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"HEA" 2003 Obituary


HEALD  HEALY  HEATH  HEATHCOTE  HEATLEY 

HEALD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-11 published
HAGAN, Frederick -- Artist Born in Toronto, 1918. Died in Newmarket, September 6, 2003. Husband of the late Isabelle HEALD. Father of Karl, Kathy, Kurt, Julie and Annemarie. Grandfather of Michael, Jessica, Eric, Heather, Meredith, Elizabeth, Alice and Gemma. son of Arthur and Mary. Brother of Bill, Peter, Jack, Jim, Ted, Mary and Marjorie. Fred HAGAN taught at the Ontario College of Design from 1946 to 1983. A memorial service and reception will be held at Pickering College, 16945 Bayview Avenue, Newmarket, on Saturday, September 20th at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to Southlake Regional Health Centre, 615 Davis Drive, Suite #101, Newmarket, Ontario L3Y 9Z9. Arrangements entrusted to the Roadhouse and Rose Funeral Home, 157 Main Street South, Newmarket (905-895-6631).

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HEALY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-18 published
PEART / LEE, Margaret Eileen (née HEALY)
Died peacefully, on March 17, 2003, at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, at the age of 86. Dearly beloved wife of Fred PEART. Loving mother of Mary Catherine O'BRIEN (Mike,) and Rosemary DUNNING (Michael,) and Fred's children: John, Mary Lou ROBERTSON (Clyde), Peter (Marjorie), and Gord (Marianne). Grammy of 22 grandchildren, and 24 great-grandchildren. Survived by her brother Frank HEALY. Predeceased by Gerry LEE, her grand_son Matthew O'BRIEN, and her brother Wilf HEALY. A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at St. Gabriel's Church (650 Sheppard Avenue East), on Thursday morning at 10 o'clock. Reception to follow service at the family home. The family wish to thank the doctors and staff of St. Michael's Hospital.

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HEATH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-09 published
Bishop served Ukrainian Catholics
Priest confronted the Vatican over mandatory retirement and ordination of married ministers
By Jordan HEATH- RAWLINGS Saturday, August 9, 2003 - Page F10
Toronto -- Isidore BORECKY, who served as Ukrainian Eparch for Toronto and Eastern Canada for more than half a century, died in his sleep on July 23 at Toronto Western Hospital after a long illness. He was 92.
His death came mere hours before Reverend Stephen CHMILAR was installed as Ukrainian Catholic bishop of Toronto and Eastern Canada, the post Father BORECKY fought long and hard to keep.
Born in Ostrivets, Ukraine, on October 1, 1911, Father BORECKY dedicated more than 60 years of his life to the priesthood, and spent his time fostering religious vocations, establishing lay organizations, churches and senior citizens homes for Ukrainian Catholics.
Father BORECKY, Canada's last bishop ordained by Pope Pius Twelfth, entered the priesthood in Munich in July of 1938. He then left Germany for Canada in November of the same year.
From 1938 to 1941, he worked in several churches in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. In 1941, he was appointed pastor at Saint John the Baptist Church in Brantford, Ontario, where he would work for seven years, serving his faithful as well as mission parishes in nearby Grimsby, Niagara Falls, St. Catharines, Thorold and Welland.
On March 3, 1948, Father BORECKY was named by Pope Pius Twelfth to the post of Apostolic Exarch of Eastern Canada. He was consecrated in St. Michael's Cathedral on May 27, and began to organize the new exarchate. During the next eight years, he would achieve his most memorable goal, as the exarchate was raised to the status of eparchy, or diocese, in 1956.
Some of Father BORECKY's most notable work came in Toronto during this period, when he oversaw the rise of many Catholic church institutions -- he encouraged parishioners to erect St. Michael's Roman Catholic Church -- and helped to integrate Eastern Rite Catholic schools into the framework of what would eventually become the Toronto Catholic District School Board.
On February 24, 1952, Father BORECKY celebrated a divine liturgy at St. Teresa's Church, and during the service he encouraged the faithful to begin the construction of their own church building.
