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"HAM" 2003 Obituary


HAMALAINEN  HAMARA  HAMBLY  HAMEL  HAMER  HAMILL  HAMILTON  HAMLIN  HAMM  HAMME  HAMMELL  HAMPTON 

HAMALAINEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
PENNELL, Martta (Martha) Aliisa (née HAMLIN)
of Appleby Place, Burlington, passed away peacefully at Joseph Brant Hospital, Burlington, February 19, 2003. Born in Toronto in 1917, she was the daughter of Juho (John) and Emilia (LEHTONEN) HAMALAINEN. Beloved wife of the late H. Allen PENNELL (Royal Canadian Air Force, September 1943). Predeceased by brothers Paul, Martti, Frederick A. (HAMLIN) and sister, Aili (RUGABER). Dearest aunt of Fred and Avalon of Sarnia and the late Carol (HAMLIN) and loving great aunt to Chris, Alisa, Erin, Jennifer and Craig and great-great aunt to Brodie, Curtis and Raeya. Special friend to Midge ELLAWAY, Stoney Creek. Martha was employed for many years at Stelco Inc., Hamilton, in the Salary and Benefits Department. During her more active years, she was a member of the Hamilton Thistle Club and was an avid curler. More recently she was a member of the Ancaster Senior Achievement Centre. She was active for many years with the Volunteer Association of Chedoke McMaster Hospital. Her passion for many years was her cottage on Canning Lake near Minden where she especially remembered her Finnish roots. Her other interests included golf, bridge, and travel. Throughout the years, she visited many interesting and exciting places with tours of Greece and Newfoundland being at the top of her list of favourites. Cremation. Family will receive Friends at the Cresmount Funeral Home, 322 Fennell Avenue East, Hamilton, on Wednesday, February 26th from 12-1 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at the funeral home on Wednesday at 1 p.m. Aunt Martha's family will always cherish her memory. Rest in peace Auntie Martha. We love you as we were loved by you. As an expression of sympathy, Friends who wish may send memorial donations to the Toronto Sick Children's Hospital or charity of your choice.

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HAMARA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-20 published
HAYASHI, Naoko - Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Naoko HAYASHI, late of the City of Toronto, who died on or about the 19th day of December, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or about the 9th day of July, 2003, thereafter, the undersigned will distribute the assets of the said estate having regard only to the claim(s) then filed.
Dated this 17th day of June, 2003
Estate Trustees:
A. NAMISATO and V.W. HAMARA
c/o 240 Gerrard Street East
Toronto, Ontario M5A 2E8
By Their Solicitor: Virginia W. HAMARA
Barrister and Solicitor
240 Gerrard St. East
Toronto, Ontario M5A 2E8
Tel: (416) 961-5010
Page B8

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HAMBLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-10 published
Samuel George HAMBLY
Died peacefully on February 19, 2003, in his 96th year. Sam was born on March 6, 1907, on a farm north of Bradford. He was an elementary school teacher and a vice principal with the Toronto Board of Education for 40 years. He was the founder of Camp Allsaw which he operated in Haliburton from 1962 to 1998. In January, 1942 Sam joined the Canadian Army. In February, 1944 he was one of 500 officers loaned to the British Army in preparation for the invasion of Europe. He was placed in charge of a mortar platoon of 60 men and given the rank of Captain. He took part in June, 1944 in the invasion of Western Europe. He was involved in heavy action throughout Western Europe for the balance of the war. After the war he was part of the occupation force in Germany until he was discharged in September, 1945.The driving force of Sam's life after the war was promotion of interest in the preservation of the environment. This was the focus of his work as a teacher and a vice principal. It was the unifying theme of Camp Allsaw. Sam had great influence on the lives of thousands of young people. He is one of those rare people of whom it can be said that the world is a better place for his having been there. He was predeceased by his wife Marjorie in August, 1996, by his parents Franklin and Florence, by his brother John and by his sister Adeline. He will be sadly missed by his son Peter and his wife Alice and by their children Jennifer and Douglas, and by his daughter Vesta and by John's wife Mary and also by his many Friends and supporters in his work in the preservation of the environment. Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home 'Weston Chapel', 2035 Weston Rd. (3 blocks north of Lawrence), Weston, on Friday, February 21, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at Beverley Hills United Church, 65 Mayall Ave., Downsview, on Saturday, February 22, 2003, at 11 a.m. Cremation to follow.

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HAMEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-10 published
The castle lights are growing dim
Canadian television icon made his mark as star of The Hilarious House of Frightenstein
By John McKAY Canadian Press Friday, January 10, 2003, Page R11
Billy VAN, the diminutive, manic comic actor who starred in Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television's Nightcap in the 1960s and The Hilarious House of Frightenstein in the seventies, died Wednesday. He was 68.
Mr. VAN, who had been battling cancer for about a year and had a triple heart bypass in 1998, died at Toronto's Sunnybrook Hospital, said his former wife, Claudia CONVERSE.
While a familiar fixture on Canadian television for decades, he also worked in the United States on variety shows such as The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour, The Ray Stevens Show and The Bobby Vinton Show.
Mr. VAN even gained fame for the Colt .45 beer commercials he made for 15 years and for which he won a Clio Award.
But he invariably returned to Toronto in shows like The Party Game, Bizarre with John Byner, The Hudson Brothers Razzle DAzzle Show and Bits and Bytes.
His wife, Susan, said that while he had opportunities in the U.S., Mr. VAN had no regrets about staying in Canada.
"He was quite happy when he came back," she said. "He had the taste of the life down there and [said] 'Okay, that's fine, I'd rather be at home.' "
Ms. CONVERSE agreed that Mr. VAN had been happy with his career and had worked non-stop until his heart bypass.
"I don't know of many Canadians that stay in Canada who get their full recognition," she said. "When he went to the States, definitely. But there isn't a star system in Canada so it's kind of difficult."
Mr. VAN -- then Billy VAN EVERA -- went into show business at the age of 12 and back in the 1950s, he and his four musically inclined brothers formed a singing group that toured Canada and Europe. Most also went on to adult careers in show business.
After his heart surgery, Mr. VAN was semi-retired but continued to do voiceover work for commercials and animated programs. His last major on-screen role was as Les the trainer in the television hockey movie Net Worth in 1995.
Mr. VAN and long-time colleagues Dave BROADFOOT and Jack DUFFY made appearances in recent years to support the fledgling Canadian Comedy Awards.
"I'm all for that enthusiasm," Mr. VAN said about the awards launch in 2000.
"Billy was one of my closest Friends," said Mr. DUFFY, who added that he called Mr. VAN several times a week after he became ill.
"We were sort of buddies under the skin. We got to know each other really well at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and then we worked on Party Game together for a number of years. He was a close friend and I will miss him very much."
Mr. DUFFY said a lot of doors opened for Mr. VAN when he did The Sonny and Cher Show,but he was happy to come home to his native Toronto, where he was born in 1934.
"He came back and we were glad to have him back."
Entertainer Dinah CHRISTIE, with whom Mr. VAN worked on The Party Game for a decade, called him a brave and glorious person.
"He would take on anything and was . . . a totally gracious guy," she said. "I'm just going to miss him like we all are going to miss him. He soldiered through this bloody cancer thing so wonderfully. I knew he was just trying to get through Christmas."
Ms. CHRISTIE said Mr. VAN had some hideous experiences in the U.S. He had seen a man shot to death next to him in a New York hotel, and had his Los Angeles home broken into twice.
"He never felt safe there. And he was such a Canadian that he always felt safe here."
Mr. VAN's picture is on the Canadian Comedy Wall of Fame at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Broadcast Centre in Toronto, along with those of Al WAXMAN, Wayne and Shuster and Don HARRON.
The Hilarious House of Frightenstein starred Vincent PRICE, with Mr. VAN as host and a variety of characters, including The Count, a vampire who preferred pizza to blood and who wore tennis shoes as well as a cape. The hour-long episodes were taped at Hamilton's CHCH-Television and are still seen in syndication around the world.
Nightcap was a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation satirical show that predated Saturday Night Live by a dozen years. Its cast included Al HAMEL and Guido BASSO and his orchestra.
Mr. VAN leaves his wife, Susan, and two daughters from previous marriages, Tracy and Robyn.
A private funeral will be held in Toronto on Monday.
Billy VAN, actor and entertainer; born in Toronto in 1934; died in Toronto on January 8, 2003.

