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"HUM" 2003 Obituary


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HUMBER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-07 published
Scott NOBLE
By Bill HUMBER Thursday, August 7, 2003 - Page A18
Publisher, old-time pugilism fan, jazz pianist, father. Born March 9, 1954, in Toronto. Died April 5 in Toronto, of cancer, aged 49.
During a visit to the rare books section of the Metro Reference Library about 10 years ago, Scott NOBLE discovered an original volume one of Pierce Egan's Boxiana. Scott dedicated the last several years of his life to publishing this long out-of-print series of boxing compilations written by Egan during the first several decades of the 19th century.
EGAN had popularized the sport of pugilism, or prize-fighting, writing in a highly vernacular fashion meant to be read aloud in coffee houses and taverns. Many have credited his vibrant and lively style not only with influencing the young Charles Dickens but also with helping invent the genre of sports writing.
Scott was enamoured with this world. He often noted that in the age before the telegraph, word of Tom Cribb's victory over his rival Molineaux travelled faster to the City of London than news of the Battle of Waterloo. Not surprising, given that there was more money riding on the former.
As a teenager, Scott had rebelled against the strictures of a schooling system out-of-step with the 1960s. He was a bright star of Etobicoke's alternative high-schools, travelled to India as a 19-year-old, learned to speak Hindi, spent a year in Humber College's music program, and was a largely self-taught jazz pianist. In the late 1970s, when he couldn't find his favourite music, he opened his own used-record store across from Sam the Record Man (where he had once worked). British Airways stewards with the latest English extended plays were his preferred customers.
He worked for Carswell's, the legal publisher, and eventually left them to produce Noble's International Guide to the Law Reports in 1995. His publishing-house imprint, Nicol Island Publishing, took its name from his mother's cottage on the family's beloved Nicol Island, a three-hour drive northeast of Toronto. A great uncle had originally bought the 26-acre property. The island was a favourite retreat for Scott and eventually his two young daughters, Anna and Roslyn.
Having decided to reprint Egan's full oeuvre, Scott quickly discovered that the library copy was brittle and words had bleached through onto other pages. Photocopying was impossible and so, daily, he lugged his 29-pound Toshiba portable to the library to begin the task of transcribing every word. Librarians warmed to this daunting (if unusual) project and provided a storage space. Working doggedly. he completed and published three volumes, discovering in the process that the University of Western Ontario not only had a full set but also kept it on their open stacks. Scott alerted that library to the need for a more secure location.
He proofread every edition four times and was working on volume four when in December, 2002, he was diagnosed with the cancer that would claim his life. A friend in Ottawa said his only concern was his girls. "He seemed truly surprised when I explained that other people would miss him, too."
Scott was a renaissance rebel and will be remembered for his contribution to legal publishing and his quirky desire to return Pierce Egan to circulation.
In a final note to boxing publisher Don Cogswell, he said simply: "Thanks for everything, went out reading Ring Magazine! P.S. Molineaux was robbed."
Bill HUMBER is a friend of Scott NOBLE.

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HUME o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-29 published
WRIGHT, W. J. Chaplin ''Bud''
Died of heart failure in Naples, Florida on March 25th, 2003, in his 81st year. He was the son of Alma CHAPLIN and Edward E. H. WRIGHT of St. Catharines. He was born and raised in St. Catharines, with summers spent at their cottage in Niagara-on-the-Lake. He attended Ridley College and graduated in Chemical Engineering from U. of T. Bud served with the submarine chasers, the corvette arm of the navy in World War 2.
As a chemical engineer, he worked for Stelco, Dupont and Galtex. Then he worked for over 25 years with Merrill Lynch as a financial advisor, a career that became his real love.
He was dearly loved and will be greatly missed by his wife of 53 years, Jane MURRAY, their four children: son Ken and wife Jill; three daughters, Marsha and Don SADOWAY, Ellen and Paul EDWARDS, and Leah Ann; by his sister Briar SMITH, wife of the late Larry SMITH, as well as three young grandchildren, Sam, Nathan and Caaryn. Bud is predeceased by his sister, Mary Elizabeth HUME.
