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"HIL" 2003 Obituary


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HILDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-20 published
CADOGAN, Elda Magill (née MAGILL)
of Mount Saint Joseph Nursing Home, Miramichi, New Brunswick, a journalist, poet, playwright and short story writer, died Tuesday, November 18, 2003, at 7: 47 a.m. at the age of 86. As a playwright, she was best known for her one-act-play, Rise and Shine, which has the distinction of being one of the most frequently-performed Canadian plays ever written. It has been performed in every province in Canada, in 47 states in the U.S., and in England, Ireland, Australia and South Africa. A German translation was Canada's representation in a worldwide cultural exchange in Bonn, Germay.
In 1992, the University of Guelph added the Elda Magill Cadogan Collection to its extensive theatre archives. The collection included correspondence, manuscripts, printed editions, advertisements, review and programs related to the play. In 1993, the university obtained her voluminous collection of memorabilia on the Stratford Festival She attended the theatre's premier performance in 1953 and took a special interest in the organization after moving to Strfatford in 1985. Born December 17, 1916 at Mount Forest, Ontario, she was the only daughter of Robert, a lay minister at Conn, and Katherine Herron MAGILL. She grew up in Woodstock, where her writing was first published - a story and poem in the Woodstock Sentinel Review - when she was 8. She graduated from Woodstock Collegiate Institute, where she was valedictorian for her class and, after completing a business course, was employed at the Woodstock Sentinel Review. In 1939, she married George CADOGAN, of Woodstock.
The couple later purchased newpapers in Durham, Ontario, Pictou, Nova Scotia and Oromocto and Newcastle, New Brunswick. George CADOGAN died in February, 1996. Mrs CADOGAN won several awards for her newspaper articles and she and her husband were the first husband and wife team to be named honourary life members of both the Atlantic and the Canadian Community Newspaper Associations. While in Stratford, Mrs. CADOGAN was an honourary member of the Writers Club of Stratford and a member of the Canadian Authors Association, the Noon Book Club and the Good Book Club. She was a member of Saint John's United Church, Stratford. She was also a contributor to The Beacon Herald for several years. In September, 1999, she moved to a retirement residence in Frederiction, New Brunswick, where she could be closer to some of her family members, and recently moved again, to Mount Saint Joseph Nursing Home in Miramichi.
An animal lover, Mrs. CADOGAN usually had at least one cat in her life, and once a dog as well.
She is survived by two sons, David (Michelle), of Miramichi, New Brunswick, and Michael, of Scarborough; daughter Katherine HILDER (Stephen,) of Prince George, British Columbia, and Elizabeth Jean MORGAN (Dan,) of Fredericton, New Brunswick. Also surviving are six grandchildren, Joanne (Allen IRVING) and Colin CADOGAN, Craig CADOGAN and Sheryl UDEH (Obi) and Kristin and Leslie HILDER, and one great grandchild, Benjamin UDEH. In addition to her husband, she was predeceased by four brothers, Max, Rex, Weston and Robert, and a daughter-in-law, Susan (YOUNG) CADOGAN. Friends will be received and the Stratford, Ontario W.G. Young Funeral Home for visitation Friday evening November 21st from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. and for the funeral service Saturday morning, November 22nd at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend Greg WHITE/WHYTE of Saint John's United Church will officiate.

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HILDESHEIM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-23 published
HILDESHEIM, Pauline Mary Adela
75, of Halifax, Nova Scotia, died suddenly on December 18, 2003 in the Halifax Infirmary, Q.E. II. Born in Toronto, Ontario in 1928, she was the only child of Paul and Nora HOME (CAWTHORNE.) Her father changed his last name from HILDESHEIM to HOME at the beginning of the First World War. Pauline attended Moulton College, then took an Honours B.A. in modern languages and literature from Trinity College in 1949 followed by an M.A. She went on to teach French, Latin and German at Edgehill School for Girls in Windsor Nova Scotia In 1953 she earned the degree of Bachelor of Library Science at the University of Toronto. She was appointed Assistant Librarian at the Halifax Memorial Library and then became an Assistant Librarian at the University of Toronto Library. Pauline returned to Halifax where she ultimately held the post of Deputy Chief Librarian at the Halifax Memorial Library, which she filled with great distinction until her retirement. During her professional career, she earned the degrees of Master of Library Science from the University of Toronto and Master of Public Administration from Dalhousie University. Pauline was a generous supporter of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia and an enthusiastic member of its Travel Committee, as well as being an active member of the Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia. She was Treasurer of the Canadian Federation of University Women, Halifax Branch, a Member of the Congregational Council of the Cathedral Church of All Saints. As well, she was Treasurer of the Cathedral Branch of Anglican Church of Women, a member of the Cathedral League, and a faithful communicant of the Anglican Church of Canada. Pauline is survived by several cousins and her god-daughter, Cynthia LANGLANDS, of Dallas, Texas. Pauline possessed a remarkable memory along with high intelligence and a strong voluntary spirit, and will be sadly missed by her family and many Friends. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held in early 2004. Details to be announced later. Donations in Pauline's memory can be made to the Cathedral Church of All Saints, the Art of Gallery of Nova Scotia or a charity of choice.

