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"HEM" 2003 Obituary


HEMBRUFF  HEMMANS  HEMREND  HEMSTREET 

HEMBRUFF o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-26 published
HEMBRUFF
-In memory of my beloved husband Nolan, who passed away March 27, 1997.
Morning dawns, night returns,
And I still think of you,
Many a silent tear is shed,
When I am all alone,
For the one I loved so much,
The one I called my own,
You were a loving husband,
A friend so good and true,
A better husband never lived,
I miss you and always will.
-Forever loved, Betty

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HEMBRUFF o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-26 published
HEMBRUFF
-In loving memory of a dear father and grandfather Nolan, who passed away March 27, 1997.
Never more than a thought away,
Quietly remembered every day,
No need for words except to say,
Still loved, still missed, in every way.
-Forever remembered by David, Brenda, Karen and Jennifer, Terry, Earla, Nicole, Vincent and Nick.

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HEMBRUFF o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-30 published
Maxine Verna HOFFMAN
In loving memory of Maxine Verna HOFFMAN who passed away peacefully at Wikwemikong Nursing Home on Saturday, April 26, 2003 at the age of 86 years.
Beloved mother of Gary and Marie HOFFMAN of South Baymouth. Cherished grandmother of Paula HOFFMAN (Dan) and Larry (Suzanne) HOFFMAN. Loved great grandmother of Kyle and Rachel. Will be missed by brothers and sisters, Ivy and Hugh KELLY, both predeceased. Pearl and Dave McLEAN, both predeceased, Gordon (predeceased) and Margaret HEMBRUFF, Freda and Robert (predeceased) SANDERS of Scarborough, Ken and Elaine (predeceased) HEMBRUFF of Beaumondville, Willard and Barb HEMBRUFF of Minden, Welland and Elizabeth HEMBRUFF of Scarborough, Dorothy and Wayne (predeceased) SMITH of Queensville and Ron and Marie HEMBRUFF of Toronto. Dear aunt of many nieces and nephews and great nieces and nephews.
A gathering of family and Friends for a grave side service will be held at 1: 00 p.m. Sunday, May 4, 2003 in Hilly Grove Cemetery. There will be no wake or funeral service. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home

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HEMBRUFF o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
HEMBRUFF-
-In loving memory of a dear mother, grandmother and great grandmother, Vera, who passed away June 5, 2000.
May has gone and June comes along
A time to remember it has been three long years
Time is long, but our love for you is still strong.
Till we meet again
-Sadly missed by Jim, Pat and family.

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HEMBRUFF o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-24 published
McIVOR
-In loving memory of my dear father Ronald, who passed away September 25, 1983.
Deep in my heart there is a picture,
More precious than silver and gold,
It's a picture of a dear father
Whose memory will never grow old.
-Forever in my heart, loved and missed. Your daughter Betty HEMBRUFF.

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HEMBRUFF o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
McIVOR
-In loving memory of my dear mother, Evelyn, who passed away on December 17, 1991.
Those we love must some day pass
Beyond our present sight
Must leave us and the world we know
Without their radiant light.
But we know, that like a candle
Their lovely light will shine
To brighten up another place,
More perfect...more divine.
And in the realm of heaven
Where they shine so warm and bright,
Our loved ones live forever more
In God's eternal light.
-Sadly missed, always remembered by daughter Betty HEMBRUFF.

