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"HEN" 2003 Obituary


HENDERSON  HENDREN  HENDRICKS  HENDRIE  HENDY  HENHAWK  HENLEY  HENNESSY  HENRY 

HENDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
Leafs trusted their doctor
Talented M.D. specialized in hand surgery. 'He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons.'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 3, 2003 - Page F10
Nothing about Jim MURRAY's hands indicated that he was a surgeon. Large and gnarled with undulating fingernails, those hands played bagpipes, patched up Toronto Maple Leafs and Team Canada players and restored form and function to other hands.
Dr. MURRAY, a plastic surgeon who was the first Canadian doctor to devote his practice to hand surgery, died last month at the age of 82.
"His hands looked more like those of a prize fighter than a surgeon. His fingers were bent, "said Robert McFARLANE, a retired plastic surgeon with a special interest in hands and a close friend of Dr. MURRAY. "It didn't seem to make a difference. He had tremendous skill."
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY brought together plastic and orthopedic surgeons to form a hand unit at Toronto's Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, the city's first. "His concept was to pull together the expertise of different surgeons, "said Paul BINHAMMER, once a student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at the hospital, now part of the Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
Dr. MURRAY assembled a highly skilled team. Among them were orthopedic surgeon Robert McMURTRY, who went on to become dean of medicine at the University of Western Ontario, and plastic surgeon and nerve expert Susan MacKINNON, who is now a professor in the United States.
But before rising to prominence in the field of hand surgery, Dr. MURRAY gained fame in hockey circles. Serving as one of the Toronto Maple Leafs team doctors from 1948 to 1964, he was greatly trusted by players. When cut during games on the road, they left their wounds unstitched until he could tend to them at home.
"He'd come at you with those fingers and they were just so big, you'd wonder how he was ever able to stitch as neat as he did," said former Leaf defenceman Bobby BAUN, who played professional hockey for 17 years.
Mr. BAUN estimates that Dr. MURRAY put in half of his 143 career stitches.
Under instructions from Leaf owner Conn SMYTHE, injured players were not to be rushed back into the lineup, according to Hugh SMYTHE, another Leaf doctor and Mr. SMYTHE's son. "This was a heavy and not always popular role, "he said.
During the 1964 Stanley Cup finals, it became especially challenging.
Entering Game 6, the Detroit Red Wings led the series against the Leafs 3-2. Playing in Detroit on April 23, with the scored tied at 3-3 in the third period, Mr. BAUN first was hit on his right leg by a slapshot from Gordie HOWE and then, after a faceoff, spun on the leg, which gave way.
X-rays delayed at Mr. BAUN's insistence showed a small broken bone, just above the ankle. He spent six weeks in a cast.
But that came after the series ended. During its sixth game, Mr. BAUN was tended to by Dr. MURRAY and other team doctors. After being carried off the ice, he asked Dr. MURRAY if he could hurt his leg any more. The doctor replied no. "Having someone like Jim tell me that, I could believe him, "Mr. BAUN said.
With his leg taped and frozen, Mr. BAUN continued playing. Within the first two minutes of the first overtime period, he scored the winning goal and kept the Leafs in the series.
Mr. BAUN didn't miss a shift during Game 7, and neither did teammate Red KELLY, who had torn knee ligaments during the previous game. The Leafs won the seventh game 4-0 and the Stanley Cup, their third in a row and their fifth during Dr. MURRAY's time with the team.
That year, Dr. MURRAY resigned and 20 years later joked to The Toronto Star that it was he who had led them to the five Stanley Cups.
If he took the connection between his presence and the Leafs' wins lightly, Punch IMLACH, then the team's coach, did not. Mr. IMLACH had become convinced that Dr. MURRAY brought the team good luck, the doctor told the Star in a 1972 story.
The newspaper was interviewing Dr. MURRAY about his appointment as a doctor to Team Canada for the Canada-Russia hockey series. In the article headlined "Good luck charm for Team Canada, " he recalled how during the 1967 Stanley Cup playoffs, Mr. IMLACH invited him to a Leaf game in Chicago, believing that he would bring the team good luck.
"If it had been anybody else but Punch, I'd have dismissed it as a joke. But he really needed to win and he honestly believed my presence would make a difference, "Dr. MURRAY was quoted as saying.
The Leafs won not only that game, but, with Dr. MURRAY in attendance for the remainder of the series, the Stanley Cup. The Leafs haven't won a Stanley Cup since.
And the Star's headline proved prophetic. Team Canada won the Canada-Russia series when Paul HENDERSON scored with 34 seconds left in the eighth game.