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HILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-25 published
FOSTER, Walter Lenord Gordon
Walter FOSTER died peacefully after a short illness at St. Michael's Hospital in his 80th year on February 19, 2003. Born in Toronto on June 9, 1923, Walter served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. Walter was a Charter dancer with the National Ballet of Canada, 1951-1953. He joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1959, retiring in 1985, and serving in many roles including Classical Music Programming, Announcer and Benefits Counselor. Walter was predeceased by his life-long companion, David WALKER in May, 1994. Walter is survived by his beloved sister Anne, his brother Owen, and by many nephews and nieces and their children and grandchildren. Walter will be greatly missed by his dear friend Mary McDONALD and his neighbours Frances and Amber, Paul and Mary, Mike, Maddy, Heather and Nadine and by his friend Adrian. A memorial service will be held later in the Spring, after the release of Walter's remains by the School of Medicine, University of Toronto. Donations to St. Michael's Hospital or the Canadian Cancer Society. Further information may be obtained from Dr. Adrian HILL at (416) 694-8438.

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HILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
The day the music didn't die
Beloved Toronto trumpeter credited with helping preserve a unique form of New Orleans jazz
By Sarah LAMBERT Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- The tightly knit world of New Orleans traditional jazz has lost one of its greats with the death, last month, of Cliff (Kid) BASTIEN, leader of Toronto's treasured Happy Pals.
The trumpeter is credited as having nothing less than single-handedly kept alive the unique, raw, New Orleans style of jazz, through his leadership and mentorship of hundreds of musicians.
Saddened fans and musicians filed into the city's Grossman's Tavern all week last month to pay tribute to Mr. BASTIEN at the long-time home of the Happy Pals, where the walls are lined with photos of his fans and musicians. It was a send-off worthy of New Orleans, birthplace of the kind of jazz Mr. BASTIEN played with his seven-piece bands, the Camelia Jazz Band and later the Happy Pals, during the 30 or so years he played at the Toronto landmark.
"He was never late. Never, never ever, said Christine LOUIE, whose family inherited Mr. BASTIEN's Saturday-afternoon gig when Al GROSSMAN sold the bar in 1975.
So it was with sinking hearts on February 8 that his loyal audience and band members watched the minute hand tick past 4 o'clock, waiting for him to arrive, brass trumpet in hand.
When he was found later that afternoon still sitting in his armchair, apparently looking up a new song in his hymn book, the Happy Pals played on and raised a glass in tribute to their leader who died as he lived, surrounded by music. He was 65 years old.
Noonie SHEARS, a long-time friend and leader of the traditional impromptu parade that would inevitably snake through Grossman's as Saturday afternoon wound down, said she thought Mr. BASTIEN was looking up I'll Fly Away, the old gospel song recently dusted off in the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou?
The band played it for the first time at Mr. BASTIEN's official memorial at Grossman's the Saturday following his death.
Born in 1937 in London's East End, Mr. BASTIEN emigrated to Canada in 1962 after a stint in New Orleans. It was there that he heard trumpeter (Kid) Thomas VALENTINE play and, experiencing a kind of epiphany, Mr. BASTIEN followed him from club to club and studied his style. It ultimately inspired a lifelong ambition to keep alive New Orleans-style traditional jazz.
A purist who drew a distinction between his chosen genre of music and the more popularized Dixieland Jazz, Mr. BASTIEN once said: "Had I never heard that music, I wouldn't have become a musician. I wouldn't play anything else."
I Like Bananas, Caledonia, All of Me and Louisiana Vie en Rose were just a few of his standards. But, as Happy Pals' trombonist Roberta TEVLIN explained, Mr. BASTIEN wasn't content to simply recycle the old chestnuts.
"Cliff kept adding songs. I've probably played 1,000 different tunes with him. He was particularly notorious for finding songs outside the standard jazz list, said Ms. TEVLIN, who joined the band 20 years ago, along with her saxophonist husband, Patrick.
Bob Dylan, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Western Swing numbers, Nigerian folk songs and Dean Martin could all tumble out during a set, said drummer Chuck CLARKE.
Mr. BASTIEN's Friends and peers point out that he was known for three primary qualities: His love of music, his scorn for fame or publicity and his mentoring of local musicians.
During the memorial at Grossman's, Downchild Blues Band headman Donny WALSH arrived from Florida to sit in with his harmonica, as he had done regularly with Mr. BASTIEN in the 1970s. Juno-nominated bluesman Michael PICKETT was there, as well as jazz singer Laura HUBERT, formerly of the Leslie Spit Treeo, pianist Peter HILL, The Nationals and many more.
From the worldwide New Orleans jazz community, among those who came to pay their respects were saxophonist Jean-Pierre ALESSI of France, trumpeter Roger (Kid Dutch) UITHOVEN of Orlando, Florida, clarinetist Kjeld BRANDT from Denmark and Toronto's Brian TOWERS, Jan SHAW and Joe VAN ROSSEM.
"I cannot imagine the Toronto traditional jazz scene without Cliff BASTIEN and his raw, emotional New Orleans-style jazz, Mr. TOWERS wrote in a notice posted on the Internet shortly after he learned of the death of his friend.
"He was probably the most popular and influential figure on the Toronto traditional jazz scene. He taught many others to play their instruments in the style and introduced thousands to the joys of New Orleans traditional jazz.
"We went to Grossman's after our own gig and Jan and I played some hymns with the Happy Pals. A sadder and more emotional scene I have rarely seen."
Toronto musician Joanne MacKELL, leader of the Paradise Rangers, wonders how things might have been if she had not met Mr. BASTIEN when she was just starting out.
"Though I was young and inexperienced, Kid would always invite me up to sing, Ms. MacKELL said, recalling how the band took her under its wing when she discovered them in the early 1970s.
"Kid didn't care about money or popular opinion. He filled Grossman's Tavern every Saturday for some 30 years because he played great music with honesty and integrity and he inspired me to try and do the same."
Until just last year, Mr. BASTIEN, who feared flying, avoided the lure of the road, taking only an annual sojourn to New Orleans for the French Quarter Festival. Finally, in the fall of 2002, he accepted an invitation to tour Scandinavia with the Danish/Swedish band New Orleans Delight, playing with George BERRY on tenor sax. A new Compact Disk is due to be released this spring.
His official recordings are few, numbering about a dozen, as Mr. BASTIEN preferred to play to an audience. Though, as Ms. TEVLIN pointed out: "There are bootleg tapes all over the place."
His legacy, the band says, is keeping the New Orleans style of jazz alive.
"Kid Thomas VALENTINE was one of the greats, and when he was gone, Kid BASTIEN carried on. Kid BASTIEN was one of the greats, and now Kid's gone. So who's going to carry the music on now? We will, said saxophonist Mr. TEVLIN on behalf of the Happy Pals, who intend to continue the Saturday-afternoon tradition at Grossman's.
In another side to his life, Mr. BASTIEN was an accomplished commercial artist whose hand-crafted signs, woodwork and acid-etched glass can be seen in many local pubs, including Toronto's Wheat Sheaf Tavern. His work can be found across Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia and California, as well as in Europe.
Mr. BASTIEN's wish was to be buried in New Orleans.

