edward Gordon
Died suddenly on April 2, 2003. A former student of the Royal Conservatory of Music, distinguished World War 2 veteran, avid concert goer and antique collector. Beloved brother of Betty JARVIS, the late Dorothy BAGSHAW and the late John DEVLIN. Dear Uncle of Bill BAGSHAW, Bettyann WARD, Carolyn MacLEOD, John KINGSMILL, Julie, Jane and Lesley DEVLIN and predeceased by his niece Gillian KINGSMILL. Devoted Great Uncle of Joshua, CONNOR and Caitlin KINGSMILL, Laura THORNBERRY, John WARD and Susan ENGLAND, Cameron and Kaylie MacLEOD and Ellie, Kate and Alex POMERANT. The family would like to thank the caring staff at The Briton House. Friends may visit on Saturday, April 5th from 11: 00 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. at Morley Bedford Funeral Home at 159 Eglinton Avenue West (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.), Toronto, following which a private family service will be held. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Toronto Humane Society or a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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JARVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
MUNNS, Diane (JARVIS)
Of Wellesley Hills, died April 8, 2003, peacefully at home. She had been married to Robert T. MUNNS for fifty years. Besides her husband, she is survived by her three daughters and their spouses: Robin and Tony HAWKSHAW of Vancouver, British Columbia Janet and Tom TUMILTY of Wellesley, Massachusetts; and Lesley and Dave OSBORN also of Wellesley; nine grandchildren, Michael, Meghan, Stephen, and Gordon Hawkshaw, Katie, Allie, and Meri TUMILTY, and Anne and Scott OSBORN. A private family goodbye was held at home, Thursday, April 10, 2003.

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JARVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-21 published
A character in life and work
Toronto-born actor played supporting roles in hundreds of films and television shows, including the cult-hit sitcom Mary Hartman
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, May 21, 2003 - Page R5
As a genial, six-foot, balding performer who wore a trademark mustache and glasses, Graham JARVIS was not the leading-man type. The Toronto-born actor from a privileged background, who died last month in California at 72, courted but never achieved stardom and instead gained a kind of small-roles fame by appearing in hundreds of supporting parts in film and television productions.
Mr. JARVIS took character parts in films as diverse as Alice's Restaurant, Cold Turkey, Middle Age Crazy, Silkwood and Misery, and a similar assortment of television shows including Star Trek, ER, Murder She Wrote, Gunsmoke, The X-Files and Six Feet Under.
His first role was as an understudy in a mid-1950s Broadway production of Tennessee Williams's Orpheus Descending, and his last was as the grandfather in an episode of the television series Seventh Heaven, which aired four days after his death in April.
He is perhaps best known for his portrayal of Charlie Haggers, the devoted husband of a country singer in the 1970s television sitcom Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman. "Nobody outside the business knows my name, but it doesn't bother me," he told an interviewer in 1982. "Fans still know me as Charlie, years after we went off the air. Fans went nuts over that character for some reason and I love the guy myself."
A scion of the historic Toronto family for whom JARVIS Street is named, Graham Powely JARVIS was also the grand_son of John LABATT Jr., who built up the famous Labatt brewery. A strain of theatrical talent obviously runs in the Labatt blood: His cousins include two legendary theatre personalities -- nonagenarian actor Hume CRONYN and Broadway producer Robert WHITEHEAD, who died last year.
It was Mr. WHITEHEAD who helped Mr. JARVIS attain the gig in Orpheus Descending and an audition at the Barter Theatre in Abbingdon, Va., where he trained for three seasons. Mr. CRONYN also helped him land a Broadway role, Mr. JARVIS said in 1982, adding that he rarely liked to mention the celebrated theatrical connections within his own family.
"This is the first time I've let this information out because I've tried not to trade on it," he said. "But I guess I've been around long enough now not to worry about it."
His father, an investment banker who was instrumental in founding what is today known as Scotia McLeod and was later president of Labatt, moved the family to New York when Graham was 5. He was sent to Bishop Ridley College, a prep school in St. Catharines, Ontario, and later to Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. A confused dropout at 23, he found work on the midnight shift in a penny arcade on 42nd Street in Manhattan. Then a friend invited him to watch an off-Broadway troupe in rehearsal and a light went on in his head. "I can do that!" he told himself, and he never looked back.
"Graham was such a great character actor because he could just go into character," said his niece, Sandra JARVIS of Toronto. "He was just brilliant that way. You'd be having a conversation with him and he'd just don a role, and it would take you a second to realize that Graham was now acting. Anyone who knew him well could just see this glow in his eyes -- this glint that told you he knew he was having fun with you."
"He loved acting," said his friend, actor Wil ALBERT. " When he was acting he was like a little boy going to the candy store."
Mr. JARVIS was a graduate of the American Theatre Wing acting school as well as of the Barter Theatre. He was an original member of the Lincoln Center Repertory Theater and a veteran of many Broadway and off-Broadway productions.
His first film role (in Bye Bye Braverman, 1968) enticed him to move to Hollywood, and he soon landed the part of the narrator in the stage production of The Rocky Horror Show at the Roxy Theatre on Sunset Boulevard.
Television producer Norman LEAR spotted him there and eventually recommended him for Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman. Mr. JARVIS also appeared in the show's sequel, Forever Fernwood. Another memorable role was of John Erlichman in Blind Ambition, a well-received 1979 television miniseries about the Watergate political scandal.
Relishing the idea of free airfare to Toronto where he had family and Friends, Mr. JARVIS took occasional work from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer Ross McLEAN once told of auditioning him as a talk-show host, but felt his bald dome would need to be covered. Mr. JARVIS owned a hairpiece but had left it in California.
"Makeup pulled 20-odd rugs out of storage," Mr. McLEAN wrote. "Everything he tried on looked absurdly out of place." Ultimately, Mr. JARVIS arranged for his L.A. agent to go to his house, find the hairpiece and rush it to Toronto.
"The rug made it on time," Mr. McLEAN noted, adding that "I have rarely seen a less convincing thatch of regrouped Hong Kong hair." In short, Graham JARVIS looked best -- and did the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation audition -- as himself.
In a 1980s television series called Making the Grade, Mr. JARVIS played a buck-passing inner-city high-school principal who didn't care that a student couldn't read. In real life, however, he worked as a volunteer to teach literacy skills to young offenders.
"It was really fascinating to hear him talk about it," said his wife, JoAnna. "He felt they couldn't read because they couldn't speak -- they were speaking a street patois. He went back to college to get his teaching certificate so he could do this on a regular basis." Active in civic politics, he pushed for handgun control and helped voters get to the polls on election day. He also sang in his church choir and worked in its Sunday school.
"I think the consensus among almost everyone who knew Graham is that he was a very warm, enjoyable man," said actor Jerry HARDIN, a friend for almost 50 years.
"You came away feeling he was a good human being if you had any contact with him. He was very empathetic. He had compassion for people's difficulties and problems, and he would help them if he could."
Friends and family also recall his storytelling skills and his joy at giving visitors detailed historic tours of New York and later Hollywood. By all accounts, he was a humble man.
"He didn't think he was nearly as successful as he was," said Barbara WARREN, a niece. "He was always extremely surprised and delighted when people would stop him on the street and ask him for his autograph.
"He loved to deliver the lines and get the shock on your face," Ms. WARREN said. "You never saw him poise himself, he just walked right in as if he was that person."
Mr. JARVIS died at his home in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles on April 16. Besides his wife, JoAnna, he leaves sons Matthew and Alex in California and sister Kitty Blair in Toronto.

