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"HAY" 2003 Obituary


HAYASHI  HAYDEN  HAYES  HAYHURSAINT_D  HAYHURST  HAYTHORNE  HAYWARD 

HAYASHI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-20 published
HAYASHI, Naoko - Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Naoko HAYASHI, late of the City of Toronto, who died on or about the 19th day of December, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or about the 9th day of July, 2003, thereafter, the undersigned will distribute the assets of the said estate having regard only to the claim(s) then filed.
Dated this 17th day of June, 2003
Estate Trustees:
A. NAMISATO and V.W. HAMARA
c/o 240 Gerrard Street East
Toronto, Ontario M5A 2E8
By Their Solicitor: Virginia W. HAMARA
Barrister and Solicitor
240 Gerrard St. East
Toronto, Ontario M5A 2E8
Tel: (416) 961-5010
Page B8

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HAYDEN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-12 published
Elva Margaret GILPIN (née ARMSTRONG)
In loving memory of Elva Margaret GILPIN April 19, 1927 to March 3, 2003.
Elva GILPIN, a resident of Spring Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital, Mindemoya on Monday, March 3, 2003 at the age of 75 years.
She was born in Gore Bay, daughter of the late Alf and Margaret (PHALEN) ARMSTRONG. Elva was a member of the Gospel Hall in Gore Bay, loved gardening, especially tending her flowers, knitting, quilting. She was a hard working farm wife and mother and will be fondly remembered for her pride, love and enjoyment of her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Beloved wife of Elwood GILPIN of Spring Bay. Loved and loving mother of Marie GRANT and husband Joe and Mary Anne HAYDEN and husband Jeff. Predeceased by two children Ronnie and Donna. Dear grandmother of Brandon and friend Tracy, Ryan, Krystal, Daniel and Holly and great grandmother of Jessica and Morgan. Loving sister of Clarence ARMSTRONG, Bill ARMSTRONG and wife Anne, Alfred ARMSTRONG wife Nelda (predeceased,) Ronnie ARMSTRONG and wife Barb and Alvin ARMSTRONG (predeceased.)
Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home on Thursday March 6, 2003. The funeral service was conducted on Thursday, March 6, 2003 with Pastor Alvin COOK officiating. Spring interment in Grimesthorpe Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home

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HAYDEN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-23 published
HAYDEN
-In Memory of a Dear Father and Pappy, Fred, July 23, 1995
If tears could build a stairway
And memories were a lane
We would walk right up to heaven
And bring you back again.
No farewell words were spoken
No time to say goodbye
You were gone before we knew it
And only God knows why.
Our hearts still ache in sadness
And secret tears still flow.
What it meant to lose you
No one can ever know.
-Always loved and remembered by Sue, Kris and Amanda.

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HAYES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-25 published
HAYES, Thomas Michael
Died peacefully on Tuesday, October 21, 2003. Tom, in his 63rd year. Loving brother of Bridget, Gerald and Ian. Tom was predeceased by his brother Christopher. He will be sadly missed by his family, Canadian family and Friends. Friends will be received at the Sherrin Funeral Home, 873 Kingston Road (west of Victoria Park Ave.) Toronto (416-698-2861) on Sunday from 4 until 6 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Saint John's Roman Catholic Church (794 Kingston Road) on Tuesday October 28, 2003 at 10 o'clock. Cremation to follow. A wake will be held at the Balmy Beach Canoe Club (at the foot of Beech Avenue) following the mass. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to the Renal Dialysis Department, St. Joseph's Health Centre, 30 The Queensway, Toronto M6R 1B5 or Interlink Community Centre #701-620 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 2C1 would be appreciated by the family.