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HILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-07 published
McHUGH, Bishop Paul, S.F.M.
Died peacefully at Providence Centre on Tuesday, May 6th, 2003. Bishop McHUGH was predeceased by his parents, Mary and Peter, and also by his brothers and sisters, Thomas, James, Matthew, Rev. John, S.J., Margaret CRINION, Katherine SMITH, Mary HILL and Peter. Survived by his many nieces and nephews. His Excellency was Ordained to the Holy Priesthood on December 8th, 1954 and Consecrated Bishop of Itacoatiara, Brazil on July 3rd, 1967.
Resting at the Scarborough Foreign Mission Society, 2685 Kingston Road (at Brimley) from 5 p.m. Wednesday, Wake Service at 7: 30 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be Concelebrated in the chapel on Thursday morning at 10: 30 a.m. Interment Priest's Plot, Queen of Clergy Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Scarborough Foreign Missions would be appreciated.

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HILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-27 published
Ontario human-rights pioneer Daniel G. HILL 3rd dead at 79
By Sahm ADRANGI Friday, June 27, 2003 - Page A8
Daniel G. HILL 3rd, a black civil-rights activist and Ontario's first human-rights commissioner, died yesterday in a Toronto hospital of complications from diabetes. He was 79.
Born in Independence, Missouri, Dr. HILL moved to Canada in the 1950s after serving in the U.S. Army and immediately became one of Canada's leading voices on racial equality.
He helped establish the Ontario Human Rights Commission in 1962 at the height of the civil-rights movement, and became its first director.
"Dan had a steadfast commitment to equality that never left him," said Alan BOROVOY, a long-time friend of Dr. HILL and general counsel of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association.
"When he started with the human-rights commission it was very much an experiment. The community was not behind it the way it is today. But through a combination of toughness, wisdom and skill, he was able to change the human-rights commission into a formidable institution; he made it work."
Dr. HILL was the father of singer-songwriter Dan HILL and novelist Lawrence HILL, both well known in their own right.
Both artists were deeply affected by their father's passion for racial equality, according to Lawrence HILL.
"As artists and human beings, [my brother and I] identify very much with our parents' struggle, and he's influenced us through and through," he said.
Dr. HILL is survived by his wife, Donna, and children Dan, Lawrence and Karen HILL.

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HILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-27 published
MacDONALD, Mary Grant (née EATON) Physiotherapy 3T7
Born in Orillia in 1915 and died at Sunnybrook Hospital on Saturday, October 25th, 2003. Loving wife of the late Duncan Graham ''Pete''. Beloved mother of Janis Anderson (Robert), Peter (Ann) and John. Proud grandmother of Graham, Cheryl HILL, David, Gordon, Douglas, James and Katharine. Great grandmother to nine delightful children. Friends may call at the Trull ''North Toronto'' Funeral Home & Cremation Centre 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence) on Tuesday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A service celebrating Mary's life will be held at St. Clement's Anglican Church (Duplex Avenue and Briar Hill) on Wednesday morning at 11 o'clock. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to the Sunnybrook Foundation, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, M4N 3M5.

