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"HUG" 2003 Obituary


HUGHES 

HUGHES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-12 published
A trailblazer in women's hockey
As a coach, he saw people first, athletes second and so took Canadian women's hockey to the pinnacle of the sport
By Ron CSILLAG Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - Page R7
Toronto -- Think "hockey coach, " and you may be forgiven for conjuring images of a bug-eyed, borderline rage-oholic working a small wad of gum while berating his bench and screaming instructions to the ice.
That wasn't Dave McMASTER.
A fixture in Canadian women's hockey for 35 years, Mr. McMASTER was the polar opposite: A calm and calming influence who taught his players respect for their abilities and those of their opponents who saw people first and athletes second; who radiated a sheer love of the game; who hugged his players and meant it.
A trailblazer who boosted woman's hockey in this country before it was popular, or even seemly, Mr. McMASTER guided the Canadian women's team to a gold medal at the first women's world hockey championship in 1990 in Ottawa. Over one-million television viewers watched as Canada beat the U.S. 5-2 in the final. He also coached Team Canada at the first unofficial women's world tournament in 1987.
Through 22 seasons coaching the University of Toronto's Varsity (Lady) Blues, Mr. McMASTER won 12 Ontario university titles and compiled a record of 212-38-22.
"Everywhere there was hockey, Dave was there, said Fran RIDER, executive director of the Ontario Women's Hockey Association. "He was the lifeblood of women's hockey, very dedicated, not only to the game but to life skills. He cared about every player on every team. His enthusiasm and love of the game was catching."
At the time of his unexpected death of a heart attack this month in Toronto at the age of 62, he was still coaching three girls' teams, despite being officially retired as a schoolteacher and coach. One of them, the squad at Bishop Strachan School, had to leave for a tournament in Newfoundland just days after Mr. McMASTER died. Their coach's influence obviously sunk in: Despite being distraught at the news of his death, which sent shock waves through the world of women's hockey, the team won all seven of its games. That was after Bishop Strachan captured the Foster Hewitt Memorial Cup for the fifth consecutive year at the Air Canada Centre just three weeks before Mr. McMASTER's death.
"He gave players a sense of responsibility for their actions. He taught us to respect ourselves and others, but most important, he let us have fun, recalled Team Canada head coach Karen HUGHES, who also took over from Mr. McMASTER as coach at U of T, where she had played for him. "With Dave, it wasn't about winning and losing, but a love of the game and sharing and Friends. He encouraged players to go beyond their limits."
Some 800 Friends, loved ones and jersey-clad players crowded Grace Church-on-the-Hill in Toronto on Valentine's Day to celebrate a life that touched so many others.
David Carson McMASTER was born in Toronto to a homemaker and a lawyer who wanted a legal career for his son. At St. Andrew's College, the young Mr. McMASTER played football, cricket and hockey, and later, at Dalhousie University, "he was a born goaltender, remembered his lifelong best friend, Douglas ROWAN. " Mix, as he came to be called (as in Mixmaster), was not known as a particularly graceful player, as his many stitches and at least seven broken noses attested. He was an early proponent of face masks for goalies and after donning one, he ducked out of the way of a puck, only to be hit in the head. More stitches followed.
It was at Dalhousie that he coached his first women's team, in 1965. "He acquired a girlfriend he could yell at on the ice, Mr. ROWAN quipped. "It didn't last." But the coaching bug did.
Armed with a history degree, Mr. McMASTER returned to Toronto to study law. That lasted less than a year, and he graduated from the University of Toronto's teachers' college instead. He joined the small staff of Toronto's Royal St. George's College in 1969 and spent nearly 30 years teaching geography, history and guidance.
Mr. McMASTER began coaching the women's hockey team at University of Toronto while still a student there. In 22 seasons (1967-69 and 1975-93), he won an enviable 82 per cent of games. There, as with Team Canada, he would don his trademark track suit and black bike helmet to preside over practices, with cries of "Regroup!" "Shoot your passes!" and "Two laps." Coughing up the puck in the neutral zone was "a never."
In 1972, he married Norma McCLURE, who'd been his waitress at the Muskoka Golf and Country Club. The couple had a son, Scott, and a daughter, Anne, before divorcing in 1991. Mr. McMASTER never remarried.
He was a focused, demanding coach, but not obsessive, said his daughter. "I don't even have any idea how to skate. But Dad never pushed me. That was testament to his patience and love. He never raised his voice." At Toronto Maple Leaf games, "he was always coaching. He would cheer a good play by the other team."
He displayed his gold medal, said Anne, but not as prominently as a letter from a young girl saying Mr. McMASTER had changed her perspective on life.
He wasn't without a mischievous sense of humour. Vicki SUNOHARA, who played for Mr. McMASTER for two years, recalled how Team Canada once thrashed Japan 13-0. Ms. SUNOHARA, who is of Japanese extraction, scored several goals and was named player of the game. She recalled how Mr. McMASTER told her after the game, in mock horror, "These Japanese girls love you and look up to you. How could you do this to them?"
Mr. McMASTER went on to Bishop Strachan School in 1998 to coach hockey and teach geography and history. He was inducted into the University of Toronto's Sports Hall of Fame in 2000. He retired in 2001, but couldn't stop a simple desire to expose young people to Canada's game.
Asked whether it was the passion, cleaner play or some other mysterious quality that drew Mr. McMASTER to women's hockey as opposed to men's, his daughter smiled. "He used to say girls asked a lot more questions. I think he liked that."