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HAYHURSAINT_D o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-01 published
EBBS, Adèle ''Couchie'' Page (STATTEN)
Died serenely, at peace, on Saturday, June 28, 2003, in her own home 10 days before her 94th birthday. Lovingly cared for by her son John, his partner Bill YEADAN and other compassionate caregivers. Companion since 1924 of the late Dr. Harry EBBS (1906 - 2000). ''Their portages often diverged but they paddled as one.'' Daughter of the late Taylor ''Chief'' and Ethel ''Tonakela'' STATTEN. Sister of Dr. Tay STATTEN and the late Dr. Page STATTEN. Wonderful mother to Bobsie, Susan, John EBBS. ''Geeya'' was so proud of her grandchildren (children of Jim HAYHURST and Sue EBBS) Cindy HAYHURST (Scott HANSON), Jimmy HAYHURST (Beth) and Barbara HAYHURST (Paddy FLYNN.) ''NanaGeeya'' was joyously entertained by her great-grandchildren Ben, Cameron, Griffen HANSON; Statten, Quinn, Tatum HAYHURSAINT_Dear to her always, Eleanor PARMENTER and Jean BUCHANAN. From birth Couchie summered under canvass, first at Geneva Park, Lake Couchiching, where her father directed the Central Toronto Young Men's Christian Association camp and from 1913 when the Stattens took a lease on Canoe Lake, Algonquin Park. In 1921 and 1924 Camps Ahmek and Wapomeo were founded. Graduate of Brown P.S., Bishop Strachan School, University College U31T, O.C.E. Inductee of the University of Toronto Sports Hall of Fame. Teacher at Oakwood Collegiate, after which she assumed full-time directorship of Wapomeo until retirement in 1975. Involved member of the Canadian, Ontario and American Camping Associations, Bolton Camp Committee, Young Men's Christian Association Board. Founding member of the Society of Camp Directors. Supporter of the Taylor Statten Bursary Fund and Camp Tonakela in Madra, India. Recipient of the Directors' Award of Friends of Algonquin. Patron of the Tom Thomson exhibit, in memory of her husband, at the Algonquin Park Visitors Centre. Loyal sister of Kappa Kappa Gamma. Avid member of the Federation of Ontario Naturalists, Toronto Mycology Society, the Toronto Camera Club, Rotary Club of Toronto Inner Wheel, Women's Auxiliary at the Hospital for Sick Children, University Women's Club. Enthusiastic member of Osler Bluff Ski Club and Rosedale Golf Club. Founding member of Lawrence Park Community Church. She and Harry travelled widely sharing their passion for children in camping, paediatric medicine and other youth causes. Her strong leadership, fairness, integrity, wisdom and instinct to see the good in all has touched thousands and will be her legacy for generations. If you wish, remember Couchie by donating to The Camping Archives, Bata Library, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7B8 or to any of the above organizations. In early September a Celebration of her Life will be held at Lawrence Park Community Church, Toronto. Friends on Canoe Lake are invited to renimisce and tell tall tales at her beloved Little Wapomeo Island on Monday, July 7th, 3-6 p.m. Memories may be posted at www.firesoffriendship.com. ''Here Let the Northwoods' Spirit Kindle Fires of Friendship.''