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HAMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-20 published
Andre HAMER
By Nancy Hamer STRAHL, Art McDONALD and Patty CARSON
Thursday, March 20, 2003 - Page A24
Husband, father, family man, scientist, traveller. Born January 17, 1968, in Oshawa, Ontario Died February 2 in Ottawa, of colon cancer, age 35.
Andre came from a family where education came naturally. He was raised in a stimulating environment, by loving parents who fostered his natural curiosity and provided him with ample learning opportunities by 17, Kant and Nietzsche were his bedtime favourites. Andre was very proud of his Belgian ancestry and visited his family's homeland many times. He and his sister loved to travel and shared this love during the teenage years -- from visiting the top of the Alps to the dismantling of the Berlin Wall.
He studied at the University of Toronto, and later earned an M.Sc. and PhD in experimental physics from Queen's University in Kingston where he met his future wife, Rosalie McKENNA. A mutual friend thought they would be perfect for each other (because they both loved old movies) and arranged for them to meet. It was February 9th -- and it was love at first sight. The clincher came when Andre said "Get it, got it, good!" and Rosalie immediately recognized the line from an old Danny Kaye movie. For Valentine's Day, Rosalie sent Andre a single red rose.
When they were married, their reception was held in the grand "train" room in Ottawa's Museum of Science and Technology. It was perfect. In the background was man's testament to our quest for knowledge and in the foreground (like an old movie with Doris Day singing Que sera, sera) were two young lovers alighting from the train, beginning life's journey.
That life journey soon included fatherhood. Andre was patient and loving with Patrick and Michael. He read to the boys each day, passing on his love of reading.
Andre loved science and he was particularly good at experimental science. Everything he did was done to completion, starting with innovative concepts and continuing to the finished product that did its intended job 100 per cent -- nothing less. He was regarded as one of the very best young particle astrophysicists in the world. He played a central role in the success of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, thus contributing directly to our current knowledge of the universe. Andre developed the central calibration device for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiment for his doctoral thesis at Queen's University, carried out major analyses essential for Sudbury Neutrino Observatory's success as a post-doctoral fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico and presented the major results from Sudbury Neutrino Observatory at the American Physical Society meetings in April, 2002. His legacy in science continues as his contributions are used every day by his colleagues at Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.
Andre lived by his personal motto "L'espoir fait vivre" (hope gives life). He loved to listen to his mother's inspiring stories of Grandmother Lea's use of this motto during their fight to survive the Second World War. Throughout his difficult struggle with cancer, Andre maintained a balance between his intellectual pursuits and caring for his spiritual and physical self. Two days before his untimely death, he was reading articles that summarized our current knowledge of the universe from its most microscopic regions to its farthest distances. Later on, he watched an inspirational video about nature with his son. He and his son Patrick talked about how they would climb mountains and build bridges over the rivers.
On February 7, his family (including some from Belgium), Friends old and new, and colleagues (from as far away as New Mexico), gathered to mourn the passing of a gentle soul and a great scientist. His coffin was adorned with a single red rose. On March 8, his third son, Andre Luc McKenna HAMER, was born.
Nancy is Andre's sister, Art his thesis advisor, Patty his sister-in-law.

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HAMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-04 published
LEE, Florence Lillian (Flo)
Passed away peacefully at Saint Mary's Hospital New Westminster June 25, 2003. Born Florence MINCHINTON at Napanee, Ontario, June 18, 1909. She was for 62 years the loving wife of William Cyril (Cy) who died November last. Flo will be affectionately remembered by their son Randy, brother-in-law Kenneth LEE (Judy,) cousins, among them Neil HILLHOUSE, Bill HAMER, Vera TABER, Donabelle OLENICK and Jean WINSLADE and very many Friends. She was predeceased by her brother James who is survived by his wife Audrey. Flo worked as a professional secretary and was a member of the Canouver Club. Married to Cy in 1940 she went with him to the Royal Canadian Air Force base Ucluelet to assist with the Young Men's Christian Association War Services. After moving to New Westminster where she and Cy lived in a house they had designed together she volunteered with the Royal Columbian Hospital Auxiliary. An avid bridge player, Flo spent many memorable hours with her neighbourhood Friends and was always ready to share happiness or problems. She will be much missed. Thanks of the family goes to the staff at Canada Way Care Centre and Saint Mary's Hospital for their kindness. At her request there will be no service. Memorial donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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HAMILL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-12 published
Alice Lucy WILLIAMS
Alice Lucy WILLIAMS passed away at the Collingwood Nursing Home, on Friday, February 7, 2003 in her 88th year.
Alice (McGIBBON) beloved wife of the late George WILLIAMS. Dear mother of Wilda and her husband Hazen WHITE/WHYTE of Providence Bay, Manitoulin Island and the late Eileen WILLIAMS and Robert Arthur WILLIAMS. Survived by her daughter-in-law Helen BOUTET. Loving grandmother of Bruce and the late Shirley WHITE/WHYTE, Wilma Eileen WHITE/WHYTE, Linda Darlene and her husband Bradford LEIBEL, Robert Bruce WILLIAMS, Julie Marie and her husband Joe STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and the late Douglas Allan WHITE/WHYTE, nine great grandchildren: Matthew WHITE/WHYTE, Marcus WHITE/WHYTE, Sarah HAMILL, Curtis MERRITT, Liana MERRITT, Joshua COX, Kimberly LEIBEL, Neil LEIBEL, Nicole STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and three great great grandchildren, Dominique, Tristan and Brayden. Funeral service was held at the Chatterson-Long Funeral Home, 404 Hurontario Street, Collingwood, on Tuesday, February 11, 2003. Spring Interment Silver Water Cemetery, Manitoulin Island.

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HAMILTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
HAMILTON, ''Al'' Elmore Richard (Veteran of World War 2, North-West Europe Campaign, Royal Canadian Engineers)
Suddenly, at the Coleman Care Centre, Barrie, on Saturday, March 1st, 2003. Beloved husband of the late Roseanne (August 2001). Father of Rik (Marilyn) of Barrie. Poppie to Paul and Tricia (Michael MIDDLETON.) Great-Poppie to Emily and Christopher. Predeceased by sister Grace and brother Bill. Al was born on November 6th, 1915 in the City of Toronto where close ties still remained with many Friends, partly due to his keen involvement with the game of tennis. He moved to Barrie in 1953, and along with his wife Roseanne, formed Lake Simcoe Glass and Mirror. Proud to be former active and current honourary member of the Rotary Club of Barrie. There will be no visitation or service as immediate cremation was requested. Al's ashes will be buried at Prospect Cemetery, Toronto, with Roseanne's in the grave of their beloved daughter Patricia Anne who passed away in 1948, age two years. Memorial donations to the Royal Victoria Hospital would be appreciated, and may be made through the Steckley- Gooderham Funeral Homes, Barrie.