Next to his family was his love for a good competitive game of squash, tennis and bridge. Many happy family holidays were spent at the cottage in Southampton, and that is where his final resting place will be.
Bud led his family by example with uncompromising integrity, loyalty, humour, a zest for life, and love.
Cremation took place in Naples. A Memorial Service will be announced at a later date, to be held at Saint Mark's Church, Niagara-on-the-lake. Donations to Historic Saint Mark's Anglican Church (est. 1792) Niagara-on-the-Lake or Arthritis Society.

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HUME o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-29 published
HUMENIUK, Mary
Died suddenly, at her home in Penetang, on Friday, July 25, 2003. Beloved wife of the late Peter (Prokip) HUMENIUK. Loving mother of Lucille HUME, Myron and his wife Abha. Dear grandmother of Michael. Resting at Cardinal Funeral Home, 366 Bathurst St. (near Dundas), on Tuesday and Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service on Thursday at 10 a.m. Interment at York Cemetery. Panachida on Wednesday 7: 30 p.m.

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HUME o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-13 published
Jim NOBLE: 1924 - 2003
Toronto beat cop who went on to become a deputy chief was 'one of the most highly respected operatives in the history of Canadian justice'
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - Page R5
He was a gentleman cop who rose through the ranks of the Toronto police force to become deputy chief. Jim NOBLE, who devoted 37 years to Canadian law enforcement, has died at the age of 78.
Mr. NOBLE's career was marked by an almost continuous advancement through the ranks. As a divisional detective, he worked on a gamut of crimes that included "housebreaking, frauds, sex offenses, robberies -- a little bit of everything," he once explained.
Later promoted to the homicide squad, he investigated more than 100 murders. He was known for his painstaking legwork, his meticulous attention to detail and his uncanny ability to weave an assortment of disparate clues into what he once called "a nice rope of circumstantial evidence."
He eventually headed the homicide squad, where up-and-coming detectives like Julian FANTINO, the current police chief, worked under his command.
"He was one of the most highly respected homicide investigators that the Toronto Police Service ever had," Mr. FANTINO said. "I always found him to be of impeccable integrity and a man of very strong character and loyalty to the profession."
"He was one of the guys that knew all the answers,"said Walter TYRRELL, a retired deputy chief who also once worked in homicide under Mr. NOBLE's command. "If you needed advice, Jim was the guy you would go to."
Mr. NOBLE was promoted to inspector in 1973, staff superintendant in 1974 and deputy chief in 1977. He retired in 1984 with 61 letters of commendation in his file.
Besides homicide investigation, he was an expert on deportation and extradition and lectured on those subjects at police colleges.
An outspoken critic of what he saw as an overly-liberal legal system that put the rights of criminals above those of law-abiding citizens, he once penned an article titled "The Pampered Criminal." Convinced that the immigration department was equally soft on criminals, he helped spurred the government into tightening up the process by which criminals are deported.
"He was really upset with the system," said his former partner, Jack FOSTER, a retired staff sergeant from the detective branch. "He felt they were too soft on immigrants. We'd go to all the trouble of a deportation hearing, they'd escort a guy over to the United States, and within an hour he'd be back on our side again."
Born in Whiteabbey, near Belfast, Northern Ireland, in 1924, James Melvyn NOBLE came to Canada with his family at the age of four and grew up in a working-class neighbourhood on Toronto's Shaw Street. After grade 12 he entered the Royal Canadian Air Force and earned his pilot's wings, but, to his immense disappointment, he never served overseas. Leaving the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1946, he began looking for "something with a little bit of action, a little bit of excitement." When his father, a carpenter, suggested that he apply for a position with the police department, the 22-year-old laughed -- hard -- but agreed to talk to a friend of his father's who was a police inspector. After two lengthy discussions, Mr. NOBLE was ready to "give it a try."
