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"HUN" 2003 Obituary


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HUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-12 published
Cecilia Pik-Ling TAM
Just over a week after being diagnosed with cancer, died peacefully at Scarborough General Hospital with her loving family at her side on February 9, 2003. She was 54. She will be sadly missed by her husband Paul and children Janice and Anthony. Dear sister to Paulson LEE and his wife Winifred WONG, Anita LEE and her husband Choy Ping YIN, Leslie LEE and her husband Gilbert HUNG, Antonia LEE and her husband Norman TU, Josephine LEE and her husband William CHAN, Bernard LEE and his wife Happy SHEE. Predeceased by her parents LEE Chun Kwok and LO Kwei Yuen as well as her siblings LEE Pik Kwan, Betty LEE, Elsie LEE and her husband Chau Kai Hang, and LEE Pik Shan. Francis LEE, Betty LEE's husband, will also miss Ceci. Loving sister-in-law to Peter TAM and his wife Julianna CHEUNG, Alice TAM and her husband Charles YAM, Henry TAM and his wife Teresa TSANG. Her many relatives and Friends will miss her kindness and beauty. She passed away with extraordinary grace, courage, and faith. Surely God was on her side. Her selfless devotion will be remembered by all the people she has touched during her shortened lifetime. Family and Friends may visit at the Jerrett Funeral Home ­ North York Chapel, 6191 Yonge Street, North York (2 lights South of Steeles Ave.) on Wednesday from 6 ­ 9 p.m. and Thursday from 2 ­ 4 and 6 ­ 9 p.m. There will be no visitation on Friday. The Funeral Mass will be on Saturday February 15, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. at St. Bonaventure Roman Catholic Church, 1300 Leslie St. (at Lawrence Ave. East.). Private burial for family members only. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Cecilia TAM Memorial Fund at 42 Fulham Street, Scarborough, Ontario, M1S 2A5.

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HUNT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
Gordon Kenneth FLEMING/FLEMMING
By Jack FORTIN Thursday, February 13, 2003, Page A30
Musician, husband, father. Born August 3, 1931, in Winnipeg. Died August 31, 2002, in Scarborough, Ontario, following a stroke, aged 71.
Gordie FLEMING/FLEMMING was a remarkable music talent, known internationally as a master of the accordion, especially in the jazz idiom. He was a life member of Local 149 of the Toronto Musicians' Association.
In show-business vernacular, Gordie was "born in a trunk." He began playing accordion when his older brother gave him lessons. His musical ability was such that he began performing publicly at the age of five. His schoolteachers often saw him being whisked away in a taxi to perform at theatres and radio stations in Winnipeg. By the age of 10, he was a working member of various bands in that city.
In 1949, Gordie lost his accordion in a fire at a Winnipeg hotel. With the insurance money, he headed for the bright lights of Montreal where he soon became an important part of that city's musical life. His accordion ability was complemented by the fact that he was also a gifted arranger and composer.
He had a marvellous ability to improvise and could string out complex bebop lines, leaving his listeners in awe. He often slipped a jazz phrase into ballads or commercial tunes, confirming that jazz was indeed his first love.
One of Montreal's busiest musicians, he wrote for local orchestras, shows, radio and television. He had perfect pitch and often wrote without reference to a keyboard. He was at home in every type of music from classics to jazz. For several years, he worked at the National Film Board as a composer and musician.
In Montreal, Gordie performed with many show business headliners: there was a wealth of home-grown talent in Montreal, such as Oscar PETERSON and Maynard FERGUSON, as well as other jazz musicians who were beginning to be noticed.
Gordie had said that when when he first heard bebop it was like entering another world. As his career indicates, he had no trouble in that world. He worked with many personalities including: Charlie PARKER, Mel TORMÉ, Hank SNOW, Lena HORNE, Englebert HUMPERDINCK, Dennis DAY, Gordon MacRAE, Cab CALLOWAY, Nat King COLE, Cat STEVENS, Rich LITTLE, Billy ECKSTEIN, Pee Wee HUNT, Arthur GODFREY and Buddy DEFRANCO.
He also performed with Tommy AMBROSE, Allan MILLS, Wally KOSTER, Tommy HUNTER, Bert NIOSI, Wayne and Shuster, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation jazz shows with Al BACULIS, and many other Canadian jazz musicians.
