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"JAC" 2003 Obituary


JACK  JACKETT  JACKLIN  JACKO  JACKSON  JACOBS  JACOBUS 

JACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-12 published
Three cheers for a funny fellow
Like his hapless Canadian hero, he often found himself in hilarious situations
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, June 12, 2003 - Page R9
Once in the middle of an interview at the Toronto airport, writer Donald JACK left to fetch a document from his car. Notorious for a sense of direction so poor he found it difficult to navigate through a city park, let alone the airport's massive parking lot, Mr. JACK took so long to find his vehicle that by the time he returned the interviewers had gone.
Like Bartholomew Bandy, the hapless hero of The Bandy Papers, Mr. JACK's eight-volume comic-novel series describing an Ottawa Valley boy's adventures during both world wars and between, the author often found himself in hilarious situations, made the more so by his telling.
A three-time winner of the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour, Mr. JACK died last week at his home in England. He was Listeners were reduced to tears of laughter by his tales of construction disasters while having a villa built in Spain; a house sale falling through on closing day; and an aging bright yellow car named Buttercup, whose sun roof shattered soon after it was searched for drugs at the Spanish-French border, showering Mr. JACK with glass, insects and rust.
Once, while being toured with his daughter around the offices of his publisher, McClelland and Stewart, Mr. JACK entered the boardroom and shouted with surprise. There on the carpet lay a large amount of dog excrement left by an employee's pet. In his Bandy-like way, the writer very nearly stepped into it.
"If you could choose one author out of the entire world who during a visit to his publisher would stumble across this, it would be Donald JACK," said Douglas GIBSON, president and publisher of McClelland and Stewart, who knew the writer for more than 30 years.
"Things would go wrong for Don, very seldom caused by himself," said Munroe SCOTT, a close friend of more than 45 years. "He would narrate all this stuff either in person or in a letter and make it all hilarious, because he always saw, in retrospect at any rate, the funny side of things. You'd be doubled up with laughter."
Despite Mr. JACK's incident-prone nature, it would be a mistake to see Mr. JACK as a buffoon, said Mr. SCOTT, also a writer. "He was enormously well read, erudite and could handle the language with aplomb at many levels. He could make me feel like a Philistine."
Said author Austin CLARKE, who was Mr. JACK's neighbour for five years during the 1960s. "He was a quiet, reserved, retiring kind of man. You would never have known he was a writer."
Mr. JACK's Leacock medals came for three volumes of The Bandy Papers: Three Cheers for Me, in 1963, That's Me in the Middle, in 1974 and Me Bandy, You Cissie, in 1980. Published between 1963 and 1996, they still enjoy a loyal following, including a Web site which draws mail from around the world. Six of the eight volumes were recently reissued by McClelland and Stewart.
Drawn from Mr. JACK's fascination with the First World War, the rural people he met in the Ottawa Valley and his time in the Royal Air Force, The Bandy Papers feature the blundering Bartholomew Wolfe Bandy, who in the first volume, Three Cheers for Me, inadvertently becomes a hero, despite capturing his own colonel by mistake.
Ensuing volumes follow Mr. Bandy's adventures through to the Second World War. Although devastatingly funny, they also describe war's horrors and the realities of the home front, and lampoon war's leaders.
Mr. Bandy encounters and influences historical figures, such as then British minister of defence Winston Churchill, and generously offers him use of the altered Bandy phrase "blood, sweat, toil and tears."
While best known for The Bandy Papers, Mr. JACK wrote countless documentary film scripts, stage, television and radio plays, as well as two non-fiction books: the history of a Toronto radio station, Sinc, Betty and the Morning Man, and another about medicine in Canada, Rogues, Rebels and Geniuses.
His third play, The Canvas Barricade, won first prize in the Stratford Shakespearean Playwriting Competition in 1960. Produced in 1961, it was the first, and remains the only, original Canadian play performed on the main stage of the Stratford Festival.
Mr. JACK, however, did not see much of its opening. He left the auditorium for the lobby. "During the performance, we'd be aware of a crack of light from a door opening slightly and a white face would stare through, then vanish for a while, before another door would open a crack, and the same apparition would fleetingly appear," Mr. Scott said.
Born on December 6, 1924 in Radcliffe, Lancashire, England, Donald Lamont JACK was one of four children of a British doctor and a nurse from Prince Edward Island. After attending Bury Grammar School in Lancashire and Marr College in Scotland, he gained enough qualifications to attend London University.
While stationed in Germany with the Royal Air Force in the last year of the Second World War, Mr. JACK attempted short-story writing, but thought he lacked talent. After his mother asked him, "Isn't it about time you left home?" Mr. JACK immigrated to Canada in 1951.
Interspersed with jobs as a member of a surveying crew in Alberta and a bank teller in Toronto, Mr. JACK studied at the Canadian Theatre School in Toronto run by Sterndale BENNETT. There he wrote two plays, one of which drew praise from theatre critic Nathan COHEN and a job offer from a film Company. Mr. COHEN later wrote Mr. Scott, decrying Canadian theatre's "shameful treatment" of Mr. JACK, which largely ignored him.
A theatrical background enhanced Mr. JACK's writing, according to Mr. Gibson. "His dialogue was terrific and his scene-setting was excellent."
After leaving the school, with the encouragement of his wife, Nancy, whom he married in 1952, Mr. JACK worked in the script department of Crawley Films in Ottawa. Two years later in 1955, the company's head, Budge CRAWLEY, let him go because he thought Mr. JACK would never make a good writer.
A dry first year of freelancing followed, until in 1957 Mr. JACK sold the play version of his novelette Breakthrough, published in Maclean's, to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television. It became the first Canadian television play to be simultaneously telecast to the United States.