For six months he pounded a beat in a police uniform. Then, paired with a partner in a patrol car, he worked a graveyard shift and became familiar with the "usual cases -- fights on the streets, drunks, domestics, robberies." Often, after an overnight shift, he would be obliged to make an appearance in court the next day.
Promoted to detective in 1957 and to the homicide squad in 1961, he once explained that he'd watch for certain telltale signs in an accused upon introducing himself as a police detective: "a darting of the eyes, the mouth becomes dry and there's a wetting of the lips, a throbbing of the artery in the neck. The person gets pale, he's trembling."
He was often amazed at how readily criminals, once apprehended, will confess their misdeeds. "There's almost a compulsion of people to confess, especially in murder cases," he once said. "It makes them feel that they have salved their conscience to some degree by telling about it."
In one of many infamous cases that he handled, NOBLE solved the murder of an 89-year-old female doctor, Rowena HUME, who was viciously beaten to death by a derelict who had stayed at a Salvation Army shelter and whom she had hired to do a few odd jobs. Two days after the murder, having followed a series of clues, Mr. NOBLE nabbed the suspect on a downtown street; the man blurted out a confession almost instantly. Mr. NOBLE was also part of the gruesome homicide investigation involving the notorious Evelyn DICK of Hamilton, Ontario
Mr. FOSTER, who was paired with Mr. NOBLE for about eight years, recalled that though he took his job very seriously, he also "had a good sense of humour -- he enjoyed a good laugh."
On one occasion, after a painstaking, six-month investigation into a complex case of insurance fraud, the duo were finally ready to collar the perpetrator, a well-known socialite named Irene.
"I remember Jim and me driving up Yonge Street to make the final arrest, and he was singing, 'Irene, Goodnight, Irene,' " Mr. FOSTER recalled. Irene, needless to say, was convicted.
For all of Mr. NOBLE's acumen as an investigator, however, not all of his professional faculties were in operation the day he and Mr. FOSTER visited a Yonge Street ladies' wear shop to check into a routine fraud. Getting back into the patrol car, Mr. NOBLE commented on how attractive he had found the store manager and that he wished he could get to know her better.
"But she's probably married," he lamented.
"Jim, what kind of detective are you?" Mr. FOSTER said. "Didn't you notice that she's got no wedding ring on her finger?"
"No, I didn't. I guess I was too busy taking notes."
Mr. FOSTER insisted that Mr. NOBLE, then 35 and single, make the requisite follow-up call on his own. He did, and he and the store manager, Barbara, were married in 1961.
Although he could play rough when the situation demanded, Mr. NOBLE was known as an impeccable gentleman and a guardian of old-fashioned standards and family values.
He once upbraided some bikers for using profanity in the presence of their girlfriends; the biker girls explained they weren't typical ladies but seemed touched by his courtesy all the same.
According to his daughter, Elaine NOBLE Tames, Jim NOBLE rarely spoke about his professional life at home.
"Being in a house with two ladies, the typical gentleman side of him would say, 'That's not the sort of thing to discuss with your wife and daughter,' " she said.
Mr. NOBLE was the subject of a cover story in Toronto Life magazine in 1972 that used him as a prism through which to view the entire police force. The article described him as "gentle, thoughtful and courteous," and noted that, except in target practice, he had never fired the snubnosed Smith and Wesson.38 revolver that he wore on his right hip.
American authors Bruce Henderson and Sam Summerlin devoted a chapter to him in their 1976 book The Super Sleuths, and described him as "one of the most highly respected operatives in the history of Canadian justice."
"He was the embodiment of professionalism in everything he did, and that was the standard to which he held other people," Mr. FANTINO said.
Jim NOBLE died in Toronto on July 15, leaving his wife Barbara, daughter Elaine and sister Pat WILKINSON, all of Toronto.

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HUMENIUK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-29 published
HUMENIUK, Mary
Died suddenly, at her home in Penetang, on Friday, July 25, 2003. Beloved wife of the late Peter (Prokip) HUMENIUK. Loving mother of Lucille HUME, Myron and his wife Abha. Dear grandmother of Michael. Resting at Cardinal Funeral Home, 366 Bathurst St. (near Dundas), on Tuesday and Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service on Thursday at 10 a.m. Interment at York Cemetery. Panachida on Wednesday 7: 30 p.m.