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HAMILTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-29 published
Sheila Anne HAMILTON Sept. 18, 1930 - Feb. 26, 2003
Sheila Anne HAMILTON died unexpectedly in her daughter's Ocala, Florida home following surgery on a broken leg. She lived until the 1970s in Hamilton and Ancaster, Ontario, where her family owned Royal Oak Dairy. She is survived and greatly missed by her son Scott McKEE of Courtenay, British Columbia, her daughter Jane HAMILTON and Jane's spouse Joy MASUHARA, both of Vancouver, her granddaughters Sarah HAMILTON of Japan and Meghann HAMILTON of Vancouver, and her daughter Sally McKEE and grand_son Corey THOMAS of Ocala, Florida, along with her brother, Donald HAMILTON and his wife Pat HAMILTON of Burlington, Ontario, several cousins, her late sister Jane's husband, Fred WRIGHT and their five children, especially Liza ALLAN. She was an Registered Nurse Anesthetist and Licensed Practical Nurse as well as a master seamstress with her own business selling children's heirloom clothing. She was keenly interested in interior design and was a master chef along with a skilled gardener who most loved red roses. She had an infectious sense of humour and a true zest for living. Services were private. Cremation was followed by the scattering of her ashes at sea off Key Largo. Donations in lieu of flowers may be made to the Humane Society.

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HAMILTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-23 published
Rolf O. KROGER, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Psychology University of Toronto
Rolf died, as he lived, with grace, courage, humour and dignity, at home on April 18th, 2003, of advanced prostate cancer. He was the devoted and beloved husband of Linda WOOD. He was the cherished son of Erna KROGER and son-in-law of Adele WOOD; loving brother of Harold and Jurgen KROGER; dear brother-in-law of Wilma KROGER, Edelgard DEDO, Lorraine WOOD, Robert and Deborah WOOD, and Reg WOOD; much loved uncle of Andrew KROGER and Stephen KROGER, Christina and Linda JUHASZ- WOOD, Taylor, Genna and Devon WOOD, Jonathan and Nicole WOOD, Phillippe NOEL, and Jose and David TILLETT, and nephew of Liesl WINTER, Otto WINTER and Alf and Sue MODJESKI. Rolf was born in Hamburg, Germany, on September 28th, 1931. He emigrated to Canada in 1952, and completed a B.A. in psychology at Sir George Williams College (now Concordia University) in 1957. Following his M.A. (1959) at Columbia University, New York, he received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1963. His advisor, Prof. Theodore R. SARBIN (Prof. Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz,) has continued to be a valued colleague and dear friend, together with Rolf's fellow graduate student, Prof. Karl E. SCHEIBE of Wesleyan University and Karl's wife Wendy. Rolf joined the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto in 1964 and continued his research and writing in social psychology after retiring in 1996. Rolf's work addressed a variety of topics concerning the individual in the social system. His articles and papers on the social psychology of test-taking, hypnosis, history, epistemology, methodology and the discipline of social psychology all reflected his dissatisfaction with the status quo combined with proposals for new directions. For more than 20 years he has worked with Linda A. WOOD (University of Guelph) on topics in language and social psychology (e.g., terms of address and politeness), and most recently on a book on discourse analysis. At the time of his death, he was working on a discursive critique of the 'Big Five' personality theory enterprise and on stories of his experiences growing up in Germany during the Second World War. Rolf also took great pleasure in teaching and greatly valued the opportunity to work for almost forty years with so many talented and enthusiastic students, both undergraduate and graduate. Rolf was privileged to have many long-lasting Friendships, and he was grateful for the encouragement, help and comfort given by so many, especially Bogna ANDERSSON, Eva and Fred BILD, Clare MacMARTIN and Bill MacKENZIE, Frances NEWMAN and Fred WEINSTEIN, Jesse NISHIHATA, Anne and Michael PETERS, Andrew and Judi WINSTON and Lorraine WOOD. We have also been sustained by the kindness of our neighbours on Walmer Road. We express our particular thanks and appreciation to family physician and friend, Dr. Christine LIPTAY. Our thanks go also to the staff of Princess Margaret Hospital, to the physicians and nurses of the Hospice Palliative Care Network Project, especially Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and nurses Francine BOHN, Joan DYKE, Dwyla HAMILTON, Lynda McKEE and Ella VAN HERREWEGHE, and to the nurses of St. Elizabeth, especially Liz LEADBEATER, Sylvia McCALLUM and Cecilia McPARLAND. Cremation was private. There will be an Open House for remembrance and celebration on Sunday, April 27th (3-7 p.m.), Monday, April 28th (4-8 p.m.) and Tuesday, April 29th (4-8 p.m.) at 98 Walmer Road, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2X7. Please direct any queries to Frances NEWMAN (416-351-0755.) In lieu of flowers, donations to Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care (700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z5) or Amnesty International would be appreciated.

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HAMILTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-10 published
Mary Boyle HUDSON
By Mary Jean McFALL Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - Page A24
Wife, mother, grandmother, community leader, cattlewoman, Scotch aficionado. Born January 10, 1931, in Hamilton, Ontario; died June 29 in Lyn, Ontario, of pancreatic cancer, aged 72.
For all that Mary HUDSON cultivated her Scottish roots and was a keen royalist, she loved her country well. Never one for southern beach holidays, she preferred a visit to the polar bears in Churchill, Manitoba
Mary's father, Edward MORWICK, was a Westinghouse engineer in Hamilton, Ontario; her mother, Anne HAMILTON, was a Scottish émigrée. The family brought mementoes from Scotland -- a tartan rug, a travelling trunk -- which had been handed down over the generations; Mary considered herself not the owner but the custodian of these pieces, which she has since entrusted to her children.
After Hamilton's Westdale Collegiate, Mary studied home economics at Macdonald Institute at the University of Guelph. In 1956, responding to a Globe and Mail ad for a high school home economics teacher in Brockville, Ontario, Mary set off in her Nash Metropolitan hardtop. Joe HUDSON, a local farmer and eligible bachelor took note; his nieces always said Mary seemed like a movie star. The city girl married the country boy in 1958, and traded her hardtop for a station wagon. Then she and Joe began a life that would allow Mary to make her home in the tiny village of Lyn, and to see her country and the world.
Mary and Joe raised five children, with the best fundamentals she could offer: She taught them to remember where they came from and she encouraged them to be citizens of the world. She helped found and maintain a local library; established a swimming program; and worked with her United Church, the Fulford Home for Women and the Brockville Hospital, where she not only sat on the board of governors, she also took the wagon around to bring chocolate bars and newspapers to patients.
Mary's passions included a penchant for early morning royal weddings on the television. A founding member of the Brockville An Quaiche society, a club that appreciates the merits of good single malt scotch, she had a taste for a "wee dram."
Together, Mary and Joe built Joe's business, Burnbrae Farms, into a dynamic agricultural enterprise. In 1978, her Christmas gift from Joe started her on her herd of Aberdeen Angus cattle. In 1995, several of her cows won championship ribbons at the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto.
Mary was a mother to many; privately, she lived a public life. Her door was open without the need to knock. Known as the best cook on the Lyn Road, she made jams in a copper kettle brought from Scotland. I remember Mom supervising church turkey dinners, using a three-foot masher to deal with all the potatoes.
She also produced baby quilts; the last was for Evelyn Mary Morwick ROGAN, her granddaughter who was born 16 days after Mom died.
The crowd at her funeral was so large that we had to enlist the Ontario Provincial Police to handle the traffic. After the service, we walked from the church to the cemetery, with Mary's Clydesdale horses leading the way. When Rob MILLER, the self-declared piper for the clan, reached the top of the hill by the cemetery, he stopped for a moment to talk with the Ontario Provincial Police officer, and they looked down at the hundreds of people walking in the procession. "With all this activity you'd think the Queen had died," said the officer. Rob responded, "She has."
Mary is survived by her husband, Joe, her sister, Helen MORWICK, her children, Helen Anne, Mary Jean, Ted, Susan and Margaret, their spouses, and nine grandchildren. She loved them all.
Mary Jean is Mary HUDSON's daughter.