On Montreal's French music scene, Gordie performed on radio and television with Emile GENEST, Ti-Jean CARIGNAN, André GAGNON and Ginette RENO. He was a featured soloist with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on several occasions.
Internationally, Gordie toured France in 1952 and performed with Edith PIAF and Tino ROSSI. He had the honour to perform for former prime minister Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU at a Commonwealth Conference.
He participated with other top Canadian musicians in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation tour to entertain Canadian and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Europe in 1952 and 1968.
For me, a memorable experience was playing in a group with Gordie for several winters in Florida. A popular member of the Panama City Beach family of musicians, Gordie looked forward to his winter trek south. Many of the American musicians will miss him, as will the many snowbirds who looked forward to hearing him each year.
His extensive repertoire allowed Gordie to author a book called Music of the World, in which he wrote the music to 280 songs from more than 30 countries.
Gordie leaves his wife of 47 years, Joanne, and seven children.
Jack FORTIN is Gordie's friend.

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HUNT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
BROWN, Ruth Elizabeth (née TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Tillsonburg
Suddenly on March 6, 2003. Beloved wife of Grant C. (Bud) BROWN, Q.C. for 61 years. Loving mother of Lyn SMITH (David,) Craig BROWN (Jane,) Kathy GIRVIN (David) and Timothy BROWN (Kathé.) Dear grandmother of Sara SMITH (Brian DYCK) and Cullen SMITH (Deceased); Will, Anna and Julian BROWN; Scott and Martha GIRVIN Lyn BROWN. Great-grandmother of Jacob and Liam DYCK. She will also be greatly missed by her sisters Kay WARREN and Jean HUNT and her brother, Campbell TAILOR/TAYLOR (Ruby) of Galt. The family will receive Friends and relatives at The Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg, on Sunday, from 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm. Funeral service will be conducted on Monday at 2 pm. at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 48 Brock Street, West, Tillsonburg. Interment to follow in the Tillsonburg Cemetery. If you wish, donations to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church or Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital Foundation would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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HUNT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-11 published
LAKIE, June Hunt
Died very peacefully on May 22, 2003 at her home in Aurora. With her were David, husband of 53 years; daughter Jennifer, sons David, Bruce and niece Judie HUNT of Ottawa. June was predeceased by brothers Lindahl and Douglas. At June's request a private family service was held at which sister-in-law Betty HUNT of Saint John's, niece Shelagh Hunt LARIVIERE, Toronto, daughters-in-law Manda and Andi and June's eight grandchildren were in attendance. She bids farewell to sister-in-law Mick HUNT of Saint John's, and her Friends in Saint John's, Montreal, Toronto and Aurora. To her French Group whose company she enjoyed so much - Au Revoir. Again, at her very special request, June's ashes were taken by David and family to her beloved Newfoundland and rest with her father and mother. A graveside service was held in Saint John's on June ''Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth''

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HUNT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-21 published
CARTWRIGHT, Joan Elizabeth
Joan Elizabeth CARTWRIGHT, 65, died on June 12th, after a long and courageous fight with breast cancer, at her daughter's home in East Hardwick, Vermont. Her daughter Deborah and son-in-law Tim were with her at her final breath. Joan was born in Toronto, Ontario, to William Bovell and Mary Elizabeth (POTTER) CARTWRIGHT. She moved to Montreal, Quebec, where she attended McGill University, and then Concordia University, from where she graduated with distinction. After marriage, she raised her family of four children living in Montreal and then again in Toronto. She moved to Wolcott, Vermont in 1992, and bought and renovated an old schoolhouse in the country. Her household consisted of several cats, all of which were orange tigers, and her beloved dog Joey, with whom she spent hours every day walking the back roads, visiting her neighbors, and playing ball. She also kept herself busy by volunteering at local libraries, was an extremely voracious reader and had a wide knowledge of books. She loved her crossword puzzles in the weekend paper, and indeed loved any type of word challenge especially Scrabble! Joan adored her grandchildren, and although she didn't see them often, never missed an opportunity to talk with Friends about them and show off photos. She was an accomplished knitter, and was pleased to give away her beautiful sweaters, dozens of which she donated to local charities. She is survived by her sister, Eleanor HUNT of Ontario; her ex-husband, L. Lamont GORDON of Toronto, Ontario; her children: Katharine GORDON and husband Chuck MITCHELL of Wolcott, Vermont, Deborah and husband Tim HARTT of East Hardwick, Vermont, James GORDON and wife Shannon McQUILLAN of Kamloops, British Columbia, and Pamela GORDON of Toronto, Ontario; her grandchildren, Keaven, Connor, Seamus, Haley, Walker, Sam, Laura and Angus; and several nieces, nephews and cousins. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, June 29th, in Toronto, Ontario. Memorial donations may be made in Joan's name, to The Frontier Animal Society of Vermont, 502 Strawberry Acres Road, Newport, Vermont 05855.

