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"HOW" 2003 Obituary


HOWARD  HOWE  HOWELL  HOWLETT 

HOWARD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-29 published
HOWARD
-In loving memory of a dear mother and grandmother, Marlene, who passed away January 24, 2001.
They say the pain will get easier
in time. Two years ago today God called
you home, the ache in our hearts
is still there, and silent tears we
shed of the greatest Mom (Grandma)
we know. What we wouldn't give
to see you smile, hear your laugh
or hold your hand again. We have
all the great memories we created
with you we will treasure those in
our hearts forever.
We miss you and love you always.
--Lovingly remembered by Wanda, Larry, Caitlyn, Tyler, Dwayne, Heidi, Natasha, Nathan and Rob.

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HOWARD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
Lilliean "Mary" TAILOR/TAYLOR
In loving memory of Lilliean "Mary" TAILOR/TAYLOR who passed away at Saint Joseph's Hospital, Sudbury on Tuesday, June 24, 2003 at the age of 76 years.
Loving friend of James ESSERY (predeceased.) Cherished mother of Kim and husband Neil ANDERSON of Blezzard Valley, Janet and husband Bruce FOX of Azilda, Marlene (predeceased) (husband Lawrence HOWARD,) Lindsey (predeceased) (wife Irene), Michael (predeceased)(close friend Sherry). Special grandmother of Tammy (husband Steve), Cory (wife Krystal), Chantelle, Wanda (husband Larry), Dwayne (wife Heidi), Rob, Shane (wife Holly), Lori (husband Neil), Sandra, Raymond, Darren, Stephanie. Will be missed by great grandchildren Mathew, Brianna, Jamie, Nathan, Carter, Caitlyn, Tyler, Nathan, Natasha, Tamara, Lindsey, Chance, Brittany, Tiffany. Dear sister of Shirley McCULLIGH (husband Dougal predeceased) of Little Current, Elva TAILOR/TAYLOR (husband Clarence predeceased) of Espanola, "Windy" William Sr. (wife Doreen) of Wikwemikong, predeceased by brothers John TAILOR/TAYLOR, and Orion (wife Doreen.) Remembered by many nieces and nephews. Visitation was held on Friday, June 27, 2003. Funeral Service was held on Saturday, June 28, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Burial in Holy Trinity Anglican Cemetery.

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HOWARD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Betty Jane VANHORN (née HOWARD)
In loving memory of Betty Jane VANHORN (née Howard,) October 28, 1935 to October 26, 2003. Suddenly at Mindemoya Hospital on Sunday, October 26, 2003 at the age of 67 years.
Dear wife of John VANHORN of Tehkummah. Loving mother of Hector (Marilyn) of Ice Lake, Jacqueline (Ted) of Cambridge, Becky (Marvin) of Manitowaning, predeceased by Barry (1981), Gilbert (1979). Special grandmother of Tammy, D.J., Tobi (Andy), B.J., Ariana, Tyler, Benjamin, Mikala and two great grandchildren Angelica and Logan John. Will be remembered by siblings, Eleanor (Len) BOND, Tina (Roy) MANDIGO, Dorothy ALLARD, Reta (Charlie) PARKINSON, Lawrence HOWARD, Marie (John) CARRADONNA, Len (Ilene) HOWARD, Tom (Florence) HOWARD. Visitation was held on Tuesday, October 28, 2003.
Funeral Service at 2: 00 pm Wednesday, October 29, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Burial in Elmview Cemetery.

