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"HOL" 2003 Obituary


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HOLLINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
HOLLINS, George 1923-2002
Died on July 10, 2003. Body willed to medical research. No funeral or service.

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HOLLINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-22 published
George HOLLINS
By Gayle M. LARMOND Monday, September 22, 2003 - Page A18
Able seaman, pioneer of head Lake shore land, builder. Born January 19, 1923, in Toronto. Died July 10, in Kingston, Ontario, of cancer, aged 80.
George HOLLINS was born to George Sr. and Alice, from Staffordshire, England, who had settled in the Oakridge area of Scarborough, Ontario Like many of this generation, he was raised in the Anglican Church. George was active in Cubs, Scouts, choir, Sunday School, Bible class, and the Anglican young people's association. As a young father, he devoted 12 years to church leadership as Sunday School superintendent.
George attended Oakridge Public School and Scarborough Collegiate. Between church and school, lifelong Friendships were forged. He recorded, "in 1932, a sister, Margaret Rose, was born." He developed a fascination and, more significantly, a love for his childhood sweetheart, one Isa TIPPING who later became his wife and mother of their three children.
Butting in on everyone's career, marriage and family plans, came the Second World War. George applied to the Royal Canadian Navy recruiting office at the Argonaut Rowing Club on Lake Ontario and was told they were not taking any inexperienced volunteers for "seaman" ratings. He was ultimately accepted as an "Engine Room Artificer -- Apprentice in Training." In his Life Story, George wrote: "There was no swearing-in ceremony, no documents to sign and no uniform was issued. Just simple instructions and a rail ticket to Galt, Ontario, in April 1941." George served in the Atlantic campaigns and moved in rank to chief petty officer. His ship's name was H.M.C.S. Midland.
Like many who came of age in the war, this was the formative experience. Life's other milestones were captured in terms of "before the war," "during wartime," "after the war was over." George was honourably discharged and returned to his Toronto east-end home a sick man only to find his mother deathly ill with stomach cancer. Married in 1946, first child in 1947, second in 1949 and a third in 1955, George spent his working career with Ontario Hydro, starting as a clerk and finishing as a recruiter of engineers. At age 57, he retired to the family cottage and followed his true calling.
What was his true calling? George loved nature: plants, trees, fish, birds, animals. For several years he hosted a fishing club with his buddies. His place became a virtual bird sanctuary as he distributed bird seed for every species. Dogs were his house companions, all of them rescued. He supported Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind.
At the lake, he will be most remembered for his gardens. On top of sandstone and thin soil, he built raised beds and co-operatively gardened with neighbours. He gave away vegetables and flowers and Friends returned it as winter preserves. To be with him in his beautiful garden was to be near paradise.
For more than 20 years, George lived with his dogs in the family-built home at head Lake. He enjoyed independent living right through his 80th birthday. A persistent sore throat sent him to Kingston General Hospital on April 1. He said a choked good-bye to his dog Bozo and walked through the blizzard to the car where the cancer volunteer driver held a door open for him. In hospital, he fought valiantly for his health and his life. Never short on charm, he captured the hearts of many nurses -- "This one's a heart-breaker," they cried. He didn't want to die. He wanted to return to the garden. He remained positive and hopeful to the end even though he described this fight as being "like going to sea in a sieve." When he died, this larger-than-life lover-of-life left large footprints on many hearts.
Gayle is George's eldest daughter.

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HOLLOWAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
Elsie Maud MILES
By John HIPKIN Monday, June 23, 2003 - Page A16
Mother, grandmother, wife, friend and survivor. Born November 11, 1909, in Hackney, London. Died April 27, 2003, in Moncton, New Brunswick, of natural causes, aged 93.
My mother Elsie's birth in a gaunt Victorian hospital almost a century ago was shrouded in secrecy, so we shall probably never know how she came to be the child of maidservant Alice Maud HOLLOWAY and an anonymous father. Consistent with her unknown origins, she was shifted throughout her infancy and girlhood by a remote and faceless authority from one foster home to another, in one at least of which she was routinely subject to unspeakable abuse.
Such were her difficult beginnings, but as the hundred-plus family members and Friends who attended her funeral can testify, hers was a life of triumph over adversity and an inspiring example of how a person can actively fashion their own fate.
At the age of 14, Elsie became a trainee maid in a London gentleman's household, where she learned the domestic arts that she scrupulously and proudly practised throughout the rest of her life as a wife and mother.
My father Jack was a regular customer at a tobacconist's opposite Hammersmith police station, where my mother later worked as a sales assistant. He was a mounted police officer with a tall and manly figure, jet-black hair and a winning way with women. My mother fell for him and they had three children: myself, Naomi and Anthony. But Jack left my mother, and during the Second World War, she was unsupported, unemployed and homeless. These were the days before the welfare state as we currently know it, so we were often forced to sleep in the waiting rooms of London train stations, which invited the stern attentions of the magistracy, who insisted that we children be taken into care. And so we were: I went to Dr. BARNARDO's children's home and my brother and sister went into adoption.
In 1941, mother joined the Auxiliary Territorial Services women's army. During her service years she met, fell in love with and married Paul MILES, an army captain and son of a Sussex clergyman. She had three children with him: David, Pamela and Hugh.
I didn't keep in touch much with my mother after I went to university in the immediate postwar years, but by the early Seventies I had re-established contact. I learned that she and her husband had emigrated to Canada in 1956, where Paul had taken up a position with a refrigerator company. In the 30 or so years that followed, we restored our relationship, and I was also reunited with my sister, living with her own family in Nottingham.
A year and a half ago, I was also reunited with my brother, who is now a deacon at the Grace Cathedral in San Francisco. And so it was that at mother's funeral, all six of her children and many of her grandchildren were present to bid her farewell.
Mother gladdened the hearts of all who knew her. She was filled with joy, despite a life that began with difficulty, and which had known disappointment and destitution. But she was finally fulfilled in motherhood, marriage and Friendship.
Death's claim is only a partial one. What remains in us and in our hearts is the living spirit of a woman who overcame adversity and took delight in her good fortune and her large and reconciled family.
So even in that most awesome encounter of all -- with death itself she has finally triumphed.
John HIPKIN is Elsie Miles's eldest child.