Born in Toronto on May 14, 1920, James Findlay MURRAY was the youngest of three children. His father ran a store at Yonge and Queen Streets in downtown Toronto and died before the birth of his third child.
Dr. MURRAY attributed his curvy fingernails to his mother's malnutrition when she was pregnant with him, said his youngest son Hugh. Within a few years, she had remarried, and his stepfather helped to raise him.
An avid athlete, Dr. MURRAY played football during his high school and university days, so much so that once, when forbidden by his mother to play for his high-school team because he had had pneumonia, he practised and played in secret.
That lasted until his picture appeared in the Star running for a touchdown. He was immediately placed on the disabled list.
Awarded the George Biggs trophy for sportsmanship, leadership and scholarship, Dr. MURRAY graduated from medical school in 1943 and spent two years in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps, finishing as a captain.
After a year of general practice in Belleville, Ontario, he trained in plastic surgery at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with A. W. FARMER, whom many consider to be the father of Canadian hand surgery.
A humble man, who drove less-than-fancy cars, Dr. MURRAY was known for his ability to relate to everyone. "He was a doctor and an esteemed member of society, but it didn't matter to him," Hugh MURRAY said. "He considered himself an everyday person. He was as comfortable, if not more comfortable, dealing with just working guys."
In 1953, Dr. MURRAY joined the Toronto East General and Orthopedic Hospital as head of plastic surgery and organized a specialized hand clinic, according to Bernd NEU, another former student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at North York General Hospital.
"It's because the hand is such an important part of the body, not just physically, but aesthetically, "Dr. MURRAY, a specialist in soft tissue and the reconstruction of flexor tendons, said in 1984 to explain the dedication of hand surgeons.
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY left Toronto East General, where he had been surgeon-in-chief since 1976, to head the hand unit at Sunnybrook Medical Centre, taking a cut in pay to do so.
At the time, plastic surgeons could earn $2,000 for a face-lift and $106.50 for a carpal-tunnel release.
Dr. MURRAY derived great satisfaction from the help his hands gave others. Once in a clinic at Toronto East General, he and Dr. NEU came upon a patient with only a thumb and little finger on one hand.
"This is a wonderful hand, "he told Dr. NEU. " Look at how dirty and callused it is."
After several surgeries, Dr. MURRAY had restored the worker's hand to the point where the man could use it once again to earn a living.
"What to other people would look like a devastating loss, to Dr. MURRAY and the patient, this was a hand to be proud of, Dr. NEU said.
As a hand consultant beginning in 1974 at the Downsview Rehabilitation Centre of the Workers' Compensation Board, Dr. MURRAY treated those injured in industrial accidents, often surmounting language barriers to do so.
"He could speak to them [the patients] in basic English, so they could understand how seriously he took their problems, and how everything was being done that could be done for them, "Dr. NEU said.
In a 1996 letter to Dr. MURRAY, another of his former residents recalled how once on rounds, the doctor lifted the sheets to examine a paraplegic patient, only to find the man soiled. Instead of calling for hospital staff to clean the man, Dr. MURRAY performed the task himself.
"That little lesson reminded me that being a doctor is not just being a cutter, "the physician wrote.
Not only did he have a natural way with people, Dr. MURRAY was a gifted surgeon.
"He was a talented person with original ways of doing things," Dr. McFARLANE said. "He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons."
Appointed a lecturer at the University of Toronto in 1953, Dr. MURRAY was first an assistant and associate professor, becoming a full professor in 1979. He developed the first hand surgery fellowship training program in Canada in 1981, Dr. NEU said.
As well as teaching at the university, Dr. MURRAY trained surgeons during two trips to Southeast Asia as a volunteer with Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc. Medico and led a group of hand surgeons to study techniques in micro-surgery in China during the late 1970s.
At the medical meetings Dr. MURRAY often attended, he impressed Dr. McFARLANE with his ability to discuss surgery. "He had a very common-sense approach to a surgical problem, and when everyone had something to say about a problem, he would get up and clarify it very nicely, "Dr. McFARLANE said.
A founder of MANUS Canada, a society of hand surgeons, once a president of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Dr. MURRAY was honoured by the U.S. society at "Murray Day" in 1990 with tributes from past presidents.
Stricken with Alzheimer's disease toward the end of his life, Dr. MURRAY died in Collingwood, Ontario, on April 4. He leaves his wife of 57 years, Shirley, and his children, John, Bill, Claire and Hugh.