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HUNT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-29 published
David LAKIE
Died July 24, 2003 in Ottawa as he was preparing to embark on an Arctic tour. David LAKIE was born December 19, 1924 at Motherwell, Scotland to James and Agnes (KENNEDY) LAKIE. After serving as a flight officer in the Royal Navy, Fleet Air Arm, during the Second World War he arrived in Newfoundland where he married his lifelong love June HUNT on October 5 1949. After a sucessful career in business David retired to Aurora, Ontario to share his love for family and travel with June. David is survived by his children David, Jennifer, Bruce and his brother William (Bill) LAKIE of Arbroath Scotland. Grandchildren, nieces and nephews will all miss David and as will his many Friends from Rosedale Golf Club, Harvard Business School, Probus Club and June's art group. Family and Friends are invited to pay their respects during visitation at the Thompson Funeral Home 29 Victoria Street, Aurora. (905-727-5421), on Wednesday July 30 from 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held on Thursday, July 31st 2003 at 11 a.m. at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 32 Mosley Street, Aurora. A Graveside Service will be held at a later date at Saint John's, Newfoundland, where David will be put to rest with June. David was deeply grieved by June's passing on May 22, 2003. His wish to be with her again has been fulfilled.

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HUNT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
Sculptor 'entirely original'
A wood carver from a young age who made many public works, he was befriended by the Group of Seven and later carved their tombstone epitaphs
By Bill GLADSTONE, Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, November 15, 2003 - Page F10
A Canadian sculptor who as a young man was adopted by the Group of Seven has died in Toronto. E. B. COX, who prided himself on achieving artistic and commercial success without ever taking a penny in government grants, was 89.
Mr. COX was a young associate, of some of the Group of Seven with whom he went on northern sketching trips; A. Y. JACKSON once complimented him on his "good sense of form." He later carved their tombstone epitaphs.
A wood carver from a young age, he came to master stone and even the delicate art of faceting and carving precious stones; he also tried metal, ceramics and glass. Because he liked to work fast, he pioneered the use of power tools to quicken the chiselling process, a technique that purists initially disdained as a form of cheating.
According to one 1990s guide-book, he had "more sculpture on view in Toronto's public places than any other single artist." His 20-piece Garden of the Greek Gods, originally installed in the 1950s on the Georgian Peaks near Collingwood, Ontario, was later relocated to the far more populous grounds of the Canadian National Exhibition near the Dufferin Gate. The only fully human representation in the group, an 11-foot-high statue of Hercules, was carved from a six-tonne piece of Indiana limestone -- "the biggest piece of stone used by a sculptor in Canada," according to friend and patron, Ken SMITH.
Among his many other public works are a fish fountain for a courtyard at the former Park Plaza Hotel, a stone bear for the Guild Inn, a stone Orpheus for Victoria College, lavish countertops and railings for historic bank buildings, a large seated lady for McMaster University and whimsical creatures for a school yard in Milton, Ontario
Having mastered big, he also excelled at small: He used to claim that he invented coffee-table art. He carved little totem poles to put himself through university, and became known for his small bear sculptures, which he sold at popular prices, especially at Christmas. "At university, I damned near starved," he would explain. "I don't believe in starving artists."
Influenced by Iroquois and West Coast Haida art, he focused on bears, beavers, birds and other animals as well as human torsos, masks and heads; he often caught the animals in quirky fluid poses and never failed to capture their essential natures. He once crafted an all-Canadian limited-edition chess set for the Hudson's Bay Co., with beavers as pawns, coureurs de bois as knights, Indian princesses as queens, and so on. He was "the great bridge between aboriginal art and modern art," according to Mr. SMITH and others. A picture book about him, featuring an essay by Gary Michael DAULT, was published by Boston Mills Press in 1999.