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HUMMEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-30 published
Making the world a better place
Toronto textbook publisher was a tireless community activist, environmentalist and philanthropist
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, October 30, 2003 - Page R9
From the moment he arose in the morning until it was time to lie down at night, Gage LOVE's goal as a textbook publisher, community activist and philanthropist was to make the world a better place.
"He felt his job on this planet was to make bloody well sure that the Earth was better when he left than when he found it," says son David LOVE of King City, north of Toronto.
To that end, Mr. LOVE gave a piece of himself to so many causes that he was often chided by his wife and accountant for trying to do too much.
"He was a $100 donor to between 100 and 200 charities every year. It used to drive mom crazy," says David LOVE. " His accountant used to say, 'You're giving away too much.' To which dad would reply, 'It's no big deal.' Mr. LOVE, a successful businessman and a relentless and passionate philanthropist, with a broad scope of interests including health care, education and the environment, died at his home in King City on September 5. He was 85.
Born in Toronto on September 17, 1917, Mr. LOVE graduated from the University of Toronto in 1939 with a bachelor's degree in history. While a student he worked at W.J. Gage Publishing, a Toronto company operated since 1880 by his maternal grandfather, Sir William GAGE, and later run by his father Harry LOVE. The company published a variety of textbooks for schools and was also involved in the envelope and stationary business.
"He started out as a stock boy and did most jobs, all part of a plan put in place by his dad to teach his son the ropes," Mr. LOVE says.
In 1941, he married Clara Elizabeth (Betty) FLAVELLE, whom he'd first met when he was four years old and had begun dating in his teens. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy in 1942 and served on Canada's West Coast, ending the war as an officer on a mine sweeper.
After the Second World War he became president of W.J. Gage. When he took over the company, it was a small shop on Spadina Avenue in Toronto; during his presidency, the company in the late 1950s moved to larger and more modern quarters in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough. By the time Mr. LOVE had left, it had become one of Canada's foremost educational book publishers.
With Mr. LOVE at the helm, W.J. Gage, in the mid-1940s, acquired the rights to Dick and Jane, a popular American educational book designed to make reading fun for children, and began publishing it in Canada. But his greatest legacy by far, and one of his proudest achievements, says David LOVE, was A Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical Principles, which W.J. Gage published as its centennial project in 1967.
It was the first dictionary to publish distinct Canadian words such as "inspectioneer," a whaling word, "suicide squad," from the Canadian Football League, "cradle-hole," a cradle-shaped hole left in the ground when a large tree is overturned by a gale and "keg angel," a whisky trader.
"The introduction to the book made the case that Canadians have quite a vibrant language," said David LOVE, whose first summer job was proofreading the dictionary. "The book contained words from coast to coast that no one else knew about." Faced with stiff American competition, Mr. LOVE in 1971 made the controversial decision to sell 80 per cent of the publishing company's shares, a move that made him unhappy, says his son.
"He was offered government money, but a handout was out of the question because as an old-school businessman, he did not believe the taxpayers of Canada should be made to pay for his company. He felt it should rise or fall on it own merits as a successful business." Six years later, a Canadian company bought it back, much to Mr. LOVE's delight.
After leaving publishing, Mr. LOVE turned his attention to philanthropy, a path also taken by his grandfather, Sir William GAGE, who had endowed many hospitals and charities, and for this work was given a knighthood in 1918.
"Dad used the fruits of what he earned at the publishing company to give back to the community," says David LOVE. "He wanted to make Toronto a better place to live for everybody." Over the years, he served as chair of the Gage Research Institute, which researches tuberculosis, the Ina Grafton Gage Home, an old-age home, and West Park Healthcare Centre, all in Toronto, and was president of the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Toronto. In 1981, he co-founded the Toronto Metropolitan Community Foundation, now the Toronto Community Foundation, which connects potential philanthropists with community needs.
