All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"HUT" 2003 Obituary


HUTCHESON  HUTCHINGS  HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON  HUTTON 

HUTCHESON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
Peter Gordon CROMPTON
Son, brother, friend, athlete, businessman. Born December 5, 1975, in Toronto. Died July 13 as a result of a boating accident, aged 27.
By Josh DOLAN, Bryce GIBSON, Blake HUTCHESON, Adam LAZIER, Rob MAGWOOD, Ian SULLIVAN
Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - Page A24
In the words of Pete's father Ken, "Pete did not live only 27 years. He lived 9,946 days and every one to the fullest!" Somehow this number is both more palatable and more appropriate when speaking of Pete's life.
Pete was born at Toronto General Hospital, weighing in at a larger-than-life 11 pounds, 10 ounces. From that day forward, "larger-than-life" was an apt description -- physically and otherwise. Pete grew up, along with brother Jeff, in a household that loved competition, outdoor activity, a good challenge, the odd healthy debate and, most of all, each other. The family went back and forth from Toronto to Collingwood, Ontario, to enjoy the best of both areas, depending on the season and the opportunity. His parents, Ken and Judy, loved watching their sons excel and gave them every opportunity to do so.
Pete was on skis at the age of 3 at Osler Bluff Ski Club, had a golf club in his hand by 5, and was windsurfing by 6. He took all three sports to incredible heights. He enjoyed and excelled at so much in life, yet did not seem to need or seek recognition. His low-key manner and his quiet confidence kept everyone at ease and drew people to him.
In skiing, Pete was a member of the Ontario Ski Team, competing nationally and internationally in the NorAm Race Series, the U.S.A. Junior Championships and the World University Games. He won several championships and had a natural gift on snow. He also became a scratch golfer and loved to take on Friends and family.
Perhaps his greatest passion, however, was windsurfing. He found every excuse he could to hit the surf on Georgian Bay, but his sense of adventure took him to beaches all over the world, including the southwest coast of Australia, Maui, the Colombian River Gorge in Oregon and Cape Hatteras in North Carolina. In the words of one of his lifelong Friends, "Pete loved life and life loved him right back!"
Pete was a generous, loyal and reliable friend who developed strong and lasting relationships at every phase of life: his youthful years of sports, competition and family; his fun and challenges at the National Ski Academy; his university years at Laurentian University and the University of Guelph (B.A. in Economics); his career launch at Nesbitt Burns; and his last several years at C.B. Richard Ellis where he was in commercial real-estate investment sales. At every turn he met with success with his long graceful stride and disarming smile.
It was going to be fun just to sit back and watch him perform in the decades ahead.
Looking through the family photo albums Pete had a mischievous smile and a sense of adventure in every picture. In virtually every snapshot either something spectacular had just happened, or it was about to happen. He was always surrounded by Friends and family as his easygoing style and sense of fun were infectious. His determination to improve and grow were never overt but always present. The results speak for themselves. As one good friend suggested: "Men wanted to be like Pete. Women wanted to be with him." More than 1,500 people attended his funeral.
Pete was quite simply a great human being who would have continued to win in his unpretentious manner and contribute on a kind-spirited and decent level to any situation. We are among his many Friends who have been brought together because of this fine person and who have had the good fortune of sharing a small piece of Pete's life -- all 9,946 days of it.
Josh, Bryce, Blake, Adam, Rob and Ian are Friends of Pete's.

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTCHESON - All Categories in OGSPI