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HOWARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-25 published
Agnes Elizabeth Jean HOWARD (née MITCHELL)
This most gracious lady died peacefully at her home in Stratford, February 22, 2003 in her 94th year. Agnes is predeceased by Earle, her loving and devoted husband of 51 years. Ever caring, ever supportive, she was cherished mother of David, adored grandmother of Gillian HOWARD, and treasured mother-in-law of Nicola ADAIR. She is most lovingly remembered by Andrew, son of Nicola; and Kitty HOWARD, mother to Gillian. Also by nephew Douglas GOWAN (Carol) and their sons, David (Debbie), Donald (Tana), Michael (Darla), and Paul. Agnes was born on her family's farm in 1909 at Hagersville, Ontario, daughter of Ionson and Annie MITCHELL. She completed her education with a post- secondary year at Waterford Business College before following her future husband's family to Fort Erie in 1928. Working briefly for the Bridgeburg Review, she married in 1933, residing in the home the couple built until 1989. Always passionate about her bridge, her garden, and her church, St. Andrew's Knox Presbyterian, Agnes was a proud member of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire; and ever the steadfast and unobtrusive power behind the man as she supported Earle throughout his career. Moving to St. Catharines, she continued to vigorously engage life, establishing a devoted and caring group of new Friends at age 80 in her home on Towering Heights Blvd., remaining there until 2002 when she joined her family in Stratford, reunited in her son's home, blessing all with her presence these last nine months. Agnes is best remembered for the quiet, understated grace with which she moved among her wide and committed circles of Friends, nurtured and maintained lifelong. Visitation (11: 00 a.m.) will precede funeral services at Knox Presbyterian Church, 53 Church Street, St. Catharines, Ontario, Saturday, March 1st, 12: 00 noon; interment at McAffee Cemetery. Expressions of sympathy may be directed to the Canadian Diabetic Association, St. Catharines General Hospital Foundation, Stratford General Hospital Foundation, Knox Presbyterian Church, St. Catharines, or St. Andrew's Knox Presbyterian Church, Fort Erie; donations may be facilitated by W.G. Young Funeral Home, 430 Huron St. Stratford, Ontario (519-271-7411). Stratford and area Friends are invited to remember Agnes at a reception at 90 Neal Avenue, Stratford, Ontario, Sunday, March 2nd, 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m.

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HOWARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
HOWARD, Barbara Lynn (DAWSON)
Known as Gram since the first of her 10 beloved grandchildren were born 25 years ago - died secure in the love of her family on Thursday, April 17, 2003.
Barbara will always be the much-loved wife and a fantastic ''first mate'' for William A. E. (Ted) HOWARD, her husband of 54 years. The two led shipwatching expeditions for their grandchildren from ''Terraho'', a home they built themselves on the Thousand Islands Parkway in Mallorytown Landing after sailing the high seas together in the ''Barbaelia''.
Barbara was also the wonderful and proud mother of Alexander, Peter, Stephen, Darrell, Christine and Timothy, who died in 1990 and welcomes her now. Born into the musical and artistic DAWSON family of Toronto Barbara will be missed every day by her surviving siblings, brother Donald DAWSON of Sherwood Park, Alberta., and sister Darrell (DAWSON) HOWARD of Nanaimo, British Columbia, as well as by all the members of the DAWSON and HOWARD families, and her many Friends.
Instead of flowers, Barbara's family suggests a contribution to St. Peter's Anglican Church Choir, or to a charity of special meaning to you and your family. They also ask you to bring your best singing voices to a service to celebrate her life on Saturday, April 26th at 2 p.m., to be held in St. Peter's Anglican Church in Brockville.

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HOWARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-24 published
HOWARD, Barbara Lynn (DAWSON)
Known as Gram since the first of her 10 beloved grandchildren were born 25 years ago - died secure in the love of her family on Thursday, April 17, 2003.
Barbara will always be the much-loved wife and a fantastic ''first mate'' for William A. E. (Ted) HOWARD, her husband of 54 years. The two led shipwatching expeditions for their grandchildren from ''Terraho'', a home they built themselves on the Thousand Islands Parkway in Mallorytown Landing after sailing the high seas together in the ''Barbaelia''.
Barbara was also the wonderful and proud mother of Alexander, Peter, Stephen, Darrell, Christine and Timothy, who died in 1979 and welcomes her now. Born into the musical and artistic DAWSON family of Toronto Barbara will be missed every day by her surviving siblings, brother Donald DAWSON of Sherwood Park, Alberta., and sister Darrell (DAWSON) HOWARD of Nanaimo, British Columbia, as well as by all the members of the DAWSON and HOWARD families, and her many Friends.
Instead of flowers, Barbara's family suggests a contribution to St. Peter's Anglican Church Choir, or to a charity of special meaning to you and your family. They also ask you to bring your best singing voices to a service to celebrate her life on Saturday, April 26th at 2 p.m., to be held in St. Peter's Anglican Church in Brockville.