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HILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-26 published
Doreen Ruth ISHERWOOD
By Colleen ISHERWOOD, Friday, December 26, 2003 - Page A32
Mother, sister, grandmother, poet, ceramist, traveller, dog lover. Born December 3, 1925, in Hamilton, Ontario. Died March 2 in Hamilton, of lung cancer, aged 77.
Doreen Ruth HILL was born the youngest of the three HILL sisters: Fern, Joyce and Doreen. She grew up in Hamilton, finished school and went to work at Westinghouse, where she met a young man named Maurice ISHERWOOD. Doreen and Maurice fell in love -- but the war intervened. Maurice went off to join the navy, and Doreen worked for the Red Cross. But they wanted to get married, and on October 21, 1944, they did just that.
Their wedding was crammed into a four-day period when Maurice was on leave from the war. And Doreen didn't get much warning! In fact, she had to borrow a wedding dress from a friend, in a hurry. Honeymoon? Well, that was a quick weekend in Montreal. The marriage didn't get off to a great start -- but it was a good marriage. It lasted for almost 59 years.
Do and Mo, as they became known, had three sons: Frank in 1948, Steve in 1952 and Mark in 1958. When I first started dating their son Steve in the 1970s, I must admit I found Doreen rather outspoken. She told us exactly what she thought, no holds barred -- how rusty our car was, how Steve's student digs had wall-to-wall dog hair, how threadbare Steve's cords were, and how university-educated kids like Steve and I were totally lacking in ordinary common sense! I won't comment on how accurate her comments were, but I will say this: Doreen only spoke her mind to the people she liked.
In the 1970s, Do and Mo had a fabulous social life, with Friends that partied and vacationed together all the time. They took cruises to exotic locations like Mexico, the Caribbean and Alaska one of their most memorable trips was to Hawaii in 1975. As the ISHERWOOD women looked through old photo albums to find photos for a collage to display at the funeral, we came across pictures of Doreen and her buddies in hula wear, modelling baby-doll pajamas, and posing with some very young, good-looking men who were not Mo or any of the other husbands! Back home, their gang had Englebert Humperdinck parties, bon-voyage parties, welcome-back parties, nifty-fifty parties -- any excuse would do. And for each occasion, Doreen would write a funny poem.
My kids always called Doreen "Freezie Grandma." That was because she would serve Mr. Freeze pops when we came to visit. Even years later, when the kids had outgrown Mr. Freeze pops, the name still stuck. Doreen and her granddaughters did ceramics together -- making garden elves, beer steins, ducks, angels, and more. Doreen also loved holding garage sales. She had one warning for her "saling" buddies. She'd say, "When I'm gone, don't you dare sell my good china for 10 cents a plate at some bloody garage sale!"
The last few years were tough ones for Doreen, as she struggled with cancer and other ailments. But throughout those years, she demonstrated that she was a strong and determined woman. When her eldest grand-daughter, Tara-Lyn, announced her engagement to Christopher CHORLEY in early 2001, Tara and Doreen set about making 150 ceramic candle holders -- one for each guest at the wedding. Doreen was already struggling with health problems at that time, and it seemed highly unlikely that she would ever last the year-and-a-half until the wedding.
But not only did she last, she also looked absolutely fantastic as she saw her oldest grandchild married in June, 2002. And for those who attended the wedding, the little candle-holders provide not only a memory of Tara-Lyn and Chris's celebration, but also of the special grandmother who helped make them.
Colleen is Doreen's daughter-in-law.

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HILLABY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-28 published
HORN, Helen Joyce (née WHITING)
Born on October 16, 1925 in Aurora. Died on Saturday, July 26, 2003 at the Willet Hospital in Paris, Ontario of complications from Parkinson's Disease. Beloved wife of James, devoted mother of Brian and Pauline HORN and Brenda and Mike HILLABY. Cherished Nana of Kevin and Peter HORN and Kiera HILLABY; Survived by her sister Doris KNAPP and predeceased by her sister Grace YOUNG. Resident of St. George, Ontario and member of Holy Trinity Anglican Church. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service to celebrate her life will be held at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, St. George on Saturday, August 9 at 2: 00 p.m. Reception to follow at the family home. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Parkinson's Foundation would be appreciated. Arrangements by Wm. Kipp Funeral Home, Paris 519-4423061.

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HILLEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
HILLEN, James
The family regrets to announce the death of James HILLEN, formerly of Montreal and Ottawa, in Bermuda on June 12, 2003. Born April 20, 1920, Belfast, he died peacefully after a short illness and was buried on the 17th June, 2003. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Margaret (FINLAYSON) Bermuda. A sister, Susan (J. D. McSHANE) Ottawa. His daughter Susan, (Dr. Simon COTE) United Arab Emirates. His son, Douglas (Allison MAITLAND) Bermuda. His grandchildren, Georges COTE, Montreal. Amy CÔTÉ (Emmanuel DAVALOS) Montreal. James, Christian, and Samantha HILLEN, Bermuda. His great-grand_son, Loic DAVALOS, Montreal. Mr. HILLEN joined the Black Watch Royal Highland Regiment of Canada in 1936 and served overseas from 1940-1945. He was captured at Dieppe and was detained for over two years as a prisoner-of-war in Germany. After his repatriation to Canada he studied at McGill University, graduating with a C.A. degree in 1955. He was a life member of both the Quebec and Ontario Order of Chartered Accountants as well as the Canadian Institute. He began his career with Cunnard Steamship Co. and then worked for a group of shipping interests and was instrumental in their relocation to Bermuda in 1961. In Bermuda he also worked for the Bermuda Hospitals Board and Ancon. A keen golfer, he was also a 20 year member of the Lions Club and an active member of Christ Church, Warwick. He will be sadly missed by his family and Friends.
Died This Day -- Louis Hémon, 1913
Monday, July 7, 2003 - Page R5
Novelist born in Brest, France, on October 12, 1880; 1911, immigrated to Montreal; moved to the Lac-St-Jean region of Quebec to work on backwoods farm; used experience to write Maria Chapdelaine, a classic account of Quebec habitant life; killed in a railway accident in Northern Ontario; book published posthumously.