HUTCHINGS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
ANDERS, Eunice Biggar
Age 84, of Leamington, died February 11, 2003. She was the wife of the late Franklin O. ANDERS (1994.) Born in Windsor, Ontario, daughter of Thomas and Mary BIGGAR, Eunice was a graduate of the University of Wisconsin in 1939. She and her husband owned and operated Point Pelee Orchards.
Eunice is survived by her son Franklin H. and daughter-in-law Barbara of Danbury, Connecticut, and her daughter Mary and son-in-law David HUTCHINGS of Cairo, Egypt. In addition to her husband, she was predeceased by her elder daughter Martha (1990). She also leaves grand_son Franklin J. and his wife Theresa of Walnut Creek, California, granddaughter Catherine ANDERS of Richmond, Virginia and grand_son John HUTCHINGS of Montreal.
Eunice was a weaver and charter member of both the Leamington Weavers Guild (1953) and the Ontario Handweavers and Spinners (1955). She was President of the Ontario Handweavers and Spinners from 1967-1969. A gifted artist, her award winning weaving was shown at the International Exposition held in Brussels in 1958. Her weaving was also exhibited in galleries throughout Ontario, Michigan and as far west as Seattle, Washington culminating in her one-woman exhibition at The Art Gallery of Windsor in 1983.
Eunice was also an accomplished musician, playing the organ at Saint John's Anglican Church as well as the Christian Science Church for many years. She was a longtime patron of the Leamington Choral Society.
At Eunice's request, there will be no funeral service. The family will receive Friends at the Reid Funeral Home, 14 Russell Street, Leamington, on Friday, February 14 from 7 to 9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Sun Parlor Home for Senior Citizens, 175 Talbot Street East, Leamington, Ontario N8H 1L9. Friends may send condolences at: www.funeral-cast.com

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTCHINGS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
HOAG, Howard Arthur
Died Sunday, June 15, 2003, at home in Toronto, surrounded by Friends. Howard will be greatly missed by his beloved bride Louise RICH and her daughter Odette HUTCHINGS, as well as by his innumerable Friends and his family, in particular his sister Sharon. Howard loved life. His humour, wit, intelligence and broad smile charmed everyone he met. Diagnosed with liver cancer in December, Howard lived the last six months with incredible courage, determination and optimism. The devotion and concern of his wide group of Friends, including those from the Toronto Racquet Club and the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club has been remarkable. The annual Robbie Burns Supper will not be the same without him. Many thanks to Dr. SIU at Princess Margaret, Drs SINGH, HUSSEIN, STEINBERG, Rosa BERG and the Palliative Care Team at Mt. Sinai and Trinity Hospice. Special thanks to Howard's friend Fred REID- WILKINSON for being there. A service to celebrate Howard's life will be held 4: 00 p.m., Saturday, June 21, East Common Room, Hart House, University of Toronto, with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Howard's name to Trinity Home Hospice, Suite 1102 - 25 King St. West, Toronto M5L 1G7.

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTCHINGS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Howard HOAG
By Steven DENURE, Julia WOODS, Michael HOMER, Marty SILVERSTONE Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page A28
Friend, husband, father, rugby player. Born September 17, 1952, in Ottawa. Died June 15, in Toronto, of cancer, aged 50.
Friends experienced a quintessential Howard HOAG moment a few years ago on the dock at a friend's cottage at a remote spot in Georgian Bay. They had an old recurve bow and a quiver full of new arrows, and were taking turns shooting at -- and missing a floating target anchored far out in the bay. As was his lifelong habit, Howard arrived much later than anticipated. He stepped out of the boat with a nautical flourish, and, after being roundly berated for being late and bringing what looked to be only six (warm) beer, he picked up the bow and tested its pull. Then he turned and fired an arrow and hit the previously unthreatened target the first time, with a satisfying thunk, like an exclamation mark at the end of a sentence. In the moment of stunned silence that followed, he gave a withering Hoagian look. "That's how it's done," he said, and picked up his six-pack and his knapsack, which turned out to be full of wine, and headed up the hill, leaving the merry band on the dock properly put in its place.
His Friends spent so much time waiting for him that they dubbed it "Howard time." The wait was always worth it. At every party there was "before Howie" and "after Howie." With his arrival, the conversation always sparkled a little more, the wine tasted better, the room seemed to grow bigger -- plus there was his unique ability to infuriate and/or entertain everybody in the room.
Howard grew up in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, the youngest of four children born to a production manager at the mighty CIP paper mill. As a child he was a Boy Scout, soloist in the church choir and an avid canoeist. He would later tell stories about paddling around the islands in the St. Lawrence River and watching the foam from the mill make the paddles disappear.
His voice eventually changed and, when he got to Montreal's McGill University, so did the songs. Howard studied environmental biology, but his true passion was the game of rugby. In recent years, Howard was best known as the heart and soul of the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club, as well as a key organizer of its annual Robbie Burns night. In Montreal, however, he's a legend: it was his monumental gaffe (he loudly lambasted a group of football coaches while the men in question sat in the next room listening to every word) that led to the creation of the Howie Hoag Award. Since its inception in 1971, "the Hoag" has been given out weekly during the MacDonald College football season to the player who performs the most remarkable misdeed of the week.
We are comforted to know that the last several years of Howard's too-short life were the absolute best. At 48, the classic lad and confirmed bachelor met the love of his life, the incomparable Louise RICH, and her daughter, Odette HUTCHINGS. This perfect trio -- whose adopted nickname was H.R.H. -- did not have anything like the number of years they deserved together, but what they did have was packed with enough love and laughter to fill many longer lifetimes.
Tragically, last Christmas Eve, Howard, who'd battled cancer as a child, learned that the radiation treatment that had saved his life 42 years earlier had probably led to the growth of an inoperable tumour in one of his bile ducts. In early June, Howard was given only a few days to live, but survived long enough to marry Louise and spend another week with his family and the Friends he loved. He also lived long enough to die on the day and at the hour of what used to be his absolutely favourite kind of night: just after midnight on a midsummer's eve with a full moon, which Howard used to say was "God's flashlight."
Steve, Julia, Mike and Marty are Friends of Howard HOAG.