A church property was purchased for $1,500 and on March 22, 1954, Father BORECKY blessed it. Parishioners donated their time and labour and on September 6, 1954, the parish hall was opened. The consecration of the church was celebrated on October 16, 1954, and Reverend Walter FIRMAN was appointed the first parish priest.
As leader of Canada's largest Ukrainian Catholic diocese, Father BORECKY was very approachable, said Reverend Taras DUSANOWSKYJ, who is currently pastor at St. Peter and Paul Ukrainian Catholic Church in Toronto.
"He was very much oriented towards his people," he said. "He was very welcoming, open and certainly ecumenical.
"He had a relationship with everyone. He knew all his clergy by name, he knew a lot of the parishioners. He was a very warm person."
He was also a man who stood devoutly for his eparchy's right to practise the Eastern Rites.
Serving as bishop at a time after the Vatican decreed in 1929 that no married men could be ordained into the priesthood, he would arrange for his priests who had wives or wished to marry to be transported to Yugoslavia or Ukraine, where they could be ordained in the traditional Eastern rites, which does not require celibacy.
Father DUSANOWSKYJ, who is one of 40 married priests out of about 75 in the eparchy, said the Vatican did not take well to his plans, but couldn't stop a man who was so strong-minded.
"Certainly there were times when he got his wrist slapped, or he would be called in so they could complain," he said. "But for the most part he simply ignored it because he knew that this was part of our tradition, and without married clergy our eparchy would have been in a tremendous shortage."
Father BORECKY kept the title of bishop until 1998, at the age of 86, 11 years past his required retirement age, when he relinquished it after five years of sparring with the Vatican over the naming of bishop Roman DANYLAK as apostolic administrator for the Toronto eparchy.
Father BORECKY confronted the Vatican over the rule, which states that bishops must retire at the age of 75. He contended that the rule did not apply to him, as he was leader of an Eastern Rite church.
One last accolade came in December of last year, when Ukrainian President Leonid KUCHMA gave him, along with Archbishop Vsevolod MAJDANSKI of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church in the United States, special commendation orders for service to Ukraine.
Father BORECKY's funeral was held on July 26 at the Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Holy Dormition, his funeral mass led by Ukraine's Cardinal Lubomyr HUSAR, the Major Archbishop of Lviv and spiritual leader to more than five million Ukrainian Catholics worldwide. He has been buried in the family plot at Mount Peace Cemetery.

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HEATH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-19 published
Neighbours grieve power-outage victim
15-year-old who died in Ottawa-area house fire remembered for 'a big heart.
He was a good boy.'
By Jordan HEATH- RAWLINGS and Kim LUNMAN Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - Page A3
The house where Michael THOMAS lived remains dark, burned-out and deserted. The power has been restored to the a small Gloucester, Ontario, neighbourhood, but the mood remains black.
"It shocked the community. It shocked everyone," said Tracy YOUNG, who lives beside the THOMASes' house. "It's pretty tense around here."
Michael's grieving family are staying in a motel while they recover from the trauma. The 15-year-old boy died during last Thursday's blackout, when a candle he took to ward off the darkness for his frightened sister ignited a fire when he fell asleep.
"He went to comfort her because she was afraid of the dark," said neighbour Jim SCRIVENER, who has set up a trust fund, along with other members of the community, to help Michael's family get back on their feet. "He had a big heart. He was a good boy.
"Michael was close to his sister and very protective of her," Mr. SCRIVENER said.
Michael, 15, was autistic and appeared much younger, he said, and was more like an eight-year-old in his demeanour.
The fire started after Michael's sister, Jennifer, left the room to join their mother, Erika, who was sitting outside. One of the candles Michael had taken to her room ignited a stuffed animal.
Ms. THOMAS was sitting outside with various neighbours, including Ms. YOUNG who lives next door, when the fire started.
Ms. YOUNG said that Ms. THOMAS noticed the smoke when she went in the house to put Jennifer back to bed.
"She ran back to my house and asked if I had a flashlight," Ms. YOUNG said. "I asked her what was wrong and she said 'I smell smoke,' so I grabbed the candle and ran up her stairs and you couldn't get up. It was just filled with smoke.
"But we never heard a smoke alarm, we never even smelled anything," she said.