He never looked back. By 1972, A Collection of Canadian Plays, Vol. 1, which included Exit Muttering by Mr. JACK, noted he had written 40 television plays, 35 documentary film scripts, several radio plays and four stage plays. The works included Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Armed Forces training films for the National Film Board and often demanded a great deal of research.
Mr. JACK wrote with military discipline, beginning at 9 a.m., taking tea at 11 a.m., lunch at 1 p.m., tea again at 3 p.m. and finishing at 5 p.m. "All my life, I swear, that routine never altered," said one of his daughters, Lulu HILTON.
Persisting in writing drafts in pen and ink long before adopting the typewriter and, much later, a word processor, Mr. JACK often developed storylines while walking. A 1959 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation press release explains Mr. JACK's dedication: "My self-discipline is to keep reminding myself of how lucky I am to be able to be the only thing I ever really wanted to be -- a writer."
During the early 1980s, Mr. JACK and his wife returned to England to be near their daughters who had emigrated there, and their grandchildren. Mr. JACK missed Canada's open spaces and its classless society, and visited often.
At the time of his death, he was working on the ninth volume of The Bandy Papers. He died on or about June 2 of a massive stroke at his home in Telford, Shropshire, England. He leaves his two daughters, Maren and Lulu, six grandchildren and one great-grandchild, a brother and a sister. His wife Nancy died in 1991.

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JACKETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-24 published
McDONALD, Gordon Alexander (a Founder and President of Guelph Twines)
Died of cancer at the Freeport Health Centre, Kitchener, on Monday, September 22, 2003. Gordon Alexander McDONALD, aged 70 years, was the beloved husband of Marilyn (née PICKERING) McDONALD of Guelph. He was the loving father of Lori and her husband David THOMAS of Calgary, Alberta, Mark McDONALD and his wife Susan WAHLROTH, and Paul McDONALD, all of Guelph. Gordon was the proud grandfather of Robyn, Brynlee, Duncan, Chelsea, and Jack. He was the dear brother of Pat MILLER, Bruce McDONALD, and Judy JACKETT.
Private cremation has taken place. The family will receive Friends at Gilbert MacIntyre and son Funeral Home and Chapel, 252 Dublin St. N., Guelph, on Friday, October 3, 2003 from 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will take place in the chapel on Saturday, October 4, 2003 at 11 a.m. As expressions of sympathy, donations to a charity of one's choice would be appreciated by the family (cards available at the funeral home (519-822-4731) or email info@gilbertmacintyreandson.com

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JACKLIN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-24 published
Lawrence Raymond BOUSQUET
In loving memory of Lawrence Raymond BOUSQUET on Saturday, September 20, 2003 at Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 92 years.
Beloved husband of Irene (née LEHMAN.) Loving father of Marion and husband Andrew BUTELLA of Brantford, Laurine and husband Harold LOOSEMORE of Killarney, James and wife Joanne of Little Current. Cherished grandfather of Catherine BUTELLA and husband Don ROBINSON, Robert BUTELLA and wife Kim SONNET, Debra LOOSEMORE, Sheri LOOSEMORE, Lauri LOOSEMORE and husband Brian WALL, Cheryl BOUSQUET, Marsha BOUSQUET, Chistopher BOUSQUET and wife Kristen JACKLIN. Great grandfather of nine. Brother of James and wife Ann, Wilber and wife Marie and sister Florence and husband Arnet THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, all predeceased. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, September 23, 2003 at Island Funeral Home with burial in Mountainview Cemetery.

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JACKO o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Donald Gregor McGREGOR
In loving memory of Donald Gregor McGREGOR, December 17, 1931 to December 20, 2002.
Donald Gregor McGREGOR Senior of Whitefish River First Nation, Birch Island who passed on to the Spirit World on Friday, December 20, 2002 at the Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 71 years. Known for his gentle spirit and kind sense of humour, he enjoyed spending time with his family, fishing, hunting, bingo and home projects. He worked for E. B. Eddy for 20 years before retiring in 1996. He also served several terms as Band Councillor on the Whitefish River Band Council and was President of St. Gabriel's Parish Council for many years. He was honoured as an Elder and Eagle Staff Carrier of Whitefish River First Nation. He was of the Eagle Clan and his Ojibway name he proudly carried was Ogimas, given to him by his father when he was a young lad. He played many years with the Sheguiandah Bears and was an avid supporter of minor hockey. Much beloved husband of 41 years and best friend of Mary Grace (nee MANITOWABI.) Loving and cherished father of Lucy Ann (husband Donald TRUDEAU) of Blind River, Patty (husband Leon LIGHTNING) of Hobbema, Alberta, Donald (wife Sandrah RECOLLET) and Kiki (husband Stephen PELLETIER) of Birch Island and Christopher WAHSQUONAIKEZHIK (wife Carol) of Sudbury. Proud and very loving grandfather of Donnelley, Kigen, Akeshia, Paskwawmotosis, Donald, Assinyawasis, Anthony, Kihiwawasis, Kianna Rae, Waasnode, Christina, Charles and Christopher. Survived by sisters Lillian McGREGOR of Toronto, Shirley McGREGOR of Birch Island and brother Peter McGREGOR of Nova Scotia and brother-in-law Roman BILASH. Also survived by brothers-in-law David (Linda), Ron (Nikki), Dominic (Brenda), and sisters-in-law Veronica (Andrew,) Rosie GAUVREAU (Gordon) and Medora(Don). Predeceased by parents Augustine and Victoria and in-laws David and Agatha MANITOWABI. Also predeceased by brothers Robert E. McGREGOR, Allan A. McGREGOR, and sister, Mary JACKO, Colleen FONT, Estelle CYWINK, Violet BONADIO and Olive McGREGOR and sister-in-law Shirley MANITOWABI McKAY. He was also a special uncle to 67 nieces and nephews.