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HOWARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-12 published
McCOOL, James Francis Patrick
Died on November 10, 2003, Peterborough, Ontario at the age of 77. Survived by his loving wife Jean; his children Sean (Victoria), Brian (Jamestown, North Carolina , Gael (Vancouver), Kerry (Peterborough), Dennis (Whitby) and Douglas (Ottawa); ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren; his sisters Sister Ann Marie McCOOL (Convent of The Good Shepherd in Toronto,) Lorraine TISCHART (Beamsville) and brother Joseph (Toronto); predeceased by his sisters Mary RUDDEN and Theresa HOWARD. Jim had a life-long interest in aviation. He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force and served as a Flight Engineer and Air Gunner on Coastal Command during World War 2. After retirement from the Edmonton Chamber of Commerce he dedicated his time as a volunteer at the Alberta Aviation Museum, where he became President and a member of the Board of Directors for some years. He was also President of the West Edmonton Senior's Association and served on the Boards of a number of community organizations. A memorial mass will be held on Saturday, November 15, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. in St. Alphonsus Catholic Church, 1066 Western Street at Clonsilla Avenue, Peterborough. Arrangements entrusted to Comstock Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 356 Rubidge Street.

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HOWARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
Fight master set standards for stage combat
Canadian Press, Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - Page R9
Stratford, Ontario -- Patrick (Paddy) CREAN, a longtime fight director at the Stratford Festival who set international standards on staging combat in theatre, died Monday after an illness. He was 93.
Mr. CREAN, who was a competitive fencer, began choreographing fights in 1932 when he was working in his native England as an actor in The Legends of Don Juan. From then on he was frequently hired to stage fight scenes in theatre and movies such as The Master of Ballantree and The Sword of Sherwood Forest. He worked with actors including Paul SCOFIELD, Laurence OLIVIER, Trevor HOWARD, Alec GUINNESS, Douglas FAIRBANKS Jr. and Errol FLYNN, often acting as FLYNN's stunt double in movies.
Mr. CREAN first came to the Stratford Festival in 1962 to be fight arranger for a staging of Macbeth and ended up by making Stratford his home. He remained as festival fight director until 1983, arranging combat scenes for such demanding productions as The Three Musketeers. He continued to work as an actor, sometimes taking small roles in shows for which he had done fight arranging and also performing a one-man show, The Sun Never Sets. A funeral will be held Saturday in Stratford.

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HOWE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
Mary Elizabeth McHARG " Bette"
In loving memory of Mary Elizabeth McHARG " Bette" who passed away peacefully at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Little Current on November 11, 2003 at the age of 80 years.
Bette was the assistant clerk for the town of Little Current, and the Justice of the Peace for many years. Born on September 12, 1923 to Thomas and Elizabeth (HOWE) TRIMBELE. Predeceased by husband Raymond. Loving mother of John. Cherished by grand_son Matthew. Will be missed by sister Peggy FISCHER (husband Homer predeceased,) brother Thomas (predeceased) and wife Jenette TRIMBELE. Remembered by cousins Thomas and wife Sandi FISCHER, Madelene CAVE, Judy MILLER and Jane FISCHER. Memorial service was held on Friday, November 14, 2003 at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Little Current. Cremation.