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HAMILTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-22 published
ARDIEL, Ruth Winnifred (née FRANCIS) 89 years.
Died peacefully at Windsor Regional Hospital-Western Campus on Tuesday, October 21, 2003. Dearest wife of the late J.R. ARDIEL (1973.) Beloved mother of Joan DUFF, Karen MEYERS and Susan and David RUCH. Dearest sister of June and Fred ROEMMELE. Loving grandmother of Melissa MEYERS and Jim DONOHUE, Jay MEYERS and Tina ROBBINS, Allison RUCH and Ryan SMITH, Dave RUCH and Anne Marie PETTINATO, Julie SANDO, and John PECARARO, Jackie and Frank HAMILTON, Michelle and Joe GRECO and Natalie DUFF. Great grandmother of Max and Miranda PECARARO, Scott and Mathew HAMILTON and Kaity and Nicholas GRECO. Dear Aunt to her special nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews. Remembered by several cousins in London and Toronto. Born on a homestead in Marengo, Saskatchewan to the late Anne and Alfred FRANCIS; pre-deceased by brothers Lloyd (1912), Bruce (Royal Canadian Air Force, 1943) and her sister Dorothy HENDERSON (1964.) Ruth was a long-standing member of Beach Grove Golf and Country Club, Windsor and Tamarac Golf and Country Club, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Visiting in the Walter D. Kelly Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1969 Wyandotte St. East, Windsor, Ontario on Thursday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. The complete funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday, October 24, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend William GALLAGHER officiating. Cremation with interment later in Greenlawn Memorial Cemetery. In kindness memorial tributes to the charity of you choice, Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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HAMILTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-06 published
DZIERZEK, Edith ''Betty'' (R.N. ret'd.)
Died peacefully at the Laurentian Hospital, Sudbury on Monday, November 3rd, 2003, at the age of 88. Loving wife of Edward DZIERZEK and much-loved mother of Krystyna DZIERZEK, both of Bracebridge. Dearly beloved sister of Doris ''Cotts'' HAMILTON of England. Betty worked as an R.N. at the St. Catharines Sanitarium for a number of years. She had also worked in the Paediatrics department of the Oakville Memorial Hospital as a Nursing Sister. Friends will be received at the Reynolds Funeral Home ''Turner Chapel'' 1 Mary Street, Bracebridge (877) 806-2257 on Thursday evening, November 6th, 2003, from 6 - 9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at Saint Thomas Anglican Church, 4 Mary Street, Bracebridge on Friday, November 7th, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. Friends are also invited to attend a celebration in honour of Betty's life at the Inn at the Falls, 1 Dominion Street, Bracebridge on Sunday, November 9th, 2003 from 5 - 9 p.m. As your expression of sympathy, memorial gifts to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals - Muskoka Branch, Box 2804, Bracebridge, Ontario P1L 1W5 would be appreciated by the family.

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HAMILTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-01 published
'Curtain up, laugh, laugh, laugh, curtain down'
Versatile comic actor appeared in a string of hit revues, as well as at the Shaw and Stratford festivals, in London and on Broadway
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, December 1, 2003 - Page R7
At the mere mention of his name some people would just start giggling. In fact, wherever the wonderfully comic actor Tom KNEEBONE went there was laughter. He loved not only to make other people laugh but also to let out his own deep laugh, which Friends say seemed to start in his gut and make its way up through his body, gathering force as it went.
"Tom could make me laugh longer and harder than anyone else," said Gary KRAWFORD, a long-time friend who first worked with him in the mid-1960s. "He was without a doubt the funniest man I've ever met in my life."
Mr. KNEEBONE, who has been described by some critics as one of the world's top cabaret performers, died in a Toronto hospital on November 15 after suffering a heart attack and other complications. He was 71.
The versatile performer appeared for many years at the Shaw Festival and the Stratford Festival of Canada, where during the 1976 season he played Puck opposite Jessica TANDY in A Midsummer Night's Dream. He also performed at London's Old Vic, the Charlottetown Festival and on Broadway. He was a guest with the Canadian Opera Company and the National Ballet of Canada, a company he greatly admired.
Toronto audiences may remember him best for the string of hit revues he performed with Dinah CHRISTIE, which included Ding Dong at the Dell, The Apple Tree and Oh Coward! "I was absolutely in awe of the man," Ms. CHRISTIE said, recalling the first time they performed together 38 years ago.
They developed an enduring partnership that resulted in appearances across the country performing everywhere from cabarets to big concert halls with symphony orchestras. In Toronto, they performed together at Massey Hall and Roy Thomson Hall. Over the years, working with Mr. KNEEBONE became like "working with kith and kin," Ms. CHRISTIE said.
"We made each other laugh," she said, adding that they worked so well together because they were complete opposites.
While Mr. KNEEBONE was happy living and working in the big city, Ms. CHRISTIE feels more at home on her farm in rural Ontario with her animals and open space.
Born in Auckland, New Zealand, on May 12, 1932, Mr. KNEEBONE later moved to England to study at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. After graduation, he went with the company on a 1963 North American tour. When the tour folded in New York, Mr. KNEEBONE went out looking for work. He travelled to Toronto and joined the Crest Theatre Company, where he got a job performing in a production of She Stoops to Conquer. He later starred with the Canadian comic actor Barbara HAMILTON in the hit revue That Hamilton Woman. The road was paved for him after that and, as he was quoted as saying, it was 40 years of "curtain up, laugh, laugh, laugh, curtain down."
Over the years, several critics remarked on Mr. KNEEBONE's unique facial features. Walter KERR in The New York Times once wrote: "His eyes are all right, but I think his nose is crossed."
In Time magazine, comparisons were made between Mr. KNEEBONE, Pinocchio and Charlie Brown. "With leprechaun whimsy, and a pace as assured as the Dominion Observatory Time Signal, his major weapon is a wonderfully mobile face that he seems never to have grown accustomed to. Small wonder," the writer wrote. "His features might have been drawn by a child. Eyes like silver dollars, a nose that wobbles to a Pinocchio point, and a mouth tight and tiny as Charlie Brown's when he is sad."
The moment the sun came up in the morning, Mr. KNEEBONE was up and out of bed, opening his curtains and declaring: "Let's get on with the show," his friend Doug McCULLOUGH recalled. "You cannot take the theatre out of Tom," Mr. McCULLOUGH said. "Tom was always on stage."
Mr. KNEEBONE was never without a story to tell, whether it was a tale about the crazy person who gravitated to him on a Toronto subway or a character he met while performing in a small town. "Everything had a theatrical dimension," Mr. McCULLOUGH said.
In recent years, Mr. KNEEBONE turned his attention toward writing and directing plays for the Smile Theatre Company. Once again he and his long-time friend Ms. CHRISTIE were collaborators. Together they brought professional theatre to senior citizens' homes, long-term care facilities and hospitals. Mr. KNEEBONE had been the company's artistic director since 1987.
Known for his extensive research, he spent hours combing through books and old musical recordings at libraries and theatrical museums collecting information to use in his productions. He charmed all the librarians at Toronto's public libraries, Ms. CHRISTIE said.
He loved the process of gathering Canada's little-known stories, whether it was the tale of a war bride or the country's first black doctor, and then bringing them to audiences. He also saw it as a way to give something not only to people whose health prevented them from getting to the theatre, but to the country that has accepted him so warmly when he arrived.
Despite his writing and directing, he never stopped performing. Just weeks before he died, Mr. KNEEBONE and Ms. CHRISTIE performed some of Noël Coward material together for a benefit.
"He was one of the masters of Noël Coward," Mr. Krawford said.
In addition to his stage work, Mr. KNEEBONE performed in film and television, including the movies The Luck of Ginger Coffey and The Housekeeper.
A proud Canadian, Mr. KNEEBONE was honoured by his adopted country with the Order of Ontario, and was named a Member of the Order of Canada in October, 2002.
He leaves his cousin, Robert GIBSON, in Australia.