Rested at the Whitefish River Community Centre. Funeral Mass was held at St. Gabriel's Lalamant Church, Birch Island on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 with Father Mike STROGRE officiating. Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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JACKO o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Joyce BOWERMAN
In loving memory of Joyce BOWERMAN who passed away Sunday morning, August 31, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital-Saint Joseph Health Centre, succumbing to heart disease at the age of 47 years.
She will be sadly missed by her children Lena JACKO (Jeremy,) Sarah JACKO and Richard JACKO all of Sudbury and their father David JACKO of Wikwemikong. Cherished grandmother of Tricia and Leona. Predeceased by Juliann and Johnathan. Dear daughter of Cleveland and Lena BOWERMAN. Dear sister of Larry (Pauline) and Barbra (BRICE) both of Sudbury, Phil (Julie) of Birch Island, Roy, Joey and Margaret of Little Current, Robbie of Blind River, David (Lynn) of West Bay. Predeceased by Jimmy and Nancy. Best friend of Sadie DEBASSIGE and Rolly NAWASH. Memorial service was in the R.J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, Sudbury on Thursday, September 4, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. Cremation at the Parklawn Crematorium, Sudbury.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Albert George WEBB
In loving memory of Albert George WEBB, April 9, 1921 to December 24, 2002.
Albert WEBB, a resident of Providence Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital, on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 at the age of 81 years. He was born in Durham, and had lived on Manitoulin for the past 6 years. Previous to that, Al had lived in Elliott Lake and Armstrong. He had a great love of the north country, which led him to his job as a bush pilot He truly loved his work, and spent many enjoyable years pursuing his love of the north and of flying. Al was a veteran of WW2, having served overseas.
Survived by his beloved partner Val TAILOR/TAYLOR of Providence Bay, and her family. Will be sadly missed by Ruby CANNARD, the Mike SPRACK family, Linda and Al BAILEY, Harvey and Diane DEBASSIGE, Lloyd JACKSON and Marshall RICHARD of Elliott Lake, Ryan HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Jim HARASYM. Survived by many Friends in the Armstrong, Elliott Lake and Manitoulin area. Also survived by sons Warren and Chris, and one brother in the Hamilton area.
At Al's request, there will be no funeral service. Cremation will take place.
Val TAILOR/TAYLOR would like to thank the doctors and nurses at Mindemoya Hospital for the wonderful care and concern given to Al and herself, during this time. Words cannot express the appreciation. Culgin Funeral Home

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JACKSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-19 published
JACKSON
-In loving memory of our Cho, Dad, and Grandpa, Ignatius.
The twinkling stars
The sun of our faces
The gentle breeze that tousles
Our hair...
And all of the hugs
That we share
All remind us that you
Are still here.
-Lovingly remembered by his "3 dollars:" and Gigi, John, Lara, Amy Jo and Kristen WAKEGIJIG.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Raymond Kenneth " Ken" HAGEN
In loving memory of Raymond Kenneth "Ken" HAGEN who passed away Monday evening, May 26th, 2003 at Mindemoya Hospital at the age of 87 years.
Beloved husband of Pearl (SEWELL) HAGEN predeceased 1982 and Florence (McCULLIGH) HAGEN of Mindemoya. Loving father of Mary BEAULIEU (husband Guil) of Toronto, George HAGEN (wife Sharon.) Bob HAGEN (wife Linda) both of Lively, Daniel HAGEN (wife Suzanne) of Calgary, Susan RICHER and infant baby Martha Jane both predeceased, stepchildren Leila THURESON (husband Peter,) Karen VANZANT (husband Clyde predeceased,) Harley BAYER (wife Lorraine) and Shirley PHILLIPS predeceased. Cherished grandfather of 24 grandchildren, 17 great grandchildren and 4 great great grandchildren. Dear son of Dan and May HAGEN, predeceased. Dear brother of Edna JACKSON of Sault Ste. Marie and Alex HAGEN predeceased. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews. Rested at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch St. Sudbury. Funeral service was held in the R. J. Barnard Chapel on Thursday May 29, 2003 at 1p.m. Interment was held in the Lakeview Cemetery, Meaford, Friday at 11 a.m. A memorial service was held on
Saturday, May 31 in the Mindemoya United Church.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Josephine "Joyce" RENAUD
In loving memory of Josephine "Joyce" RENAUD who passed away peacefully on Friday, October 24, 2003 at Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 74 years.
Daughter of Michael Sr. and Sophie MANITOWABI (predeceased.) Predeceased by dear friend Wesley GORDON " Bud" from Sault. Ste. Marie, Michigan. Loved sister of Margaret JACKSON (Robert predeceased) of Manitowaning, Michael MANITOWABI (predeceased 1986,) Alphonse MANITOWABI of Toronto, and Betty CRACK (Mervyn) of Little Current. Joyce was like a mother to her friend Mickie GUERRA and family of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. Will be remembered forever by many nieces, nephews, cousins and Friends.
Visitation was held on Sunday, October 26, 2003. Funeral service was held on Monday, October 27, 2003 at Buzwah Church. Burial in Buzwah Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
JACKSON, Charles Richard
Passed away peacefully at Scarborough Hospital - Grace Division, Thursday February 27th, 2003, just 2 days short of his 91st birthday. Family and Friends who stayed with him through his final days, shared smiles and quips that were truly Charlie. Charlie will be lovingly remembered by his wife Florence; daughters Carol (Mel), and Leslie; son Richard (Carol); brother Allan (Beulah) sister Audrey; his large extended family and many long time Friends. A memorial service and reception will be held at Ogden Funeral Homes, Agincourt Chapel, 4164 Sheppard Avenue East, on Wednesday March 12th, 2003, at 11 am. If Friends so desire, donations in memory of Charlie may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
Willard Adrian JACKSON
By Andrew LINDELL, Donna MORRISON Friday, March 7, 2003 - Page A18
Engineer, adventurer, grandfather. Born July 19, 1912, in Sudbury, Ontario Died February 8, in Toronto, of congestive heart failure, aged 90.