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HOWE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
Leafs trusted their doctor
Talented M.D. specialized in hand surgery. 'He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons.'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 3, 2003 - Page F10
Nothing about Jim MURRAY's hands indicated that he was a surgeon. Large and gnarled with undulating fingernails, those hands played bagpipes, patched up Toronto Maple Leafs and Team Canada players and restored form and function to other hands.
Dr. MURRAY, a plastic surgeon who was the first Canadian doctor to devote his practice to hand surgery, died last month at the age of 82.
"His hands looked more like those of a prize fighter than a surgeon. His fingers were bent, "said Robert McFARLANE, a retired plastic surgeon with a special interest in hands and a close friend of Dr. MURRAY. "It didn't seem to make a difference. He had tremendous skill."
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY brought together plastic and orthopedic surgeons to form a hand unit at Toronto's Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, the city's first. "His concept was to pull together the expertise of different surgeons, "said Paul BINHAMMER, once a student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at the hospital, now part of the Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
Dr. MURRAY assembled a highly skilled team. Among them were orthopedic surgeon Robert McMURTRY, who went on to become dean of medicine at the University of Western Ontario, and plastic surgeon and nerve expert Susan MacKINNON, who is now a professor in the United States.
But before rising to prominence in the field of hand surgery, Dr. MURRAY gained fame in hockey circles. Serving as one of the Toronto Maple Leafs team doctors from 1948 to 1964, he was greatly trusted by players. When cut during games on the road, they left their wounds unstitched until he could tend to them at home.
"He'd come at you with those fingers and they were just so big, you'd wonder how he was ever able to stitch as neat as he did," said former Leaf defenceman Bobby BAUN, who played professional hockey for 17 years.
Mr. BAUN estimates that Dr. MURRAY put in half of his 143 career stitches.
Under instructions from Leaf owner Conn SMYTHE, injured players were not to be rushed back into the lineup, according to Hugh SMYTHE, another Leaf doctor and Mr. SMYTHE's son. "This was a heavy and not always popular role, "he said.
During the 1964 Stanley Cup finals, it became especially challenging.
Entering Game 6, the Detroit Red Wings led the series against the Leafs 3-2. Playing in Detroit on April 23, with the scored tied at 3-3 in the third period, Mr. BAUN first was hit on his right leg by a slapshot from Gordie HOWE and then, after a faceoff, spun on the leg, which gave way.
X-rays delayed at Mr. BAUN's insistence showed a small broken bone, just above the ankle. He spent six weeks in a cast.
But that came after the series ended. During its sixth game, Mr. BAUN was tended to by Dr. MURRAY and other team doctors. After being carried off the ice, he asked Dr. MURRAY if he could hurt his leg any more. The doctor replied no. "Having someone like Jim tell me that, I could believe him, "Mr. BAUN said.
With his leg taped and frozen, Mr. BAUN continued playing. Within the first two minutes of the first overtime period, he scored the winning goal and kept the Leafs in the series.
Mr. BAUN didn't miss a shift during Game 7, and neither did teammate Red KELLY, who had torn knee ligaments during the previous game. The Leafs won the seventh game 4-0 and the Stanley Cup, their third in a row and their fifth during Dr. MURRAY's time with the team.
That year, Dr. MURRAY resigned and 20 years later joked to The Toronto Star that it was he who had led them to the five Stanley Cups.
If he took the connection between his presence and the Leafs' wins lightly, Punch IMLACH, then the team's coach, did not. Mr. IMLACH had become convinced that Dr. MURRAY brought the team good luck, the doctor told the Star in a 1972 story.
The newspaper was interviewing Dr. MURRAY about his appointment as a doctor to Team Canada for the Canada-Russia hockey series. In the article headlined "Good luck charm for Team Canada, " he recalled how during the 1967 Stanley Cup playoffs, Mr. IMLACH invited him to a Leaf game in Chicago, believing that he would bring the team good luck.
"If it had been anybody else but Punch, I'd have dismissed it as a joke. But he really needed to win and he honestly believed my presence would make a difference, "Dr. MURRAY was quoted as saying.
The Leafs won not only that game, but, with Dr. MURRAY in attendance for the remainder of the series, the Stanley Cup. The Leafs haven't won a Stanley Cup since.
And the Star's headline proved prophetic. Team Canada won the Canada-Russia series when Paul HENDERSON scored with 34 seconds left in the eighth game.
Born in Toronto on May 14, 1920, James Findlay MURRAY was the youngest of three children. His father ran a store at Yonge and Queen Streets in downtown Toronto and died before the birth of his third child.
Dr. MURRAY attributed his curvy fingernails to his mother's malnutrition when she was pregnant with him, said his youngest son Hugh. Within a few years, she had remarried, and his stepfather helped to raise him.
An avid athlete, Dr. MURRAY played football during his high school and university days, so much so that once, when forbidden by his mother to play for his high-school team because he had had pneumonia, he practised and played in secret.
That lasted until his picture appeared in the Star running for a touchdown. He was immediately placed on the disabled list.
Awarded the George Biggs trophy for sportsmanship, leadership and scholarship, Dr. MURRAY graduated from medical school in 1943 and spent two years in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps, finishing as a captain.
After a year of general practice in Belleville, Ontario, he trained in plastic surgery at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with A. W. FARMER, whom many consider to be the father of Canadian hand surgery.
A humble man, who drove less-than-fancy cars, Dr. MURRAY was known for his ability to relate to everyone. "He was a doctor and an esteemed member of society, but it didn't matter to him," Hugh MURRAY said. "He considered himself an everyday person. He was as comfortable, if not more comfortable, dealing with just working guys."
In 1953, Dr. MURRAY joined the Toronto East General and Orthopedic Hospital as head of plastic surgery and organized a specialized hand clinic, according to Bernd NEU, another former student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at North York General Hospital.
"It's because the hand is such an important part of the body, not just physically, but aesthetically, "Dr. MURRAY, a specialist in soft tissue and the reconstruction of flexor tendons, said in 1984 to explain the dedication of hand surgeons.
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY left Toronto East General, where he had been surgeon-in-chief since 1976, to head the hand unit at Sunnybrook Medical Centre, taking a cut in pay to do so.
At the time, plastic surgeons could earn $2,000 for a face-lift and $106.50 for a carpal-tunnel release.
Dr. MURRAY derived great satisfaction from the help his hands gave others. Once in a clinic at Toronto East General, he and Dr. NEU came upon a patient with only a thumb and little finger on one hand.
"This is a wonderful hand, "he told Dr. NEU. " Look at how dirty and callused it is."
After several surgeries, Dr. MURRAY had restored the worker's hand to the point where the man could use it once again to earn a living.
"What to other people would look like a devastating loss, to Dr. MURRAY and the patient, this was a hand to be proud of, Dr. NEU said.
As a hand consultant beginning in 1974 at the Downsview Rehabilitation Centre of the Workers' Compensation Board, Dr. MURRAY treated those injured in industrial accidents, often surmounting language barriers to do so.
"He could speak to them [the patients] in basic English, so they could understand how seriously he took their problems, and how everything was being done that could be done for them, "Dr. NEU said.
In a 1996 letter to Dr. MURRAY, another of his former residents recalled how once on rounds, the doctor lifted the sheets to examine a paraplegic patient, only to find the man soiled. Instead of calling for hospital staff to clean the man, Dr. MURRAY performed the task himself.
"That little lesson reminded me that being a doctor is not just being a cutter, "the physician wrote.
Not only did he have a natural way with people, Dr. MURRAY was a gifted surgeon.
"He was a talented person with original ways of doing things," Dr. McFARLANE said. "He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons."
Appointed a lecturer at the University of Toronto in 1953, Dr. MURRAY was first an assistant and associate professor, becoming a full professor in 1979. He developed the first hand surgery fellowship training program in Canada in 1981, Dr. NEU said.
As well as teaching at the university, Dr. MURRAY trained surgeons during two trips to Southeast Asia as a volunteer with Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc. Medico and led a group of hand surgeons to study techniques in micro-surgery in China during the late 1970s.
At the medical meetings Dr. MURRAY often attended, he impressed Dr. McFARLANE with his ability to discuss surgery. "He had a very common-sense approach to a surgical problem, and when everyone had something to say about a problem, he would get up and clarify it very nicely, "Dr. McFARLANE said.
A founder of MANUS Canada, a society of hand surgeons, once a president of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Dr. MURRAY was honoured by the U.S. society at "Murray Day" in 1990 with tributes from past presidents.
Stricken with Alzheimer's disease toward the end of his life, Dr. MURRAY died in Collingwood, Ontario, on April 4. He leaves his wife of 57 years, Shirley, and his children, John, Bill, Claire and Hugh.