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HAMILTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-23 published
Mary Elizabeth STARR
By Elizabeth STARR, Michael STARR and Laurie STARR Tuesday, December 23, 2003 - Page A22
Musician, teacher, mother, mother-in-law, sister, granny. Born March 4, 1920, in Toronto. Died August 3 in Toronto, of a brain hemorrhage, aged 83.
Mary STARR lived a full life teaching the cello to generations of students and enjoying a close relationship with her family.
Growing up in Toronto, Mary received her licentiate in cello in 1947 from the then-Toronto Conservatory of Music (now the Royal Conservatory) -- the highest possible diploma, and a rather uncommon achievement at the time for cellists. As a member of the Conservatory orchestra, she remembered seeing "a young kid" who played a piano concerto with the orchestra. The "young kid" was Glenn GOULD. Through the 1940s and 1950s she travelled extensively throughout Ontario playing chamber music with various Canadian musicians who were to become well known: Victor FELDBRILL, Eugene KASH, Stuart HAMILTON, Steven STARYK, and John COVEART among them.
After her future husband Frank (a singer) went to England, he managed to entice Mary over in 1951 by sending her programs of the concerts that were happening in London. There Mary worked, practised, played, went to concerts, and got married in 1952.
After returning to Canada (and two children later), Mary's teaching career was well under way. Through her career she taught with the Metropolitan Toronto School Board as an itinerant cello teacher, privately with the Royal Conservatory of Music, and in the Seneca College Suzuki program. She taught three-year-olds, school-aged children, high-school students, university students and even a few of the parents of her students. After years of doing four to six schools per day walking up three flights of stairs (it always seemed to be three flights of stairs) with a cello and music, she left to concentrate on private teaching. Although a number of her students went on to become professional cellists, Mary remained a tireless advocate of the fundamental value of musical education to developing and informing the enjoyment of the art of music throughout one's life; this was more important to her than becoming a professional musician.
Whether at music camp where she was a faculty member for many years, or her regular Monday night quartet sessions where we will always appreciate the warm vibrations and wonderful harmonies that crept through our house, the opportunity to play chamber music, just for fun, was one of the great pleasures for Mary throughout her life.
With the death of Frank in 1969, Mary had to work hard to support the family to cover all the "needs" and most of the "wants." She did this admirably.
The last six years of Mary's life, after moving into an apartment in her son and daughter-in-law's house, were surely among her best. There she had security with independence, community with privacy, and a granddaughter who lived just downstairs. She would sit ensconced in her big green chair, content to let life swirl around her as she read, needle-pointed, embroidered, or knitted.
Nothing thrilled Mary more than when 11-year-old Laurie and a few of her Friends took up cello last year. So began private teaching all over again -- not something she expected at the age of 82, but this was much more fun!.
Mary was Mary right to the end. After making an impressive recovery from a broken hip and arm suffered through an encounter with a revolving door, she was soon to be discharged from the rehabilitation hospital. She was in good spirits, had her sense of humour, and craved her "big green chair." She worked hard for that goal that unfortunately was not to be.
Elizabeth and Michael are Mary's children; Laurie is Mary's granddaughter.

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HAMLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
PENNELL, Martta (Martha) Aliisa (née HAMLIN)
of Appleby Place, Burlington, passed away peacefully at Joseph Brant Hospital, Burlington, February 19, 2003. Born in Toronto in 1917, she was the daughter of Juho (John) and Emilia (LEHTONEN) HAMALAINEN. Beloved wife of the late H. Allen PENNELL (Royal Canadian Air Force, September 1943). Predeceased by brothers Paul, Martti, Frederick A. (HAMLIN) and sister, Aili (RUGABER). Dearest aunt of Fred and Avalon of Sarnia and the late Carol (HAMLIN) and loving great aunt to Chris, Alisa, Erin, Jennifer and Craig and great-great aunt to Brodie, Curtis and Raeya. Special friend to Midge ELLAWAY, Stoney Creek. Martha was employed for many years at Stelco Inc., Hamilton, in the Salary and Benefits Department. During her more active years, she was a member of the Hamilton Thistle Club and was an avid curler. More recently she was a member of the Ancaster Senior Achievement Centre. She was active for many years with the Volunteer Association of Chedoke McMaster Hospital. Her passion for many years was her cottage on Canning Lake near Minden where she especially remembered her Finnish roots. Her other interests included golf, bridge, and travel. Throughout the years, she visited many interesting and exciting places with tours of Greece and Newfoundland being at the top of her list of favourites. Cremation. Family will receive Friends at the Cresmount Funeral Home, 322 Fennell Avenue East, Hamilton, on Wednesday, February 26th from 12-1 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at the funeral home on Wednesday at 1 p.m. Aunt Martha's family will always cherish her memory. Rest in peace Auntie Martha. We love you as we were loved by you. As an expression of sympathy, Friends who wish may send memorial donations to the Toronto Sick Children's Hospital or charity of your choice.