"He was entirely original," said Toronto sculptor Dora DE PEDERY- HUNT. "Absolutely nobody else did what he did. What style he had was entirely his. I call him a real good sculptor, a real good artist."
The younger of two brothers, Elford Bradley COX was born on July 16, 1914, in Botha, Alberta., where his family made a short-lived attempt at farming; he learned to carve by watching his maternal grandfather whittle kindling by the fireside. He persisted in sculpting even though his pious father was vehemently opposed to the creation of "graven images," he told Toronto Life magazine in 1997. The family returned to Bowmanville, Ontario, where E. B. spent most of his childhood, and where his mother died suddenly after an epileptic attack when her favoured son was a young teenager. When it was time for him to go to university, "his father sent him off with $5, a suitcase and a wish of good luck," said Kathy SUTTON, the younger of his two daughters.
Studying languages at the University of Toronto from 1934 to 1938, Mr. COX was befriended by German professor and painter Barker FAIRLEY, who introduced him to A. Y. JACKSON, Fred VARLEY and Arthur LISMER of the Group of Seven.
Mr. COX started teaching languages at Upper Canada College, but soon left to join the war effort as an intelligence officer, interrogating prisoners of war in Europe.
Afterward, he resumed teaching at Upper Canada College, and devoted part of a summer to a school canoe trip on the Mississauga River the next summer he escorted a group of boys on an even more adventurous trip down the Churchill River in the barren lands. "That was just unheard-of in those years," recalled Terence A. WARDROP, who joined that expedition and became Mr. COX's lifelong friend and solicitor. "It was a big trip and it was almost historic the rivers and some of the lakes were unmapped in 1948."
Quitting his teaching job in 1949, Mr. COX married the former Betty CAMPBELL, bought a farm near Palgrave, Ontario, and discovered that he could survive as a full-time artist. (Although he considered government subsidies poisonous, he once applied for a government grant to study Canadian stones suitable for sculpting -- and was turned down. "I did my stone research without their damn-fool money," he told The Globe and Mail in 1970.) Moving to a rural property in north Toronto and later to a Victorian house in eastern Toronto, he separated from his wife but remained on excellent terms with her and their daughters.
Being partial to pranks, he once purchased a canoe for his wife as a gift and, to achieve maximum surprise, paddled it to the dock at the family cottage in a rented disguise. Along with his love of humour, Friends recall his sharp wit and his ability to cut through social pretense. "He said he wanted his gravestone to read, 'I told you I was sick,' " recalled art dealer John INGRAM. " That's what I remember about him -- his great sense of humour and just what a wonderful compassionate guy he was. He tried to give this air of being an old curmudgeon, but in fact, he was anything but."
Becoming a mentor to many young artists, Mr. COX generously shared his tools and experience with them. "He didn't have much mentoring when he was learning to be an artist -- people didn't help him so he took the opposite tack," said his daughter Kathy.
Always enthusiastic and full of ideas, he was usually in his workshop early in the morning -- and kept on working even after losing his sight in his final years. His home was full of fine sculpture and painting, including a portrait of Mr. COX by Mr. FAIRLEY that hung over the mantel. "It was a lovely place, and by the time you got out of there, you were in a buying fever," Mr. SMITH recalled. "E.B. himself was part of the fun of buying stuff. People were just charmed by the atmosphere he created." He was also famously not particular about the prices he asked from genuine admirers of his work.
As for his art's place in the world, he was confident it would last, at least in the physical sense. "We'd have these long philosophical talks about whether there was an afterlife and what legacy to leave behind," friend Eric CONROY recalled. "He'd say that his stone works would be there long after Rembrandt's paintings had crumbled."
E. B. COX died in Toronto on July 29, leaving his wife Betty, daughters Sally SPROULE and Kathy SUTTON, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

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HUNTER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
Lillian Milinda VINEY
In loving memory of Lillian Milinda VINEY, who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Health Centre on Friday, April 11, 2003 at the age of 82 years.
