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"HOU" 2003 Obituary


HOUDE  HOULE  HOUSTON  HOUTMAN 

HOUDE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-19 published
Karen Louise SHAW (née KING)
Passed away peacefully at Gore Bay, Ontario on February 16, 2003, age 59.
Loving wife of Robert D. SHAW for 33 years and mother of Dara (husband Richard BRACHMAN), Debbie (husband Kyle BRENTNELL), and Diana (fiancé Scott INGHAM).
Predeceased by parents Kenneth and Dorothy KING and brother Harold (wife Bonnie KING). Sister to Alan KING (Barbara), Betty Ann HOUDE (Garry) and Candace INNES (Eric.) Sister-in-law to Norman SHAW and Barbara BILLMAN (Arlo.) Aunt, friend, and role model to many. Karen possessed a passion for education working with Okanagan University College in Kelowna, BC (1996-98), Cambrian College (1982-1996), and Sudbury High School as a teacher (1967-72). She earned a Doctor of Philosophy in Higher, Adult and Lifelong Education from Michigan State University in 1997. Karen served the Sudbury community in many roles as: Councillor, Regional Municipality and City of Sudbury (1991-97), Governor, Laurentian University (1985-96), President, Sudbury Chamber of Commerce (1993-94), President, Sudbury Business and Professional Women's Club (1986-88), and Trustee, Sudbury Board of Education (1976-85).
Her family greatly appreciates the loving care provided by the staff at Manitoulin Lodge.
A memorial service was held on Thursday, February 20 in Sudbury. Karen's life will be celebrated with a memorial service at St. Francis of Assisi in Mindemoya later in the summer.

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HOULE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
Florence Adeline WITTY
In loving memory of Florence Adeline WITTY, April 20, 1923 to June 25, 2003.
Adeline WITTY, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Wednesday, June 25, 2003 at the age of 80 years.
She was born in Salter Township, daughter of the late August and Florence {HOULE} BURMASTER. Adeline had a strong sense of community, always willing to help when needed. She was a member of the Mills Women's Institute and enjoyed knitting, sewing, quilting and will be remembered also for being a great cook.
Adeline was predeceased by her beloved husband Grant, June 1, 2002. Loved and loving mother of Ches and his wife Donna of Hanmer, Cliff and his wife Lorie of Thessalon, Bruce and his wife Linda of Gore Bay and Peter of Toronto. Proud grandmother of Kevin, Craig, Derek, Teresa, Trevor, Tom, Jim, Stephanie, Emily and Joshua and great grandchildren Katherine and Kaleb. Dear sister of Alfred, Alvin, Geraldine and Brenda. Predeceased by brothers Orville and Aubrey. Friends called at the Culgin Funeral Home on Thursday, June 26, 2003. The funeral service was held in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel of the Culgin Funeral Home on Friday, June 27, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. with Rev. Frank HANER officiating. Interment in Gordon Cemetery.