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HAMM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-18 published
Nova Scotia's marathon man
Cape Breton boy was Boston's most surprising victor
By Kevin COX Wednesday, June 18, 2003 - Page R5
Halifax -- Johnny MILES was first the determined champion, then the gentle grandfather of Canadian distance running.
His first major running prize was a sack of flour in North Sydney, Nova Scotia, in 1922 -- he finished third in the three-mile race but was first to sprint by the store. After four years of training including sprints behind his grocery cart, the humble, unknown 20-year-old Cape Breton delivery boy and Sunday-school teacher stunned the running world by defeating its best athletes to win the prestigious Boston Marathon.
It was a win that Mr. MILES and his father had calmly predicted to a policeman and a race official the day before. But even Johnny MILES had his doubts on that chilly April Monday as he pounded along the 26.2-mile course on his 95-cent shoes from the Co-op store in his hometown.
At the 22-mile mark, Mr. MILES was running stride for stride with leader and Finnish running legend Albin STENROOS when he looked over and saw a blank and exhausted expression on his rival's face.
"I knew right there that I had him and I had to make a move," he recalled with the gleam of a fierce competitor in his eye in an interview 54 years later. "He was rubbing his side and he had a stitch, so I didn't look back. I speeded up and I think that took the heart out of him."
He is still widely hailed among running raconteurs as the most surprising victor in the 107-year history of the event. Mr. MILES's time -- then a world marathon record -- was so unbelievable that race officials measured the Boston course -- and found it 176 yards short of the classic 26-mile, 385-yard distance.
"I don't know what all the fuss is about," he said in an interview in 1995. "I had a God-given gift and I used it."
Mr. MILES, his father and his mother arrived in Boston by train a few days before the marathon. The day before the race, father and son walked the course, got lost and ended up asking a burly Irish policeman for directions and received some advice that was not exactly a vote of confidence.
"My son needs to know the route because he's entered in tomorrow's race." The friendly officer smiled and said, "Tell your son to just follow the crowd."
On race day, Mr. MILES wore a red, homemade maple leaf on a white undershirt. His performance shattered the 1924 record held by the other race favourite, Clarence DEMAR, the four-time winner of the event.
"That boy ran the best marathon since that Indian [Canadian Tom LONGBOAT] in 1907," a stunned Mr. DEMAR was reported to have said.
A year later, he again challenged the gruelling course but suffered an embarrassing setback when he had to withdraw from the race with serious burns to his feet. His dad had taken a pair of his 95-cent sneakers and shaved down the soles with a straight razor so they wouldn't be so heavy. His feet -- tops and bottoms -- had bled.
It was a rare retreat. Mr. MILES, who trained on rural Cape Breton roads, dominated Canadian distance running through the late 1920s and early 1930s. He captured the Boston crown again in 1929 and won a bronze medal at the British Empire Games in 1931 and also ran the marathon in the Olympic Games in 1928 and 1932.
Born in Halifax, England, on October 30, 1905, Mr. MILES moved with his family to Cape Breton the following year. He worked as a grocery delivery boy at the time of his big win. But his first job as a young teen was in the Cape Breton coal mines. He went to work there to help support his family when his father went off to fight in the First World War.
Mr. MILES left the mines a few years later and entered his first contest -- a three-mile race in Sydney, Nova Scotia -- with the hopes of winning some fishing supplies.
He is revered in his home province of Nova Scotia even though he moved to Hamilton, Ontario, to train and take a job with International Harvester in 1927.
After his victories, some parents even named newborn children after the marathon hero. One of those babies, Johnny Miles WILLISTON, went on to become a driving force in establishing the Johnny Miles Marathon in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia.
The victories on the tracks and roads by a local boy who had worked as a child coal miner at the age of 11 injected some joy and hope into Cape Breton's coal-mining towns at a time when the industry was going through tough times and work underground was brutish and dangerous.
After he hung up his thin-soled racing shoes in 1932, Mr. MILES became an ambassador for fitness and clean living. He became a manager at International Harvester and worked in many parts of the world for the company after being told by a company executive that he could make something of himself if he put the same effort into his work that he exerted in running.
When running regained popularity in the 1970s, he was startled to become a celebrity among the new set of competitors who recognized his accomplishments. While Quebec runner Gérard CÔTÉ would dominate the Boston Marathon in the 1940s, winning it four times, Johnny MILES's time of 2: 25:40 stood as the Canadian record for the event until Jerome DRAYTON ran 2: 14:46 in 1977.
He was taken aback in 1967 at being named to the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
"That I should now be in the same illustrious company as the great stars of hockey, football, track and field, and other Canadian sports was a bit mind-boggling," he told author Floyd WILLISTON in the biography Johnny MILES: Nova Scotia's Marathon King in He was also caught off guard by being named to the Order of Canada in 1983.
"It's not going to change my life -- same hat size and shirt size," he told the New Glasgow Evening News.
Mr. MILES, who regularly attended races in the Hamilton area as a spectator in the 1980s, wondered how well he might have run with the technology offered to runners today.
"I think now I wouldn't eat steak before a race and I'd get these cushioned shoes and I'd know how to train," he said in an interview in New Glasgow at the marathon that was created and named after him in 1975 and still bears his name.
Mr. MILES and his wife Bess were fixtures at the Johnny Miles Marathon, which took place this past Sunday shortly after his death. Runners best remember him for his personal attention, anecdotes, quiet kindness and his enthusiasm for the sport.
Jerome BRUHM, a long-time Halifax runner and historian, remembered his first encounter with the running legend at the Johnny Miles Marathon in 1981.
"He was there and I'm nobody -- I'm just a runner. He came over and I said it was my first marathon and I was kind of nervous. He took me aside and talked to me and he said, 'Do you think you'll win the marathon'? Mr. BRUHM recalled this week. "I said, 'No, I'm a slow runner.' So, he said, 'Then go out there and do that -- finish the race and enjoy it.' He came over to me after the race and asked me how I did and how I felt. I thought that was fantastic that he would talk to me before the race and come over and check on me after the race."
He was a humble, personable man, Mr. BRUHM said.
"When he was inducted into the Canadian Running Hall of Fame, I went over to talk to him and he only wanted to talk about other people, not about what he had done."
Nova Scotia Premier John HAMM praised Mr. MILES for bringing international attention to his home province.
"We will always remember with pride his athletic accomplishments at the Boston Marathon and numerous other competitions as well as his success in business and accomplishments in life," the Premier said Monday.
In 2001, Boston Marathon officials celebrated the 75th anniversary of his startling 1926 win -- but at the age of 95, Mr. MILES said his health prevented him from attending the festivities. However, he promised to try to attend the 75th anniversary of his last Boston triumph.
Will CLONEY, long-time Boston Marathon official, had only praise for Mr. MILES. " There hasn't been a Johnny MILES in Boston since Johnny MILES."
Now there never will be.
Kevin COX is Atlantic correspondent of The Globe and Mail. He has completed 50 marathons -- including the Johhny Miles Marathon and the Boston Marathon.