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HOLMES o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Joan Beverley BURNETT
In loving memory of Joan Beverley BURNETT who passed away peacefully at St. Joseph Health Centre on Monday, December 30, 2002.
Cherished mother of Bruce and Rosemary, Murray and Debbi, Randy and Maryellen, Karen and Mark, Linda and friend Kevin, Kevin and friend Melanie. Will be missed by her grandchildren Shannon and Joel, Kraig and Brett, Jason and Wendy, Kris and Laura, Sarah and Jennifer, Duke and Snowy. Also missed by siblings, Shirley GUINN, Marilyn HOLMES, Jim STILL (Ellen), Rick STILL (Mildred), Ross STILL and Winnie STILL (Brian predeceased).
Visitation was on Wednesday, January 1, 2003. Funeral service was held on Thursday, January 2, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Burial to follow at a later date.

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HOLMES o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
Lillian Milinda VINEY
In loving memory of Lillian Milinda VINEY, who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Health Centre on Friday, April 11, 2003 at the age of 82 years.
Beloved wife of Charles VINEY. Dear mother of Shirley VINEY of Little Current, George VINEY of Manitowaning, Sandra and husband Bruce POPE of Manitowaning, Lyla VINEY of Orillia. Loved grandmother of Stephanie and Mark MacDONALD (fiancée Holly,) Andrew and Katherine POPE, Kimberley, Laura and Marianne MENARD. Special great grandmother of Jonathan and Jessica ORR, Justin, Destanie (BAILEY) and Liliana MacDONALD. Remembered by brother and sisters Violet HUBBARD- McALLISTER (predeceased,) Harry JAGGARD (wife Gladys predeceased,) Bessie LOCKYER (husband James predeceased,) Florence LENSON (husband Walter predeceased,) Madeleine CHARLTON (husband John predeceased), predeceased by sisters Beulah and Iris and parents Guy and Evalena JAGGARD. Sister-in-law of Harry VINEY, Ruth McCULLIGH (predeceased,) Lauretta McGILLIS (predeceased,) Grace HUNTER (predeceased,) Joyce and husband Howard HOLMES, Glenn and wife Margaret VINEY, predeceased by Joe, Bob and Edith. Will be missed by numerous nephews and nieces. Visitation was held Sunday, April 13, 2003. Funeral service was held Monday, April 14, 2003. Both at Knox United Church, Manitowaning. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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HOLMES o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-26 published
Howard Kenneth HOLMES
In loving memory of Howard Kenneth HOLMES who died unexpectedly at home on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 at the age 72 years.
Beloved husband of Joyce (née VINEY.) Loved father of Bonny and husband Douglas KILGOUR of Fort McMurray, Kenneth and wife Evelina of Longlac, Joe and wife Joyce of Bidwell Rd., Manitowaning, Diana HOLMES and friend Williard PYETTE of Tehkummah, Sharon and Robert Case of the Slash, and predeceased by son Douglas (1957). Cherished grandfather of Allison KILGOUR and friend Jason, Heather and husband Gopal BRUGALETTE, Kenny HOLMES and friend Sarah, Crystal and husband Rob PERIGO, Nick HOLMES and friend Melanie, Pam SHEAN, Pat SHEAN, Scott CASE, Brock CASE. Forever remembered by four great grandchildren Jazzlynn, Taylor, Faith and Nikaila. Will be missed by brother Clarence and wife Guelda of Mitchell and sister Dorothy and husband Gordon GERMAN of Crossfield, Alberta and in-laws Harry VINEY of Gore Bay, Charlie (wife Lillian predeceased) VINEY of Wikwemikong Manor, Glenn and wife Margaret VINEY of Kinmount, Gladys (predeceased) and husband Harry JAGGARD of Manitowaning. Predeceased by Grace and husband Carmen HUNTER, Ruth and husband Bill and Loretta and husband Neil McGILLIS. Visitation was held on Thursday, November 20. Funeral service was held on Friday, November 21, 2003 all at Island Funeral Home. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery.