Beloved wife of Charles VINEY. Dear mother of Shirley VINEY of Little Current, George VINEY of Manitowaning, Sandra and husband Bruce POPE of Manitowaning, Lyla VINEY of Orillia. Loved grandmother of Stephanie and Mark MacDONALD (fiancée Holly,) Andrew and Katherine POPE, Kimberley, Laura and Marianne MENARD. Special great grandmother of Jonathan and Jessica ORR, Justin, Destanie (BAILEY) and Liliana MacDONALD. Remembered by brother and sisters Violet HUBBARD- McALLISTER (predeceased,) Harry JAGGARD (wife Gladys predeceased,) Bessie LOCKYER (husband James predeceased,) Florence LENSON (husband Walter predeceased,) Madeleine CHARLTON (husband John predeceased), predeceased by sisters Beulah and Iris and parents Guy and Evalena JAGGARD. Sister-in-law of Harry VINEY, Ruth McCULLIGH (predeceased,) Lauretta McGILLIS (predeceased,) Grace HUNTER (predeceased,) Joyce and husband Howard HOLMES, Glenn and wife Margaret VINEY, predeceased by Joe, Bob and Edith. Will be missed by numerous nephews and nieces. Visitation was held Sunday, April 13, 2003. Funeral service was held Monday, April 14, 2003. Both at Knox United Church, Manitowaning. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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HUNTER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-26 published
Howard Kenneth HOLMES
In loving memory of Howard Kenneth HOLMES who died unexpectedly at home on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 at the age 72 years.
Beloved husband of Joyce (née VINEY.) Loved father of Bonny and husband Douglas KILGOUR of Fort McMurray, Kenneth and wife Evelina of Longlac, Joe and wife Joyce of Bidwell Rd., Manitowaning, Diana HOLMES and friend Williard PYETTE of Tehkummah, Sharon and Robert Case of the Slash, and predeceased by son Douglas (1957). Cherished grandfather of Allison KILGOUR and friend Jason, Heather and husband Gopal BRUGALETTE, Kenny HOLMES and friend Sarah, Crystal and husband Rob PERIGO, Nick HOLMES and friend Melanie, Pam SHEAN, Pat SHEAN, Scott CASE, Brock CASE. Forever remembered by four great grandchildren Jazzlynn, Taylor, Faith and Nikaila. Will be missed by brother Clarence and wife Guelda of Mitchell and sister Dorothy and husband Gordon GERMAN of Crossfield, Alberta and in-laws Harry VINEY of Gore Bay, Charlie (wife Lillian predeceased) VINEY of Wikwemikong Manor, Glenn and wife Margaret VINEY of Kinmount, Gladys (predeceased) and husband Harry JAGGARD of Manitowaning. Predeceased by Grace and husband Carmen HUNTER, Ruth and husband Bill and Loretta and husband Neil McGILLIS. Visitation was held on Thursday, November 20. Funeral service was held on Friday, November 21, 2003 all at Island Funeral Home. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery.

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HUNTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
Gordon Kenneth FLEMING/FLEMMING
By Jack FORTIN Thursday, February 13, 2003, Page A30
Musician, husband, father. Born August 3, 1931, in Winnipeg. Died August 31, 2002, in Scarborough, Ontario, following a stroke, aged 71.
Gordie FLEMING/FLEMMING was a remarkable music talent, known internationally as a master of the accordion, especially in the jazz idiom. He was a life member of Local 149 of the Toronto Musicians' Association.
In show-business vernacular, Gordie was "born in a trunk." He began playing accordion when his older brother gave him lessons. His musical ability was such that he began performing publicly at the age of five. His schoolteachers often saw him being whisked away in a taxi to perform at theatres and radio stations in Winnipeg. By the age of 10, he was a working member of various bands in that city.
In 1949, Gordie lost his accordion in a fire at a Winnipeg hotel. With the insurance money, he headed for the bright lights of Montreal where he soon became an important part of that city's musical life. His accordion ability was complemented by the fact that he was also a gifted arranger and composer.
He had a marvellous ability to improvise and could string out complex bebop lines, leaving his listeners in awe. He often slipped a jazz phrase into ballads or commercial tunes, confirming that jazz was indeed his first love.
One of Montreal's busiest musicians, he wrote for local orchestras, shows, radio and television. He had perfect pitch and often wrote without reference to a keyboard. He was at home in every type of music from classics to jazz. For several years, he worked at the National Film Board as a composer and musician.
In Montreal, Gordie performed with many show business headliners: there was a wealth of home-grown talent in Montreal, such as Oscar PETERSON and Maynard FERGUSON, as well as other jazz musicians who were beginning to be noticed.