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HENDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-07 published
SCHEFFEL, Maxwell Lewis (Lew)
Of Niagara-on-the-Lake died peacefully after a short illness at the Greater Niagara General Hospital on May 1, 2003 aged 83. Cherished husband for 35 years of Marie Virginia (LAVIS.) Beloved brother of Clifford A. SCHEFFEL and his wife Helen (HENDERSON) of Cambridge. Lovingly remembered by his nieces and nephews Kenneth M. SCHEFFEL, Ronald P. SCHEFFEL, Susan E. BOUGHTON and Sandra L. WANKLIN and their families. Remembered affectionately also by Albert R. LAVIS and Georgette and Victoria E. and Edward E. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. He is survived also by many cousins in Canada, Germany and U.S.A. B.A.Sc. Toronto 1945, he was a long-time employee of Stone and Webster, Toronto. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Niagara-on-the-Lake on Thursday May 29, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, if desired donations may be made to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church or the charity of your choice. Arrangements entrusted to the Morgan Funeral Home, Niagara-on- the-Lake.
On line guest register
www.morganfuneral.com

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HENDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-14 published
PAISLEY, Margaret C.
Marnie was born in Berlin, Ontario November 1, 1906, and died in Waterloo on June 11, 2003.
She was the daughter of Talmon and Martha RIEDER (ANTHES) both of whom predeceased her, as did her dear sister Helen HENDERSON, her brother Edward, and her brother Paul. She was also predeceased by her husband Elmer and her great-granddaughter, Victoria Paisley D'AGOSTINO.
Marnie's life was anchored by a deep faith which carried her through adversity but also inspired her to remarkable accomplishment. She graduated with an arts degree from the University of Toronto in 1929. Following her graduation she joined Emma KAUFMAN in Japan where she spent a year helping to build the Young Women's Christian Association in that country. Her travels through the far east had a lasting impact on her life thereafter.
She was always active in the United Church, sometimes as a Sunday School teacher, or as a summer camp director, or as a Canadian Girls In Training leader. Later, after the family moved to Toronto, she led a Family Life Education program which pioneered a nursery school for working mothers.
She was a fine athlete, who played women's ice hockey at the University of Toronto. She was an inspiring teacher. She taught high school Guidance and English at Kitchener Collegiate Institute and at Waterloo Collegiate between 1955 and 1969 where her warmth and generous spirit fostered lasting Friendships, and her devotion to young people was an inspiration.
Her compassion, integrity and wisdom made her a good listener and counsellor even into the last days of her life. She shared her knowledge of wild flowers, trees and astronomy, just as she shared herself with all who needed help, or love, or an arm to lean on. Caring for others came as natural as breathing itself. Her last breath is gone but her memory will continue to shape the lives of her Friends and family. She has surely joined the fellowship of the Saints.
She is lovingly remembered by her children Penny HOBSON and her husband Richard of Baden, and Ian and his wife Linda of Aurora, and by her grandchildren Gregory, Martha, Aaron, Matthew, Jill and Margaret. She also leaves six adoring great-grandchildren and many loving nieces and nephews, especially Bonnie PASSMORE and Beth HENDERSON who found a nurturing substitute mother in Aunt Marnie after the death of their own mother when they were very young.
Marnie's family will receive Friends at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, in Waterloo, from 2 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, June 22, 2003. A service to celebrate her life will be held in the chapel of the funeral home on Monday, June 23, 2003, at 11 a.m., with Reverend Harold STEAD officiating. Following cremation, a family committal service will be held at Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener.
Following the service, Friends and relatives are invited to the Reception Room of the funeral home for refreshments and a time to visit with the family.
Those wishing to make memorial donations are encouraged to consider the Kitchener-Waterloo Young Women's Christian Association, or the Victoria D'Agostino Children's Fund at the K-W Community Foundation. Donations can be arranged through the funeral home, phone (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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HENDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-22 published
ARDIEL, Ruth Winnifred (née FRANCIS) 89 years.