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HILLHOUSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-04 published
LEE, Florence Lillian (Flo)
Passed away peacefully at Saint Mary's Hospital New Westminster June 25, 2003. Born Florence MINCHINTON at Napanee, Ontario, June 18, 1909. She was for 62 years the loving wife of William Cyril (Cy) who died November last. Flo will be affectionately remembered by their son Randy, brother-in-law Kenneth LEE (Judy,) cousins, among them Neil HILLHOUSE, Bill HAMER, Vera TABER, Donabelle OLENICK and Jean WINSLADE and very many Friends. She was predeceased by her brother James who is survived by his wife Audrey. Flo worked as a professional secretary and was a member of the Canouver Club. Married to Cy in 1940 she went with him to the Royal Canadian Air Force base Ucluelet to assist with the Young Men's Christian Association War Services. After moving to New Westminster where she and Cy lived in a house they had designed together she volunteered with the Royal Columbian Hospital Auxiliary. An avid bridge player, Flo spent many memorable hours with her neighbourhood Friends and was always ready to share happiness or problems. She will be much missed. Thanks of the family goes to the staff at Canada Way Care Centre and Saint Mary's Hospital for their kindness. At her request there will be no service. Memorial donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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HILLIARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-02 published
An active life of kindness and empathy
The wife of former Globe and Mail editor and senator always reached out to others
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, April 2, 2003 - Page R7
In Florence DOYLE, Friends and family saw someone who throughout her life actively lived her Catholic faith and embodied the qualities of kindness and compassion.
"My mom was always very concerned about the people in her immediate reach," said her daughter Judith DOYLE. " Her sense of empathy and concern for others guided her. People felt safe near her."
Whether it was chauffeuring her family around or taking an elderly neighbour on an outing to the horse races, Mrs. DOYLE, wife of former Globe and Mail editor and senator Richard (Dic) DOYLE, was always conscious of others. Mrs. DOYLE died on March 20 in a Toronto hospital after suffering a stroke. She was 78.
Known as Flo to family and Friends, Mrs. DOYLE also earned the affectionate nickname of "Sarge" from her family for her knack of keeping watch over their schedules and well-being. At one point, she was the only family member with a driver's licence and would faithfully drive her husband to work and their children to various places. She also kept track of the family's money matters and would ensure at tax season that everyone filed on time. Later, she nursed her husband through a bout with throat cancer and with diabetes.
"Her family was the centrepiece of her life," said Colin McCULLOUGH, a former Globe reporter and newspaper publisher.
Sharing in her husband's professional life, Mrs. DOYLE travelled with him, attended functions and opened their home to Friends and colleagues. "I didn't enjoy myself without her," Mr. DOYLE said.
Aside from her responsibilities at home and at church, where she helped with various charitable works, Mrs. DOYLE enjoyed a good game of cards. Her bridge club met regularly for 40 years. One favourite memory was from a trip she and Mr. DOYLE took to China in the early 1980s, when she travelled down the Yangtze River playing cards with their guides.
Florence Barbara CHANDA was born on November 30, 1924 in Lynedoch, Ontario, the youngest of six children to farmers Frank and Franis CHANDA. Her early ancestors had cleared the land in this southwestern part of the province using workhorses. They grew turnips and later tobacco. Mrs. DOYLE was very close to her mother, who considered her last child "a gift" because she had her later in life, Judith DOYLE said.
After her father was killed in a car accident when she was about eight years old, Florence was put to work in the tobacco fields and remained on the farm until her older brother took over and she and her mother moved to nearby Chatham. In town, she attended a Catholic high school but soon suffered another tragedy when her mother died. Left without parents, she moved into a local boarding house run by a generous woman remembered as Mrs. Con SHAY/SHEA.
After high school, she found work at Libby's Foods and rose to the rank of office manager. Around that time, she met Dic DOYLE, a young reporter at The Chatham Daily News. The couple married in Chatham in January, 1953.
Not long after they were married, Mrs. DOYLE moved to Toronto, where her husband was by that time at The Globe and Mail. Hired as a copy reader on the news desk in 1951, Mr. DOYLE became editor and then the paper's editor-in-chief from 1963 to 1983.
Judith DOYLE remembers her parent's house as an open and welcoming place. Late at night after Mr. DOYLE and his colleagues left The Globe's office, they would often venture over to the house to talk and unwind from a busy day.
Cameron SMITH, a former editor at The Globe, said of Mrs. DOYLE: "She was one of the most welcoming people that I've known. She made me feel good about whatever I was doing."
Judith will never forget the only Christmas she experienced away from her mother. It was the early 1980s and Judith was in Nicaragua to make a documentary. Mrs. DOYLE managed to track her down and sent a Christmas cake. When the cake arrived, Judith remembers the joy of slicing it into slivers for a group of foreign journalists.
Years later when Judith made another documentary about an Ojibway reserve in Northern Ontario, Mrs. DOYLE befriended some of the people from the reserve when they visited Toronto.
Mrs. DOYLE extended her kindness to animals. Working in the garden of her Toronto home, Mrs. DOYLE could be heard chattering away to the birds and animals, Judith said. The family has photographs of her feeding foxes in the backyard.
"She was the kind of person who had raccoons following her around, " Judith said.
After Mr. DOYLE was appointed to the Senate in 1985, the couple moved to Ottawa. Their years in the capital were among their happiest. They made close Friends and Mrs. DOYLE enjoyed heading across the river to Hull with a friend and a few rolls of quarters to do some gambling. "She had the capacity for developing Friendships that went on throughout her life," Mr. DOYLE said. "She was interested in people."
Florence DOYLE leaves her husband Richard, sister Clara HILLIARD, son Sean and daughter Judith.