Among his largest donations was $250,000 in June, 2001, to the West Park Healthcare Centre, which was founded by Sir William GAGE in 1904. He was also a regular donor to Pollution Probe and the World Wildlife Fund.
"Seven months after founding Pollution Probe in 1969, we needed advice and help, so we went looking for it from people in the establishment," says Monte HUMMEL, one of the founders of Pollution Probe and now president of World Wildlife Fund. "Gage was one of those. He said, 'You [Pollution Probe] have got something to say and some of us in the business community need a kick in the pants.' He supported us with money, he sat on our board and he appealed to his peers to support Pollution Probe. In those days, that was a really courageous thing for him to do."
Mr. LOVE's sons are carrying on their father's philanthropy and his work in community and environmental affairs. David LOVE has been involved in the not-for-profit sector for 30 years, including 24 years with World Wildlife Fund; Geoff LOVE is a waste-recycling expert who played a significant role in developing Ontario's blue-box recycling program and Peter LOVE is a green-energy expert. A fourth son, Gage, is a teacher.
In addition to his wife and sons, Mr. LOVE leaves grandchildren Austin, Bryce, Melanie, Jennifer, Adrian, Charmian, Colin, Gage, Gaelan, Allie, Kate, Jesse, and great-grandchildren Ava, Makayla and Olivia.

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HUMPERDINCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
Gordon Kenneth FLEMING/FLEMMING
By Jack FORTIN Thursday, February 13, 2003, Page A30
Musician, husband, father. Born August 3, 1931, in Winnipeg. Died August 31, 2002, in Scarborough, Ontario, following a stroke, aged 71.
Gordie FLEMING/FLEMMING was a remarkable music talent, known internationally as a master of the accordion, especially in the jazz idiom. He was a life member of Local 149 of the Toronto Musicians' Association.
In show-business vernacular, Gordie was "born in a trunk." He began playing accordion when his older brother gave him lessons. His musical ability was such that he began performing publicly at the age of five. His schoolteachers often saw him being whisked away in a taxi to perform at theatres and radio stations in Winnipeg. By the age of 10, he was a working member of various bands in that city.
In 1949, Gordie lost his accordion in a fire at a Winnipeg hotel. With the insurance money, he headed for the bright lights of Montreal where he soon became an important part of that city's musical life. His accordion ability was complemented by the fact that he was also a gifted arranger and composer.
He had a marvellous ability to improvise and could string out complex bebop lines, leaving his listeners in awe. He often slipped a jazz phrase into ballads or commercial tunes, confirming that jazz was indeed his first love.
One of Montreal's busiest musicians, he wrote for local orchestras, shows, radio and television. He had perfect pitch and often wrote without reference to a keyboard. He was at home in every type of music from classics to jazz. For several years, he worked at the National Film Board as a composer and musician.
In Montreal, Gordie performed with many show business headliners: there was a wealth of home-grown talent in Montreal, such as Oscar PETERSON and Maynard FERGUSON, as well as other jazz musicians who were beginning to be noticed.
Gordie had said that when when he first heard bebop it was like entering another world. As his career indicates, he had no trouble in that world. He worked with many personalities including: Charlie PARKER, Mel TORMÉ, Hank SNOW, Lena HORNE, Englebert HUMPERDINCK, Dennis DAY, Gordon MacRAE, Cab CALLOWAY, Nat King COLE, Cat STEVENS, Rich LITTLE, Billy ECKSTEIN, Pee Wee HUNT, Arthur GODFREY and Buddy DEFRANCO.
He also performed with Tommy AMBROSE, Allan MILLS, Wally KOSTER, Tommy HUNTER, Bert NIOSI, Wayne and Shuster, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation jazz shows with Al BACULIS, and many other Canadian jazz musicians.
On Montreal's French music scene, Gordie performed on radio and television with Emile GENEST, Ti-Jean CARIGNAN, André GAGNON and Ginette RENO. He was a featured soloist with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on several occasions.