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HOLMES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-24 published
HOLMES, Margery Sterling Palmer (January 30, 1928 - September Died peacefully in her sleep at her residence, 111 Avenue Road, Toronto. Beloved wife of the late Stanley Winchester HOLMES, she will be greatly missed by her loving children John Palmer HOLMES, Peter Winchester HOLMES and Stephanie van Batenburg HOLMES and by her grandchildren Jennifer, Elizabeth, Robbie, Christie, Marisa and Aaron HOLMES, and Henry SEXSMITH. Margery was an intrepid and loving spirit who will be missed by her family and Friends all over the world. A funeral service will be held at Saint John's Anglican Church York Mills, 19 Don Ridge Drive, on Friday, September 26th at 2 o'clock. A reception will follow in the Garnsworthy Room.

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HOLMGREN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-16 published
MURPHY, C. Francis, Q.C.
Frank MURPHY died August 13, 2003 at St. Paul's Hospital from complications following pneumonia. He is survived by his loving wife, Jean, and his children, Caroline, Elizabeth, Adrienne (Peter HOLMGREN,) John (Leslie LEE,) Frances and Sarah, and his grandchildren, Anna HOLMGREN, Jacqueline MURPHY and Robert MURPHY. Frank and Robert were special companions. Frank is survived as well by his brothers Bud, Cal and Louis, his sister Josie BENZ, and many nephews and nieces. He was predeceased by his parents and his sisters, Mary COSTELLO and Pat MURPHY. Frank was devoted to his family and deeply committed to his community. Frank was born in 1929 in Calgary and lived most of his life in Vancouver. He loved Vancouver for its beauty and the opportunities it presented. He graduated from high school at Vancouver College in 1945, and graduated from the University of British Columbia with a Bachelor of Laws in 1950. He articled at and then practised with Campney, Owen, Murphy and Owen from 1951 to 1958. He then joined Farris, Stultz, Bull and Farris, which evolved into the firm Farris, Vaughan, Wills and Murphy. He was the managing partner there from 1978 until his retirement in 1992. He remained as associate counsel until his death. He was appointed Queen's Counsel in 1984. Frank practised primarily in areas of corporate and commercial law. He particularly enjoyed his involvement in the Greater Vancouver Regional District. He sat on many corporate boards, including British Columbia Gas Inc., Mitsui Company of Canada Ltd., Northwest Life Assurance Company, Pacific Petroleum Ltd., Westcoast Transmission, Kelly Douglas, Alberta Distillers, and Loomis (Mayne Nickless). Frank was on the board of many non-profit organizations, including the Vancouver Art Gallery, Canadian Red Cross Society, Convent of the Sacred Heart, Holy Family Hospital and St. Paul's Hospital. Frank was for many years on the board of the Catholic Children's Aid Society, serving as president from 1973 until 1980. It was an association of which he was particularly proud. Frank was active in the Canadian Bar Association and was president of the Commercial Law Section for two years. He was heavily involved in the International Bar Association and from 1972 to 1982 he was the Canadian representative to its Council. Frank's work with this organization gave Jean and him great opportunities to travel. Frank was a student of the world, interested and knowledgeable about history and world affairs. Each of his children has fond memories of trips, both at home and abroad, taken with their father. From 1995 to 2000, Frank served on the International Joint Commission, a binational Canada-United States organization. This experience gave him further opportunity to travel, including to many smaller communities in both the United States and Canada, which were experiences he enjoyed just as he did his trips to those destinations that are more traditionally favoured. In keeping with his great interest in his community, Frank was involved in politics and government affairs. He was of a liberal mind and was a member of the Liberal Party of Canada. He participated at all levels of the political process side by side with Jean and Friends, more frequently at the federal level and in particular in the riding of Vancouver-Quadra. Frank's greatest love was his family. He was a loyal and supportive son, brother, husband, father and grandfather. Frank's house at Point Roberts, certainly his favourite place on this earth, is a site of especially treasured memories. Frank was keenly involved with his children's activities. He inspired his children and others with his curiosity, his physical and intellectual energy and his commitment to principle. He lived life fully and fearlessly. He met his final illnesses and challenges in the same manner. He died within the rites of his church and with the love of his family. He is greatly missed. The MURPHY family is greatly appreciative of the care and support Frank and his family received from the staff at the I.C.U., in particular from his final nurse, David BOOTH. The Mass of Christian Burial for Frank will take place at 11: 00 a.m. on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 at Sts. Peter and Paul's Church, 1430 West 38th Avenue, with a reception to follow at noon at Shaughnessy Golf and Country Club, 4300 Southwest Marine Drive. The interment will follow the reception. Prayers will take place at Sts. Peter and Paul on Monday, August 18, 2003 at 7: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the St. Paul's Hospital Foundation at Ste 164, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver British Columbia, V6Z 1Y6, Charitable Registration No. 11925 7939 RR0001.