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HOWE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
Linda STEARNS: 1937-2003
As ballet mistress and artistic director of the esteemed Montreal company, she nurtured personality, flair and a risk-taking approach to dance
By Paula CITRON Wednesday, August 6, 2003 - Page R5
In the cutthroat, competitive world of dance, Linda STEARNS was an anomaly. As artistic director of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, she never played games or held grudges. Whether good or bad news, she bluntly told her dancers what they had to hear, and in return, her open-door policy allowed them to vent their own feelings. National Ballet of Canada artistic director James KUDELKA, who spent almost a decade as a member of Les Grands Ballets, likens her approach to wearing an invisible raincoat upon which unhappy dancers spewed their venom. At the end of their tirades, she would serenely remove the garment and say, "Now let's talk."
Linda STEARNS died at her home in Toronto on July 4, at age 65.
She was born into privilege on October 22, 1937. Her father, Marshal, was an investment broker; her mother, Helen, was heavily involved in charity work. The family lived in the posh Poplar Plains area of central Toronto, where Ms. STEARNS attended Branksome Hall.
Despite their wealth, the STEARNS children (Linda, Nora and Marshal) were expected to earn their own livings. Helen STEARNS had studied dance in her youth, but a career was never an option. When eldest daughter Linda showed a strong talent, history might have repeated itself had not Marshal Sr. set aside his reservations after seeing his daughter perform.
After graduating from high school, Ms. STEARNS went to London and New York for advanced training. It was the great Alexandra Danilova, one of Ms. STEARNS's New York teachers, who pointed the young dancer in the direction of the upstart Les Grands Ballets Canadiens. Ms. STEARNS joined Les Grands in 1961, and was promoted to soloist in 1964. In a Who's Who of Entertainment entry, Ms. STEARNS was once listed as joining the company in 1861, and she liked to joke that, at 103 years, she held the record for the longest time spent in the corps de ballet. In fact, one of Ms. STEARNS's hallmarks was her sense of humour, much of it at her own expense.
Les Grands was known for taking dancers who did not necessarily have perfect ballet bodies, but had personality and flair, a policy Ms. STEARNS continued during her own administration.
Although Ms. STEARNS had very unballetic, low-arched feet, she was a fine classical dancer. She excelled, however, in the dramatic repertoire: Mother Courage in Richard Kuch's The Brood, or the title role in Brydon Paige's Medea. In later years, while teaching and coaching, Ms. STEARNS wore high heels to conceal her hated low arches -- while showing off her attractive ankles.
Her performing career was cut short in 1966 when artistic director Ludmilla CHIRIAEFF recognized that Ms. STEARNS would make a brilliant ballet mistress, and by 1969, Ms. STEARNS was exclusively in the studio. In fact, giving up performing was one of the great disappointments of her life, although she did in time acknowledge that she had found her true destiny. Ms. STEARNS's astonishingly keen eye allowed her to single out, in a corps de ballet of moving bodies, every limb that was out of position. She could also sing every piece of music, which saved a lot of time, because she didn't have to keep putting on the tape recorder. Because of her intense musicality, Ms. STEARNS also insisted that the dancers not just be on the count, but fill every note with movement.
Ms. STEARNS loved playing with words -- she was a crossword-puzzle addict, for example -- and gave the dancers nicknames, whether they liked them or not. Catherine LAFORTUNE was Katrink, Kathy BIEVER was Little Frog, Rosemary NEVILLE was Rosie Posie, Betsy BARON was Boops, and Benjamin HATCHER was Benjamino, to name but a few. One who escaped this fate was Gioconda BARBUTO, simply because Ms. STEARNS loved rolling out the word "G-I-O-C-O-N-D-A" in its full Italian glory. The dancers, in turn, called her Lulubelle, Mme. Gozonga and La Stearnova or, if they were feeling tired, cranky and hostile -- and were out of earshot -- Spoons (for her non-arched feet) and even less flattering names. As reluctantly as she became ballet mistress, Ms. STEARNS became artistic director, first as one of a triumvirate in 1978 with Danny JACKSON and Colin McINTYRE (when Les Grands and Brian MacDONALD came to an abrupt parting of the ways;) then with Jeanne RENAUD in 1985 and finally on her own in 1987. She retired from Les Grands in 1989. Both Mr. JACKSON and Mr. McINTRYE still refer to Ms. STEARNS as the company's backbone.
These were the famous creative years that included the works of Mr. KUDELKA, Paul Taylor, Lar Lubovitch, Nacho Duato and George Balanchine. Les Grands toured the world performing one of the most exciting and eclectic repertoires in ballet. It was a company that nurtured dancers and choreographers, many of whom reflected Ms. STEARNS's risk-taking, innovative esthetic.
She also had time to mentor choreographers outside the company, including acclaimed solo artist Margie GILLIS. Her post-Grands career included writing assessments for the Canada Council, setting works on ballet companies, coaching figure skating, and most recently, becoming ballet mistress for the Toronto-based Ballet Jörgen. When she was diagnosed with both ovarian and breast cancer two years ago, she continued her obligations to Ballet Jörgen until she was no longer able, never letting the dancers know how ill she was.
Ms. STEARNS loved huge dogs -- or what Ms. GILLIS refers to as mountains with fur -- and always had at least two. Her gardens were magnificent, as was her cooking. Her generosity was legendary, whether inviting 20 people for Christmas dinner, or hosting the wedding reception for dancers Andrea BOARDMAN and Jean-Hugues ROCHETTE at her tastefully decorated Westmount home. After leaving Montreal, whether, first, at her horse farm in Harrow, Ontario, or at the one-room schoolhouse she lovingly renovated near Campbellville, northwest of Toronto, former colleagues were always welcome.
She continued to keep in touch with her dancers, sending notes in her beautiful, distinctive handwriting. Her love of sports never left her, and after a hard day in the studio, she would relax watching the hockey game. Religion also filled her postdance life, with Toronto's Anglican Grace-Church-on-the-Hill at its epicentre. Ms. STEARNS was very discreet in her private life, although another disappointment is that neither of two long relationships resulted in marriage or children.
Ms. STEARNS was always ruthlessly self-critical, always striving for perfection, never convinced she had rehearsed a work to its full potential. As a result, she never made herself the centre of her own story. Her homes, for example, did not contain photographs glorifying the career of Linda STEARNS. Only at the end of her days, as she faced death with the same grace with which she had faced life, was she finally able to appreciate how many lives she had touched, and accept her outstanding achievements with Les Grands Ballets. Linde HOWE- BECK, former dance critic for the Montreal Gazette, sums up Ms. STEARNS perfectly when she says that she was all about love -- for her Friends and family, for life, but most of all, for dance.
Paula CITRON is dance critic for The Globe and Mail.