Died peacefully at Windsor Regional Hospital-Western Campus on Tuesday, October 21, 2003. Dearest wife of the late J.R. ARDIEL (1973.) Beloved mother of Joan DUFF, Karen MEYERS and Susan and David RUCH. Dearest sister of June and Fred ROEMMELE. Loving grandmother of Melissa MEYERS and Jim DONOHUE, Jay MEYERS and Tina ROBBINS, Allison RUCH and Ryan SMITH, Dave RUCH and Anne Marie PETTINATO, Julie SANDO, and John PECARARO, Jackie and Frank HAMILTON, Michelle and Joe GRECO and Natalie DUFF. Great grandmother of Max and Miranda PECARARO, Scott and Mathew HAMILTON and Kaity and Nicholas GRECO. Dear Aunt to her special nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews. Remembered by several cousins in London and Toronto. Born on a homestead in Marengo, Saskatchewan to the late Anne and Alfred FRANCIS; pre-deceased by brothers Lloyd (1912), Bruce (Royal Canadian Air Force, 1943) and her sister Dorothy HENDERSON (1964.) Ruth was a long-standing member of Beach Grove Golf and Country Club, Windsor and Tamarac Golf and Country Club, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Visiting in the Walter D. Kelly Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1969 Wyandotte St. East, Windsor, Ontario on Thursday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. The complete funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday, October 24, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend William GALLAGHER officiating. Cremation with interment later in Greenlawn Memorial Cemetery. In kindness memorial tributes to the charity of you choice, Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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HENDREN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-03 published
Valetta May ROSE
By Jim PATTERSON Thursday, April 3, 2003 - Page A22
Valetta May ROSE
Domestic worker, farmer and comic writer's muse. Born in Warsaw, Ontario, January 9, 1912. Died January 16, in Toronto, of a stroke, aged 91.
On January 16, 2003, Valetta ROSE, 91, spoke with her brother, Ken DRAIN, and her niece, Dora BARR, by phone from her home in Norwood, Ontario Then she got into a limousine to go to a large family party in Toronto, to celebrate her nephew David PATTERSON's birthday. On the way, she sat with her great-nephew Paul, his partner Cathy and their six-week-old daughter, Kira, and was delighted to have the baby beside her for the trip.
There were more than 100 people at the party, but Valetta held court, greeting family members. Then, at 7 p.m., she suffered a stroke, and died instantly in her daughter Beattie's arms.
Born on January 9, 1912, Valetta was the second child of David DRAIN and Christina EDWARDS, who farmed near Warsaw, Ontario The DRAIN household was full of fiddle, piano and song; people arrived by horse and sled for music in the parlour, food in the kitchen and children everywhere. When Valetta's mother went into labour to deliver her sister Cora, Valetta's older brother Ivan was told to take his 20-month-old sister to grandma's house. Ivan was 3 and the house was two kilometres away -- but those were different times. Off the pair toddled, perfectly capable and perfectly safe.
As teenagers, Valetta and Cora set off for Toronto to work as domestics, eventually earning a respectable $25 per month plus room and board.
In 1943, Valetta married the love of her life, Ted ROSE. They farmed together outside Warsaw for 32 years. One night just after they were married, they went to Peterborough to see a movie. Afterward, walking up George Street, Valetta mused aloud about how lovely it would be to own a bedroom suite like the one in a store's display window. The next day, Ted came home with the furniture. Valetta never did discover how he'd afforded it.
In 1975, Ted and Valetta sold the farm and retired to Norwood. Ted died in 1987.
Last year, Valetta set off for Scotland with her daughters Beattie and Judy, their husbands, Bob BECHTEL and David GORDON, and Judy and David's two sons, Ian and Paul. Valetta announced, "On this trip, I just want to enjoy being all together." For three weeks, they drove around staying at bed and breakfasts and exploring the islands off the north coast. She was planning another trip this year -- to Judy's home in Vancouver.
For 40 years, Valetta followed the advice of one Dr. JARVIS, whose book Folk Medicine taught the benefits of lecithin, and she followed his prescription for a daily teaspoon of apple cider vinegar mixed with honey in a half glass of water to keep herself free from the worst of arthritis and other afflictions. Valetta knew that the secret of caring for others was simply to enjoy their company and, as the family "Information Central," loved to share stories of their successes.
She had her own place in Canadian cultural history. Filmmaker Norman JEWISON, a cousin, mentioned Valetta to writer Don HARRON, who immediately claimed her for use as the wife of his fictional character Charlie FARQUHARSON. Soon Valetta was credited with writing down Charlie's Hist'ry of Canada on those days when it was "too wet to plough." A highlight of Valetta's 90th birthday party was a card and framed photo from her "second husband."
Valetta made the best of every minute. She spent her last night on the bed that Ted had bought for her so many years before. Her spirit will delight family and Friends for years to come.
Jim PATTERSON is Valetta's sister Cora's youngest son. He was helped by Beattie, Ken, Cora HENDREN and Stephen PATTERSON.