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HOLMQUIST o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-22 published
J. Grant MAXWELL
June 6, 1922 - May 16, 2003.
Grant died peacefully in Victoria on May 16th, 2003 in the presence of loved ones. He is survived by his his loving and supportive family; his devoted wife of 56 years, Vivian (née MITCHENER) five children; Anne, Victoria; Mary (Bill ROBERTSON,) Saskatoon James (Marjory PORTER), Victoria; Kathleen (Darrel ANDERSON), Victoria; and, Gregory (Carrie HOLMQUIST,) Saskatoon, eight grandchildren: Joshua and Katie PENDLETON; Maxwell BRANDEL; Kristin, Melissa, and Adam MAXWELL; and, Emily and Michael MAXWELL; Vivian's surviving siblings Eileen and Cecil; and, numerous Friends across Canada, U.S.A., and Holland. Grant was predeceased by his children Thomas John, Christopher, and Christine, and by his parents Gilmour and Bridgette (ZETTA) MAXWELL of Plenty, Saskatchewan.
Grant had a dignified and distinguished career and life. He was born and raised on a farm near Plenty. After he finished high school in Plenty, he attended Saint Thomas More College, at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. While at university, he met Vivian and many life-long Friends. Grant graduated from the U of S in 1944.
From 1944-45, he served in the Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve on the Atlantic Seaboard. After completing his national duty, he and Vivian married and he began his media career and family.
A print, radio, and television, journalist for over fifty years, Grant's extensive career reflected his social conscience and ecumenical beliefs. He began his career as a radio news reporter and assistant news director with CFQC Radio (1946-48.) Moving on to newspaper journalism with the Saskatoon Star Phoenix (1949-59), he was a senior reporter and feature writer, and then the chief editorial writer for the newspaper.
Grant's deep religious faith guided him down a path that utilized his journalistic expertise while nurturing his spirit. From 1960-68, he was the Lay Director at the Saskatoon Catholic Centre. He was also a regular columnist with several Catholic newspapers, including the Prairie Messenger, Canadian Register, Western Catholic Reporter, and Our Family, between 1959-69. In the same time period, Grant and Vivian were the Canadian couple on the international writing committee of the Christian Family Movement based in Chicago. In 1967 Grant with Vivian were the Canadian delegates to the International Lay Congress of the Catholic Church. Between 1962-68, Grant was a regular panelist on the CFQC-television show ''In the Public Interest,'' and a Saskatchewan correspondent to the Globe and Mail.
In 1969 Grant and Vivian and family moved from Saskatoon to Ottawa where Grant had accepted a position as Co-Director, and later Director, of the Social Action Office, Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops. While working at this position from 1969 - 77, Grant researched, advised, and prepared draft policy statements on national, social and religious issues, including Project Feedback, a qualitative ''sounding at the grassroots'' of religious beliefs and church concerns across Canada. Also during this time (1972-75), Grant was a Canadian consultant with the International Pontificial Commission for Justice and Peace, Vatican City: Grant and Vivian met Pope Paul 6th while in Rome.
From 1977-81, Grant worked in Ottawa as a freelance journalist and consultant for numerous and varied clients such as the Department of the Secretary of State, the Canadian Human Rights Commission, the Conserver Society Project of the Science Council of Canada, the Vanier Institute of the Family, and the Committee of National Voluntary Organizations. During this time, he wrote the book Assignment in Chekiang detailing the 1902 - 54 experience of the Scarborough Foreign Mission Society in China.
In 1981, Grant and Vivian moved from Ottawa to Toronto. From 1981-86, Grant served as founding editor of ''Compass, '' a national magazine published by the Jesuits of English-speaking Canada. During this time, he was also a member of the writing team for ''Living with Christ, '' a monthly missalette of scriptural texts and commentary circulated to most Catholic parishes across Canada.
In 1986, Grant and Vivian left Toronto and semi-retired in Victoria, British Columbia. Grant's faith and desire to write kept him involved in several projects. In 1987 - 88 Grant wrote At Your Service: Stories of Canadians In Missions. From 1989-91, he co-edited Forward in the Spirit, a popular history of the ''People Synod'' published by the Catholic Diocese of Victoria. From 1992 - 94 he co-wrote and edited a book entitled Healing Journeys: The Ka Ka Wis Experience, which described the history of the Aboriginal residential counseling centre for the Ka Ka Wis Family Development Centre, Meares Island, B.C.
Throughout his life, Grant was also actively involved in his communities. He was an executive member of the Saskatchewan Association for Human Rights; the Saskatchewan Association for Adult Education a founding member of the Downtown Churches' Association of Victoria an occasional commentator on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio, Western Region; and a speaker at national, regional, and local events on both civic and religious topics.
Grant spent over twenty happy summers at Emma Lake with Vivian, his family, and many visiting Friends.
A respected journalist and community volunteer, Grant always made time for family and Friends. He was a loving husband, intellectual companion, and graceful dance partner to Vivian; a gentle, fair and compassionate teacher to his children; an affectionate, singing, cartoon-drawing storyteller to his grandchildren; and was warm and accepting of his relatives. He was a stimulating conversationalist and a loyal friend. Grant will be greatly missed by all until we meet his gentle soul again.
There will be a prayer service in Saskatoon at St. Philip's Church at 1902 Munroe Avenue (at Taylor Street) at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 22, 2003.
The funeral and celebration of Grant's life will be held in Saskatoon at St. Philip's Church at 1902 Munroe Avenue at Taylor Street at 10 a.m. on Friday, May 213, 2003. A memorial celebration will be held in Victoria in the fall of 2003, and prior notice will be provided in this paper. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Development and Peace and/or the Friendship Inn, Saskatoon. Arrangements are entrusted to the Saskatoon Funeral (306-244-5577).