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HOUSTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
Hockey coach who changed the game
'Captain Video' introduced new teaching tools in more than 25 years with the National Hockey League
By William HOUSTON Monday, June 23, 2003 - Page R5
The morning after Roger NEILSON was fired from his first of seven head coaching jobs in the National Hockey League, he returned to his office at Maple Leaf Gardens.
He viewed and edited the videotape of the Toronto Maple Leafs' loss to the Montreal Canadiens the night before. When a replacement didn't show up, he put the Leafs through a practice. Later, he was asked by a reporter why he was still hanging around.
"Somebody had to run the practice," he said. "Whoever comes in will have to look at the tapes."
The next day, Mr. NEILSON was reinstated when the club could not find a replacement, but Maple Leafs owner Harold BALLARD, always looking for publicity, wanted to make his return behind the bench a surprise. Mr. BALLARD tried to talk him into wearing a ski mask or bag over his head, and then dramatically throwing it off at the start of the game. Numbed by the three-day ordeal of not knowing his status in the organization, Mr. NEILSON almost agreed, but ultimately declined.
"He hated that story," said Jim GREGORY, who hired Mr. NEILSON to coach the Leafs in 1977 and was fired along with the coach at the end of the 1978-79 season. "I hated that story."
The incident reflected poorly on Mr. BALLARD, but in a smaller way it helped create the image of Mr. NEILSON we have today, that of a coach who put the team ahead of his ego, who was loyal to his players and dedicated to his job.
Mr. NEILSON, who died Saturday after a long battle with cancer, will be remembered not just as a man who loved hockey, but also as a skilled strategist and innovator. He stressed defensive play and systems, and also physical fitness. In Toronto, he was given the nickname "Captain Video," because he was among the first to use videotape to instruct his players and prepare for games.
When Mr. NEILSON, a soft-spoken man famous for his dry sense of humour, was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame last year, he was asked about the late, controversial Leafs owner.
"I'm sure he's looking up rather than down," he said, with a smile, before saying Mr. BALLARD did some "good things for hockey."
Mr. NEILSON was also named to the Order of Canada in January.
Roger Paul NEILSON was born in Toronto on June 16, 1934, and went as far as Junior B hockey as a player. While earning a degree at McMaster University in Hamilton, he started coaching kids baseball and hockey.
After graduating, he taught high school in Toronto and his passion by then was coaching. In hockey, he won Toronto and provincial titles at different levels. In 10 years, his Metro Toronto midget baseball teams won nine championships, once defeating a team that included pitcher Ken DRYDEN, who would later become a Hall of Fame goaltender with the Montreal Canadiens.
Mr. NEILSON scouted for the Peterborough Petes of the Ontario Major Junior Hockey League before moving to Peterborough in 1966 to coach the team. During his 10 years behind the bench, the Petes never finished below third place and won the league championship once.
By the time Mr. NEILSON moved to the National Hockey League to coach the Leafs in 1977, his reputation for creativity and also mischief was firmly established. In baseball, he used, at least once, a routine involving a peeled apple, in which the catcher threw what appeared to be the ball wildly over the third baseman, prompting the runner to race home. As the apple lay in the outfield, the catcher met the runner at home plate with the real baseball in his glove.
Always looking for a loophole in the rules, Mr. NEILSON's ploys instigated rule changes in hockey. On penalty shots against his team, he used Ron STACKHOUSE, a big defenceman, instead of a goalie. Mr. STACKHOUSE would charge out of the net and cause the shooter to flub his shot. The rule was subsequently changed to require the goalie to stay in his crease.
Over an National Hockey League career that lasted more than 25 years, Mr. NEILSON holds the record for most teams coached (seven.) He also held four assistant coaching positions. But he never won the Stanley Cup. He didn't coach great teams. He seemed to enjoy the challenge of taking an average group of players, making them into a solid, defensive unit, and seeing them succeed.
In his first year with the Leafs, he moulded a previously undisciplined group of players into a strong unit that upset the New York Islanders in the 1978 playoffs.
In 1982, Mr. NEILSON's playoff success with the Vancouver Canucks underscored his skill as a tactician and manipulator.
When Canuck head coach Harry NEALE was suspended late in the season, Mr. NEILSON, his assistant, took over. The Canucks weren't expected to advance past the first round of the playoffs. But backed by strong goaltending from Richard BRODEUR, they defeated the Calgary Flames and then the Los Angeles Kings to advance to the semi-finals against Chicago.
The Canucks won the first game, but with Chicago leading 4-1 late in the second game, Mr. NEILSON, unhappy with the officiating, waved a white towel from the bench, as if to surrender to the referee. He was fined for the demonstration, but the white towel became a symbol of home-fan solidarity. In the Stanley Cup final, the Canucks were swept by the powerhouse Islanders.
In addition to Toronto and Vancouver, Mr. NEILSON's journey through the National Hockey League consisted of head coaching jobs with the Buffalo Sabres, the Kings, New York Rangers, Florida Panthers and Philadelphia Flyers. He worked as a co-coach in Chicago, and as an assistant coach with the Sabres, St. Louis Blues and Ottawa Senators.
Ottawa, where he was hired in 2000, was his final destination. In the 2001-02 season, head coach Jacques MARTIN stepped down for the final two games of the regular season to allow Mr. NEILSON to coach his 1,000th regular-season game.
Frank ORR, who covered hockey for The Toronto Star for more than 30 years, said, in 2002, "Roger is one of the few people I've met in any line of work who never had a bad word to say about anybody."

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HOUSTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-21 published
HOUSTON, Neil Ritchie
78, of North Vancouver, British Columbia, amiable entrepreneur, avid golfer and bridge partner, long-time horse-racing fan, armed forces veteran, one-time owner of a thoroughbred racehorse in Toronto, a hotel in Leamington, Ontario, a fishing lodge on the French River, a clothing store in Burlington, Ontario, an antique/collectibles store in Waterdown, Ontario. Born in Toronto on October 11, 1924, husband of the late Helen HOUSTON (née CHARLTON) and the late Dorothy HOUSTON (née LAKE,) brother of Archie of West Vancouver, Bob of Toronto and the late Colin HOUSTON, father of Gail TERRON of Windsor, Ontario, and John HOUSTON of Toronto, stepfather of Ron JOINER of Victoria, British Columbia, Lynda JOINER of Burlington, Ontario, Elizabeth HADDOCK of Chatham, Ontario, grandfather of six, uncle to many nieces and nephews. Died peacefully Monday, August 18, 2003 in Lion's Gate Hospital, North Vancouver, following a lengthy illness. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of British Columbia or a charity of your choice. Special thanks to the doctors, nurses and staff at Lion's Gate and St. Paul's Hospital. Arrangements will be made for burial service in Aylmer, Ontario.