Internationally, Gordie toured France in 1952 and performed with Edith PIAF and Tino ROSSI. He had the honour to perform for former prime minister Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU at a Commonwealth Conference.
He participated with other top Canadian musicians in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation tour to entertain Canadian and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Europe in 1952 and 1968.
For me, a memorable experience was playing in a group with Gordie for several winters in Florida. A popular member of the Panama City Beach family of musicians, Gordie looked forward to his winter trek south. Many of the American musicians will miss him, as will the many snowbirds who looked forward to hearing him each year.
His extensive repertoire allowed Gordie to author a book called Music of the World, in which he wrote the music to 280 songs from more than 30 countries.
Gordie leaves his wife of 47 years, Joanne, and seven children.
Jack FORTIN is Gordie's friend.

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HUMPHREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-21 published
CHRISTIE, Mary Louise (née HUMPHREY)
Died peacefully of natural causes on February 19, 2003, at the age of 84. She was predeceased by her husband John Donald CHRISTIE (1967,) and her mother Stella HUMPHREY (CHARTERS) (1977.) She was born in Toronto but after her marriage to Jack, considered herself to be a Westerner. She will be greatly missed by a small Corp of dear Friends in Winnipeg and her cousins in Ontario. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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HUMPHREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
HUMPHREY, Molly, (May Anne) née MOLLOY
Peacefully March 6, 2003, in her 89th year. Predeceased in 1996 by Cecil, her husband and best friend of 57 years. Beloved mother of Valerie, Susan, Jennifer and Patricia; cherished Nana of 8 grandchildren, Craig (Susie), Karin, Christopher (Julie), Alexis, David, Leigh, Ian and Robyn; and two great-granddaughters, Cameron and Aidan. While Molly lived in Canada for many years she was always proud to be first a Londoner. If desired donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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HUMPHREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-24 published
Thomas Alexander HUMPHREY
By Bruce T. HUMPHREY Tuesday, June 24, 2003 - Page A20
Husband, father, grandfather, community leader, funeral director. Born December 6, 1918 in Toronto. Died October 22, 2002 in Barrie, Ontario, of cancer, aged 83.
Tom HUMPHREY was born the only child of Albert (Bert) and Florence HUMPHREY. When his father died at the age of 44, Tom's mother took control of the family firm with the assistance of a manager until Tom was old enough, in 1939, to obtain his funeral director's licence.
He and his mother operated both the funeral home and the ambulance service they provided to the public. As the third generation HUMPHREY to guide the family business, Tom took great care in making sure that the firm continued to upgrade its services and facilities within an ever-changing society.
Active in the community, Tom helped create the Metropolitan and Provincial Ambulance Groups.
He was also a member of the Toronto Board of Trade; the Masonic Order, and Bedford Lodge No. 638 G.R.C. for more than 50 years.
Tom also belonged (and held office) in the Rameses Shriners as well, he was a member for 50 years (in addition to having served as a past director) of the Royal Order of Jesters Court 83 and a member of the Toronto-Leaside Rotary Club for more than 45 years.
He was one of the founders of the Funeral Society of Ontario (Fraternal), known today as Guaranteed Funeral Deposits of Canada. He also served as a director on various boards for several companies and participated in several professional associations during his life.
Tom was a member of Toronto's Leaside United Church since 1956, having served many years as an elder.
Boating was a also great interest -- almost a passion -- to my father; this led to his becoming the first Commodore of the Big Bay Point Yacht Club.
Thomas HUMPHREY moved to Thornhill, Ontario, shortly after his marriage to Lois Belle LEONARD, the love of his life since their meeting 70 years ago. Eventually, he and his family moved to homes in Big Bay Point and the Barrie area in Ontario, providing him with great personal satisfaction and an ever-increasing and enlarging circle of Friends.
"His other love in life has been to travel with my mom to wonderful and exotic locales around the world, with his home time divided between Ontario and Florida," says his daughter Valerie DICKSON/DIXON.