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HOWELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
Norma PITAWANAKWAT (née MISINISHKOTEWE)
In loving memory of Norma PITAWANAKWAT (née MISINISHKOTEWE) at the age of 73 years. Thursday, October 2, 2003 at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Little Current.
Beloved wife of Ignatius PITAWANAKWAT (predeceased.) Loving mother of Inez (Joe), Jackie (Lenny), Ignatius (Carolyne), Howard (Kim), Arlene (John), Troy (Cindy), Victor (Rose), Carmen, Barry (Patty), Emmett (Adele), Jerome (Tammy Jo), Bruno (predeceased), Florice Esmma Marie (predeceased) and "granddaughter" Delores. Loving daughter of Joseph and Agnes McGREGOR (both predeceased.) Proud grandmother of 38 grandchildren and 20 great grandchildren. Dear sister of Wilbert (predeceased), Verna (predeceased), Jim (wife Georgine predeceased), Larry, Dennis, Sara (Ron) and Elaine (John). Sadly missed by many nephews, nieces and Friends. Also predeceased by sisters-in-law Elizabeth PITAWANAKWAT and Susan CYWINK, and brothers-in-law, John, Edgar and Andre. Also survived by: Albert (June), Lillian and Genevieve PITAWANAKWAT, and brother-in-law Bill CYWINK and son-in-law Robert HOWELL.