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JARVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-03 published
WELD, Thomas John
Died peacefully at his Toronto home on Saturday, May 31, 2003 in his 49th year, surrounded by his family. Tom handled his illness, a 12½ year battle with brain cancer, with dignity and courage. Tom is survived by his beloved wife of 25 years, Gillian (a true Florence Nightingale), and was a proud father to daughter Ashley, and son Christopher. Also survived by his mother, Harriet ''Sis'' Bunting WELD and father John Douglas WELD (Patricia,) sisters Wendy JARVIS (David) and Leeanne KOSTOPOULOS (Chris;) nephews Strachan and Pearce JARVIS, Andreus KOSTOPOULOS, niece Olivia KOSTOPOULOS, and mother-in-law Margaret EASTON. Tom was educated at Trinity College School, Port Hope, and Ryerson Polytechnical Institute. He then embarked on a career in the Graphic Arts Industry where he spent 25 years with The Bryant Press Limited in Toronto. Tom was an enthusiastic sportsman who was a long-time member of The Toronto Golf Club, The Badminton and Racquet Club, and The Osler Bluff Ski Club. The family would like to extend special thanks to Annette Drinkwater for her months of care as well as Dr. John RIEGER and Mamdough REZK (R.N..) A funeral service will be held at Saint John's Anglican Church (York Mills), 19 Don Ridge Drive, Toronto, on Wednesday, June 4, 2003 at 11 a.m. with a reception to follow. Private family interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. The family would appreciate memorial donations to St. Michael's Hospital Foundation, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 1W8 or a charity of your choice.

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JARVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-02 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Marja Margaret Elizabeth STEEVIE late of the City of Toronto, in the Province of Ontario, who died on or about the 6th day of December, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned representative on or before the 29th day of August, 2003, after which date the Estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees shall then have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 24th day of July, 2003
Timothy PILGRIM
and James Robert STEEVIE
Estate Trustees with a Will of the Estate
of Marja Margaret Elizabeth STEEVIE
by: Beard Winter Llp
Barristers and Solicitors
Suite 701, 130 Adelaide Street West
Toronto, Ontario
M5H 2K4
Attention: David A. JARVIS
Telephone: (416) 593-5555
Fax: (416) 593-7760
Page B6

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