The house was equipped with three fire alarms, but all of them were powered by alternating current electricity -- not batteries and were not operating during the blackout.
Ms. YOUNG and Ms. THOMAS ran to another neighbour's house, and when he couldn't find a way in, some of those outside hooked up Ms. YOUNG's garden hose and tried quench the flames in order to rush up the stairs to Michael's aid.
"They were yelling his name inside, when they brought the hose up, and they were screaming, really screaming, but there was no answer, no nothing from him," she said. "Then they tried to go on the roof and they broke the window and that's when the fire department showed up."
Michael's parents and sister have been left homeless by the fire and are living in an Ottawa motel while they grieve. The family who were living in subsidized housing -- did not have insurance. Michael's father, Dan, a security guard, was at work when the fire occurred.
"They're still in shock," said Mr. SCRIVENER, who started a fund in Michael's name yesterday at the Gloucester Centre branch of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce in Ottawa. He said all other Ottawa Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce branches will also accept donations and that he is hoping Canadians across the country will also help the family.
"They didn't have much to begin with," Mr. SCRIVENER said. Michael's sister "is taking it very, very hard," he said. The boy will be buried after a funeral Friday.
His death was one of the few attributed to the blackout in most of Ontario that left 10 million Canadians without electricity. Another 40 million people in the northeastern United States, from New York City to Ohio and Michigan, were also affected.
Another neighbour tried to save the teenager from the blaze at the townhouse complex but was too late. He was pronounced dead at hospital.
Mr. SCRIVENER remembered Michael during a happier time in the neighbourhood when people gathered outside to gaze at the sky during a lunar eclipse. Michael was there.
"He had a big smile that night," Mr. SCRIVENER said. "He was a nice kid."
Michael's young demeanour made him a perfect playmate for her four-year-old son, Nathan, Ms. YOUNG said.
"They got along so well. It was excellent," she said. "My son would always ask me, 'Can I go play with Michael now?' "
"Michael would come over and see if Nathan could come out. They would always play together. He was a beautiful kid. Very nice, very shy, very polite. I never saw him hurt a fly... He was just so funny. An excellent boy."
In addition to the trust fund set up by Mr. SCRIVENER to help the family get back on its feet, the neighbourhood is soliciting donations to help pay for for flowers for Michael's funeral.
"Any extra money we get will go to help the family buy whatever they need," Ms. YOUNG said. "We want to do something, whatever we can."

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HEATH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-04 published
A painter of real people
Toronto artist sought to get beneath a subject's veneer to achieve a 'luminous presence'
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 4, 2003 - Page R11
'She'll paint you the way she wants," David MIRVISH, patron and art collector, once said of the Canadian portrait painter Lynn DONOGHUE.
"She's sensitive to mood," Mr. MIRVISH, who sat for Ms. DONOGHUE on several occasions, told The Financial Post Magazine in 1984. "She may catch you at a different angle, and not every subject feels that's the way they want to be seen. The important thing is whether it's a successful picture or not. You shouldn't expect to like a portrait."
But what you could expect if you were having your portrait painted by Ms. DONOGHUE is that you would at the very least enjoy the process. Sitting for the Toronto-based painter was like having tea with a lively, old friend.
"You were always chatting about this and that with Lynn," said Father Daniel DONOVAN, an art collector and professor of theology at St. Michael's College in the University of Toronto, who also sat for Ms. DONOGHUE. " She was always vibrant and alive."
Always seeking to get beyond a person's veneer, Ms. DONOGHUE enjoyed the process of trying to draw out her subjects. "She wanted people to [be] open and communicate with her," Father DONOVAN said.
Mr. DONOGHUE, considered one of the pre-eminent portrait painters in Canada, died last month in Toronto. She was 50.
"She made a huge impact [in the Canadian art world] and did so at a very young age," said Christian Cardell CORBET, founder of the Canadian Portrait Academy.
"She was at a stage... where she was just about to take off," Mr. CORBET said. "What she could have contributed was just cut short."
Ms. DONOGHUE started showing her work in 1973. Her early work caused a stir when some galleries refused to show her giant portraits of naked males. Since then she has had countless group shows and solo exhibitions. Her work can be found in the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Ontario Legislature, the National Museum of Botswana, the Vancouver Art Gallery, and several other private and public collections.