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HAYHURST o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-01 published
EBBS, Adèle ''Couchie'' Page (STATTEN)
Died serenely, at peace, on Saturday, June 28, 2003, in her own home 10 days before her 94th birthday. Lovingly cared for by her son John, his partner Bill YEADAN and other compassionate caregivers. Companion since 1924 of the late Dr. Harry EBBS (1906 - 2000). ''Their portages often diverged but they paddled as one.'' Daughter of the late Taylor ''Chief'' and Ethel ''Tonakela'' STATTEN. Sister of Dr. Tay STATTEN and the late Dr. Page STATTEN. Wonderful mother to Bobsie, Susan, John EBBS. ''Geeya'' was so proud of her grandchildren (children of Jim HAYHURST and Sue EBBS) Cindy HAYHURST (Scott HANSON), Jimmy HAYHURST (Beth) and Barbara HAYHURST (Paddy FLYNN.) ''NanaGeeya'' was joyously entertained by her great-grandchildren Ben, Cameron, Griffen HANSON; Statten, Quinn, Tatum HAYHURSAINT_Dear to her always, Eleanor PARMENTER and Jean BUCHANAN. From birth Couchie summered under canvass, first at Geneva Park, Lake Couchiching, where her father directed the Central Toronto Young Men's Christian Association camp and from 1913 when the Stattens took a lease on Canoe Lake, Algonquin Park. In 1921 and 1924 Camps Ahmek and Wapomeo were founded. Graduate of Brown P.S., Bishop Strachan School, University College U31T, O.C.E. Inductee of the University of Toronto Sports Hall of Fame. Teacher at Oakwood Collegiate, after which she assumed full-time directorship of Wapomeo until retirement in 1975. Involved member of the Canadian, Ontario and American Camping Associations, Bolton Camp Committee, Young Men's Christian Association Board. Founding member of the Society of Camp Directors. Supporter of the Taylor Statten Bursary Fund and Camp Tonakela in Madra, India. Recipient of the Directors' Award of Friends of Algonquin. Patron of the Tom Thomson exhibit, in memory of her husband, at the Algonquin Park Visitors Centre. Loyal sister of Kappa Kappa Gamma. Avid member of the Federation of Ontario Naturalists, Toronto Mycology Society, the Toronto Camera Club, Rotary Club of Toronto Inner Wheel, Women's Auxiliary at the Hospital for Sick Children, University Women's Club. Enthusiastic member of Osler Bluff Ski Club and Rosedale Golf Club. Founding member of Lawrence Park Community Church. She and Harry travelled widely sharing their passion for children in camping, paediatric medicine and other youth causes. Her strong leadership, fairness, integrity, wisdom and instinct to see the good in all has touched thousands and will be her legacy for generations. If you wish, remember Couchie by donating to The Camping Archives, Bata Library, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7B8 or to any of the above organizations. In early September a Celebration of her Life will be held at Lawrence Park Community Church, Toronto. Friends on Canoe Lake are invited to renimisce and tell tall tales at her beloved Little Wapomeo Island on Monday, July 7th, 3-6 p.m. Memories may be posted at www.firesoffriendship.com. ''Here Let the Northwoods' Spirit Kindle Fires of Friendship.''

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HAYTHORNE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-28 published
The architect of Canada's basic wage
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, January 28, 2003, Page R7
The man who more than anyone else modernized working conditions for most Canadians has died. George HAYTHORNE spent his career in the federal Department of Labour, serving as deputy minister from 1961 to 1969, died last month in Ottawa. He was 93.
Raised on a Prairie farm in Salisbury, Alberta, a rural community just outside Edmonton, Mr. HAYTHORNE began his career as a civil servant in Halifax in 1938. At the age of 29 he became secretary of the Nova Scotia Economic Council. Four years later, he moved to Ottawa where he joined the Department of Labour as associate director of the National Selective Service.
After the war years, he worked his way up through the labour department, becoming director of the economics and research. In 1961, he was made deputy minister.
"George was an extremely hard-working and creative deputy minister who had excellent working relations with the Canadian labour movement," said retired senator Allan MacEACHEN, who served as Canada's Minister of Labour between 1963 and 1965.
Mr. HAYTHORNE was also actively involved in the International Labour Organization in the 1950s and 1960s, serving in various capacities, including chairman of the organization's governing body.
"I had tremendous respect for him," Mr. MacEACHEN said. "He was a straight shooter."
Mr. HAYTHORNE was part of significant change and growth in the Department of Labour, which at the time had responsibility for areas such as training and employment programs that have since been transferred to Human Resources Development Canada.
In 1965, Mr. HAYTHORNE saw the Canada Labour (Standards) Code establish not only minimum wages, but also minimum work hours and vacation pay for workers.
"He was always wanting to see the workers get their share of what was going around," said George HAYTHORNE's wife, Ruth HAYTHORNE. "He pushed for programs that would ensure this."
George Vickers HAYTHORNE was born in 1909, the second of two sons to Frank and Elizabeth HAYTHORNE. His parents, who were both raised on farms in northern England, arrived in Canada in 1906 and bought a piece of virgin land just outside Edmonton.
As a child, Mr. HAYTHORNE and his older brother Tom regularly attended the nearby West Salisbury Church, where his mother and father taught Sunday school.
At the University of Alberta, Mr. HAYTHORNE became involved in the Christian Student Movement and was later an active member in the Unitarian Church.
"There was a spiritual foundation to his life," Mr. HAYTHORNE's son Eric said, adding that it shaped his approach to life and his work. "His life was one of purpose."
Growing up on a Prairie farm, Mr. HAYTHORNE never lost his interest in agriculture, and later studied agricultural and labour economics. After graduating from the University of Alberta with a Masters of Economics in 1932, he went to McGill University in Montreal to the study farm labour situation in Ontario and Quebec. The findings of the study were subsequently published in a book of which he is the co-author.
After completing his fellowship at McGill, he became a research assistant at Harvard University in 1937 and eight years later earned his PhD there.
After finishing his duties as deputy minister of labour, Mr. HAYTHORNE was appointed to the federal Prices and Incomes Commission, serving until 1972.
He spent the next year as a senior visitor at Churchill College, University of Cambridge before becoming director and professor of development management at the Institute of Development Management based in Gaborone, Botswana. He remained there until 1979.
Mr. HAYTHORNE leaves his wife Ruth; children Elinor and Eric and brothers Donald and Owen.
George Vickers HAYTHORNE, civil servant; born in Salisbury, Alberta, on September 29, 1909; died in Ottawa on November 22, 2002.