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HOWELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
HOWELL
-In loving memory of a dear son and brother, Austin, who passed away December 12, 1999.
Beyond our smiles
There lies a tear
For the one we lost
And loved so dear.
Our hearts still ache
For what it meant to lose him
No one will ever know.
There will always be a heartache
And many a silent tear
But always the precious memories
Of the days when you were here
We hold you close within our hearts
And there you will remain
To walk with us throughout our lives
Until we meet again.
-Sadly missed and always remembered by Dad and Sheelah.

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HOWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-20 published
John Edward Burns (Ted) HOWELL
By Frank GARDINER Thursday, November 20, 2003 - Page A26
Father, husband, Sunday School teacher, fisherman, sports enthusiast, Crown Attorney. Born June 26, 1934, in Goderich, Ontario Died August 11, in Omemee, Ontario, of cancer, age 69.
Ted HOWELL, through all of his life, was a little man with a big heart and a giant intellect.
During his early years growing up in Goderich, Ted displayed an early love of academic excellence mixed with a fun sense of competitiveness in all endeavours from table tennis and hockey, to debating contests sponsored by the local Lion's Club.
As part of his 1950 high-school election campaign for treasurer, Ted and his loyal cohorts dressed up as members of the Mafia. Ted in his zoot suit, trench coat and oversized fedora imitated a smaller version of Chicago gangster Al Capone with a campaign slogan: "Vote for me. I need the money." Ted won.
Ted loved a physical challenge. Few could beat him at his favourite sport of table tennis. Many fell prey to his quick eye and cunning strategies and years later Ted won several table tennis championships with the Scarborough Kings Table Tennis Club.
Another field of Ted's early expertise was lawn croquet. On the large lawn of their home, the HOWELL family had a grand lawn croquet court. Ted, as usual, took this game very seriously and had little patience with anyone who did not do the same. Ted was an expert at the double-ball knock out.
These traits also made him a memorable boys' Sunday School teacher at North Street United Church where he creatively handled -- some might say "civilized" -- some lads bigger than himself, all tough, key members of the "Church Street gang." With his leadership, he earned their life-long respect.
Ted graduated at the top of his high-school class and went off to University of Toronto and then on to Osgoode Law School where he earned an award for outstanding contribution to school life.
He was called to the bar in 1960.
Jack BATTEN's book titled Lawyers quotes Ted: 'But from the time I started reading Erle Stanley Gardner as a kid, around grade seven, I wanted to be a courtroom lawyer.' HOWELL won a public speaking award in high school, and an essay he wrote about Canada's role in the United Nations took him on an all-expenses-paid weekend to Ottawa, where he proudly shook hands with Prime Minister Louis SSAINTURENT. HOWELL was a diligent student and he was headed for law.
"Ted HOWELL is, in almost every respect, a perfect servant of the Crown. He is an admirably correct man. There is no stuffiness in his make-up but he sends out the message that he values propriety and turns off at bad manners. He conducts himself according to such old verities."
Visiting a summer camp, Ted met the woman who was to become his wife and soul-mate for 40 special years. Ted and Theresa (TIFF) were married in 1963. This was Ted's greatest project and he is the proud father of Thomas (and his wife Andrea METRICK) and Michael. Ted was the grandfather of Ashley HOWELL.
Ted HOWELL's many legal accomplishments and Friendships over 40 years embraced eminent legal associates and Friends as well as Goderich pals. He was a proud Goderich character. He was a long-time resident of Scarborough, Ontario, as well as his family's cottage and country home in Omemee, Ontario
Ted is missed and remembered.
Frank GARDINER is a one-time Sunday school pupil of Ted HOWELL.