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HUGHES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-24 published
MURRAY, Marjorie Eleanor (née HUGHES)
Died peacefully at Toronto on April 23, 2003. Beloved wife of R. Gordon for 61 years. Loving mother to John (Elizabeth), Scott (Janice), Janet (John DILL), Sheila (David DICKINSON) and Cameron (Marie) and proud grandmother of 12. Survived by her sister Janet (John FOREMAN) and her sister-in-law Inez HUGHES. Marjorie was a graduate of University College, U of T, a member of Gamma Phi Beta, and a longtime member of the Toronto Cricket, Skating and Curling Club and the Garden Club of Toronto. Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (two lights west of Yonge) on Saturday, April 26 from 2-4 p.m. Funeral Service on Sunday at 4 p.m. from The Church of St. Timothy, 100 Old Orchard Grove, Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

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HUGHES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
TRUSCOTT, Peggy (née SAULT)
Peggy lived her life as a beautiful, special person who brought joy, love and light to everyone she touched. Her kindness, compassion and overwhelming energy to help others was ever present from her days as a nurse at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto Western Hospital and the Victorian Order of Nurses, to her work as a nursing instructor at Centennial College and as a public health nurse for the City of Toronto. A wife, a mother, a daughter, a sister and a wonderful friend. Peggy lived courageously with ovarian cancer for the last four years, her strength, positive outlook and love of life never wavering. Peggy died peacefully at home, on May 25th, 2003, wrapped in the love of her husband and best friend Bruce and her daughters - Sarah, Rebecca and Martha and son-in-law Josh KESTER. Peggy will be dearly missed by all who knew her including her parents John and Beth SAULT, her in-laws Marg and Os TRUSCOTT, her siblings Mary McKELVEY (Max,) Cathie HUGHES (Wayne,) John SAULT (Linda,) Barb SAULT (Liz THOMAS,) Patty BONTJE (Michael) as well as by her many Friends, cousins, nieces and nephews. We wish to thank Dr. J. STURGEON and Dr. D. DEPETRILLO (Princess Margaret Hospital), Dr. J. MEHARCHAND (Toronto East General Hospital), Dr. J. RIEGER (Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care,) and nurses Barb MOFFAT and Ann Marie HOGAN (St. Elizabeth Health Care) for their compassionate and supportive care. At Peggy's request, a private cremation has occurred, arranged by The Simple Alternative Funeral Centre. A service celebrating her life will be held for family and Friends at the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, 10365 Islington Ave, Kleinburg, Ontario (905-893-1121) on Monday, June 2nd, 2003 at 5: 30 p.m. The family extends a warm welcome to all who wish to join them. In lieu of flowers, we encourage donations to the National Ovarian Cancer Association, 27 Park Road, Toronto M4W 2N2 (416-962-2700). In September 2002 Peggy founded the first annual ''Walk of Hope'' to raise awareness about ovarian cancer. Please join us on September 7th, 2003 at the second annual National Ovarian Cancer Association ''Walk of Hope'' and remember Peggy. Further details will be available at: www.ovariancanada.org

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HUGHES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Mark ALLEN, late of the Town of Markham, in the Regional Municipality of York, Province of Ontario, who died on or about the 6th day of March, 2003, must be filed with the personal representative (the "Estate Trustee"), named below, on or before the 15th day of August, 2003, after which date the estate wil be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustee then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 30th day of June, 2003.
Estate Trustee: Patricia Joyce HUGHES
by her solicitors:
Smith and Werker
Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries
Attention: John Osgoode SMITH
4950 Yonge Street, Suite 1800
Toronto, Ontario
M2N 6K1
Telephone: 416-224-0200
Fax: 416-224-0758
Page B11