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HAYWARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-10 published
Programmer was a 'people person'
Computer consultant advised clients not only on technology, but on the psychology that made the technology work for the company
Harvey GELLMAN was the first person in Canada to get a PhD based in computer studies.
By Marina STRAUSS Saturday, May 10, 2003 - Page F11
He broke new ground in the computer field long before most Canadians even knew what a software program was, or that computers would so profoundly change their way of communicating and doing business.
Known as the dean of computer consulting, Harvey GELLMAN had a hand in purchasing the first computer in this country in 1952 he ran one of the first software programs and was the first to get a PhD based on computer studies. Last month, Dr. GELLMAN died suddenly in Florida at the age of 78.
He made his name as a consultant who advised clients not only on technology, but on the psychology that made the technology work for a company -- with a knack for matching people's skills to the job at hand, colleagues say.
Most important, Dr. GELLMAN put the clients first, always looking out for their best interests rather than simply the consultant's bottom line, says Jim HAYWARD, his partner at Toronto-based Gellman Hayward and Partners for 18 years until it was sold to Montreal-based CGI Group in 1992.
What particularly distinguished Dr. GELLMAN as a consultant was his departure from others in refusing just to analyze a problem and deliver a report to the client, Mr. HAYWARD says.
Instead, Dr. GELLMAN would find out exactly how far the client was ready to go in implementing any change recommended in a report and then guide the client through the change process.
This fundamental shift took root in the mid-1970s, when Dr. GELLMAN became frustrated that too many consultants simply handed over a report and then walked away from the problem, Mr. HAYWARD says.
"The trick is to work beside the client and walk with them, but don't take the problem away from them, " he says. "It's like therapy."
Together, they applied this form of business therapy at Gellman Hayward, which grew from four partners to about 100 employees before it was sold, boasting a client list that read like a Who's Who of corporate Canada.
Indeed, the firm at one time or another advised all the big banks, Bell Canada, Imperial Oil, Labatt Breweries, Eaton's, Hudson's Bay, Spar Aerospace, TransCanada PipeLines, Noranda, Falconbridge, Inco, Atomic Energy of Canada and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
"It was all the big names, says CGI president Serge GODIN, who worked closely with Dr. GELLMAN after the 1992 acquisition and credits him with helping to manage its huge surge in staff mostly through acquisitions -- by integrating and streamlining the various systems.
"Harvey GELLMAN is a brand name, Mr. GODIN says. "He was quite something, very strong, brilliant -- with a big heart."
He was a man of few words, with a deep-seated respect for and interest in people, colleagues and family.
"He would say, 'The janitor and the president are the same, ' recalls Paul GELLMAN, the younger of his two sons, who also is a computer consultant. "He believed it and he lived it."
From the security officers at Dr. GELLMAN's apartment building in Florida, where he lived half the year in his retirement, to the secretary in his doctor's office -- all were touched by him and upset by his death, Paul says.
Born in 1924, Dr. GELLMAN was the middle of five children of Polish parents who immigrated to Toronto in 1928. His youngest brother Albert says nobody in the household ever quarrelled: a calm reigned in the family and reverberated in the future computer guru.
Still, Dr. GELLMAN's life threatened to take an entirely different course early on, when he dropped out of high school to work in an electrical manufacturing plant and help the family make ends meet.
The factory had an electrical test set that only Dr. GELLMAN was able to figure out, Mr. HAYWARD says. The budding tech whiz realized that he wasn't so dumb, went back to school -- and the rest is history.
He attended the University of Toronto, graduating with a bachelor's degree in mathematics and physics in 1947. The following year, the university's newly established Computation Centre, headed by Professor Calvin (Kelly) GOTLIEB, invited him to join and study electro-mechanical devices.