Gordie had said that when when he first heard bebop it was like entering another world. As his career indicates, he had no trouble in that world. He worked with many personalities including: Charlie PARKER, Mel TORMÉ, Hank SNOW, Lena HORNE, Englebert HUMPERDINCK, Dennis DAY, Gordon MacRAE, Cab CALLOWAY, Nat King COLE, Cat STEVENS, Rich LITTLE, Billy ECKSTEIN, Pee Wee HUNT, Arthur GODFREY and Buddy DEFRANCO.
He also performed with Tommy AMBROSE, Allan MILLS, Wally KOSTER, Tommy HUNTER, Bert NIOSI, Wayne and Shuster, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation jazz shows with Al BACULIS, and many other Canadian jazz musicians.
On Montreal's French music scene, Gordie performed on radio and television with Emile GENEST, Ti-Jean CARIGNAN, André GAGNON and Ginette RENO. He was a featured soloist with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on several occasions.
Internationally, Gordie toured France in 1952 and performed with Edith PIAF and Tino ROSSI. He had the honour to perform for former prime minister Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU at a Commonwealth Conference.
He participated with other top Canadian musicians in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation tour to entertain Canadian and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Europe in 1952 and 1968.
For me, a memorable experience was playing in a group with Gordie for several winters in Florida. A popular member of the Panama City Beach family of musicians, Gordie looked forward to his winter trek south. Many of the American musicians will miss him, as will the many snowbirds who looked forward to hearing him each year.
His extensive repertoire allowed Gordie to author a book called Music of the World, in which he wrote the music to 280 songs from more than 30 countries.
Gordie leaves his wife of 47 years, Joanne, and seven children.
Jack FORTIN is Gordie's friend.

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HUNTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-26 published
Died This Day -- Adelaide HOODLESS, 1910
Wednesday, February 26, 2003 - Page R7
Social activist, educational reformer born Adelaide HUNTER at St. George, Canada West, on February 26, 1857; in 1889, jolted out of a comfortable, middle-class life by death of infant son caused by impure milk; thereafter, sought to improve education of women for motherhood and household management; campaigned for domestic science courses in schools; in 1897, founded first Women's Institute chapter; within few years, the movement spread across Canada and around the world; helped found National Council of Women, Victorian Order of Nurses and national Young Women's Christian Association; believed women's destiny lay in home never supported suffragette cause.

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HUNTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-09 published
Activist established blue box program
Radical became known for putting pressure on government, corporations
By Martin MITTELSTAEDT Wednesday, July 9, 2003 - Page R7
Toronto -- One of Canada's most influential environmental activists, Gary GALLON, died Thursday in Montreal after a long battle with cancer.
Although Mr. GALLON may not have been a household name, Canadians almost everywhere will recognize one of his major achievements, the setting up of the country's first blue box recycling program in Ontario during the late 1980s.
He also had a hand during the 1970s in establishing Greenpeace, and maintained a lifelong passion for environmental causes evident in his series of twice-monthly newsletters, called the GALLON Environmental Letter.
"I've always been bothered by excess consumption and wanton destruction of habitat. Human ethics must allow space for other creatures," he said recently.
Born in the United States in 1945, Mr. GALLON moved to Canada in the late 1960s to avoid the draft during the Vietnam war. He settled in Vancouver and began working by writing newsletters promoting mining stocks listed on the Vancouver Stock Exchange.
After work, he turned to his true passion, the environment, joining the nighttime meetings of the Society for the Promotion of Environmental Conservation, a group that at the time opposed the use of the British Columbia coast for supertanker routes.
"He became concerned that what he was doing [by selling stocks] was causing environmental damage," said David OVED, a Toronto environmental consultant who worked with him in the Ontario government.
Mr. GALLON's biggest impact on the country's conservation movement occurred when he was senior policy adviser for Jim BRADLEY, Ontario's Liberal environment minister from 1985-90, one of Mr. BRADLEY's surprise hires.
It was a risky move for the new Liberal government to employ one of Canada's leading environmental radicals for such a post.
Mr. GALLON instantly became known as one of " BRADLEY's brats," the moniker given the group of dedicated environmentalists assembled by Mr. BRADLEY within the Ontario government who helped originate such programs as the blue box and the province's acid rain reduction program.
In the mid-1980s, municipal recycling had been an experimental effort in a few communities.