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HAMM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
Party leaders pay tribute
Tories fondly remember Stanfield as best prime minister Canada never had
By Kim LUNMAN and Drew FAGAN, Thursday, December 18, 2003 - Page A10
Ottawa -- Robert Lorne STANFIELD, the former leader of the federal Progressive Conservatives, was remembered yesterday as a Canadian icon.
Political tributes were made across the country for Mr. STANFIELD, who died Tuesday at the Montfort Hospital in Ottawa. He was 89.
He had been in poor health for several years after a stroke. A private funeral will be held in Ottawa tomorrow and a family burial in Halifax.
Mr. STANFIELD led the federal Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 against Pierre TRUDEAU and was known within the party as the greatest prime minister Canada never had. In later years, he was regarded as the conscience of the Conservatives, representing their progressive side on social issues.
"Today we mourn the passing of one of the most distinguished and committed Canadians of the past half-century," said Prime Minister Paul MARTIN. "I, like other Canadians, fondly remember Mr. STANFIELD's great warmth, humility and compassionate nature, but also his intellect and humour."
Progressive Conservative Leader Peter MacKAY said Mr. STANFIELD will be remembered as an icon.
"It's a very sad and poignant day. He had a larger-than-life persona and I think he can be accurately described as an icon in Conservative politics and Canadian politics," Mr. MacKAY said.
"Conservatives across the country, and indeed all Canadians, have lost a great leader and a great Canadian," Canadian Alliance Leader Stephen HARPER said.
In an interview yesterday, former prime minister Brian MULRONEY described Mr. STANFIELD as having brought the Progressive Conservative Party into the mainstream of modern Canadian life through his support for the Official Languages Act and his openness to ethnic minorities and diversity. Mr. MULRONEY said it was appropriate that Mr. STANFIELD had been receiving treatment at Montfort Hospital, the French-language facility in Ottawa, considering how hard he had worked as leader to make the Tories comfortable with bilingualism and how much effort he himself had made to learn French. "He was a strikingly impressive, quiet, thoughtful man, but who was very resolved and determined -- and with a generous view of Canada," Mr. MULRONEY said.
When Mr. MULRONEY was prime minister from 1984 to 1993, he would occasionally invite Mr. STANFIELD to 24 Sussex Dr. for lunch. Mr. MULRONEY revealed yesterday that, in the late 1980s, when Mr. STANFIELD was almost 75, he offered him the post of Canadian ambassador to the United Nations.
"He thought it was a great honour. He wrestled with it for a little while, but decided that, though he would love to do it, he thought it would be a bit much at that stage of his life," Mr. MULRONEY said.
"He brought compassion to politics," Nova Scotia's Premier John HAMM said yesterday.
"He brought a love of his country to his politics."
Flora MacDONALD, a former federal Tory cabinet minister, first worked with Mr. STANFIELD during the 1956 provincial campaign that made him Nova Scotia premier. "He set a very high standard for himself as a politician and expected others to do the same," she said yesterday. Mr. STANFIELD supported official bilingualism and abolition of the death penalty when his other caucus colleagues were strongly opposed, she said. "He didn't do things just because they were popular. He did things because he thought they were intrinsically right."
Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON said Mr. STANFIELD "will be remembered for his integrity, his devotion to his country, his social conscience and especially for his wit and sense of humour."
Mr. STANFIELD was premier of Nova Scotia from 1956 to 1967. He was born in Truro into a family famous for its underwear business and became a lawyer before turning to politics, first provincially and later on the federal stage. But his awkward image contrasted sharply to that of the hip, telegenic Mr. TRUDEAU, costing the party every election it fought under his leadership. The 1972 election was Mr. STANFIELD's closest brush with federal power, when the Liberals narrowly defeated the Conservatives by 109 to 107 seats. Two years later, the Liberals regained their majority and Mr. STANFIELD announced his decision to step down. He remained as leader until Joe CLARK succeeded him in 1976.
After relinquishing his seat in the Commons in 1979, Mr. STANFIELD became Canada's special envoy to the Middle East and North Africa until 1980, and was chairman of the Commonwealth Foundation from 1987 to 1991.
He married three times. His first wife died in a car crash in 1954 and his second wife died of cancer in 1976. He married his third wife, Anne Henderson AUSTIN, in 1978. He had four children.

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HAMM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
Nova Scotians proudly recall a political icon
By Kevin COX, Thursday, December 18, 2003 - Page A10
Halifax -- To many Canadians, Robert STANFIELD was a hard-luck opposition leader in the wrong place at the wrong time, but in his home province, he inspired fierce pride as a political icon.
Yesterday, the flags flew at half-mast at Province House, where he served four terms as premier from 1956-1967, and mourners signed a book of condolences for Mr. STANFIELD, who died in Ottawa at 89 on Tuesday.
"Robert STANFIELD brought a remarkable understanding of our country based on respect, strength and civility that was, and is, missing in public life," Premier John HAMM said yesterday. Mr. HAMM's low-key country style has been compared to that of Mr. STANFIELD. "We will always wonder how Canada would have moved forward with Robert STANFIELD as prime minister."
Colleagues remembered him as a compassionate, honest and decent leader who reluctantly entered partisan politics in 1949 to rebuild the Progressive Conservative Party after it had been shut out in the provincial election three years earlier.
He took the unusual step of refusing to attack the governing Liberals under long-time premier Angus L. MacDONALD, and instead chose to build up the Tory organization, which would dominate the province for decades.
He overcame the tragic death of his first wife, Joyce, in a car crash in 1954 and took the Conservatives to power two years later.
Senator John BUCHANAN, who was Nova Scotia premier for 13 years, recalled campaigning as a political rookie under Mr. STANFIELD's banner in 1967.
"Bob STANFIELD was a household name in this province. In my constituency, I would meet people I had never known before and they'd look at the badge I was wearing and say, 'Good, you're a STANFIELD man.'"
Mr. STANFIELD's folksy, earnest manner, coupled with an often self-deprecating dry wit, disguised an ambitious reform program that he brought to the economically depressed Atlantic province with a tradition of political patronage.
Under Mr. STANFIELD, the Tories undertook sweeping education changes, building several new schools, introducing vocational institutions and providing more funds for universities.
But his most controversial move was to establish one of the first provincial economic development agencies in Canada -- Industrial Estates Ltd. -- to attract industry to the province.
Entrepreneurs including grocer Frank SOBEY signed on to provide provincial money to bring businesses to Nova Scotia.
The agency had a couple of embarrassing failures that cost the government millions of dollars, but also created thousands of jobs.
Mr. BUCHANAN also spoke of Mr. STANFIELD's calm demeanour.
The senator recalled Mr. STANFIELD placidly watching in a Halifax curling club as the results came in from the 1972 election when the tally was seesawing and jubilant supporters believed that he would become prime minister.
"About 11 p.m., he just decided that he and his wife would go back to the hotel and they were going to get a good night's rest and see what would happen the next day," Mr. BUCHANAN recalled.
The next morning, Mr. STANFIELD found out the Liberals had won the election by two seats.
The homespun, Lincolnesque qualities that endeared Mr. STANFIELD to Nova Scotians were no match for the emotional Trudeaumania that swept the country in the 1968 election campaign.

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HAMME o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
BRITNELL, P. May (Paulson)
Born in Winnipeg, 1907, died in Toronto on Wednesday, May 21st, 2003. Predeceased by her husband George E. BRITNELL. Survived by her daughters Margaret VAN HAMME (Doug) and Elin GRAHOLM (Leonard,) and grandchildren Daniel, Simon, Kristin and Erica. A Memorial Service will be held in Saskatoon on June 27, 2003. Donations may be made to the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, 250 Bloor Street East, Suite 1000, Toronto, Ontario M4W 3P9.

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HAMME o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-26 published
BRITNELL, P. May (Paulson)
Born in Winnipeg, 1907, died in Toronto on Wednesday, May 21st, 2003. Predeceased by her husband George E. BRITNELL. Survived by her daughters Margaret VAN HAMME (Doug) and Elin GRAHOLM (Leonard,) and grandchildren Daniel, Simon, Kristin and Erica. A Memorial Service will be held in Saskatoon on June 27, 2003. Donations may be made to the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, 250 Bloor Street East, Suite 1000, Toronto, Ontario M4W 3P9.