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTCHINGS - All Categories in OGSPI

HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Albert George WEBB
In loving memory of Albert George WEBB, April 9, 1921 to December 24, 2002.
Albert WEBB, a resident of Providence Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital, on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 at the age of 81 years. He was born in Durham, and had lived on Manitoulin for the past 6 years. Previous to that, Al had lived in Elliott Lake and Armstrong. He had a great love of the north country, which led him to his job as a bush pilot He truly loved his work, and spent many enjoyable years pursuing his love of the north and of flying. Al was a veteran of WW2, having served overseas.
Survived by his beloved partner Val TAILOR/TAYLOR of Providence Bay, and her family. Will be sadly missed by Ruby CANNARD, the Mike SPRACK family, Linda and Al BAILEY, Harvey and Diane DEBASSIGE, Lloyd JACKSON and Marshall RICHARD of Elliott Lake, Ryan HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Jim HARASYM. Survived by many Friends in the Armstrong, Elliott Lake and Manitoulin area. Also survived by sons Warren and Chris, and one brother in the Hamilton area.
At Al's request, there will be no funeral service. Cremation will take place.
Val TAILOR/TAYLOR would like to thank the doctors and nurses at Mindemoya Hospital for the wonderful care and concern given to Al and herself, during this time. Words cannot express the appreciation. Culgin Funeral Home

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
BOIGON, Dede
On Thursday, February 27, 2003, at Toronto Western Hospital. Dede BOIGON, beloved wife of Irving. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Stanley BOIGON and Fern ROTSTEIN, Brian BOIGON and Susan SPEIGEL, Gary BOIGON and Michele SPANO, and Beth BOIGON and Gregor HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Ed and Sylvia HYDE, and Ruth and Albert KELMAN. Devoted grandmother of Michelle, Kayla, Ryan, Stella, Austin, Melissa, Molly, Sam, Matthew, and Zoe. Shiva 355 St. Clair Avenue West #1007. If desired, donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, 416-946-6560.

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
Rowan T. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, D.F.C., 1917-2003
Died peacefully at home in New Liskeard, Ontario on June 25, 2003. Husband of Rosemary KERR, father of Geraldine of Markham (Ronald PIERCE,) Robert of North Bay (Wendy TAILOR/TAYLOR) and Patrick of London, England, grandfather of Kevin and Ian HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON. He had a distinguished career in the Royal Canadian Air Force (1940-1946) flying Spitfires and Mustangs in England and on the continent with 401 and 414 Squadrons, attaining the rank of Squadron Leader. He was well known in business in New Liskeard and for many years a member of the Board of Directors of Northern Telephone Company Ltd. A private memorial service will be held at a later date. If desired, donations may be sent to the Canadian Cancer Society.