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HILLMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-21 published
Elizabeth Audrey HEILIG (née HILLMER)
Daughter of the late Robert and Mabel HILLMER of Southampton Ontario and long time resident of Oakville, Ontario Died peacefully and with grace in her 98th year on February 19th, 2003. She was predeceased by her husband Carl, her son Kenneth, her brother George HILLMER and her sister-in-law Margaret HEILIG. She will be missed by her son Bob (Margaret), daughter Margie (Ron), daughter-in-law Kay SCOTT and her ten grandchildren- John, Katherine HEINRICHS, Nancy, Mike; Chris, David, Karen GRANT, Linda, James; Daniel ROGERS. She is also survived by her sister-in-law Alice HEILIG of Hamilton and 15 great-grandchildren. We would like to thank Tita BAGUISA for her devoted care of Elizabeth and the staff of North York Seniors Health Centre for their sensitive support. A Memorial Service will be held on February 22nd at the North York Seniors Health Centre, 2 Buchan Court, North York at 2: 00pm. In lieu of flowers donations may be sent to the Marine Heritage Society, Box 421, Southampton, Ontario N0H 2L0 or your favourite charity.

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HILLMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
BEST, Winnifred McDonald
Winn BEST died peacefully on June 24, 2003, at the age of 95. Loving mother of Catherine CARTER (Donald) of Kingston and Michael BEST (Patti) of Waterloo. Beloved grandmother of Ian CARTER (Chrissie YAO), Colin CARTER (Toni THORTON), Gillian BEST, David BEST and Kerri BEST and great-grandmother to Nathan CARTER. Loving aunt to Elizabeth McDONALD (Ken WEST) and Anne HILLMER and her children Victoria and Andrew. Special friend to Norbert MacKENZIE. Predeceased by her husband John BEST, her brother Murray McDONALD and her sister-in-law and best friend, Catherine McDONALD. Winn lived for her family and Friends, her warmth and empathy will not be forgotten. A memorial service will be held at the church that she grew up in, St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 9860 Keele Street, Maple, Ontario, on Thursday, July 3, 2003 at 1: 30 p.m. Donations in memory of Winn may be made to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 9860 Keele Street, Maple, Ontario L6A 1R6.

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HILLMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
MUTRIE, Dr. Eric Tolton, M.D.
Of Guelph, died at the Guelph General Hospital, Sunday, December 21, 2003, in his 91st year. son of the late Alice MUTRIE (TOLTON) and Major Robert J. MUTRIE. Beloved husband of the late Edith Grace MUTRIE (COWAN.) Dearly loved father of Nancy (Felix) BAELE of Ottawa, the late Alice BEZANSON (Keith,) Robert (Heather) MUTRIE of Orleans, and David (Jane) MUTRIE of Thunder Bay. Loving grandfather of Ian and Amy BAELE, Kate and Sarah BEZANSON, Megan, Erin, and Laura MUTRIE, Julia and Eric A. MUTRIE. He is survived by his sister, Doreen HILLMER. After he graduated from Queen's University in 1937, Eric worked briefly for the Pineland Timber Company and later was in private practice in Elora. He served in the Royal Canadian Medical Corp for the duration of the second world war, seeing tours of duty in England, North Africa, Italy and Washington. After the war, he returned to Guelph where he was a general practitioner for forty years. Highly regarded as a compassionate, dedicated physician with a lively sense of humor, he touched many lives and will be greatly missed. The family is appreciative of the care he received from Nan WIDDOWS, R.N., nurse practitioner, and from Joanne HOLT. At his request, a private memorial service was held on December 23. Donations in his memory may be made to the Foundation of the Guelph General Hospital, 115 Delhi Street, Guelph, N1E 4J4, St. Joseph's Health Care Foundation, 70 Westmount Rd., Guelph, N1H 5H7 or to the charity of your choice.

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HILLSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
HILLSON
-In loving memory of Maxwell Alexander "Bud" Hillson, who passed away at the age of 77 years. Husband of the late Katherine "Kay" (TURINECK,) July 4, 1999.
You had a smile for everyone
You had a heart of gold
You left the sweetest memories
This world could ever hold
No one knows how much we miss you
No one knows the bitter pain
We have suffered since we lost you
Life has never been the same
Those we love don't go away
They walk beside us every day
Unseen, unheard but always near
Still loved, still missed and very dear.
A father's legacy is not riches
possessions or worldly goods
It's the way he lived,
the lives he touched, the promises he kept
It's the man he was
Your life, Dad was a job well done
and now you have left us to be with Mom.
Loving father of Bernadine, husband Phillip HARRIS of Ottawa, Maxine, husband Ronald ALBERTS of London, Edward of Little Current, Roseanne of Calgary and Kevin of Little Current. Remembered by brothers Maxime, wife Shirley, Randolph wife Helen. By sisters Marie, husband Gene ARMOUR, Agnes CARDINAL, Rita DUNDON, Judith, husband Wifred GUAY, Georgina GAGNON and Dorothy MASSON.