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HOLOWACK o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Margaret Clara LEWIS (Nee WHIDDON)
In loving memory of Margaret Clara LEWIS who died peacefully, January 19, 2003 at the Manitoulin Lodge, age 91 years.
Beloved wife of William LEWIS (predeceased in 1996.) Loving mother of Jack (Myrna,) Carol (Carl HALL,) Lyle (Paulette.) Very special grandmother to Wendy, Michael, David, Stacey and Sherry. Cherished great grandmother to Justin, Adrien, Parker, Ally and Hunter. Dear sister of Bill (Lena) and Nora (Nick predeceased), predeceased by John and Dorothy. Dear sister-in-law of Doreen GRANGER (George,) Madeline HOLOWACK, Mary KERHANOVICH (Earl), Catherine GIFFEN (Garth). Predeceased by Ina and George BREATHAT and Margaret and Arden LEWIS. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews.
Margaret was born in Fort Frances, Ontario and graduated as a registered nurse in 1932. She moved to Manitoulin Island where she married her husband in 1941. A hard working woman, Margaret raised her children, worked on the family farm, and nursed until her retirement. She lived her later years in Little Current, and most recently at the Manitoulin Lodge in Gore Bay. Visitation from 10: 00 until Funeral Service 11:00 a.m. Wednesday, January 22, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Cremation with burial of ashes in Elmview Cemetery.