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HUGHES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-21 published
HUGHES, William Henry
Bill died of lymphoma on August 19th, 2003 at his home in New Denver, British Columbia. He was a faculty member in the Philosophy Department at the University of Guelph from its inception in 1965 until his retirement in 1997. Bill was above all an educator. At the family dinner table, in the University classroom, in his writings, and in his service to youth music and community arts organizations he took great pleasure in helping young people to think with clarity and to make informed and moral choices in their daily lives. His essential goodness, and his tolerance and respect for others shone through his relationships with his family, Friends and colleagues. He will be remembered with love by his wife Daphne, daughters Miranda and Anna, sons Jeremy and Jonathan, son-in-law Charles BURKHOLDER, daughters-in-law Emma and Robin, his brothers Barry and Richard, sisters-in-law Margaret HUGHES and Dawn CAVE, his nieces and nephews, and his eight beloved grandchildren (Erin, Noah, Sophie, Fiona, Oliver, Jessica, Alexander and Paige). A celebration of Bill's life will be held in Guelph Ontario at a later date. If desired, donations may be made to the Philosophy Department, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, where a memorial scholarship fund is being organized.

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HUGHES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-23 published
William Henry HUGHES
By Michael RUSE, Thursday, October 23, 2003 - Page A24
Husband, father, singer, instrument repair expert, teacher, philosopher. Born October 22, 1936, in Sarnia, Ontario Died August 19, in New Denver, British Columbia, of cancer, aged 66.
Bill HUGHES was a student at Victoria College, University of Toronto, and then did graduate work in England, receiving a master's degree from the London School of Economics, and a doctorate from University College London. On returning to Canada in 1965, Bill got a job at the brand new University of Guelph, and he was one of the founding members of its philosophy department. He taught there until he retired in 1997.
Bill and Daphne (his wife of 42 years) have four children, and the family has always been united around a deep love of music. Bill sang in various choirs, including the Guelph Chamber Choir and, most recently in his new home in New Denver, British Columbia, as a member of the Valhalla Choral Society.
He was also an enthusiastic amateur on the double bass, and for several years ran a string instrument repair shop to serve students of the Suzuki String School of Guelph. One of his proudest memories, however, was singing in a barbershop quartet, along with Gordon LIGHTFOOT, when in high school.
Bill HUGHES's philosophical interest and expertise were in social and ethical philosophy. In more recent years, he had become interested in techniques for teaching informal logic, and wrote course material, especially for distance education, turning his work eventually into a textbook. This is now going into its fourth edition. Bill served as department chair, and if there was a university committee on which Bill did not at some time sit, it has not yet been discovered.
He was one of those people known to everyone on campus, and to whom all had at one point or another turned for advice or help.
For this was the main point about Bill HUGHES. At one level, he was a rather ordinary man. At another level, he was a most extraordinary man, the rare example of someone who is truly good. His whole life was given to others -- to his family, to his students, to his colleagues, and to anyone else whom he met. Quakers speak of the "inner light," or "that of God in every person."
Although he had no religious beliefs, Bill saw worth in everyone he knew, and gave unstintingly of his time and effort to all, whether this was a student late in the afternoon who needed some guidance on a project, or a colleague who needed help with an idea or a class, or a child whose cello was not sounding quite right and perhaps needed a new string or bridge.
Bill was not perfect. He made mistakes. But, although Bill may not have believed in heaven, if such there be, he has certainly earned his place. I am sure that God has already nabbed Bill for several important committees. ("Criteria for promotion up the order of angels.") At the end of the day, Bill will be sitting in the divine faculty club, Jeremy Bentham, Doubting Thomas (the patron saint of philosophers), and one or two other slightly non-respectable folk around him, pints of Wellington County -- the nectar of the gods -- in hand.
And now for a good natter: "Tell me, is the ontological argument really valid?"
Michael RUSE was Bill's colleague for nearly 40 years.