Willard Adrian JACKSON was cremated in a pine box, with no funeral, arrangements you might think were for a man without family or Friends. Yet, Willard was one of most loved men I've ever known, deeply loved by his wife of 68 years, three daughters, eight grandchildren and 17 great grandchildren.
Born the son of a funeral director, he did not believe in excess or unnecessary extravagances and rituals, including funerals. He called cars "necessary evils" and did not pretend to understand the generation controlled by computers. His strong attitudes were often offensively opinionated and even politically incorrect. Still, what most warmed to in him was his belief in the simple joys of life: family, love, and good old-fashioned hard work.
Willard lived a good life and a long one -- one longer than you might expect after a life of work-related injuries and mishaps. A plane crash in 1954 during Hurricane Hazel left him with a torn ear, crushed left forearm and broken neck (he broke it twice in his lifetime; his back once, in another incident), that put him in a plaster cast from head to waist for six months. The doctors told him he would likely be paralyzed. Helped by his wife Jane by playing Scrabble for hours, forced to pick up the tiny letter pieces with his mangled hand, he fully recovered.
A graduate of Queen's University science class of 1939, as a civil engineer, Willard began his career working in the underground mines, first with Inco and then at Falconbridge, both in Sudbury. In 1940, he tried to join the war effort overseas, but wasn't accepted because, as an engineer, he was needed in his own country to help build airstrips in Goose Bay, Labrador. After the war, he worked at Canadian Pacific Railway in Sudbury for five years. He joined Clarke Steamship Co. of Montreal in the construction department and was later lured to join Caswell Construction where he helped build Highway 401. He left to set up his own business in Toronto, Consul Consultants, where, as crane specialist, he travelled all over North America investigating large construction and mining accidents for insurance companies.
Willard was a master storyteller, and loved to tell tales of his adventures hunting, building or travelling. He once had to eat raw porcupine after his food and dry-match supply ran out on a moose-hunting trip. He had a special place in his heart for Canada's Arctic, where in 1978 he befriended many of the local residents at his (now late) grand_son's wedding to (now) federal Member of Parliament for Nunavut, Nancy KARETAK- LINDELL. A week before Willard died, he was paid a visit by his longtime friend from Iqaluit, Abraham. It was one of the final highlights of his life.
My grandfather was an extraordinary male role model for seven boys growing up in divorced marriages. He taught us to work hard at everything we do. When we were teenagers, he had us blasting rocks and felling trees to build roads at his farm in Lafontaine, Ontario He was always our biggest fan, praising our accomplishments and encouraging us to take risks into fields that filled our hearts, not necessarily our wallets.
When he turned 90 last July, it became obvious that Willard himself thought he was done. Living became a necessary evil. He became crippled with arthritis and his breathing became very laboured. In November, he called the entire family together for Christmas day, knowing -- he told us -- it would be his last. With my video camera rolling, I asked him what advice he could pass on. "Be true to your values, " he said.
Andrew is Willard's grand_son. Andrew and his fiancée Donna collaborated on this essay.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-04 published
Died This Day -- A.Y. JACKSON, 1974
Friday, April 4, 2003 - Page R13
Painter born Alan Young JACKSON in Montreal on October 3, 1882 in 1895, began career in lithography; in 1907, attended Julien Academy in Paris to study impressionism; in 1913, moved to Toronto to share studio with Lawren HARRIS and Tom THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON; from 1915, served in Canadian infantry in France; in 1917, appointed official artist for Canadian war memorials; in 1919, made series of landscape-painting excursions to Northern Ontario with Harris and other Group of Seven artists; in May, 1920, Group of Seven held its first exhibition died in Kleinburg, Ontario

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JACKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-26 published
Died This Day -- Harvey JACKSON, 1966
Thursday, June 26, 2003 - Page R9
Hockey player born on August 19, 1911; left-winger played with the Toronto Marlboros as a junior; 1930, joined Toronto Maple Leafs; formed famous Kid Line with Charlie CONACHER and Joe PRIMEAU five-time all-star; 1932, member of Stanley Cup-winning team 1932-33, led National Hockey League in scoring.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
Dancer devoted career to Montreal company
Staff, Thursday, July 10, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- Canadian dancer and choreographer Linda STEARNS has died of cancer.
Born in Toronto on October 22, 1937, she was introduced to dance as a youngster and went on to study in London and New York. In 1961, Ms. STEARNS joined Les Grands Ballets Canadiens are remained with the Montreal company for most of her career, performing works by Eric Hyrst, Brydon Paige and Ludmilla Chiriaeff.
In 1969, she became the company's ballet mistress. In 1978, along with Danny JACKSON and Colin McINTYRE, she became part of the triumvirate that directed the company. In 1987, Ms. STEARNS became artistic director and retired two years later.
She died in Toronto on July 4 at age 65.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
Linda STEARNS: 1937-2003
As ballet mistress and artistic director of the esteemed Montreal company, she nurtured personality, flair and a risk-taking approach to dance
By Paula CITRON Wednesday, August 6, 2003 - Page R5
In the cutthroat, competitive world of dance, Linda STEARNS was an anomaly. As artistic director of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, she never played games or held grudges. Whether good or bad news, she bluntly told her dancers what they had to hear, and in return, her open-door policy allowed them to vent their own feelings. National Ballet of Canada artistic director James KUDELKA, who spent almost a decade as a member of Les Grands Ballets, likens her approach to wearing an invisible raincoat upon which unhappy dancers spewed their venom. At the end of their tirades, she would serenely remove the garment and say, "Now let's talk."