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HOLST o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
'He kept a little flame of geometry alive'
Superstar University of Toronto mathematician considered himself an artist, but his seminal work inevitably found practical applications
By Siobhan ROBERTS Saturday, April 12, 2003 - Page F11
Widely considered the greatest classical geometer of his time and the man who saved his discipline from near extinction, Harold Scott MacDonald COXETER, who died on March 31 at 96, said of himself, with characteristic modesty, "I am like any other artist. It just so happens that what fills my mind is shapes and numbers."
Prof. COXETER's work focused on hyperdimensional shapes, specifically the symmetry of regular figures and polytopes. Polytopes are geometric shapes of any number of dimensions that cannot be constructed in the real world and can be visualized only when the eye of the beholder possesses the necessary insight; they are most often described mathematically and sometimes can be represented with hypnotically intricate fine-line drawings.
"I like things that can be seen," Prof. COXETER once remarked. "You have to imagine a different world where these queer things have some kind of shape."
Known as Donald (shortened from MacDonald,) Prof. COXETER had such a passion for his work and unrivalled elegance in constructing and writing proofs that he motivated countless mathematicians to pick up the antiquated discipline of geometry long after it had been deemed passé.
John Horton CONWAY, the Von Neumann professor of mathematics at Princeton University, never studied under Prof. COXETER, but he considers himself an honorary student because of the COXETERian nature of his work.
"With math, what you're doing is trying to prove something and that can get very complicated and ugly. COXETER always manages to do it clearly and concisely," Prof. CONWAY said. "He kept a little flame of geometry alive by doing such beautiful works himself.
"I'm reminded of a quotation from Walter Pater's book The Renaissance. He was describing art and poetry, but he talks of a small, gem-like flame: 'To burn always with this hard, gem-like flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life.' "
Prof. COXETER's oeuvre included more than 250 papers and 12 books. His Introduction to Geometry, published in 1961, is now considered a classic -- it is still in print and this year is back on the curriculum at McGill University. His Regular Polytopes is considered by some as the modern-day addendum to Euclid's Elements. In 1957, he published Generators and Relations for Discrete Groups, written jointly with his PhD student and lifelong friend Willy MOSER. It is currently in its seventh edition.
Prof. COXETER's self-image as an artist was validated by his Friendship with and influence on Dutch artist M. C. ESCHER, who, when working on his Circle Limit 3 drawings, used to say, "I'm Coxetering today."
They met at the International Mathematical Congress in Amsterdam in 1954 and then corresponded about their mutual interest in repeating patterns and representations of infinity. In a letter to his son, Mr. ESCHER noted that a diagram sent to him by Prof. COXETER that inspired his Circle Limit 3 prints "gave me quite a shock."
He added that " COXETER's hocus-pocus text is no use to me at all.... I understand nothing, absolutely nothing of it."
While Mr. ESCHER claimed total ignorance of math, Prof. COXETER wrote numerous papers on the Dutchman's "intuitive geometry."
Though Prof. COXETER did geometry for its own sake, his work inevitably found practical application. Buckminster FULLER encountered his work in the construction of his geodesic domes. He later dedicated a book to Prof. COXETER: "By virtue of his extraordinary life's work in mathematics, Prof. COXETER is the geometer of our bestirring twentieth century. [He is] the spontaneously acclaimed terrestrial curator of the historical inventory of the science of pattern analysis."
Prof. COXETER's work with icosohedral symmetries served as a template of sorts in the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the Carbon 60 molecule. It has also proved relevant to other specialized areas of science such as telecommunications, data mining, topology and quasi-crystals.
In 1968, Prof. COXETER added to his list of converts an anonymous society of French mathematicians, the Bourbakis, who actively and internationally sought to eradicate classical geometry from the curriculum of math education.
"Death to Triangles, Down with Euclid!" was the Bourbaki war cry. Prof. COXETER's rebuttal: "Everyone is entitled to their opinion. But the Bourbakis were sadly mistaken."
One member of the society, Pierre CARTIER, met Prof. COXETER in Montreal and became enamoured of his work. Soon, he had persuaded his fellow Bourbakis to include Prof. COXETER's approach in their annual publication. "An entire volume of Bourbaki was thoroughly inspired by the work of COXETER," said Prof. CARTIER, a professor at Denis Diderot University in Paris.
In the 1968 volume, Prof. COXETER's name was writ large into the lexicon of mathematics with the inauguration of the terms "COXETER number," " COXETER group" and "COXETER graph."
These concepts describe symmetrical properties of shapes in multiple dimensions and helped to bridge the old-fashioned classical geometry with the more au courant and applied algebraic side of the discipline. These concepts continue to pervade geometrical discourse, several decades after being discovered by Prof. COXETER.
Prof. COXETER became a serious mathematician at the relatively late age of 14, though family folklore has it that, as a toddler, he liked to stare at the columns of numbers in the financial pages of his father's newspaper.
He was born into a Quaker family in Kensington, just west of London, on February 9, 1907. His mother, Lucy GEE, was a landscape artist and portrait painter, and his father, Harold, was a manufacturer of surgical instruments, though his great love was sculpting.
They had originally named their son MacDonald Scott COXETER, but a godparent suggested that the boy's father's name should be added at the front. Another relative then pointed out that H.M.S. COXETER made him sound like a ship of the royal fleet so the names were switched around.
When Prof. COXETER was 12, he created his own language -- "Amellaibian" a cross between Latin and French, and filled a 126-page notebook with information on the imaginary world where it was spoken.
But more than anything he fancied himself a composer, writing several piano concertos, a string quartet and a fugue. His mother took her son and his musical compositions to Gustav HOLST. His advice: "Educate him first."
He was then sent to boarding school, where he met John Flinders PETRIE, son of Egyptologist Sir Flinders PETRIE. The two were passing time at the infirmary contemplating why there were only five Platonic solids -- the cube, tetrahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron. They then began visualizing what these shapes might look like in the fourth dimension. At the age of 15, Prof. COXETER won a school prize for an English essay on how to project these geometric shapes into higher dimensions -- he called it "Dimensional Analogy."
Prof. COXETER's father took his son along with his essay to meet friend and fellow pacifist Bertrand RUSSELL. Mr. RUSSELL recommended Prof. COXETER to mathematician E.H. NEVILLE, a scout, of sorts, for mathematics prodigies. He was impressed by Prof. COXETER's work but appalled by some inexcusable gaps in his mathematical knowledge. Prof. NEVILLE arranged for private tutelage in pursuit of a scholarship at Cambridge. During this period, Prof. COXETER was forbidden from thinking in the fourth dimension, except on Sundays.
He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1926 and was among five students handpicked by Ludwig WITTGENSTEIN for his philosophy of mathematics class. During his first year at Cambridge, at the age of 19, he discovered a new regular polyhedron that had six hexagonal faces at each vertex.
After graduating with first-class honours in 1929, he received his doctorate under H. F. BAKER in 1931, winning the coveted Smith's Prize for his thesis.
Prof. COXETER did fellowship stints back and forth between Princeton and Cambridge for the next few years, focusing on the mathematics of kaleidoscopes -- he had mirrors specially cut and hinged together and carried them in velvet pouches sewn by his mother. By 1933, he had enumerated the n-dimensional kaleidoscopes -- that is, kaleidoscopes operating up to any number of dimensions.
The concepts that became known as COXETER groups are the complex algebraic equations he developed to express how many images may be seen of any object in a kaleidoscope (he once used a paper triangle with the word "nonsense" printed on it to track reflections).
In 1936, Prof. COXETER was offered an assistant professorship at the University of Toronto. He made the move shortly after the sudden death of his father and following his marriage to Rien BROUWER. She was from the Netherlnds and he met her while she was on holiday in London.
As a professor, Prof. COXETER was known to flout set curriculum. Ed BARBEAU, now a professor at the U of T, recalled that at the start of his classes, Prof. COXETER would spread out a manuscript on the desks at the front of the room. During his lecture, he would often pause for minutes at a time to make notes when a student offered something that might be relevant to his work in progress. When the work was later published, students were pleasantly surprised to find that their suggestions had been duly credited.
Prof. COXETER was also known to show up to class carrying a pineapple, or a giant sunflower from his garden, demonstrating the existence of geometric principles in nature. And he was notorious for leaping over details, expecting students to fill in the rest.
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's resident intellectual, Lister SINCLAIR, was one of Prof. COXETER's earliest students. He once recounted that Prof. COXETER would "write an expression on the board and you could see it talking to him. It was like Michelangelo walking around a block of marble and seeing what's in there."
Asia Ivic WEISS, a professor at York University, Prof. COXETER's last PhD student and the only woman so honoured, describes an incident that perfectly exemplifies Prof. COXETER's math myopia. Going into labour with her first child, she called him to cancel their weekly meeting. Prof. COXETER, who never acknowledged her pregnancy, said not to worry, he would send over a stack of research to keep her busy when she got home from the hospital.
Despite several offers from other universities, Prof. COXETER stayed at University of Toronto throughout his career.
Like his father, he was a pacifist. In 1997, he was among those who marched a petition to the university president's office to protest against an honorary degree being conferred on George BUSH Sr. Prof. COXETER recalled with disdain Robert PRITCHARD's telling him, "Donald, I have more important things to worry about."
After his official retirement in 1977, Prof. COXETER continued as a professor emeritus, making weekly visits to his office. These subsided only in the past several months. On the weekend before his death, he finished revisions on his final paper, which he had delivered the previous summer in Budapest.
In his last five years, he survived a heart attack, a broken hip (he sprung himself from the hospital early to drive to a geometry conference in Wisconsin) and, most recently, prostate cancer.
Considering his 96 years of vegetarianism and a strict exercise regime, he felt betrayed by his body. "I feel like the man of Thermopylae who doesn't do anything properly," he commented recently after an awkward evening out, quoting nonsense poet Edward LEAR.
Prof. COXETER died in his home, with three long last breaths, just before bed on the last day of March.
His brain is now undergoing study at McMaster University, along with that of Albert EINSTEIN. Neuroscientist Sandra WITELSON is tryng to determine whether his brain's extraordinary capacities are associated with its structure.
Prof. COXETER met with her at the beginning of March and learned that the atypical elements of Einstein's brain, compared with an average brain, were symmetrical on both right and left sides.
Prof. WITELSON said she wondered whether there might be similar findings with Prof. COXETER's brain. "Isn't that nice," he said. "I suppose that would indicate all my interest in symmetry was well founded."
Prof. COXETER leaves his daughter Susan and son Edgar. His wife died in 1999.
Siobhan ROBERTS is a Toronto writer whose biography of Donald COXETER will be published by Penguin in 2005.