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HENDRICKS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
DUNSMUIR, James Smith
Jimmy DUNSMUIR, on Saturday, February 15, at Hamilton General Hospital after a lengthy battle. Born in Kilmarnock, Scotland on January 17, 1918. Jim was married to Nancy WILSON of Ballyclare, Northern Ireland, who predeceased him in 1985. Survived by his daughter Mollie (Michael CLELAND) of Ottawa; his companion of 15 years, Mary Ann HENDRICKS of Hamilton; his brother David (Ermie) of Toronto; his sister Betty (Hodge) of Buffalo, New York; his nieces Judy of Toronto and Marcia of Illinois; his nephews, Derek of North Carolina, David of Vancouver, and Jim, Harry, Douglas, Bruce and Kevin all of Toronto. Predeceased on January 24, 2003, by Michael's mother Sheila of Vancouver; two families joined in sadness. Jim, who always described himself as ''a lover, not a fighter'', fought his way, with some reluctance but considerable success, from Dunkirk through North Africa. Sicily and Italy, from 1939-1945, for a war he thought was worth fighting. Thanks to the staff of the Hamilton General, in particular Kevin and Anna, and Ann RUSH. In lieu of donations, please consider when you make your next charitable gift, adding a little something in memory of Jim. Arrangements entrusted to Canadian Cremation Services, 80 Ottawa Street, North, Hamilton 905-545-8889.

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HENDRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-04 published
Died This Day -- 269 airline passengers, 1983
Thursday, September 4, 2003 - Page R9
All aboard Korean Air Lines flight 007 killed when plane shot down by Soviet fighter after straying into Soviet airspace; dead included nine Canadians: Mary Jane HENDRIE of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario; George PANAGOPOULOS, Marilou COVEY, Chun Lan YEH and San-Gi LIM, all of Toronto; François DE MASSY and François ROBERT of Montreal; Larry SAYERS of Stoney Creek, Ontario; and Rev. Jean-Paul GRÉGOIRE, a Tokyo resident.

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HENDY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
FOSTER, Douglas Mortimer
Died peacefully at the South Muskoka Memorial Hospital in Bracebridge, on Saturday, November 22nd, 2003 at the age of 88. Beloved husband of Mary Jean (née LYALL.) Predeceased by his first wife Marnie (née KERR.) Lovingly remembered by his children Lynn ARMSTRONG (Brock,) Wendy SHELLEY (Steven,) Doug FOSTER (Nancy,) Lesley FOSTER (Leslie HENDY), his stepchildren Susan BELL, Sharon JONES, Donald BELL and Lyall BELL. Loving grandfather of Craig, Carolyn, Stuart, Adam, Katelynn, Samantha, Marcella, Natalie, Alexandra, Sachi and Hunter. A private memorial service was held at the Reynolds Funeral Home ''Turner Chapel'' in Bracebridge 877-806-2257. Donations in memory of Doug to the South Muskoka Hospital Foundation would be gratefully appreciated by the family.