Linda STEARNS died at her home in Toronto on July 4, at age 65.
She was born into privilege on October 22, 1937. Her father, Marshal, was an investment broker; her mother, Helen, was heavily involved in charity work. The family lived in the posh Poplar Plains area of central Toronto, where Ms. STEARNS attended Branksome Hall.
Despite their wealth, the STEARNS children (Linda, Nora and Marshal) were expected to earn their own livings. Helen STEARNS had studied dance in her youth, but a career was never an option. When eldest daughter Linda showed a strong talent, history might have repeated itself had not Marshal Sr. set aside his reservations after seeing his daughter perform.
After graduating from high school, Ms. STEARNS went to London and New York for advanced training. It was the great Alexandra Danilova, one of Ms. STEARNS's New York teachers, who pointed the young dancer in the direction of the upstart Les Grands Ballets Canadiens. Ms. STEARNS joined Les Grands in 1961, and was promoted to soloist in 1964. In a Who's Who of Entertainment entry, Ms. STEARNS was once listed as joining the company in 1861, and she liked to joke that, at 103 years, she held the record for the longest time spent in the corps de ballet. In fact, one of Ms. STEARNS's hallmarks was her sense of humour, much of it at her own expense.
Les Grands was known for taking dancers who did not necessarily have perfect ballet bodies, but had personality and flair, a policy Ms. STEARNS continued during her own administration.
Although Ms. STEARNS had very unballetic, low-arched feet, she was a fine classical dancer. She excelled, however, in the dramatic repertoire: Mother Courage in Richard Kuch's The Brood, or the title role in Brydon Paige's Medea. In later years, while teaching and coaching, Ms. STEARNS wore high heels to conceal her hated low arches -- while showing off her attractive ankles.
Her performing career was cut short in 1966 when artistic director Ludmilla CHIRIAEFF recognized that Ms. STEARNS would make a brilliant ballet mistress, and by 1969, Ms. STEARNS was exclusively in the studio. In fact, giving up performing was one of the great disappointments of her life, although she did in time acknowledge that she had found her true destiny. Ms. STEARNS's astonishingly keen eye allowed her to single out, in a corps de ballet of moving bodies, every limb that was out of position. She could also sing every piece of music, which saved a lot of time, because she didn't have to keep putting on the tape recorder. Because of her intense musicality, Ms. STEARNS also insisted that the dancers not just be on the count, but fill every note with movement.
Ms. STEARNS loved playing with words -- she was a crossword-puzzle addict, for example -- and gave the dancers nicknames, whether they liked them or not. Catherine LAFORTUNE was Katrink, Kathy BIEVER was Little Frog, Rosemary NEVILLE was Rosie Posie, Betsy BARON was Boops, and Benjamin HATCHER was Benjamino, to name but a few. One who escaped this fate was Gioconda BARBUTO, simply because Ms. STEARNS loved rolling out the word "G-I-O-C-O-N-D-A" in its full Italian glory. The dancers, in turn, called her Lulubelle, Mme. Gozonga and La Stearnova or, if they were feeling tired, cranky and hostile -- and were out of earshot -- Spoons (for her non-arched feet) and even less flattering names. As reluctantly as she became ballet mistress, Ms. STEARNS became artistic director, first as one of a triumvirate in 1978 with Danny JACKSON and Colin McINTYRE (when Les Grands and Brian MacDONALD came to an abrupt parting of the ways;) then with Jeanne RENAUD in 1985 and finally on her own in 1987. She retired from Les Grands in 1989. Both Mr. JACKSON and Mr. McINTRYE still refer to Ms. STEARNS as the company's backbone.
These were the famous creative years that included the works of Mr. KUDELKA, Paul Taylor, Lar Lubovitch, Nacho Duato and George Balanchine. Les Grands toured the world performing one of the most exciting and eclectic repertoires in ballet. It was a company that nurtured dancers and choreographers, many of whom reflected Ms. STEARNS's risk-taking, innovative esthetic.
She also had time to mentor choreographers outside the company, including acclaimed solo artist Margie GILLIS. Her post-Grands career included writing assessments for the Canada Council, setting works on ballet companies, coaching figure skating, and most recently, becoming ballet mistress for the Toronto-based Ballet Jörgen. When she was diagnosed with both ovarian and breast cancer two years ago, she continued her obligations to Ballet Jörgen until she was no longer able, never letting the dancers know how ill she was.
Ms. STEARNS loved huge dogs -- or what Ms. GILLIS refers to as mountains with fur -- and always had at least two. Her gardens were magnificent, as was her cooking. Her generosity was legendary, whether inviting 20 people for Christmas dinner, or hosting the wedding reception for dancers Andrea BOARDMAN and Jean-Hugues ROCHETTE at her tastefully decorated Westmount home. After leaving Montreal, whether, first, at her horse farm in Harrow, Ontario, or at the one-room schoolhouse she lovingly renovated near Campbellville, northwest of Toronto, former colleagues were always welcome.
She continued to keep in touch with her dancers, sending notes in her beautiful, distinctive handwriting. Her love of sports never left her, and after a hard day in the studio, she would relax watching the hockey game. Religion also filled her postdance life, with Toronto's Anglican Grace-Church-on-the-Hill at its epicentre. Ms. STEARNS was very discreet in her private life, although another disappointment is that neither of two long relationships resulted in marriage or children.