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-01 published
McCULLOCH, Peter Blair, M.D., Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada
On July 31, Dr. Peter McCULLOCH died peacefully at home in Hamilton, in his 65th year. Peter was the loving husband of Judith (Craig), devoted father of Peter and his financée Christine KELLY of Westport, Connecticut, Paul and his wife Daphne BONAR of Toronto, Colin and his wife Marie (Hooey) of Charlton, New York, and gentle ''Bwana'' of Ian McCULLOCH. In 1968, just after five years of marrige, he lost his first wife, Sally Ann MARSHALL, mother of Peter and Paul, in a car accident. Peter was the only and dearly loved son of the late Velma and Peter McCULLOCH, the much admired and appreciated son-in-law of the late Charlotte and William CRAIG of Cambridge (Galt) and the late Grace and Frank MARSHALL of Orillia, and dear brother-in-law of Patricia and Ross HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON of Oakville. A graduate of the University of Toronto (1964), he did his residency in Internal Medicine and Clinical Haemotology at the Montreal General Hospital, earning his Fellowship in the Royal College of Physicians of Canada in 1969. This was followed by two years in Kenya where he was seconded to the University of Nairobi by McGill University for the Canadian International Development Agency/Kenya Medical Development Program. While in Kenya, he taught medical students, served as a medical consultant, undertook various study projects for the United Nations International Agency for Research on Cancer and climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro. Dr. McCULLOCH returned to his hometown in 1972, becoming the first medical oncologist and establishing his systemic treatment program at the Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre. He cared skilfully and compassionately for his patients, collaborated on research projects, coordinated provincial clinical trials, mentored colleagues and inspired students until April 2003 when his own cancer was diagnosed. He was a Professor of Medicine at McMaster University and over the years served on many committees locally and nationally. He was particularly proud of his work as Chair of the Research Ethics Board of McMaster University/Hamilton Health Sciences. Peter was an enthusiastic skier, fisherman, photographer and student of history, science and world affairs, and he travelled extensively in pursuit of these interests. He will be sorely missed by his family, Friends, colleagues and patients, and by people whose lives he touched around the world. A funeral service will be held at Central Presbyterian Church, 165 Charlton Avenue West (at Caroline), Hamilton on Tuesday, August 5 at 11 a.m. The family will receive visitors at Dodsworth and Brown Funeral Home, Robinson Chapel (King Street East at Wellington, Hamilton) on Monday, August 4 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts to the Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre Foundation, Hamilton Community Foundation or charity of your choice would be appreciated.

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-15 published
Died This Day -- William Bruce HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, 1992
Monday, September 15, 2003 - Page R7
Journalist and historian born at Prescott, Ontario, on June 5, 1901; 1918, became reporter for Victoria Times; 1950-63, editor of Victoria Times; 1963, appointed editorial director of Vancouver Sun; 16 books include histories, biographies and studies of Canadian-American relations; member of the Order of Canada; won three Governor-General's Awards.