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HENHAWK o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
Jason Keith Alexander SMITH, March 28, 1976 to November 7, 2003. Began his journey home on November 7, 2003 where he will be met by his "Ma" Darlene SMITH, grandpa "Chubby" SMITH, his "Zhi Zhe" Ed Thompson (Zhish), Uncle Ronnie, Tanya, Eric as well as many other family and Friends.
Those of us to carry on his gifts and memory are his parents Kari and John AGUONIA, Richard PORTER, Peggy LOGAN. Proud brother of Boshk, Dawniss, Dawyne, Rick, Martina, Corrina, Bettina and Georgina. Loving nephew of Wanda (Nana), Scott (Lilianne), Cindy (Tony), Brock, Ves, Norman (Louise), Auntie Bea, Francis (Viola), Lawrence (Susan), Auntie George, Eddie, Brenda, Kenny, JoAnne, Jeanne, Carolyn, Jesse, ad Ronnie and special nephew to Eva Proter. Grandson to Arthur PORTER, Joyce PORTER, Dorise HENHAWK. Fondly remembered by his many "cuzsins", nieces, nephews and many, many Friends.
Wake: Ceremony and drumming at Sheguiandah First Nation Community Centre on Monday November 10, 2003 and Tuesday November 11, 2003. Feast was held Tuesday, November 11, 2003. Second wake was held at "Ma" SMITH's. 1074 Sour Springs Road, Six Nations, Ontario on Wednesday, November 12, 2003 and Thursday, November 13, 2003. Burial was held Friday, November 14, 2003 at Saint Paul Anglican Church, sour Springs Road, Six Nations, Ontario. Feast followed at Six Nations Community Centre, Ohsweken, Ontario.

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HENLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-11 published
AFFLECK, Betty Ann (née HENLEY) 1927-2003
Died on Monday evening, June 9th, 2003, in Montreal, at home with her family. Beloved wife of the late Raymond AFFLECK and dear companion of Harry MAYEROVITCH. Mother of Neil (Marnie STUBLEY,) Jane (John KIMBER), Gavin (Sylvie CORMIER), Ewan (Susan CHATWOOD) and the late Graham. She will be lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Alexander, Gabriel, Lucas, Shonah and Anika. Visitation will be held at Collins Clarke Funeral Home, 5610 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, on Wednesday, June 11th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at the Unitarian Church of Montreal (5035 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West, on Saturday, June 14th at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, a donation to Autism Society, Canada, P.O. Box 65, Orangeville, Ontario L9W 2Z5, would be appreciated.

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HENNESSY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-18 published
BIRKS, Helen Thompson
Died peacefully on August 16, 2003, in Montreal, in her 92nd year. Predeceased by her husband John E. BIRKS. Dear mother of Sally BONGARD (Strachan), Barbara WYBAR and Peter BIRKS. Cherished grandmother of Sarah, Ashley and John HENNESSY, Caroline, Jonathan and James WYBAR, Nicola Wybar THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, and Michael BIRKS. Survived by her brother Alan G. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and sister June PASHKEVITCH. Predeceased by brothers Richard THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, John Munroe THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and sister Margaret LAY. Funeral service will be held on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 at St. Andrew's and St. Paul's Church (3415 Redpath Street, Montreal), at 2 p.m. Memorial service will be held in Metis Beach, Little Metis Presbyterian Church, on Friday, August 22nd, 2003. Donations in memory of Helen BIRKS may be made to McGill University, Attention Libraries (3605 de la Montagne, Montreal, Quebec H3G 2M1) or to the Little Metis Presbyterian Church Outreach, c/o 21 Beach Road, Metis Beach, Quebec G0J 1S0.