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HILLSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-22 published
HILLSON
-In loving memory of Katherine "Kay" dear wife of the late Maxwell "Bud" HILLSON. Mother, Grandmother, and Great Grandmother who passed away December 25, 1996.
In a quiet country cemetery
Where the gentle breezes blow
Lies the one we love so dearly
Whom we lost seven years ago.
In a matter of seconds you were taken
From the ones you loved and loved you
Thoughts of you are always near
Your laughter we can still hear.
Many think the wounds are healed
But little know the pain we feel
Your strength and courage were like none we've seen
Now you come to us only in our dreams.
So for you we will keep your memory alive forever
Until we are all together again
God's garden must be beautiful
Because he only takes the best
And that is you.
-We love and miss you. Bernadine, Kevin, Eddy, Maxine, Roseanne, Robbie, your grandchildren and great grandchildren.

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HILTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-12 published
Three cheers for a funny fellow
Like his hapless Canadian hero, he often found himself in hilarious situations
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, June 12, 2003 - Page R9
Once in the middle of an interview at the Toronto airport, writer Donald JACK left to fetch a document from his car. Notorious for a sense of direction so poor he found it difficult to navigate through a city park, let alone the airport's massive parking lot, Mr. JACK took so long to find his vehicle that by the time he returned the interviewers had gone.
Like Bartholomew Bandy, the hapless hero of The Bandy Papers, Mr. JACK's eight-volume comic-novel series describing an Ottawa Valley boy's adventures during both world wars and between, the author often found himself in hilarious situations, made the more so by his telling.
A three-time winner of the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour, Mr. JACK died last week at his home in England. He was Listeners were reduced to tears of laughter by his tales of construction disasters while having a villa built in Spain; a house sale falling through on closing day; and an aging bright yellow car named Buttercup, whose sun roof shattered soon after it was searched for drugs at the Spanish-French border, showering Mr. JACK with glass, insects and rust.
Once, while being toured with his daughter around the offices of his publisher, McClelland and Stewart, Mr. JACK entered the boardroom and shouted with surprise. There on the carpet lay a large amount of dog excrement left by an employee's pet. In his Bandy-like way, the writer very nearly stepped into it.
"If you could choose one author out of the entire world who during a visit to his publisher would stumble across this, it would be Donald JACK," said Douglas GIBSON, president and publisher of McClelland and Stewart, who knew the writer for more than 30 years.
"Things would go wrong for Don, very seldom caused by himself," said Munroe SCOTT, a close friend of more than 45 years. "He would narrate all this stuff either in person or in a letter and make it all hilarious, because he always saw, in retrospect at any rate, the funny side of things. You'd be doubled up with laughter."
Despite Mr. JACK's incident-prone nature, it would be a mistake to see Mr. JACK as a buffoon, said Mr. SCOTT, also a writer. "He was enormously well read, erudite and could handle the language with aplomb at many levels. He could make me feel like a Philistine."
Said author Austin CLARKE, who was Mr. JACK's neighbour for five years during the 1960s. "He was a quiet, reserved, retiring kind of man. You would never have known he was a writer."
Mr. JACK's Leacock medals came for three volumes of The Bandy Papers: Three Cheers for Me, in 1963, That's Me in the Middle, in 1974 and Me Bandy, You Cissie, in 1980. Published between 1963 and 1996, they still enjoy a loyal following, including a Web site which draws mail from around the world. Six of the eight volumes were recently reissued by McClelland and Stewart.
Drawn from Mr. JACK's fascination with the First World War, the rural people he met in the Ottawa Valley and his time in the Royal Air Force, The Bandy Papers feature the blundering Bartholomew Wolfe Bandy, who in the first volume, Three Cheers for Me, inadvertently becomes a hero, despite capturing his own colonel by mistake.
Ensuing volumes follow Mr. Bandy's adventures through to the Second World War. Although devastatingly funny, they also describe war's horrors and the realities of the home front, and lampoon war's leaders.
Mr. Bandy encounters and influences historical figures, such as then British minister of defence Winston Churchill, and generously offers him use of the altered Bandy phrase "blood, sweat, toil and tears."
While best known for The Bandy Papers, Mr. JACK wrote countless documentary film scripts, stage, television and radio plays, as well as two non-fiction books: the history of a Toronto radio station, Sinc, Betty and the Morning Man, and another about medicine in Canada, Rogues, Rebels and Geniuses.
His third play, The Canvas Barricade, won first prize in the Stratford Shakespearean Playwriting Competition in 1960. Produced in 1961, it was the first, and remains the only, original Canadian play performed on the main stage of the Stratford Festival.
Mr. JACK, however, did not see much of its opening. He left the auditorium for the lobby. "During the performance, we'd be aware of a crack of light from a door opening slightly and a white face would stare through, then vanish for a while, before another door would open a crack, and the same apparition would fleetingly appear," Mr. Scott said.
Born on December 6, 1924 in Radcliffe, Lancashire, England, Donald Lamont JACK was one of four children of a British doctor and a nurse from Prince Edward Island. After attending Bury Grammar School in Lancashire and Marr College in Scotland, he gained enough qualifications to attend London University.
While stationed in Germany with the Royal Air Force in the last year of the Second World War, Mr. JACK attempted short-story writing, but thought he lacked talent. After his mother asked him, "Isn't it about time you left home?" Mr. JACK immigrated to Canada in 1951.
Interspersed with jobs as a member of a surveying crew in Alberta and a bank teller in Toronto, Mr. JACK studied at the Canadian Theatre School in Toronto run by Sterndale BENNETT. There he wrote two plays, one of which drew praise from theatre critic Nathan COHEN and a job offer from a film Company. Mr. COHEN later wrote Mr. Scott, decrying Canadian theatre's "shameful treatment" of Mr. JACK, which largely ignored him.
A theatrical background enhanced Mr. JACK's writing, according to Mr. Gibson. "His dialogue was terrific and his scene-setting was excellent."
After leaving the school, with the encouragement of his wife, Nancy, whom he married in 1952, Mr. JACK worked in the script department of Crawley Films in Ottawa. Two years later in 1955, the company's head, Budge CRAWLEY, let him go because he thought Mr. JACK would never make a good writer.
A dry first year of freelancing followed, until in 1957 Mr. JACK sold the play version of his novelette Breakthrough, published in Maclean's, to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television. It became the first Canadian television play to be simultaneously telecast to the United States.
He never looked back. By 1972, A Collection of Canadian Plays, Vol. 1, which included Exit Muttering by Mr. JACK, noted he had written 40 television plays, 35 documentary film scripts, several radio plays and four stage plays. The works included Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Armed Forces training films for the National Film Board and often demanded a great deal of research.
Mr. JACK wrote with military discipline, beginning at 9 a.m., taking tea at 11 a.m., lunch at 1 p.m., tea again at 3 p.m. and finishing at 5 p.m. "All my life, I swear, that routine never altered," said one of his daughters, Lulu HILTON.
Persisting in writing drafts in pen and ink long before adopting the typewriter and, much later, a word processor, Mr. JACK often developed storylines while walking. A 1959 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation press release explains Mr. JACK's dedication: "My self-discipline is to keep reminding myself of how lucky I am to be able to be the only thing I ever really wanted to be -- a writer."
During the early 1980s, Mr. JACK and his wife returned to England to be near their daughters who had emigrated there, and their grandchildren. Mr. JACK missed Canada's open spaces and its classless society, and visited often.
At the time of his death, he was working on the ninth volume of The Bandy Papers. He died on or about June 2 of a massive stroke at his home in Telford, Shropshire, England. He leaves his two daughters, Maren and Lulu, six grandchildren and one great-grandchild, a brother and a sister. His wife Nancy died in 1991.