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-17 published
Gallant fighter pilot was war hero
Upper Canada College alumnus received the coveted Distinguished Flying Cross in 1943 for his 'very keen fighting spirit'
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, September 17, 2003 - Page R7
Rowan T. (Bob) HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON was a Second World War fighter pilot who credited his flying mate, Larry DOHERTY, with saving his life at the cost of his own.
Mr. DOHERTY alerted Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON by radio of an impending attack by three German fighters, shortly before he was shot down and killed in June, 1943.
Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON escaped a similar fate only by outlasting the enemy in a desperate, 20-minute dogfight.
His friend's warning and his own skill saved Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON from becoming a wartime casualty. He returned from Europe a decorated pilot and enjoyed a successful business career before dying at home in New Liskeard, Ontario, on June 25, aged 86.
Rowan Theodore HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, who was called Bob by childhood Friends and Hutch by fellow pilots, was born in Toronto on May 10, 1917, the only child of an accountant father. He attended Upper Canada College before entering engineering studies at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario
He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force on August 14, 1940, just as the Battle of Britain was underway. After training, he was posted to No. 401 Squadron, flying Spitfires.
In August, 1942, he was transferred to No. 414 Squadron, known as the Sarnia Imperials, which flew Mustangs from a base at Croydon, Surrey.
On August 19, just eight days after arriving, Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON flew a tactical reconnaissance mission during the ill-fated Dieppe Raid.
The Imperials spent the next 12 months flying defensive patrols over the south coast of England, as well as engaging in daytime strafing raids on targets in occupied France.
Flying Officer HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON returned to Dieppe on the French coast on March 26, 1943, flying low across the English Channel in his Mustang before attacking two locomotives and an electrical transformer.
Typical of the harassment campaign was a mission Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Mr. DOHERTY flew on April 1, as they scoured the French coast from Fécamp to Dieppe, firing on electric power lines and shooting up two freight engines.
On one such raid, Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and another partner riddled five locomotives in the Le Havre area.
Another time, a strafing run in the Breton coastal region damaged seven locomotives. A wing of Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON's Mustang was struck by ground fire. He returned safely to base.
On June 6, 1943, the pair was assigned to escort a naval vessel on a secret mission in the English Channel when Flying Officer DOHERTY spotted a trio of Folke-Wulf 190s just as they launched a surprise attack. His brief radio warning alerted Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON to the danger, although DOHERTY's Mustang was almost immediately shot down.
"For 20 minutes HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON fought off the three enemy aircraft until the German pilots gave up their attacks and flew away," according to an account published in The Royal Canadian Air Force Overseas, an official 1944 history. "Then, despite the fact that his petrol was almost exhausted, the Mustang pilot resumed his patrol over the naval vessel and saw it safely back to port.
"Thanks to DOHERTY's warning and HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON's gallantry the naval vessel had not been attacked during the engagement."
On landing, it was discovered that Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON's Mustang had but a thimbleful of fuel.
The Imperials were redesignated as a fighter reconnaissance squadron later that month, as Allied planners began preparations for an invasion of Europe.
They also took airborne before-and-after photographs of the launch sites for V-1 flying bombs.
Once, Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Flying Officer B. B. MOSSING were jumped by eight German fighters, although Mr. MOSSING damaged one with a well-placed burst and three more were shot down by Spitfires which came to the rescue of the reconnaissance Mustangs.
On the morning of the D-Day landings, Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON's squadron was assigned to spot targets for the naval bombardment of coastal defences stretching from Le Havre to Cherbourg. For Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, it was exactly one year to the day since he had tangled with the trio of FW 190s.
The following days were a blur of predawn briefings, as the squadron flew at first light to photograph mosaics of Caen, France, as well as Luftwaffe airfields. Planners were desperate for information on overnight changes in the battle area.
On Dominion Day, 1944, Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, by now a squadron leader, was made commander of the Imperials. They moved base from Odiham, Hampshire, to Ste-Honorine-de-Ducy, France, in August, replacing their Mustangs with Spitfires. The squadron moved base every few weeks to keep pace with the army's advances.
One of his final achievements was in providing valuable photographs and reports in August, 1944, as the German Seventh and Fifth Panzer armies tried desperately to escape an encroaching Allied encirclement in an area that became known as the Falaise pocket.
Mr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross in 1943 for his "very keen fighting spirit."
After the war, he was prominent in business in New Liskeard, operating a travel agency, an insurance brokerage and a real-estate company. He sat on the board of directors of the Northern Telephone Company Ltd.
He leaves his wife of 54 years, Rosemary (née KERR,) their daughter and two sons, and two grand_sons.