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HUGHES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-27 published
SAULT, John Henry (1918 - 2003)
Died peacefully in Toronto on Friday, October 24, 2003 surrounded by his wife and family. Loving husband of Beth (HARRISON) for over 60 years. Great Dad to Mary (Max McKELVEY,) the late Peggy (Bruce TRUSCOTT), Cathie (Wayne HUGHES), John (Linda), Barb (Liz THOMAS,) Patty (Michael BONTJE.) Wonderful Grampa who will be missed particularly at Boshkung Lake by his grandchildren Keith, Andrew and Heather McKELVEY; Sarah, Rebecca (Josh KESTER), and Martha TRUSCOTT; Alison, Calum and Jeremy HUGHES; Harrison and Alex BONTJE. Predeceased by sister Helen (SAULT) LINDSAY whose children looked to him as a mentor and guide. Special Uncle to his many nieces and nephews. Jock, affectionately known as ''Saltie'' was a long-time salesman for the Canadian Salt Company. Along with a busy career and active family life, Jock coached hockey, golfed and drove the water-ski-boat. He was a dedicated Big Brother, Boy Scout Leader and Elder at Forest Hill United Church. Later in life he volunteered with North Toronto Meals on Wheels. He served a term as Mayor of Donarvon Park, Boshkung Lake and spent a cherished year as President of the Boshkung Lake Cottagers Association ending the summer by holding the First Annual Presidents Ball. A large man who loved life, he will be missed by his family, many relatives, Friends and co-workers. Jock was well known for his favourite saying, ''It's great to be alive''.The family extends sincere gratitude to the staff at Kingsway Retirement Home and the Trillium Health Centre (Mississauga) for their devoted and professional care. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. West at Windermere, east of the Jane subway from 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm, Monday; Memorial Service in the Chapel on Tuesday October 28, 2003 at 3: 00 pm. If desired a donation may be made to National Ovarian Cancer Association, 27 Park Road, Toronto, Ontario Canada, M4W 2N2.