Mr. GALLON worked to establish the blue box across the province. Mr. OVED said Mr. GALLON could often influence opponents within the government through his use of the inventive turn of phase or image.
In one particularly bitter debate, cabinet was discussing preservation of Ontario's Temagami forest region, an area containing some of Canada's last remaining stands of towering old growth red and white pines.
Mr. OVED said some politicians were questioning why environmentalists in Toronto and elsewhere in Southern Ontario were arguing to preserve a forest in the north that they might never see.
Mr. GALLON said forest preservation was part of the ideal that Canadians held of the society they would like to be part of.
"Gary's comment was 'People here may never see those forests, but they value green spaces in their minds,' Mr. OVED said.
Mr. OVED said the turn of phase impressed then-premier David PETERSON, who began to affectionately call Mr. GALLON and Mr. BRADLEY's other environmental activists "space cadets."
Some of the biggest run-ins that Mr. GALLON had during the 1980s were with Inco, one of Ontario's major emitter of chemicals that cause acid rain.
At one testy meeting, Mr. GALLON, dressed in a pink shirt, had exchanges with Inco's former chairman, Chuck BAIRD, who was later so annoyed at being pressed on the company's pollutants, that an Inco official called Mr. BRADLEY to complain.
"I got a call the next day asking who where those young radicals in pink polo shirts asking those impertinent questions," Mr. BRADLEY said.
Television broadcaster and Greenpeace founder Robert HUNTER said that Mr. GALLON related to him that the Inco chairman "had never run into such serious sass from mere political minions."
Of his experience in government, Mr. GALLON once said "you have less room to rail but more power to get things done."
Mr. GALLON suffered from colon cancer, which had spread to his lungs and liver.
Despite the pain of the disease and its treatments, he kept up his hobby of competitive swimming, winning in his age group in a Quebec swim meet last year, according to Mr. OVED.
Last month, the Royal Canadian Geographic Society's magazine gave Mr. GALLON its national environmental award for lifetime achievement.
Mr. GALLON was picked in 1977 to be executive director of the Nairobi-based Environment Liaison Centre International, where he met his wife-to-be, another prominent Canadian environmental activist, Janine FERRETTI.
Ms. FERRETTI was executive director of the North American Free Trade Agreement Commission for Environmental Cooperation and now holds a senior position with the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington. Mr. GALLON is survived by his two children, Kalifi and Jenika.

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HUNTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-04 published
Wilma Ruth KYLE
By Patricia HUNTER Thursday, September 4, 2003 - Page A28
Wife, mother, grandmother, volunteer, world traveller. Born November 12, 1915, in Toronto. Died March 28 in Niagara Falls, Ontario, of congestive heart failure, aged 87.
Wilma sounds like such a plain name and my mother was anything but: she was a beautiful woman who was intelligent, kind, loving, and fun-loving. She often said that she was supposed to be a boy and be named after her Uncle Bill, Wilfred Reese BINCH. However, my dad, her family and her Friends called her "Willie."
Willie and her parents, Ernie and Ella YOUNG, and her brother, Jerry, lived in the west end of Toronto. Mom attended Keele Street Public School and she made some lifelong Friends there. She and her Friends at Humberside Collegiate started a bridge club, calling themselves The Lucky Thirteen. They had great fun together and one summer they rented a cottage at Grand Bend, Ontario.
One evening six medical students crashed a dance at University College at the University of Toronto. Cam KYLE asked Willie YOUNG to dance and then he asked if he could drive her home and she said yes. When he took her home, she told him that she should write down her phone number for him because there were a lot of Youngs in the phone book. Cam didn't call for about two weeks and Willie was starting to wonder if he was ever going to phone her. When he finally did call and asked if he could come and see her, he brought along his best friend for moral support. This was the beginning of a four-year courtship and 62 years of marriage.
After completing her B.A., Mom worked for six weeks at Eaton's in the accounting department. She made $13 a week and before she left to get married, she was offered a promotion and a raise to $18 a week.
Dad completed his junior internship at St. Michael's Hospital and joined the newly formed medical corps in the Royal Canadian Air Force. This was July, 1940. Dad couldn't get leave to come to Toronto to get married, so my parents were married in Winnipeg on Valentine's Day, 1941.