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HILTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
DOYLE, The Honourable Richard James, O.C. Died peacefully on April 8, 2003 in the Toronto Hospital in his 80th year. Dic DOYLE was born on March 10th, 1923 in Toronto and moved with his parents, Lillian and James DOYLE, to Chatham, Ontario where he attended McKeough Public School and the Chatham Collegiate Institute with his brothers William and Francis and his sister, Ruby Louise KEIL, all of whom predeceased him. He would want us to mention that he was the grand_son of Fan Gibson HILTS who taught him when he was ten to draw parallel columns on brown wrapping paper and to write stories to fill them. In January 1940, he joined the reporting staff of the Chatham Daily News where he remained until 1942 when he joined the Royal Canadian Air Force. After training in Vancouver and Nova Scotia, he joined 115 Squadron Royal Air Force Bomber Command. He was engaged in operations in the European Theatre until the war's end when his crew was assigned to the movement of Canadian Prisoners of War from liberated camps to the United Kingdom. He retired from the Royal Canadian Air Force with the rank of flying officer. In the summer of 1945, DOYLE returned to the Chatham Daily News as city editor. Apart from a one-year stint at a public relations job at the Canada and Dominion Sugar Company, he remained at the Chatham News until 1951 when he was hired as a copy reader at The Globe and Mail in Toronto. He married the lovely Florence CHANDA in Chatham in 1953, and they moved together to Toronto, taking a small apartment on Harbord Street where the University of Toronto Robarts Library now stands. They moved to the Beaches before their children Judith and Sean arrived in the late 1950's. Subsequent jobs at The Globe and Mail included Night City Editor, Editor of the newly-launched Weekly Globe and Mail. When he was called to the Senate of Canada in 1985, he had been editor of the paper for 20 years - a longer period than that served by any editor other than the paper's founder. In the course of that service he received honourary doctorates from St. Francis Xavier and King's College Universities, and was named an Officer of the Order of Canada. In his years in the Senate, DOYLE was active in a number of committees, in particular the Internal Economy and Legal and Constitutional Committees. When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY asked DOYLE to come to Ottawa, he was aware of his record in print as a Senate critic. He invited the editor to share with others in an on-going campaign to enhance the effectiveness of the Upper Chamber in the Parliamentary process. When DOYLE left the Senate, he recalled the challenge and insisted the goal was within sight. Richard DOYLE was the author of two books, The Royal Story and Hurly Burly: A Time at the Globe. He was named to the Canadian Newspaper Hall of Fame. Richard DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean, and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. After celebrating their 50th anniversary in January of this year, Dic's beloved wife Flo passed away suddenly and peacefully on March 20. They were parted for less than three weeks. Funeral service will be held at Trinity College Chapel, 6 Hoskin Avenue, on Wednesday, April 16 at 2: 30 p.m. A reception will follow. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, 20 Holly Street, Suite 101, Toronto M4S 3B1.

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