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HEMMANS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
witnesses: are silent as the slain weep
By Christie BLATCHFORD, Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - Page A1
Even on its face, what unfolded in two parts of the Beechwood Cemetery at noon yesterday is a gripping story.
There, in Section 7, the family of Godfrey "Junior" DUNBAR -- including his three astonishingly beautiful children, aged 12, 8 and 7 -- were holding a vigil for their lost son, brother and father at his grave. Mr. DUNBAR and Richard BROWN, respectively 27 and 29 years old, were gunned down precisely four years earlier at a North York nightclub jammed with upward of 800 people.
The case went cold and has stayed that way -- Toronto police offered a $50,000 reward yesterday as a last resort -- not because it isn't solvable, not for a lack of potential witnesses, but rather because none of those witnesses, including many Friends of the two men, is talking.
Among those who were at the Connections II club that night and who would not tell detectives what they saw was one Kirk SWEENEY.
And who was being buried yesterday in Section 17 of the cemetery, about 400 metres away from the vigil? None other than young Mr. SWEENEY, himself the victim of an execution-style killing just before Christmas at a downtown club called the G Spot.
There was a big crowd of mourners at the mound of fresh earth by his grave. Funerals for the young black men who form the city's largest single group of homicide victims are always well attended, as Mr. DUNBAR's terrific older sister, Trisha, noted yesterday. At her brother's, for instance, she remembered, people did what they could to console the family. "But money is not what we wanted," she said. "We wanted for one of them to come forward." It is the cruellest irony, she said, that her brother, who so "valued Friendship," should have been betrayed by those who were with him the night he died.
At the vigil, the crowd was tiny, composed only of relatives, media (invited because the DUNBARs are hoping renewed publicity will see someone belatedly speak up) and other black mothers who have lost sons to gun violence.
One of them was Yvonne BEASLEY. I'd been told her son had been killed, and after introducing myself, asked if the case had been solved. She looked at me as though I was mad. "Oh," she said, "they're all unsolved."
"What was your son's name?" I asked, apologizing for not remembering. "I don't blame you," she said. "There have been so many."
Her boy was Sydney HEMMANS. One day shy of his 19th birthday, in July, 2001, he was shot and killed in his old downtown neighbourhood. "Were there witnesses?" I asked Ms. BEASLEY. " There are always witnesses," she said. "That's why all us moms are here."
Another was Julia FARQUHARSON, whose 24-year-old son, Segun, was shot and killed on May 17, 2001, the victim of what began as an attempted robbery and ended in an utterly senseless murder.
Mr. FARQUHARSON was carrying his basketball at the time of his death, and, realizing the gravity of the situation he was in, had called his own cellphone's voicemail to secretly record the voices of the two men wanting to rob him. That two-minute call, played publicly by homicide detectives not long after Mr. FARQUHARSON's murder, is a terrifying mélange of Mr. FARQUHARSON clutching his basketball and pleading for his life, and one of his attackers shrieking, "Yo, let me fucking kill you, dude."
Police were hoping someone would recognize the voices on the tape, and call them. That was more than two years ago. They continue to wait, and despite a recent $50,000 reward, Mr. FARQUHARSON's slaying remains unsolved.
That is one of the other stories here -- that police, despite dogged work and the fact that so many of these killings take place in public places, cannot successfully close these cases without witnesses: willing to testify and that, on the rare occasion they are able to get a case to court, the witnesses: are by then demonstrably unreliable, having given several versions of what they saw before belatedly telling the truth.
All of this goes to undermine the administration of justice.
But the other, broader story is that because of the intimate connections that often exist among the slain and their killers and the mute witnesses: to their deaths -- and the fact that so much of the gun violence in Toronto is committed by young black men upon other young black men -- there is a growing cynicism, captured in an e-mail I got yesterday.
In Monday's paper, I'd written about the case of Adrian Roy BAPTISTE, a handsome 21-year-old who was shot five times, in broad daylight, last Saturday, just eight days after he was found not guilty by a properly constituted jury, and freed, in another shooting in Hamilton almost two years previous.
This is what the note said: "Let them all shoot each other. Leave the rest of us in peace. And let God sort it all out. Enough said."
I understand the weariness there, but strongly disagree.
The killing spree now going on in the city -- not the first one, merely the latest -- is not a problem confined to the lawless, and it ought not to be left to the black community to solve.
There are often perfectly innocent victims, and even those with lengthy criminal records die so young that they never get the proverbial second chance that ought to be a given in a civilized society.
Junior DUNBAR's mother, Jamela, bent low in the rain yesterday and whispered to her son's tombstone, "You had so many Friends. None of them came forward to speak on your behalf; no one has the decency. Where are your Friends now?" His older son, Marquel, left a little drawing of him and his dad holding hands.
The baby son, D'angelo, stood with his small face utterly stricken, his big sister, Deondra, keeping an arm around him.
Aside from a few reporters, the only white face at the vigil belonged to Gary BRENNAN, the detective who was one of the original investigators of Mr. DUNBAR's killing; he has moved to another squad now, but still was good enough to show up.
It's rarely the cops who have to be motivated to give a damn. It's the rest of us.