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HOUSTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-13 published
Edward James HOUSTON
By Jim HOUSTON, Thursday, November 13, 2003 - Page A28
Lawyer, judge, war veteran, "sports nut," father, friend to many. Born September 15, 1918, in Arnprior, Ontario Died May 27 in Ottawa, of colon cancer, aged 84.
Ed HOUSTON accomplished much in his life: He was a bomb aimer in Lancaster bombers in the Second World War, a prominent lawyer and judge in Ottawa for almost 50 years, and the National Hockey League's first arbitrator. But it was his family and Friends, not his accomplishments, which mattered most to him. Speaking at Ed's funeral in Ottawa on a sunny Friday in late May, the Honourable Patrick GALLIGAN (Ed's former law partner and long-time friend) said there are "legions of people" whose lives have been affected for the better by Ed HOUSTON.
Ed was a product of his generation -- the people that came of age in the "dirty thirties," served their country in wartime, and then made their contributions (and let off some steam) as civilians in a more prosperous post-war Canada. Born and raised in modest circumstances in the Ottawa Valley town of Arnprior, Ed left home in the Depression to find work. He ended up working in a drug store in Schumacher, Ontario, near Timmins. There he met a Torontonian, Joe GREENE, who was to become his best friend and my godfather. Like thousands of other young Canadians, Ed volunteered for military service in the Second World War. His air force days changed his life. In January, 1944, he was shot down over Berlin, with five of seven aboard perishing, and became a prisoner of war for 15 months (he escaped in April, 1945). The veteran's benefits he earned through his wartime service gave him the opportunity to attend the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall Law School, which opened the door to a successful career and countless Friendships in the legal fraternity. While at university, Ed met and married Mary McKAY of Galt, Ontario, and the first of their two sons, Bill, was born. In 1950 they moved to Ottawa where Ed began his legal career as an assistant Crown attorney. Later -- as a lawyer in private practice and then as a judge -- Ed became known for helping younger lawyers learn the ropes.
Ed was, by his own admission, a "sports nut." As a participant, golf was his passion -- and on the course he was known as Steady Eddie for his straight drives and sure putting. As a spectator, he was an avid fan of almost every sport. Even in the final days of his life, when you handed him a newspaper -- another benign addiction of his -- he would still dive for the sports section, and be lost in it for hours. On the day before his death, he rejoiced in the Blue Jays having just swept the Yankees in a four-game series.
As a judge, Ed had to make lots of tough decisions. However, the decisions that got him the most publicity took place outside the courtroom, in his capacity as arbitrator for the National Hockey League. In 1991, Brendan SHANAHAN became a free agent and jumped from the New Jersey Devils to the St. Louis Blues. Under the free-agency compensation regime then in effect, Ed had to decide which player the Blues would have to give to the Devils as compensation for signing SHANAHAN. When Ed chose defenseman Scott STEVENS (who captained the Devils to the Stanley Cup earlier this year), his decision was greeted with a storm of media criticism. But Ed never second-guessed himself, and moved on.
In a letter Ed received a couple of years ago, another friend of his, the late Ray HNATYSHYN, former Governor-General of Canada, summed up how he will be remembered by family, Friends and acquaintances alike: "Ed, you have served your community, province and country with great distinction, and I am privileged to call you my friend." My sentiments exactly.
Jim HOUSTON is Ed's son.

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HOUTMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
PETERS, George
Formerly of London, Ontario, and longtime resident of Aylmer, Quebec, passed away on April 30th, 2003. His first wife, Patricia BELK, passed away in 1989. His second wife, Françoise (''Toto'') BACH- KOLLING, died in 2000. He is survived by his sister Dorothy McLAREN of London, Ontario, his stepdaughter Felicia HOUTMAN, by Gordene STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, and by his nieces and nephews. A gathering of Friends and family will take place at the Beauchamp Funeral Home, 47 Denise Friend Street, Aylmer, on Sunday, May 4th beginning at 2 o'clock. For more information, please call (819) 770-1300.

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