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HOLT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
LAMONT, Jean Annette (ROBINS)
Jean died peacefully, on Tuesday, October 14, 2003 in Toronto, with her children Doug and Anne at her side; in her 84th year. Predeceased by her loving husband and friend of 53 years, Bruce Maitland LAMONT, a former senior international executive with Royal Bank of Canada. Survived by son, James Douglas and his wife Kathy, stepchildren Melissa and August and step-great granddaughter, Elizabeth; and daughter Anne and husband Christopher JAMES and their daughter, Kathleen. Cherished sister of Joan BAILEY and her children, Robin (Marie,) Joanne (Ken HOLT,) John (Clare) and Janet (Heino CLAESSENS) and their families. Remembered by sisters-in-law Pauline FLYNN (Hank) and Meribeth LAMONT and their families and the extended LAMONT clan. Special thanks to cousin Joanne HOLT for all her support and help over the last few years. Thank you to the staff and Mom's new Friends at the Kingsway Retirement Residence, Etobicoke for their Friendship and support in making the Kingsway her home away from home. A graduate of MacDonald Hall, Guelph University (1940) and Toronto Western Hospital School of Nursing (1943) she was always proud of her accomplishment as one of Canada's first female nursing flight attendants with Trans Canada Airways. Mom was an avid bridge player and golfer, a social dynamo who cherished her wide circle of Friends. A celebration of her life will be held on Saturday, October 18, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 89 Dunn Street (at Lakeshore Road), Oakville. If desired, in lieu of flowers, donations in Jean's memory to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.
Mom, a Grand Slam and a hole-in-one to you. Love always.