Ms. DONOGHUE, who was elected a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in 1991, did both commissioned and non-commissioned portraits. One of her notable commissions was of John STOKES, the former speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.
Last year, Ms. DONOGHUE completed a portrait of Margaret ATWOOD that came was at once celebrated. After approaching the Canadian literary icon to paint her portrait, Ms. DONOGHUE set about to capture Ms. ATWOOD using bright oil colours. In the portrait, Ms. ATWOOD, sits with her legs crossed and looks out at the viewer wearing a vibrant, green shirt.
"She was not afraid of colour," Mr. CORBET said. "She would take it [paint] right from the tube."
Three years ago, Terrence HEATH, the former director of the Winnipeg Art Gallery, wrote in BorderCrossings following an exhibition of Ms. DONOGHUE's work at a Toronto gallery: "Each painting... is a statement in colour. The figures are set in colour fields that tell you as much about the figure as the likeness and body position do. Most remarkable about these paintings is their sheer luminous presence."
"She created honest portraits" and "didn't follow much of a systematic approach to portraiture," Mr. CORBET said. "She allowed her spontaneity and intuition to come through."
Ms. DONOGHUE once said that her historic mentors, such as Frans Hals, conveyed in their portraits the feeling of people who are very alive. "Why do people know, when they look at a painting of mine, that it is a real person?" she told The Financial Post Magazine in 1984. It was one of her perpetual queries into the nature of portrait painting.
Lynn DONOGHUE was born on April 20, 1953, in the small community of Red Lake in northern Ontario, more than 500 kilometres from Thunder Bay. Her father Graham DONOGHUE was a mining engineer who moved his family about, including a spell in Newfoundland. Ms. DONOGHUE finished high school at H.B. Beal Secondary School in London, Ontario She graduated in 1972 with a special art diploma.
Having lived in England and New York as an artist, Toronto was home to Ms. DONOGHUE. She lived with her 14-year-old son Luca in a loft in a converted industrial building in the city's west end. Her loft doubled as her studio. In the cluttered space, some of her paintings hung on the walls and canvases were stacked next to the essentials required for daily living. Living off the sale of her paintings, Ms. DONOGHUE financially scrapped by month to month, her Friends said.
Described as vivacious and gregarious, she was "the life of the party." An active member of the arts community, she could regularly be seen at gallery openings and art shows around Toronto. Outside the art world, she was an active community member. Most recently she helped to organize events for Toronto's new mayor David MILLER during the municipal election. She also attended the Anglican Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, where a painting she had done of her son's baptism hung on the wall.
An exhibit of Ms. DONOGHUE's most recent major work is scheduled to open at the MacLaren Art Centre in Barrie, Ontario, in March. Called the The Last Supper, the large group piece, which Ms. DONOGHUE started in 2001, consists of 13 portraits encircling a central table piece, which is itself a triptych. The installation requires a total wall space of about 5 metres by 10 metres (16 feet by 34 feet).
Father DONOVAN well remembers how he first learned of the project. One day, he received a call from Ms. DONOGHUE asking if he would have lunch with her. She had an idea she wanted to talk to him about. The idea turned out to be the The Last Supper and Ms. DONOGHUE said she needed his help. After their lunch, she invited Father DONOVAN, along with several others, to dinner. While they were eating and drinking, she photographed them, capturing their mannerisms and expressions. From the photographs, she made a series of sketches which she then used to develop the large group piece.
"She loved what she was doing," Mr. CORBET said. "There was this inner drive that said 'go on.' "
Ms. DONOGHUE, an insulin-dependent diabetic, died on November 22 in a Toronto hospital, after suffering from an insulin reaction that led to a coma.
She leaves her parents Marjorie and Graham DONOGHUE, her son Luca LANGIANO and his father, Domenico LANGIANO and sister Barbara VAVALIDIS.