Ms. STEARNS was always ruthlessly self-critical, always striving for perfection, never convinced she had rehearsed a work to its full potential. As a result, she never made herself the centre of her own story. Her homes, for example, did not contain photographs glorifying the career of Linda STEARNS. Only at the end of her days, as she faced death with the same grace with which she had faced life, was she finally able to appreciate how many lives she had touched, and accept her outstanding achievements with Les Grands Ballets. Linde HOWE- BECK, former dance critic for the Montreal Gazette, sums up Ms. STEARNS perfectly when she says that she was all about love -- for her Friends and family, for life, but most of all, for dance.
Paula CITRON is dance critic for The Globe and Mail.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-22 published
Canadian painter left his mark all over the world
Friday, August 22, 2003 - Page R11
Livingston, New York -- The painter and muralist Robert JACKSON has died at age 72.
Mr. JACKSON, born in Toronto, painted murals throughout the United States, Canada, the Netherlands, France and Italy. His works can be found in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and at the White House.
The Columbia County resident had recently been working on landscapes and still lifes, often based on his travels. Mr. JACKSON died Sunday of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. A private memorial service is planned. Associated Press

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JACKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-26 published
JACKSON, Robert
Internationally known muralist and painter, died suddenly on August 17th, 2003 at his home in Livingston, New York as the result of Lou Gehrig's Disease. Born in Toronto in 1931, Robert was educated at Williamson Road Public School, U.T.S. and University of Toronto where he earned an Honour's Degree in Art and Archaeology. Throughout his childhood and youth, Robert performed with the Toronto Children's Players, on radio, and the early days of television. He performed the second lead in an American production of No Time for Sargeants in London, England for 2 years, then began his lifelong career as a muralist in the restoration of Horace Walpole's house Strawberry Hill in Surrey, England. His murals can be seen in the White House, Blair House, The Department of State, The Metropolitan Museum in New York City and in private homes in the U.S., Canada, Holland, France and Italy. Robert JACKSON's easel paintings and watercolours were displayed in group shows at Hart House and Victoria College in 1953 and 1954. Later, during his residency in London, England, Robert had a one man show held in Toronto. His easel paintings grace houses around the world. Robert is survived by his sister Eleanor WARNOCK, three nephews and a niece, nine great-nieces and nephews, and his longtime companion Frederic CORKE. Friends are requested to make a donation to the charity of their choice. A private memorial service is planned.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-10 published
JACKSON, Berners Archdale Wallace " Barney"
Died peacefully after a short illness on October 9, 2003 at his home. Predeceased by his only love, Evelyn Maire (née DAVIES.) Loving Father to Michael, Jane and Katherine, Grandfather to Todd, Seana, Andrew and Christine, Great Grandfather to Jacob. Professor Jackson was the son of the late Lloyd JACKSON, former mayor of Hamilton, and his wife Susan. He was educated at Hamilton public schools, and later attended Pickering College in Newmarket as a student, moving on to become a Master at Pickering for 13 years. He attended McMaster University where he earned his B.A. and M.A. He then attended Oxford University where he earned his D, Phil Oxon. For 25 years he had a distinguished career at McMaster University as a Professor in the English Department. At various times he served as a member of the University Board of Governors, The Senate, and as President of the McMaster Faculty Association. He was the founding Director of the Shakespeare Seminars at Stratford, which he held for many years, and served as a member of the Board of Governors of the Festival Theatre. He was the editor of several texts of Shakespeare's plays, and contributed a ''much-admired'' annual review of the Straford season for ''The Shakespeare Quarterly.'' A devoted golfer, he was a member of the Royal Canadian Golf Association and worked on the Committee for the Canadian Open. A memorial service to be held on Tuesday, October 14 at 2 p.m. at the Marlatt Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 195, King Street West, Dundas, Ontario. (905) 627-7452. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
Sculptor 'entirely original'
A wood carver from a young age who made many public works, he was befriended by the Group of Seven and later carved their tombstone epitaphs
By Bill GLADSTONE, Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, November 15, 2003 - Page F10
A Canadian sculptor who as a young man was adopted by the Group of Seven has died in Toronto. E. B. COX, who prided himself on achieving artistic and commercial success without ever taking a penny in government grants, was 89.
Mr. COX was a young associate, of some of the Group of Seven with whom he went on northern sketching trips; A. Y. JACKSON once complimented him on his "good sense of form." He later carved their tombstone epitaphs.
A wood carver from a young age, he came to master stone and even the delicate art of faceting and carving precious stones; he also tried metal, ceramics and glass. Because he liked to work fast, he pioneered the use of power tools to quicken the chiselling process, a technique that purists initially disdained as a form of cheating.
According to one 1990s guide-book, he had "more sculpture on view in Toronto's public places than any other single artist." His 20-piece Garden of the Greek Gods, originally installed in the 1950s on the Georgian Peaks near Collingwood, Ontario, was later relocated to the far more populous grounds of the Canadian National Exhibition near the Dufferin Gate. The only fully human representation in the group, an 11-foot-high statue of Hercules, was carved from a six-tonne piece of Indiana limestone -- "the biggest piece of stone used by a sculptor in Canada," according to friend and patron, Ken SMITH.
Among his many other public works are a fish fountain for a courtyard at the former Park Plaza Hotel, a stone bear for the Guild Inn, a stone Orpheus for Victoria College, lavish countertops and railings for historic bank buildings, a large seated lady for McMaster University and whimsical creatures for a school yard in Milton, Ontario
Having mastered big, he also excelled at small: He used to claim that he invented coffee-table art. He carved little totem poles to put himself through university, and became known for his small bear sculptures, which he sold at popular prices, especially at Christmas. "At university, I damned near starved," he would explain. "I don't believe in starving artists."
Influenced by Iroquois and West Coast Haida art, he focused on bears, beavers, birds and other animals as well as human torsos, masks and heads; he often caught the animals in quirky fluid poses and never failed to capture their essential natures. He once crafted an all-Canadian limited-edition chess set for the Hudson's Bay Co., with beavers as pawns, coureurs de bois as knights, Indian princesses as queens, and so on. He was "the great bridge between aboriginal art and modern art," according to Mr. SMITH and others. A picture book about him, featuring an essay by Gary Michael DAULT, was published by Boston Mills Press in 1999.