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HOLT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
MUTRIE, Dr. Eric Tolton, M.D.
Of Guelph, died at the Guelph General Hospital, Sunday, December 21, 2003, in his 91st year. son of the late Alice MUTRIE (TOLTON) and Major Robert J. MUTRIE. Beloved husband of the late Edith Grace MUTRIE (COWAN.) Dearly loved father of Nancy (Felix) BAELE of Ottawa, the late Alice BEZANSON (Keith,) Robert (Heather) MUTRIE of Orleans, and David (Jane) MUTRIE of Thunder Bay. Loving grandfather of Ian and Amy BAELE, Kate and Sarah BEZANSON, Megan, Erin, and Laura MUTRIE, Julia and Eric A. MUTRIE. He is survived by his sister, Doreen HILLMER. After he graduated from Queen's University in 1937, Eric worked briefly for the Pineland Timber Company and later was in private practice in Elora. He served in the Royal Canadian Medical Corp for the duration of the second world war, seeing tours of duty in England, North Africa, Italy and Washington. After the war, he returned to Guelph where he was a general practitioner for forty years. Highly regarded as a compassionate, dedicated physician with a lively sense of humor, he touched many lives and will be greatly missed. The family is appreciative of the care he received from Nan WIDDOWS, R.N., nurse practitioner, and from Joanne HOLT. At his request, a private memorial service was held on December 23. Donations in his memory may be made to the Foundation of the Guelph General Hospital, 115 Delhi Street, Guelph, N1E 4J4, St. Joseph's Health Care Foundation, 70 Westmount Rd., Guelph, N1H 5H7 or to the charity of your choice.

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HOLUBEC o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-06 published
KARGER, John Paul, B.A.Sc., M.B.A.
35 years employed with Atomic Energy of Canada with postings in Russia, Romania, Argentina, India and other foreign lands, preceded by 3 years as a pilot with the Canadian Air Force; graduating from University of Toronto '58
He died suddenly, on Friday, October 3, 2003 of a heart attack at the age of 68, in Mississauga. John will be sadly missed by his most beloved Pearl, his loving children Paula, Tomas and Lisa, stepsons Neil and Adrian, brother George and wife Jana, sister Vera and husband Igor HOLUBEC and brother and sister-in-law, the late Paul and Dorothy KARGER. The family will receive Friends at the Turner and Porter ''Peel'' Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga, (Hwy. 10 north of Queen Elizabeth Way), on Monday from 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be held on Tuesday, October 7, 2003 at 10: 30 a.m. at Saint Mary Star of the Sea, 11 Peter Street South, Port Credit (Lakeshore Road, east of Mississauga Road). Cremation. As an expression of sympathy, a donation to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be greatly appreciated.

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HOLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-14 published
SCHMIDT, Zdenek, ''Dan''
Died peacefully at home in Toronto on October 10, 2003, at the age of 80 years. Dan was born on his family's estate in Kvasetice, Czechoslovakia on December 21, 1922. In 1948, he fled communist oppression in his native Czechoslovakia and in 1949 he came to Canada, where he made Toronto his home. He will be lovingly remembered for his kindness, wit and charm by his widow, Kathleen, his nephews Thomas HRUBY of Prague, Czech Republic and Michael HOLY of Montreal, his cousin, M.U. Dr. Olga BEZPALCOVÁ of Prague, his step-daughter, Mary MORDEN of Salt Spring Island, British Columbia, his brother-in-law, Dr. Jarolsav ''Jerry'' HRUBY- HOLY of Montreal, as well as many other relatives and Friends both in North America and Europe. Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home 159 Eglinton Ave. West (2 stoplights west of Yonge Street) on Tuesday October 14, from 7-9 p.m. The funeral mass will be held in Saint Margaret's of Scotland Church, 222 Ridley Blvd. (at Avenue Road) Wednesday October 15, 10: 30 a.m. Dan loved animals and his family is certain that he would greatly appreciate donations made in his memory to the Canadian Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in lieu of flowers.

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