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HEATHCOTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-14 published
HEATHCOTE, Eric Thomas Blake
Died peacefully, after a short illness, at North York General Hospital, on March 12, 2003. The loving husband of Barbara, father of Isobel and Blake, grandfather of Elspeth, Zoe, Elizabeth, Edward and Maggie, and brother of Joan GRIGNON of Ajax. He was predeceased by his father, Major E.T. HEATHCOTE, Military Medal, Canadian Efficiency Decoration, and his mother, Winnifred (WALLIS) HEATHCOTE. Blake was born in Toronto in 1925, attended Lawrence Park Collegiate, and graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in engineering after serving with the Canadian Signal Corps (1944-1946). His career took him from work under the Eisenhower administration in radio technologies, and back to Canada in engineering consultancy work until 1964. He then spent 23 years with the firm of McGregor and Associates, retiring as senior partner to work with the firm of Proctor and Redfern as senior Vice President until his retirement. He continued working as an independent engineering consultant until December 2002, when he completed his last assignment for St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. Blake was a member of the Don Mills Civitan Club and helped found their hockey league; of the Professional Engineers of Ontario, the Canadian Healthcare Engineering Society, the Royal Canadian Legion, the Royal Canadian Military Institute, and a range of other professional associations. In 1998, he was presented with an award for 25 years' service from the Canadian Standards Association, for whom he had done extensive work in the medical gas sector, serving on many inquiries and boards as an expert analyst. He was an active member of the Church of Our Saviour in Don Mills, and also took great pleasure from such activities as woodworking, winemaking, fixing pretty much everything that got broken, and travel with his family. He also took great satisfaction in maintaining a colourful correspondence with a wide range of corporate and political thorns in his side. His family would like to extend warmest thanks to Dr. Sid FELDMAN, Dr. Simon YU, the nursing staff of North York General Hospital (particularly the pastoral support people), as well as the many Friends who showed such compassion and support as his rapidly-moving illness emerged and took hold. There will be a visitation at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home (159 Eglinton Avenue West, 2 lights west of Yonge) Sunday, March 16th from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. The funeral will take place at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home on Monday, March 17th at 11 a.m., with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Church of Our Saviour in Don Mills (1 Laurentide Drive, Don Mills, M3A 3C6), the North York General Hospital 4001 Leslie Street, Toronto, M2K 1E1), or the charity of your choice.

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HEATLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-07 published
Desire impressed scout
By Tim WHARNSBY Tuesday, October 7, 2003 - Page S11
Toronto -- Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER had a twinkle in his eye and an eye for beating the odds. Nobody knew this better than Atlanta Thrashers scout Dan MARR, who took a chance on Snyder.
The first time MARR sat down to have breakfast with SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER at the Boot and Blade Dining Lounge in Owen Sound, Ontario, seven years ago, the initial impression SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER made was good enough.
"Snydes had this twinkle in his eye that said he was going to get there no matter what the odds were," MARR recalled yesterday, a day after the 25-year-old hockey player died of fatal injuries suffered in a car accident with teammate Dany Heatley last week.
The odds were stacked against SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER making it to the National Hockey League. He was a scrawny teenager. He didn't possess a grand scoring touch. He lacked the impressive speed that smaller players need. But MARR couldn't cross SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER off his list of prospects.
"When you watch a game as a scout, you look at the basics," MARR said from his Toronto home yesterday. "You look at skating ability, size and strength. Dan didn't score high in the basics. But then you make a list of the best players on each team and he was the best player on his junior team [the Owen Sound Platers]."
MARR, who was a Toronto Maple Leafs scout at the time, simply used common sense and invited SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER to the Leafs' rookie camp in 1998. When SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER wasn't offered a contract, he returned to Owen Sound for a fourth season.
MARR, who joined the expansion Thrashers a few weeks later, told SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER not to give up. MARR wanted SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER for the Thrashers.
"I know this sort of thing is said all the time, but you wish some of the players you see with more talent had the heart, courage and determination of Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER," MARR said. "He played like his personality. He was an honest performer, whose work ethic and attitude were infectious.
"Everything you saw with this guy is that he gave it his all. That's why a superstar like Dany HEATLEY took him in as a roommate last summer and the two trained together...... He fit in everywhere."

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HEATLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-07 published
A close-knit community mourns death of National Hockey League player
Anthony REINHART visits the hometown of Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, a kid who just wouldn't quit.