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HENRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-07 published
Florence (ALLEN) HOBBS.
By R. Gerald HOBBS Tuesday, January 7, 2003, Page A16
Christian feminist, minister, wife, mother. Born October 14, 1911, near Flesherton, Ontario Died June 28, 2002, in Belleville, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 90.
Florence ALLEN, eldest daughter in a large farm family, was of Afro-American descent, her great-grandfather John ALLEN having left Philadelphia for King Township, York County in 1820. Florence's grandfather, James HENRY, subsequently took a homestead in the stony fields of Grey County. Florence was raised to be proud of that heritage, and she communicated that pride to her children and grandchildren.
Florence had begun nursing studies at Women's College Hospital in Toronto when she experienced an evangelical conversion, and felt a call to prepare for ministry in the Pilgrim Holiness (now the Wesleyan) Church. Ordained, she served churches in Wiarton and Oshawa, Ontario In September, 1940, she married a fellow student from Bible College, the Reverend Frank HOBBS. They had nine children, a career in itself. But she also determined not to forget her pastoral ministry, and was active in organizing groups for women and children in several of the congregations served by her minister husband.
Florence was raised in the traditions of farm populism. Her father, Richard, initiated her politically in the campaign that elected the United Farmers of Ontario government in 1919. When, at the age of 14, her oldest son expressed the intention of becoming a lawyer, she discouraged his ambition with the statement: "Oh, son, a Christian cannot be a lawyer. Lawyers tell lies!" In her later years she would undoubtedly have nuanced the judgment, but the passion for justice and integrity never wavered.
Current affairs were often discussed at the family table. "Come, children," Florence would say, "I've been too busy today to read the paper. Who can tell me what is happening in the world?" Elections were always an interesting time for the family. Frank was a lifelong Liberal, and made no secret of his support. When the children asked Florence how she had voted, she would reply: "It is the privilege of the secret ballot, that a woman does not have to reveal her vote to anyone." Given her strict religious convictions and our father's teasing about her vote cancelling his vote, we children assumed she was a Tory. In 1971, another son was arrested and jailed overnight for breaking a court injunction against picketing in support of immigrant women garment workers. Upon his release, Frank warned him that he would now unfortunately have a police record. Florence simply said: "I'm proud of you, son." She confessed she had been voting Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation (later New Democratic Party) all those years.
Florence raised her children to detest racism of all sorts, and to be feminists before most of us had heard of the term. She stood, unflinchingly, for the values of her generation of Christian feminists. Women's suffrage had been won, but the battle against gambling and the social abuse of alcohol held her attention. She organized a chapter of the Women's Christian Temperance Union in Massey, Ontario, and members of her growing family were strongly encouraged to take the pledge of total abstinence!
Although her stern moralism was tempered with compassion, she was not always an easy person to live with. As her husband and family knew well, once she had a clear conviction of what was right in any situation, compromise was out of the question. That strength, however, enabled her to carry her husband through his last years before his death in 1995. So it seems right that, with mind still clear, the night before she died she was granted a vision that Frank had come to accompany her "across the river." All nine of Florence's children survive her.
R. Gerald HOBBS is Florence's son.

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HENRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-14 published
COOK, Bernard James
Bernard died peacefully and with dignity at North York General Hospital on February 11, 2003, following a brief illness in his 81st year. Beloved husband of Edythe COOK and the late Gertrude (Trudy) COOK. Bernard will be greatly missed by his daughters Patricia HENRY (Mike) and Mary TOD (Ian) and sons David BINGHAM (Diane) and Bruce BINGHAM (Mary.) He leaves behind 9 grandchildren, Karen BOWES, Kim REEP, Lesley TOD, Brian TOD, Kate BINGHAM, Elizabeth BINGHAM, Michael BINGHAM, Mickey HENRY and Alex HENRY and great grand_son Jonathan REEP. Bernie COOK, a World War 2 veteran who served with the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals in England and Northern Europe, was a proud employee of Canadian Pacific Railway throughout his career and was respected by all. The family extends thanks to the excellent nursing staff at North York General Hospital. Friends may call at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles), on Friday February 14 from 2- 4 and 6 - 8 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Leo's Church (277 Royal York Road) on Saturday, February 15 at 10 a.m. Please join us for a reception following the mass to celebrate Bernard's life at 33 Elmhurst Avenue. Private family interment. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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HENRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-05 published
HENRY, Christina (née MITCHELL)
Died Wednesday, April 2nd, 2003, in Ottawa, after a lengthy illness. She left this world as she lived her life with dignity, courage and grace. Survived by her loving family, husband, Dr. Sandy HENRY, sons Blair and Neil (Wendy,) brother Ian MITCHELL of Stornoway, Scotland and nephew Christopher MITCHELL (Karen) of Chicago. Her grandchildren Alexandra and Mitchell will dearly miss their beloved Seanny.
The family wish to thank the staff of the palliative home care program for their great help in maintaining Chris at home. Special thanks as well to Dr. Pippa HALL and her family General Practitioner, Dr. Brian GRIFFITHS.
Cremation. A service in memory of Christina will be held on Monday, April 7th, 2003 at 2 p.m. at the First Unitarian Church at 30 Cleary Avenue (off Richmond Road near Woodroffe) to be followed by a reception there.
Arrangements by Kelly Funeral Home, Carling Avenue (613-235-6712).