"He was entirely original," said Toronto sculptor Dora DE PEDERY- HUNT. "Absolutely nobody else did what he did. What style he had was entirely his. I call him a real good sculptor, a real good artist."
The younger of two brothers, Elford Bradley COX was born on July 16, 1914, in Botha, Alberta., where his family made a short-lived attempt at farming; he learned to carve by watching his maternal grandfather whittle kindling by the fireside. He persisted in sculpting even though his pious father was vehemently opposed to the creation of "graven images," he told Toronto Life magazine in 1997. The family returned to Bowmanville, Ontario, where E. B. spent most of his childhood, and where his mother died suddenly after an epileptic attack when her favoured son was a young teenager. When it was time for him to go to university, "his father sent him off with $5, a suitcase and a wish of good luck," said Kathy SUTTON, the younger of his two daughters.
Studying languages at the University of Toronto from 1934 to 1938, Mr. COX was befriended by German professor and painter Barker FAIRLEY, who introduced him to A. Y. JACKSON, Fred VARLEY and Arthur LISMER of the Group of Seven.
Mr. COX started teaching languages at Upper Canada College, but soon left to join the war effort as an intelligence officer, interrogating prisoners of war in Europe.
Afterward, he resumed teaching at Upper Canada College, and devoted part of a summer to a school canoe trip on the Mississauga River the next summer he escorted a group of boys on an even more adventurous trip down the Churchill River in the barren lands. "That was just unheard-of in those years," recalled Terence A. WARDROP, who joined that expedition and became Mr. COX's lifelong friend and solicitor. "It was a big trip and it was almost historic the rivers and some of the lakes were unmapped in 1948."
Quitting his teaching job in 1949, Mr. COX married the former Betty CAMPBELL, bought a farm near Palgrave, Ontario, and discovered that he could survive as a full-time artist. (Although he considered government subsidies poisonous, he once applied for a government grant to study Canadian stones suitable for sculpting -- and was turned down. "I did my stone research without their damn-fool money," he told The Globe and Mail in 1970.) Moving to a rural property in north Toronto and later to a Victorian house in eastern Toronto, he separated from his wife but remained on excellent terms with her and their daughters.
Being partial to pranks, he once purchased a canoe for his wife as a gift and, to achieve maximum surprise, paddled it to the dock at the family cottage in a rented disguise. Along with his love of humour, Friends recall his sharp wit and his ability to cut through social pretense. "He said he wanted his gravestone to read, 'I told you I was sick,' " recalled art dealer John INGRAM. " That's what I remember about him -- his great sense of humour and just what a wonderful compassionate guy he was. He tried to give this air of being an old curmudgeon, but in fact, he was anything but."
Becoming a mentor to many young artists, Mr. COX generously shared his tools and experience with them. "He didn't have much mentoring when he was learning to be an artist -- people didn't help him so he took the opposite tack," said his daughter Kathy.
Always enthusiastic and full of ideas, he was usually in his workshop early in the morning -- and kept on working even after losing his sight in his final years. His home was full of fine sculpture and painting, including a portrait of Mr. COX by Mr. FAIRLEY that hung over the mantel. "It was a lovely place, and by the time you got out of there, you were in a buying fever," Mr. SMITH recalled. "E.B. himself was part of the fun of buying stuff. People were just charmed by the atmosphere he created." He was also famously not particular about the prices he asked from genuine admirers of his work.
As for his art's place in the world, he was confident it would last, at least in the physical sense. "We'd have these long philosophical talks about whether there was an afterlife and what legacy to leave behind," friend Eric CONROY recalled. "He'd say that his stone works would be there long after Rembrandt's paintings had crumbled."
E. B. COX died in Toronto on July 29, leaving his wife Betty, daughters Sally SPROULE and Kathy SUTTON, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-06 published
DALGLEISH, Delsya Florence
After an adventurous and fun life, Delsya passed away at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, on Thursday, December 4, 2003, in her 92nd year. Born in Wales and raised in South Africa, Delsya established a stage career in London, England, where she met her future husband. ''Del and Dal'' returned to Toronto where they raised a family and had a wonderful time together. She was a world traveller and local volunteer. Predeceased by her husband Oakley and sons Gary and Peter, Delsya is survived by grand_son Murray (Donna) of Toronto and granddaughter Mary (John CONGDON) of Calgary. Great-grandmother of Jordanne, Stephanie and Grace Jennifer and Michelle. Fondly remembered by Friends and family. The family wishes to thank Marg JACKSON of Saint Elizabeth Health Care for her care and support. A service will be held in the chapel of the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (South of Eglinton Avenue East), on Sunday, December 7 at one o'clock. Interment Mount Pleasant Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations in memory of Mrs. DALGLEISH to Saint Elizabeth Health Care, 90 Allstate Parkway, Suite 300, Markham L3R 6H3, would be greatly appreciated.

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JACKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
Died This Day
Charles William CONACHER, 1967
Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - Page R7
Hockey player born in Toronto on December 10, 1909; played 12 seasons in the National Hockey League, mostly with Toronto Maple Leafs; played right wing on "Kid Line" with Joe PRIMEAU and Henry (Busher) JACKSON; 1938, traded to Detroit and then to New York scored 225 goals, 173 assists in regular season, with 17 goals and 18 assists in playoffs.

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JACOBS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
WABINOGESHIG Maxie Isadore ASSINEWAI
In Loving Memory of WABINOGESHIG, Maxie Isadore ASSINEWAI, Fish, Eagle and Bear Clan, 49 years.