By Anthony REINHART Tuesday, October 7, 2003 - Page A3
Elmira, Ontario -- On the main street of Elmira, three slabs of polished black granite rise from a fountain in Gore Park.
The monument, erected in 2001 after a string of car accidents, bears the names of those taken too young. The name Dan Snyder will now join a list that's grown too long, too quickly for this bucolic town of 9,600, better known for its maple syrup and Mennonites.
Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, a 25-year-old forward with the Atlanta Thrashers of the National Hockey League, died Sunday night, six days after teammate Dany HEATLEY lost control of his speeding Ferrari and crashed on a narrow Atlanta street.
In the wider world of sport and celebrity, Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER will be remembered, perhaps only briefly, as the latest professional athlete to die in the fast lane.
But it's different here in his hometown, a short country drive north of Kitchener-Waterloo, where community ties are drawn tight by blood and strengthened by sidewalk familiarity.
Here, Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER will be remembered as a scrappy, hard worker who refused to listen when they said he was too skinny, too small, too whatever to play mid-level junior hockey, let alone in the National Hockey League.
"He just kept proving people wrong," his uncle, Jeff SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, said yesterday outside the old brick house where Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER had lived with his parents.
"And we were hoping that he'd be able to do that again this week, but that's one battle he couldn't overcome, I guess."
The fight of Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's life began on the night of September 29, after he and Mr. HEATLEY, the Thrashers' 22-year-old scoring sensation, left a social gathering with the club's season-ticket holders.
Mr. HEATLEY, according to Atlanta police, was driving his 2002 Ferrari 360 Modena at about 130 kilometres an hour when he lost control and struck a fence made of brick and wrought iron.
The car was sheared apart, and both men were thrown to the pavement. Mr. HEATLEY, who suffered a broken jaw and torn knee ligaments, faces several charges. Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER suffered a fractured skull and died of brain injuries without regaining consciousness.
People who knew him said he would have never driven so recklessly himself, that he preferred his pickup truck to the flashy cars that a fat paycheque affords.
"That's not Dan," said Bob CUMMINGS, who taught Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER in grade school and helps manage the Junior B Elmira Sugar Kings, for which Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, his father and his uncle all played.
"He enjoyed life, but he respected life."
Standing in the Sugar Kings dressing room yesterday afternoon, Mr. CUMMINGS described a career rife with hints why Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER took so little for granted.
Even the Sugar Kings, one rung down from the level where the National Hockey League drafts most of its talent, had their doubts when he arrived for the 1994-95 season.
"By the end of the season, he was probably one of the best players we had," Mr. CUMMINGS said.
His hard work caught the eye of the Junior A Owen Sound Platers (now the Attack,) but just barely; they drafted Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER in the seventh round.
"He beat those odds and became the captain," Mr. CUMMINGS said, "probably the best captain they ever had."
Still not deemed good enough for the National Hockey League, Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER became a free agent and landed with the Thrashers' farm teams in Chicago and Orlando, where he helped both win league championships.
Atlanta finally called him up in the latter half of last season. He scored 10 goals and four assists in 36 games. "That isn't bad for a kid at the National Hockey League level who wasn't supposed to play Junior B," Mr. CUMMINGS said.
An ankle injury, resulting in surgery last month, was expected to delay Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's start with the Thrashers this season. Still, he was excited, just five days before the crash, when team officials told him to find a place to live in Atlanta, his uncle said.
"He had really earned the respect of the people at the highest level of hockey in the last half of last year," Jeff SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER said.
The people of Elmira shared in that excitement, as they have several times since the SEILING brothers (Rod and Ric) and Darryl SITTLER from nearby St. Jacobs, made the big time decades ago.
Now, they are left mourning yet another one of their young.
Matthew SHANTZ, 13, paid his respects yesterday by walking into Central Source for Sports on the main street to order a Thrashers jersey, complete with Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's name and number.
Matthew, who hopes to play for the Toronto Maple Leafs one day, said he met Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER a couple of times, since his father knows the SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER family.
"It's bad," he said simply, standing in front of the store, where plastic letters spelled out "We Remember Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER" in the window, beneath a Thrashers jersey.
Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's funeral will be held in Elmira on Friday.

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