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HOWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-21 published
FOGARTY, James Patrick ''Pat'' September 9, 1920 Consort, Alberta - November 16, 2003 Victoria, British Columbia
Died peacefully at Sandringham Hospital after a long struggle with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. He was predeceased by eldest son, John (1953 - 1973) and by siblings, Arthur, Margaret Dulsrud HOWELL and Edna KOVACH. Pat is survived by his wife, Helen, sons Richard and David and daughter Claire and two sisters, Florence MURRAY (Edmonton) and Joyce SPENCER (Lethbridge) and by nieces and nephews and their families. In 1940, Pat joined the Royal Canadian Air Force becoming an aero-engine mechanic and later a flight engineer seconded to the Royal Air Force Transport Command. After World War 2, received his M.S.W. from University of British Columbia. He worked at various social agencies in Vancouver before becoming a director in the Saskatchewan Dept. of Welfare until 1966. He completed his career in the federal Department of the Environment. A memorial service will be held at 2: 00 p.m. Wednesday, November 26 at St. Aidan's United Church Victoria, British Columbia. Memorial Society of Vancouver Island.

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HOWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-22 published
HOWELL, Marian February 7, 1921 - December 20, 2003.
Passed away peacefully in her sleep, after a short battle with cancer at the age of 82. Wife of William HOWELL and loving mother of Philip and Brian (predeceased). She adored her grand_sons Gregory, James and Thomas and they will miss her very much. Marian will be fondly remembered by her daughters-in-law Margaret, Marya, and Karen. Her last weeks were filled with memories and laughter and she died at peace. The family would like to thank Dr. HORVATH and the Palliative Care Unit at Sunnybrook for their care and kindness. Private cremation and memorial. It was Marian's wish that memorial donations be made to the Hospital for Sick Children.

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HOWLETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-26 published
BARR, Robert Matthew (October 15, 1918 - May 23, 2003)
Bob died peacefully at the Southlake Regional Health Centre on May 23, 2003, surrounded by his family. Predeceased by his loving wife of over 50 years, Christine Philp BARR; he will be lovingly remembered and missed by his five children and their spouses: Brian (and Joan) BARR of Toronto, Janice FOX (and Bill HOWLETT) of Toronto, Brenda TOOMBS- ERNST (and Bob ERNST) of Newmarket, Colleen McCONNELL (and Sam FUNK) of Pt. St. Lucie, Florida, and Robert (and Dawn SIMKIN) BARR of Barrie. Treasured by his grandchildren: Patty (and Graham) ASCOUGH of Brisbane, Australia, Michael (and Andra) BARR of Toronto, Jeffrey FOX of Toronto, James FOX of Toronto, Matthew (and Brandy) McCONNELL of Pt. St. Lucie, Florida, Christine McCONNELL of Tennessee, Darcy TOOMBS of Newmarket. Beloved great-grandfather of Jonathon and Andrew ASCOUGH of Australia, Kristopher and Meghan BARR of Toronto. Bob's wide ranging interests were pursued with larger than life passion; baseball, music, parties, horse racing, golf, cars, boating, bridge, gambling and travel. His entrepreneurial business career spanned 50 years and was equally successful and prolific: tool and die making, furnaces, foundries, golf courses, coal mines, oil wells and fitness clubs. He was the epitome of the song ''My Way''. Friends may call at the Roadhouse and Rose Funeral Home, 157 Main Street South, Newmarket, on Monday, May 26 from 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Tuesday, May 27th at 2: 30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Southlake Regional Health Centre Foundation, Newmarket, Ontario, would be appreciated.

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