After being raised a city girl in Toronto, Mom's life changed dramatically, living in the wild west called Manitoba. She learned how to cook on a wood stove and shoot prairie chickens with a shotgun. Mom would drive the car and dad would stand on the running board and shoot. When they reversed roles, my mother broke her collarbone as the gun discharged.
The next several years tested my mother's inner strength. Dad was posted overseas for three years when my brother, Bill, was an infant. This meant that Mom was a single mother like many women during the war. As well, her father died of heart disease at the early age of 52. After the war, Dad completed his surgical training and my brothers, Bob and Peter, and I arrived on the scene.
Jumping ahead to life in Niagara Falls, Mom worked hard on the home front while dad established his medical practice. Mom enjoyed gardening and grew beautiful flowers, especially roses and African violets. Other activities included reading, curling, theatre, and volunteer work. But mostly, she looked after dad and us and this was a full-time job, especially when we were young. I didn't realize until I was much older that everyone's mother didn't stay up late at night sewing ballet and skating costumes after putting in a full day.
Travel was a big part of my parents' life together. Not only did it enrich their lives, teaching them about other cultures around the world, but my mother often had some funny stories to tell. She certainly was able to laugh at herself.
At her funeral, granddaughter Shannon described Willie as being loving, adventurous, intelligent, and a bit of a worrywart. After years of training from my mother, we all say to our own children, "Call when you get there."
Patricia is Wilma's daughter.

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HUNTINGTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-22 published
DE CASTRO, Mhairi Angela McLeod (née FENTON- McEUEN)
November 30, 1918 - March 19, 2003 Mhairi lived in Ste-Agathe, Quebec with her parents until she was five, when her mother died. Her uncle and aunt in Scotland, Dr. and Mrs. Stuart McEUEN, took her back with them to St. Andrews, Fife. On the death of her grandfather Dr. HUNTINGTON in St. Andrews, the McEuens returned to Quebec, Montreal, and Lac Ouimet in the Mont Tremlant area. Mhairi was educated in Montreal and Ottawa, where she was a pupil at Elmwood School for a while before finishing her education at a private school in Scotland. She left the United Kingdom at the outbreak of World War 2, but not before having an adventure in France driving ambulances. In 1937 Mhairi accompanied the McEUENs to the Canadian Arctic. Her uncle was conducting research into the health of the Native people in that area. During World War 2 Mhairi spent much of her time helping her aunt, Dolly McEUEN, run the Ajax Club for British sailors in Halifax. Many comforts, and brief holiday respites were made available to the sailors in private homes. As well, the club provided a place to go when they had leave from their duties on board ship. After the war the success of this venture produced enough funds to create fifteen scholarships for young men from the United Kingdom These young men were unable to attend university because of their service in the navy during the war. Now, the McEuen Scholarship would provide them with an opportunity to continue their education at McGill University. The McEUENs knew all these scholars well, meeting them at the dock when they first set foot in Canada. For many of them the McEUEN House became a home away from home. After the war Mhairi lived at 'Ottir', the house the McEUENs built on the side of a mountain overlooking Lac Ouimet, Quebec, until the late sixties when she and her aunt moved to Ottawa. Mhairi married her beloved Henry DE CASTRO in 1976, he died in 1989. Mhairi and her aunt created another scholarship for a Canadian to attend St. Andrews University in Fife, Scotland, and this will continue indefinitely. She cared a lot about these students and loved to hear from them, their progress and successes while at university and afterwards. Mhairi also maintained her interest in the Fraser Highlanders of which she was a member. Mhairi will be remembered for her generosity in providing donations of Canadian artifacts to Government House and to the Museum of Civilization in Ottawa, as well as to the Louisburg Fortress and Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in Nova Scotia. Over the last years after Alzheimer Disease took away the life she loved, Mhairi has been cared for by Luci PEREIRA, her employee, friend, and loving caregiver, since the seventies. Luci headed the team charged with attending Mhairi, and deserves our thanks and praise for her devotion. Also appreciated is the compassion and nurturing of the nurses, staff, and doctors in the Villa Marguerite. The Funeral Service will be held at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, 125 Mackay Street, Ottawa, Ontario on Tuesday, March 25, 2003, at 11 a.m. Arrangements in care of the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair & McGarry, Ottawa. In lieu of flowers we request that you may think of making a donation to the Villa Marguerite or the McEuen Scholarship Foundation.

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