Thomas's wife Lois says: "His personal and corporate success will be long remembered and revered by family, Friends and business associates. "
Most of all, Tom loved his family members, who meant so much to him. He will always be missed and loved by his children, grandchildren and all those who were close to him.
Tom is survived by his wife Lois, daughter Valerie and her husband Rod DICKSON/DIXON; son Bruce and his wife Christina K. HUMPHREY.
Tom was predeceased by daughter Denise WATSON and is father-in-law to John WATSON.
Tom is lovingly remembered by his grandchildren Andrew WATSON Sean and Jeffrey DICKSON/DIXON; and Adam, Jacquelyn and Courtney HUMPHREY.
Bruce HUMPHREY is Thomas HUMPHREY's son and president of Humphrey Funeral Home, A.W. Miles Chapel.

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HUMPHREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-31 published
Slain man was central to case that altered confession rule
By Christie BLATCHFORD, Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - Page A7
The late Kirk Alexander SWEENEY, who was buried just this week, may be best remembered by the general public as one of a number of young black men gunned down over the Christmas holidays.
Toronto homicide detectives may think instead of how crude street justice got Mr. SWEENEY in the end: He was, they say, essentially executed at the G-Spot nightclub in the early-morning hours of December 22.
The handsome 26-year-old allegedly had been a witness, four years ago, to a double murder that took place at another crowded club.
But Mr. SWEENEY, like dozens and dozens of others who were within an arm's length of the victims, refused to tell police what he knew of the shooting of Godfrey (Junior) DUNBAR and Richard BROWN.
The result of their collective silence has been that those two slayings remain unsolved, the killer or killers still at large.
And now, of course, the same hear-, see-, and speak-no-evil rule appears to be applying to the investigation of Mr. SWEENEY's slaying. Detectives find few people who were within eyeshot, among the crowd of 150, willing to co-operate.
But Mr. SWEENEY made a rather more lasting contribution to Canadian criminal law -- aside, that is, from compiling a not unimpressive record of his own on various weapons-related offences.
In the fall of 2000, he was the person at the centre of an important legal case, the outcome of which made it far more difficult for police to get suspects to talk and virtually impossible for prosecutors to take any resulting confessions to court if even a hint of a whiff of a threat had been used to obtain them.
The background goes like this.
On December 31, 1996, a taxi driver -- a hard-working new immigrant picked up two men and drove them to a townhouse complex in Toronto.
One man, allegedly Mr. SWEENEY, was in the front passenger seat, the other in the rear. Once they reached their destination, the man in the front switched off the ignition, while the rear passenger purportedly put his arm around the driver's neck.
The man in the front then allegedly pointed a gun at the driver, threatened to kill him, and demanded his money.
As the driver was reaching to get it, he told police later, the man in the front pistol-whipped him about the head.
The two men fled with the money; the police were called, and within an hour, a police dog was tracking a scent from the cab to the rear entrance of the townhouse of Mr. SWEENEY's family.
As Mr. SWEENEY left the home, he was arrested, along with another suspect.
Mr. SWEENEY subsequently made two statements to police.
One officer said if Mr. SWEENEY could tell them where the gun was, they would not have to execute a search warrant on his mother's home.
Mr. SWEENEY told the detective he had thrown the weapon out a window, but police still couldn't find it.
At Mr. SWEENEY's original trial, Judge David HUMPHREY disallowed the statement on the grounds that it was the product of "an inducement" by the detective.
But Mr. SWEENEY gave another statement.
A second officer said police had prepared a search warrant for the house -- this was true -- and told Mr. SWEENEY that officers would "trash" the house, looking for the gun, if he didn't tell them where it was. Mr. SWEENEY apparently hesitated, and the officer added, "Your mom is already upset. Just be a man and make this easier for her." Mr. SWEENEY told the officer the gun was in a box in his mother's closet, and even drew a little diagram for him.
The police executed the warrant and, as sure as cats like litter, found the gun, right where Mr. SWEENEY said it was.