Dr. GELLMAN subsequently was involved in purchasing a huge Ferranti computer from England for $250,000. It was the first computer bought in Canada, sponsored in part by one of the centre's clients Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.
"The machine would fail every five minutes, Dr. GELLMAN was quoted as saying years later when he was inducted in the industry-sponsored Canadian Information Productivity Awards hall of fame. "We would sit at the monitor and watch the diagonal array of dots, and when a dot dropped, we would stop the machine, reset it and carry on."
He wrote a small program on punch paper tape to help users print efficiently from the computer, one of the first software programs to be run in Canada, and soon he produced the first printout for a computational problem, according to information supplied to Canadian Information Productivity Awards.
In 1951, he obtained his PhD in applied mathematics, the first doctorate in Canada for which the theoretical calculations depended on a computer.
That same year, he became head of computing at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. and, by 1955, he founded H. S. Gellman and Co. Ltd. in Toronto to advise the growing number of companies seeking his help.
Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. was his first client and remained one throughout his consulting career.
"He was doing a lot of pioneering work on operating systems, and operating systems that deal with controlling nuclear-power plants, says Bob BANTING, manager of information technology security at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. "He understood the programming and the technical stuff, but he also knew how to manage people.... He was very good at assessing skills."
He hired top talent, sizing up job candidates in minutes, and was able to move seamlesslessly from being a good programmer to a good "people person, Mr. BANTING says.
Dr. GELLMAN's early work was computing based on mathematical equations, but the firm quickly moved into what became known as information technology.
His busy consulting firm was swallowed in 1964 by a subsidiary of de Havilland and subsequently by AGT Data Systems before he left with Mr. HAYWARD to form Gellman Hayward.
But by the early 1990s, the firm was "stuck" and started to seek a buyer, Mr. HAYWARD says. "We didn't know how to get to the next level."
When CGI acquired it in 1992, Dr. GELLMAN stayed on as a senior vice-president until he retired six years later.
In 1997, he co-wrote Riding the Tiger, a book that helps business managers use information technology effectively. He was often quoted in the media on managing information systems, and wrote articles on the topic for The Globe and Mail.
In addition, he received many honours during his career, including being named International Systems Man of the Year in 1967. He was a founding member of the Canadian Information Processing Society, among other professional bodies.
In his personal life, he was a private man and a steadfast father and grandfather nine times over. He was devoted to Lily, his wife of 57 years. They were teenage sweethearts, best of Friends and "a model of how we all should live, " says his son Paul.
When Paul's older brother, Steven, decided to pursue a career as a composer and musician, Dr. GELLMAN had some reservations, aware of the risks of such an unconventional and insecure profession.
"Before I left home to study at Juilliard, he said to me, 'I understand you wanting to become a musician. Become the best musician you can be; but I am concerned that you don't become just a musician, ' " Steven says.
"Dad was reminding me to become a full human being, to develop many facets of my life, just as he did."
Dr. GELLMAN and his wife spent a lot of time in Israel, where they had family. In the mid-1970s, he took a six-month sabbatical from work for an extended stay.
He was also part of a small discussion group called the Senge Circle, started more than a decade ago among business colleagues to discuss Peter Senge's management book, The Fifth Discipline. It evolved into regular breakfast meetings to chew over different business tomes.
The last meeting was in October before he went to Florida when the group delved into the Peter DRUCKER classic, The Practice of Management. Dr. GELLMAN was struck by how relevant the book was almost 50 years after he first read it.
Dr. GELLMAN, who died on April 23, leaves his wife Lily, sons Steven and Paul, and siblings Dorothy, Albert and Esther.

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