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-04 published
Thelma Eaton Hutchison WILKINSON
By Laurie SEHL Tuesday, November 4, 2003 - Page A24
Mother, sister, teacher. Born February 2, 1913, in Arthur, Ontario Died August 1, in Brampton, Ontario, of old age, aged 90.
Thelma Laurene EATON, the second child of Hugh and Jean EATON, was sister to Clifford and Irene. At the age of 10, Thelma wrote her entrance exams to high school. She was held back a year because of her age and was delayed another year when she became quite ill with whooping cough. She started high school when she was During her years at Arthur High, Thelma was heavily involved in the community. She was the church pianist and was involved in staging several community plays. Thelma applied to and was accepted at Toronto Normal School and she graduated at the age of 17. She returned to her elementary school, Metz School, where she taught many younger than she who had been in the same one-room school. In the subsequent 39 years, Thelma taught students in many Ontario towns.
"Thelma was a dedicated teacher -- she cared for and had concerns for all of her pupils and in turn they cared for and were inspired by her," says stepdaughter Ruth CRUMP of Windsor, Ontario "She was an excellent teacher of our academics but still made time to umpire a ball game, organize the yearly gala Christmas concert or whatever else it took to keep about 40 pupils in eight grades busy and on their paths to becoming productive citizens."
Thelma met Gordon HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, who also was from the Arthur area, and they dated for about seven years. The marriage was delayed while they both helped support their families during the Depression years. They finally tied the knot on November 18, 1939. Thelma had two children, Donna Jean (now WANLESS) and Wayne Alexander.
The years from 1969 to 1975 were difficult for Thelma and the strength of her character shone through. She quit her teaching career to care for ailing husband Gordon (who died in August, 1971), her father who died in June of that same year and a brother who became critically ill with diabetes.
Over the years, one of Thelma's passions beyond her family and teaching was the Federated Women's Institute of Ontario. From 1959 until she was no longer able, Thelma was heavily involved with the Institute. She served her branch, district, area and province as president, vice-president and in various other executive positions. One of her favourite projects was attracting and arranging the appearance of guest speaker Pauline McGIBBON, Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario, at a special Institute event. Thelma was honoured by her branch in 1984 by becoming a life member of the Federated Women's Institutes of Ontario. Thelma also became a life member of the Associated Country Women of the World.
On October 11, 1975, Thelma married Edgerton WILKINSON from Milton, Ontario, who had been a long-time family friend; he, too, had lost his spouse. Together they enjoyed 20 years and with their blended families, shared five children, 18 grandchildren and 33 great-grandchildren. Thelma lived with Ed until his death in 1996, after which she moved to Southbrook Retirement Community for most of her final years.
"Thelma was always fun and always welcomed us," says Ruth CRUMP. "She loved to be active -- either entertaining or being entertained. She was a true conversationalist and could tell great stories and jokes. She never turned down an offer for a game of bridge or euchre. Most of all, she loved her family and many Friends. The times she laughed, gave advice or just listened echo in the memories of those lives (she) touched -- and, in being so remembered, her legacy will live on."
Laurie SEHL is Thelma's granddaughter.

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON - All Categories in OGSPI

HUTTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-17 published
HUTTON, Douglas
Born September 29, 1918. Died with peace and the love of his family on April 15th, in his 85th year, at Sunnybrook Veterans Wing. Beloved husband of Mary and loving and caring father of Ginny and her husband Mike, Bob and his wife Karen, and Kit and her husband Doug. Admired and loved grampy to Kerry, Don, Nattie, Mike, Warren, and Robyn. Doug was a graduate engineer from University of Toronto in 1940. He then joined the Canadian Navy as lieutenant, entered a business career with Canada Metal Co. Ltd and retired as a highly regarded Chief Executive Officer. He was an accomplished athlete, in his early years in varsity track and field, and later in in curling and golf until a stroke partially paralyzed him in 1994. He would want again to extend his deep gratitude to all those who provided care in the last nine years. His family and Friends will remember him as strong willed yet thoughtful and kind hearted. Friends may visit at the McDougall and Brown Funeral Home, 2900 Kingston Rd, Scarborough from 3 to 5 p.m or 7 to 9 p.m, on Thursday, April 17th, and/or attend his funeral service there at 10: 30 am on Friday, April 18th which will be followed by a light reception also at McDougall and Brown's. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or to the charity of your choice, would be appreciated.

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-21 published
Died This Day -- Jennie Creighton WOOLWORTH, 1924
Wednesday, May 21, 2003 - Page R5
Homemaker and multimillionaire born in Picton, Ontario, in 1855 grew up on family farm in Prince Edward County; on June 11, 1876, married F.W. WOOLWORTH, store clerk from Watertown, New York in 1878, husband experimented with sale of five-cent-only items and sold out in day; next year, opened first five-and-dime store by 1911, chain totalled 600 stores; in 1919, assumed $40-million estate when husband died of long illness brought on by dental neglect; became world's richest woman but suffered Alzheimer's disease; declared incompetent and never comprehended situation died without leaving will; $60-million divided among two daughters and four-year-old granddaughter, Barbara HUTTON.

  H... Names     HU... Names     HUT... Names     Welcome Home

HUTTON - All Categories in OGSPI