At trial, Judge HUMPHREY concluded -- sensibly, I'd argue, to the average Joe -- that this statement was also the result of an inducement, and thus involuntary, but found it admissible under what's called the St. Lawrence rule. That rule, taken from an old case of the same name, held that even involuntary statements are admissible if they are reliable -- if, in other words, the suspect is proved to have been telling the truth. In this way, those who make false confessions are still protected.
As Judge HUMPHREY wrote with considerable understatement of the purported inducement, "There was no aura of oppression, no torture it was almost a gentlemen's agreement, if you will."
Mr. SWEENEY was duly convicted by a judge and jury of robbery, assault while using a weapon and two other weapons offences, and sentenced to six years in prison.
Fast forward to the Ontario Court of Appeal, where Mr. SWEENEY's new lawyer, Howard BORENSTEIN, successfully argued that his client's Charter right to remain silent had been violated by the police having held over his head the "threat" of the raucous search.
In a September 25, 2000, decision, Mr. Justice Marc ROSENBERG, writing for the unanimous court, threw out the involuntary confession, thundered that "a threat to destroy the property of a family member by abusing the authority given to the police by the search warrant is not properly characterized as a technical threat" and said that if the confession were allowed, "it would be condoning the use of threats to abuse judicial process" and would "raise serious concerns for the administration of justice."
More broadly, Judge ROSENBERG said that the old St. Lawrence rule was now so undermined by the Charter that it "would only be in highly exceptional circumstances" that a trial judge would be entitled to admit a confession like Mr. SWEENEY's.
And because the poor cab driver -- remember him? -- had had only a glimpse of his attacker, and there was virtually no other evidence against Mr. SWEENEY, the Court of Appeal set aside the conviction and entered an acquittal.
Mr. SWEENEY went on to compile his lengthy criminal record, allegedly witness a double murder about which he remained mute, and die on the floor of the G-Spot. I wonder what all that does for the glory of the administration of justice.
Clarification Due to my inability to read my own notes, I wrote the other day that Adrian BAPTISTE, gunned down last Saturday in a North York parking lot and only eight days out of jail after being acquitted of second-degree murder, had been talking of straightening out his life, and thinking of going into law enforcement. In fact, as his lawyer David BAYLISS told me, Mr. BAPTISTE had dreamed of becoming a lawyer.

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HUMPHRIES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
MARCHANT, Douglas Macleod
Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, 69 years ago and died on July 20th, 2003, while holidaying at Mermaid Beach, Queensland, Australia. For 35 years a loving husband and friend of Juleen, wonderful father and father-in-law of Warwick (Toronto) and Ainslie and James AITKEN (London, England,) proud son-in-law of Jean HUMPHRIES (Brisbane, Australia.) Loved younger brother of Canon Iain MARCHANT, Colonel Kenneth MARCHANT and Anne PATERSON and their families in England and Scotland. Doug was a special and energetic man, who radiated life and inner strength. He was always there for his family and gave his enthusiastic support in all their endeavours. After 40 years living and working around the world with Bata International, Doug's passion for life, be it in work or in retirement, was an inspiration to all who knew him. He was a champion golfer, a skier, windsurfer, sailor, tennis and squash player, surfboarder, motorcycle enthusiast and Bridge player. With his love of nature, sports, music and reading there were never enough hours in each day. He will be greatly missed and forever in our hearts. A funeral service and cremation took place in Brisbane on July 25th, 2003. A Memorial Service will be held at 3: 30 p.m. on Thursday October 9th at Kingsway Lambton United Church, The Kingsway and Prince Edward Drive in Etobicoke, with a reception following. Doug's final resting place will be in the hills of Scotland. With interests in a number of organizations, Doug was also on the Board of the Bethany Hills School. If desired, donations may be made to the Douglas M. Marchant Endowment Fund, to benefit the students through an academic scholarship, at the Bethany Hills School, P.O. Box 10, Bethany, Ontario. L0A 1A0. Phone (705)-277-2866. www.bethanyhills.on.ca

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