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HEMREND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-31 published
Peg ROBERTS
By Pat ROBERTS Thursday, July 31, 2003 - Page A24
Wife, mother, theatre director and founder. Born May 27, 1919, in Brandon, Manitoba Died April 2 in Toronto, of cancer, aged Peggy DORAN grew up in Brandon, Manitoba, and graduated from Brandon College before training as a nurse at Montreal's Royal Victoria Hospital during the Second World War. She did not like being a nurse, however. She had wanted to purse a career in the theatre and to study it at university. Her parents would not allow that; acting and theatre were seen as beneath the dignity of the only child of a well-to-do dentist from United Empire Loyalist stock. Nonetheless, her first theatrical success came at age 20, when she directed the Brandon Little Theatre production of Send Her Victorious, winning top honours in the Manitoba Drama Festival.
Peg worked as a nurse for just over a year. In 1945, she married Dennis ROBERTS, whom she had met in high school. They then moved to a tiny apartment in Toronto while he completed his psychology degree at the University of Toronto. In 1950, they moved to Sudbury, Ontario where Dennis became the city's first psychologist. As a couple, they played an active role in the city's educational and cultural life until Dennis' death in 1985.
The Sudbury Little Theatre Guild, founded in 1948, gave Peg the opportunity to "do theatre," and she made the most of it. Between 1950 and 1956, she gave birth to two children, directed four plays, acted in a fifth, and was twice president of the guild. Plays she directed include Blithe Spirit, The Importance of Being Earnest, The Glass Menagerie, and Antigone, which won the Edgar Stone Trophy for Direction at the Dominion Drama Festival in Toronto in 1955. That play coincided with her final pregnancy. The cast reportedly encouraged her to name the baby Antigone, if it was a girl.
Her production of The Importance of Being Earnest also made it to the national Dominion Drama Festival finals. Although it did not win, the adjudicators reviewed it quite favourably, noting that the colours for the production -- white, black and yellow were playwright Oscar Wilde's favourites. Peg's production of that play might have been the world (or at least Canadian) premiere of a recently discovered scene, cut from the final text of the play, which Peg obtained after reading of its discovery.
A frequent leading man in those early days, Al HEMREND, recalls that Peg was "ahead of her time. She took risks and chose plays that were very difficult."
As president of the Sudbury Little Theatre Guild in the 1956-57 season, Peg successfully petitioned the Dominion Drama Festival to create a new region. Thus, in 1957, the Quebec-Ontario Theatre Association region was formed, with Peg as its first regional chair.
As Sudbury grew, Peg was one of those who saw a need for a professional theatre company in the city. She was instrumental in the founding of the Sudbury Theatre Centre as a member of the planning study group and of the first board of directors (known as "the Five Fools").
Peg was also enthusiastic about bringing theatre to young people, and was a drama consultant for the Sudbury Secondary School Board in the 1970s.
She loved to entertain, and our house was often filled with guests. Each party was "staged," complete with costumes and sets (furniture arranged and rearranged, flowers, candles, crystal, linen or lace table cloths). She often served dishes she had never made before, with sometimes dubious, sometimes wonderful results.
Diagnosed with breast cancer in 1997, Peg moved back to Toronto in 1998. Cancer was something she could not stage-manage, direct, or control. Her motto until her death became: "rage, rage against the dying of the light."
She is survived by her three children: Judy, Steve, and Pat, and granddaughter, Charlotte.
Pat (not Antigone) ROBERTS is Peg's daughter.

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HEMSTREET o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-17 published
HEMSTREET, Gladys Leone 1914-2003. (longtime teacher at Dufferin School, Trenton, Ontario)
Died peacefully while listening to classical music at Maple Villa in Burlington. Predeceased by her husband Gordon 1990. Much loved mother of Dona JUSTICE and husband Clinton. Proud grandmother of Tim (Kim,) Joy (Jim SLATTERY,) David and Erin, and her wonderful great grandchildren Alexandra, Tara, David and Amy. The family gratefully thanks the superb staff of Maple Villa for their kind and loving care, especially at the end. They were her students! At her request a private family only service will be held.

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