Max began his Spirit Journey Sunday, November 02, 2003 at his favourite place, Perch Lake in Sheguiandah First Nation. Beloved husband and best friend to Shauna (née PITAWANAKWAT) ASSINEWAI. Loving father to Derek, Adrienne, Nicole, Brian and Maggie. Proud grandfather of Cole and Eric. Dear son of Evelyn and Jacob ASSINEWAI (predeceased) and Isabel and John McGRAW of Wikwemikong. Will be sadly missed by special in-laws (Walter GONAWABI of Wikwemikong, Gail JACOBS of Serpent River and Ken BISSON of M'Chigeeng). Dear brother to Steven, Wendy, Raymond, Josephine, Julius (wife Mary), Thomas (predeceased), Jeanette (husband Darcy PAQUET,) Norman (wife Frances) all of Wikwemikong. Son-in-law to Malcom and Connie PITAWANAKWAT of Wikwemikong. Cherished brother-in-law to Rachel (Todd), Mark (Tanya), Lisa (Gord), Wendy, Dawn, Walton, Ralphie (Wendy), Shannon, Raven, Alison and Tim (predeceased). He is also survived by his many nieces and nephews and his families of Birch Island, Rousseau River (Manitoba) and Red Lake (Minnesota).
Max's life path was guided by the culture and traditions of the Anishinabek. He was Ogitch'dah, Eagle Staff Carrier, Pipe Carrier, and respected spiritual healer. He will also be missed by his traditional societies to which he belonged: Windigo, Big Drum, Mide(win), Wiidehgokaan and Giiskaa. His devotion to this people led him to be a political leader and advisor for Sheguiandah First Nation, neighboring First Nations and the Metis Nation.
Max enjoyed hunting, gambling, BINGO, cultural gatherings, pow-wows, children, visiting, hockey and traveling extensively throughout Mother Earth.
Most of all, Max will be remembered for the time he took to share with his sense of humour and for his willingness to always help others at anytime.
Wake Services was held at the Sheguiandah First Nation Community Centre on Tuesday, November 04, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. Funeral Services will be celebrated on Friday, November 07, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. at the Sheguiandah First Nation Community Centre. Interment at his residence, Feast to follow. Bourcier Funeral Home, Espanola.

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JACOBS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-08 published
VILA, Helen Jeanette
59, died on Sunday, July 6, 2003, at her home in Scotch Hill, Pictou Co., Nova Scotia. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, she was a daughter of the late Alan P. VILA and Jeanette (McVICAR) VILA. Helen attended schools in Chippawa, Ontario, and Baldwin, New York, where she excelled in sports and music. She graduated with Honours in English from McGill University and with a master teacher certificate from the Ontario College of Education at the University of Toronto. For several years, Helen taught English at Lawrence Park Collegiate Institute and film arts at Sheridan College in Toronto. Later, she and her late companion Trini PEREZ had a home craft business in woodworking and jewelry in Stoney Creek, Ontario, which they continued in Pictou. In recent years, Helen sang in the Hosannah Gospel Choir at the United Church of Canada, Lyons Brook, served as a volunteer at the Maritime Odd Fellows home, and worked at the job placement center and the library. She is survived by her sisters and brothers, Mary SHAW and her husband Robert of Palo Alto, California; John VILA and his partner Terry BISHOP of Guttenberg, New Jersey; James VILA and his wife Tanya of Tilton, New Hampshire; Elizabeth ROGAN and her husband Edward of Glastonbury, Connecticut; and Anne VILA and her husband Steven JACOBS of Needham, Massachusetts; and by five nieces -- Catherine VILA, Carolyn ROGAN, Jenny ROGAN, Julia JACOBS, and Anne ROGAN; four nephews -- Mark SHAW, Andrew SHAW, Jonathan SHAW and Daniel JACOBS; four grandnieces -- Jessica, Kaeli, Alissa and Zoë; one grandnephew -- Max; and two stepnieces -- Tracy MESSINGER and Kerri PACHOMOW. Helen will be dearly missed by her companion, Margaret MacCULLOCH, who cared for her during her long illness. Visitation will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. on Friday, July 11, at the McLaren Funeral Home, 246 Faulkland Street, Pictou. The funeral will be held at the United Church in Lyons Brook at 2 p.m. on Saturday, July 12, Mary MacDERMID officiating. Interment at the Scotch Hill Cemetery will be followed by a reception at the church hall. Her family requests that, in lieu of flowers, memorial donations be made to the Canadian Cancer Society -- Nova Scotia Division, the Humane Society of Canada, or to Palliative Care of the Aberdeen Hospital.

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JACOBUS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-26 published
Engelina Johanna (TRYSSENAAR) VELDHUYZEN
On Tuesday, November 4, 2003 at the Coleman Care Centre, Barrie, in her 93rd year.
Beloved wife of the late Benjamin, formerly of Corunna and Stayner. Loving mother of Hendrika VAN KOOTEN (Jerry) of Minesing, Benjamin (the late Elsie) of Evansville, Trudy MARSHALL (Bruce) of Bethany and Hendrik (Carol GOVER) of Pt. Claire. Dear sister of Laurens (Christina) of Listowel, Johanna BOS (John) of Elmira and the late Theodorus JACOBUS, Hendrika VAN DELFT and Pieter. Grandmother of Michele and Jerry VAN KOOTEN, Frederick, Allen, and Janet VELDHUYZEN, Krystina and Scott FIRTH. Great-grandmother of Angelina Nicole and Michael VAN KOOTEN. A Service to celebrate Engelina's life will be held on Saturday, November 29 at 1 p.m. in the Anten Mills Community Centre, 3985 Horseshoe Valley Road, Anten Mills. Arrangements and cremation entrusted to Peaceful Transition, Barrie.

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