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HENRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-15 published
CRUTTENDEN, Isobel (Dey)
On Tuesday, May 13, 2003, beloved wife of 64 years of Stan, died peacefully after a long illness. Mourning her loss is her devoted family; Scott (Dianne) and Mark (Sharon). Grandchildren: Norah (Erik), Adam and Sarah will miss her greatly. She was predeceased by her daughter Penny (1970). Isobel was involved in many organizations life member and Past Regent 2nd Dragoons Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire, Children's Aid (pre Family Services), member of May Court Club for 60 years. For many years a member of St. Catharines Golf and Country Club and a devotee of Duplicate Bridge which was a source of much enjoyment. The family is thankful for Dr. David HENRY and Dr. Sandra HARTMAN and grateful to Victorian Order of Nurses services and ParaMed Home Services (Avita) and all her faithful and caring Friends. Cremation has taken place. A Memorial Service will be held at The Hulse and English Funeral Home and Chapel, 75 Church Street, St. Catharines, 905-684-6346 on Thursday, May 15, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. Dear to her heart was Hospice Niagara and the Merritt Branch Public Library for donations or a charity of your choice.

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HENRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-28 published
Reta Ellen WOODWARD
By Elizabeth (WOODWARD) HENRY, Friday, November 28, 2003 - Page A24
Aunt, "Cabbagetown angel." Born July 24, 1915, in Toronto. Died October 12, in Maple, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 88.
Toronto's Cabbagetown of the forties and fifties was the humble habitat of the poor. Faithful blue-collar labourers from downtown factories wearily wended their way home by streetcar at the end of each long day. They struggled on low, non-union wages to be breadwinners for their one-income families. That era is far removed from the contemporary two-income families thriving in this upgraded enclave of today.
Our family consisted of two parents and nine children living in a tiny rented Cabbagetown house with no running hot water and with coal stoves as our only source of heat. There was no basement nor an upstairs. The outside world included little corner stores on quiet streets void of parked automobiles, colourful horse-drawn bread, milk, and tea wagons as well as wagons delivering blocks of ice to those families fortunate enough to have an ice-box. Along the back lane travelled the dusty coal man and the unkempt rag man, the former delivering and the latter soliciting. Falling chestnuts, children playing homemade games, and the ever-present popcorn man added to the scenery.
To this lowly landscape of my life in a poor Cabbagetown family came an elegant angel: a very special aunt.
Reta Ellen WOODWARD was born in Toronto on July 24, 1915. The great flu epidemic broke out in many places in 1918, including Toronto. Reta's mother died in that epidemic, leaving her motherless at age 2½ along with her four-year-old brother, who later became my father. The children were cared for in a boarding home until their father remarried.
Reta grew up through the Great Depression as a young teenager with no opportunity for further education. She worked diligently in a packaging factory, Progress Packaging, for 40 years, often coming home with blue fingers, bruised by the machines as she tried to work faster and accomplish more than it was safe for a human to achieve.
Reta never married nor had children but became the treasured and cherished Auntie Reta to the nine of us. We were her children. Throughout our childhood years she was our stability and hope. Small in stature, quiet and unassuming, her constant generosity and inner warmth, shown toward each one of us, was very large and real. In spite of her deprived childhood, she took great delight in lighting up our needy lives and encouraging us at every new chapter. We each felt like an only child as she focused her deep care upon us individually, never forgetting our birthdays, Christmas, graduations, weddings and our children's birthdays.
Her income was meagre but she used it unselfishly to make us happy. She had no car but took us places like the Santa Claus parade, the Canadian National Exhibition, Centre Island, the Riverdale Zoo and a farm outside the city -- usually one-on-one and we felt unique. She read to us stories about faraway countries, played games with us and, best of all, hugged us.
My favourite old photo is of her hugging me in the modest back yard of my Cabbagetown house. Her hugs, smiles and personal attention touched my deprivation and poverty. She made me rich with genuine love and I felt secure within her warm embrace. She lived for us kids. She had no favourites and we knew it. We were each her favourite. We gravitated to any chance to visit at her house, see her neatly made bed and the interesting things on her dresser and in her room.
She was insignificant in terms of education, prestige or wealth but to us she was most significant, like Maria in The Sound of Music, or like royalty, but truly beyond royalty, she was angelic "our Cabbagetown angel."
Elizabeth is one of Reta's nieces.

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