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HUGHES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-31 published
The dean of Canadian sociology
The first chair of a new University of Toronto department trained a generation of scholars
By Carol COOPER, Special to the Globe and Mail Friday, October 31, 2003 - Page R13
In 1938, with a doctorate in political science and anxious to achieve his dream of becoming a professor, Samuel Delbert CLARK reluctantly took the only position available to him at the University of Toronto, as its first full-time lecturer in sociology.
In doing so, S.D. CLARK became one of the country's early anglophone sociologists. During his career, his immense intellect, painstaking scholarship and prolific writing brought credibility and respect to the fledgling discipline. At a time when Canadian universities had few sociology departments, Prof. CLARK trained a generation of sociologists who spread out across the country, establishing sociology departments in other centres. And as an administrator at U of T, Prof. CLARK brought leading sociologists to the school.
The first sociologist born, raised and trained here, Prof. S. D. CLARK has died at the age of 93.
Incorporating the staples theory of his mentor, leading Canadian political economist Harold INNIS, the work of American historian F. J. TURNER, and sociologists Carl DAWSON and E. C. HUGHES of McGill University, among others, Prof. CLARK developed his own approach.
He studied social change on Canada's economic frontiers such as the fur trade, Western wheat farming, and the lumber and mining industries. He traced the development of those communities as the residents there, far from the cultural and financial institutions that controlled their lives and contending with distance and poverty, took their communities through a period of simultaneous disorganization and reorganization. From the struggle emerged new organizations and religious sects, such as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Social Credit Party.
Reflecting his university training in history, sociology and political science, Prof. CLARK brought a multifaceted approach to his research.
"He looked at things that were happening in Canada almost uniquely and tried to understand them and not to reduce it to some simplistic international generalization," said William MICHELSON, the S. D. Clark professor of sociology at the University of Toronto. "He really wanted to look into a multiplicity of factors."
Not everyone liked Prof. CLARK's approach to sociology, but nor did Prof. CLARK favour the Chicago School approach then taught at McGill University. Although he later altered his research methods, Prof. CLARK at first viewed the American approach dimly, seeing it as one of doorbell-ringing in order to ask stupid questions, one that scientifically quantified what happened in the present without exploring the past. Instead, he pored over archival material, studying the development of Canadian society from a historical perspective.
Books by Prof. CLARK, such as The Social Development of Canada, drew fire from historians, who challenged his theory and said sociology and history were incompatible. But the publications brought attention to the new discipline.
Born to a farming family on February 24, 1910, in Lloydminster, Alberta., Samuel Delbert CLARK was the second of five children. The family of Northern Irish descent had been established in Ontario since 1840 until it moved West in 1905.
Showing an early aptitude for school and a strong interest in history, Prof. CLARK graduated from the University of Saskatchewan with an honours B.A. in history and political science and an M.A. in history. Brushing aside suggestions that he become a high-school teacher and politician, Prof. CLARK aimed instead for a university position.
He entered University of Toronto in 1931 to do a doctorate in political science and economic history. While the studies proved dry and disappointing, it was there that he first met Harold INNIS, read the works of Marx, Engels and North American left-wingers, and attended meetings of the radical League for Social Reconstruction. Disillusioned with his studies and short of funds, Prof. CLARK accepted a Saskatchewan Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire scholarship and headed for the London School of Economics in 1932. At the school, he received his first exposure to sociology, including the works of Prof. DAWSON at McGill.
After leaving London in 1933, Prof. CLARK arrived in Montreal, again strapped for cash. Hoping to collect a debt from a friend, who was then studying at McGill, Prof. CLARK stopped by his house. With the friend not home, Prof. CLARK then visited Prof. DAWSON, who offered him a research fellowship. After working on a project studying Canadian-American relations for two years and receiving an M.A. in sociology, Prof. CLARK returned to Toronto to continue his doctorate in political science.
In 1937 he accepted an appointment to teach political science and sociology at the University of Manitoba and stayed a year before returning once again to University of Toronto to complete his thesis and begin his career there.
As a proponent of a more British style of sociology, Prof. CLARK was favoured for the job over another Chicago-trained candidate, setting the academic direction for the school. Sociology was then run as a section under the department of anthropology, to be transferred a year later to the department of political economy. Except for occasional leaves, Prof. CLARK remained a fixture on campus, impeccably dressed in a woollen suit and sporting a pipe, until his retirement in 1976.
Shy and quiet, Prof. CLARK constantly cleared his throat and jingled the change in his pocket while lecturing.
"He never cracked a joke.... It was serious scholarship. You had to ask serious questions," recalled retired York University sociology professor Edward MANN, an early undergraduate student and later a doctoral student of Prof. CLARK. " Their [ INNIS and CLARK] religion was scholarship."
In that vein, Prof. CLARK never talked to the press about daily issues, saying it cheapened the discipline. And he practised rigorous scholarship.
"He had a tremendous amount of integrity," said Lorne TEPPERMAN, a University of Toronto sociology professor and former student of Prof. CLARK. " This was a guy who knew what he stood for, what he believed in. He was uncompromising. He had very high standards for himself and other people."
During the fifties, Prof. CLARK, an admirer of Lester PEARSON, exchanged his membership in the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation for that of the Liberal Party, the one endorsed by his wife, Rosemary. A graduate in economics from Columbia University, she edited all his works. By the sixties, Prof. CLARK had begun to study social change and urbanization, writing The Suburban Society and later, The New Urban Poor. Despite altering his research methods, dropping his historical research and adopting the American style of conducting questionnaires to collect data, he stopped short of tabulating them, arguing in The Suburban Society that "to lay claim to scientific precision... would be to falsify the competence of sociology."
And the man who studied social change became buffeted by it. While the sociology section had remained small during the forties and fifties, it ballooned during the sixties, becoming an independent department in 1963 with Prof. CLARK as its appointed head.
A capable administrator, Prof. CLARK brought feistiness to the job. "He was a very honest man," said Prof. TEPPERMAN. "He wasn't afraid on an argument, he wasn't afraid of a fight. If he liked you, he really liked you and if he didn't like you, he really didn't like you."
With the huge increase in sociology-department enrolment but small number of sociology graduates, Prof. CLARK looked outside the country to fill teaching positions. Most either came from the United States, or had been trained there.
While some scholars hailed Prof. CLARK for having eschewed American-style sociology and maintaining a Canadian approach, the young and sometimes radical newcomers with a markedly different approach regarded him as an oddball and an anachronism. And as an older, white, staunch Liberal Party-supporting male at the centre of an old-boy network, he represented everything they were fighting against. Accustomed to a more democratic academic culture at other schools, the new staff agitated for a greater say in the running of the department. When Prof. CLARK resisted, he was pushed out, and the chair became an elected position. He remained at the university until his retirement in 1976.
Outside of the university, throughout his career, Prof. CLARK served as an editor of The Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science, and as president of the Royal Society of Canada. In addition, he was appointed an Officer in the Order of Canada.
Despite the recognition he received, Prof. CLARK always felt that his older brother who took over the farm was the family success, according to his son, Edmund. And he enjoyed such simple pleasures as hockey. Once, while attending a dinner party at Claude BISSELL's house, then the president of U of T, Prof. CLARK asked where the television was and sat down to watch the hockey game. When questioned later, Prof. CLARK replied, "Anyone stupid enough to hold a party on a hockey night deserved to have the guests watch television in the den."
S.D. CLARK died on September 18. He leaves his wife, Rosemary, sons Edmund and Samuel, nine grandchildren and a sister, Grace. His daughter Ellen predeceased him.

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