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HAMMELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-19 published
Sharon NIELD
By Barbara LAPERRIÈRE and Nora HAMMELL Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - Page A18
Wife, mother, grandmother, nurse. Born October 18, 1943, in Dauphin, Manitoba Died December 26, 2002 in Ottawa, of cancer, aged 59.
Sharon championed nurses and nursing. She was always on the lookout for pioneers and heroes whom she visited, to know first-hand what their work was like. Then she would tell the world.
On business in the Northwest Territories, she met with a nurse in the community and learned she had established a Brownie group, an effective way to create a healthier community for young girls. She spent time with a "street nurse" in Toronto and told people about the amazing nursing she had seen. Sharon noticed a Canadian Living magazine contest and submitted an essay on the contribution of nursing sisters. Hers was a winning entry and the prize was a tulip garden planted in front of the Canadian Nurses Association to honour the nursing sisters.
In becoming a nurse, Sharon was following in her mother's footsteps. Sharon graduated from Misericordia Hospital in Winnipeg and began her practice as a labour and delivery nurse. After moving to Montreal, Sharon completed both her Bachelor of Nursing and a graduate degree in counselling psychology. Returning to school even while caring for four small children -- awakened in her the understanding of nursing's vast possibilities and her commitment to the profession.
For more than 10 years, Sharon taught nursing at John Abbott College in Montreal. She was a role model of nursing and teaching at its best. One patient, a woman in the final stages of multiple sclerosis, was considered difficult by staff but not by Sharon. Sharon recognized that this woman was a talented storyteller who dreamed of writing a children's story. Sharon helped her realize her dream by listening to the story, writing it down and finding a way to have it published. The woman lived to see her story in print.
In 1992, Sharon joined the Canadian Nurses Association in Ottawa, in time becoming the director of nursing policy. At the national level, she was alert to the impact nursing can have and was a ray of hope at a difficult time. She didn't shy away from tackling the hard issues (such as the role of the nurse practitioner) for which consensus needed to be built across the country. Sharon's influence extended beyond Canada. Twice she visited the Ethiopian Nurses Association. The Ethiopian Nurses Association president wrote: "She was like a mother who was nurturing our association to stand on its own feet."
She was a mentor to many and revelled in the achievements of others -- completing a course, having an article published, giving up smoking or having a baby. A firm believer in having fun at work, Sharon convened occasional meetings at a neighbourhood coffee shop which she dubbed the "Elgin Street office." At work, Sharon would often say: "I've got to get a life." This was frequently followed by: "Jack [her husband] has a life, and I don't." And even sometimes by: "Jack's having more fun than I am." We always chuckled: We knew and Sharon knew that she was enjoying a truly wonderful life both at work and beyond.
She showed how to balance work and personal goals. Regardless of what was happening at work, she made it clear that the moment a new grandchild was born (there were seven) she was gone. Cottage time with her husband, their four children and grandchildren was sacrosanct.
During her illness, Sharon continued to give us lessons in living. When she left work on sick leave, she spoke openly about her cancer and informed her co-workers that she was going out to do some "undercover" work on the health-care system. Through her final days, with humour and grace, she reminded us of the power of love, the importance of family and the meaning faith can give to life.
Barbara and Nora are Sharon's Friends.

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HAMPTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-22 published
She danced on tabletops of Ottawa
Former reporter with capital connections hosted parties for the powerful and waged a spirited campaign to save railway cabooses
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, January 22, 2003, Page R5
Most who knew her have a story to tell about Starr SOLOMON, a journalist and public-relations practitioner who for years hosted glamorous parties in Ottawa that attracted a who's who of cabinet ministers, bureaucrats and media people.
Ms. SOLOMON, the widow of Hy SOLOMON, former Ottawa bureau chief for The Financial Post, has died in Toronto. She was 64.
Long-time friend and colleague Walter GRAY/GREY remembers the time Ms. SOLOMON convinced former Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY and Liberal Member of Parliament Sheila COPPS -- for years Mr. MULRONEY's nemesis -- to sing together at the National Press Club in Ottawa in the mid-1980s, following the annual Parliamentary Press Gallery dinner.
"They sang a duet. The song was You Made Me Love You," says Mr. GRAY/GREY, a former Globe and Mail bureau chief in Ottawa, who played the piano while the two politicians crooned in tandem. Ms. COPPS is now Canada's heritage minister.
Edna HAMPTON, one of Ms. SOLOMON's closest Friends, said acquaintances, colleagues and politicians always looked forward to dinner parties at the SOLOMON home in Ottawa's trendy Glebe neighbourhood. Trouble was, you never knew when the meal would be served.
"I always used to eat first because the parties would zip along and she would let dinner go. You might eat at 8, you might eat at 11 . . . but you always knew the food would be good," said Ms. HAMPTON, a retired journalist.
Ms. SOLOMON was born in Ottawa and moved to North Bay, Ontario, as a child, where she attended elementary and high school. In the late 1950s, she landed a reporting job with The North Bay Nugget, where Ms. HAMPTON was a senior reporter at the time. Later, The Ottawa Citizen hired her as a reporter and she wrote under the byline Starr COTE, the surname of her first husband.
"She was always full of energy and fond of fun assignments," recalls Ms. HAMPTON. " She would cover anything from a royal tour to a St. Patrick's Day event up the Ottawa Valley."
Among her plum assignments was the visit to Ottawa by U.S. president John F. KENNEDY and his wife, Jacqueline. She also wrote restaurant reviews for The Citizen, where she developed a reputation as a lively writer who was quick-witted, entertaining and personal. Ms. SOLOMON often fought it out for the big local stories with Joyce FAIRBAIRN, a reporter with the now-defunct Ottawa Journal. Ms. FAIRBAIRN later became a Senator.
Ms. SOLOMON left The Citizen in the mid-1960s and moved to Toronto, where she worked with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a writer/producer. She married Mr. SOLOMON on January 23, 1966. The couple lived in Toronto until Mr. SOLOMON was transferred to Washington to open a bureau for The Financial Post.
When the SOLOMONs returned to Ottawa, Ms. SOLOMON and a partner formed a public-relations firm. She quickly became a fixture in the city's media and political circles, a move Mr. GRAY/GREY calls "networking at its best. She had a wide range of Friends and she used these connections to her greatest advantage. I wish I had her Rolodex."
For about 10 years in the 1980s, Ms. SOLOMON and Mr. GRAY/GREY worked at the same public-relations firm, where they teamed up on a variety of projects.
"There was the day the African chief Butelezi arrived in Ottawa as a front for a group of Canadian businesses trying to develop business relations with South Africa. I was assigned to shepherd the chief around town," says Mr. GRAY/GREY. " Starr was to accompany his lady, the lovely Princess Irene, whose sole interest was to shop -- especially at Zellers. As they made their departure laden down with Zellers bags. I think the princess gave Starr a tip for her services."
The pair also worked together on an unsuccessful campaign to stop the Canadian National Railway from eliminating railway cabooses. "The cabooses disappeared, but to this day, the Save the Caboose sweatshirt has been the most comfortable sweatshirt in our respective wardrobes," says Mr. GRAY/GREY.
Over the years Ms. SOLOMON volunteered her public-relations skills for many campaigns. She was a founding member of the Legal Education and Action Fund, which was established to advance women's equality rights, and served on the board of directors of the Ottawa Civic Hospital.
As a couple, the SOLOMONs were known in Ottawa for throwing glamorous parties, some planned, some spontaneous, that attracted the leading cabinet ministers, writers and journalists of the day. Ms. SOLOMON entertained and amused guests with her wit and political insights, while her husband was an engaging conversationalist whose business and political insights held the attention of politicians and bureaucrats.
Those who attended their soirees remember Ms. SOLOMON as a welcoming hostess and terrific cook, whose specialty was Greek and Mediterranean dishes. When guests arrived, she was always beautifully dressed and "the records were on the turntable," recalls Mr. GRAY/GREY. " Patsy Cline was her favourite. But also lots of jazz -- her friend Brian Browne, Oscar Peterson, Oliver Jones." Often guests would sing and dance around the SOLOMONs' dining-room table.
"We did have serious discussions on serious subjects, from time to time," adds Mr. GRAY/GREY.
Former Ottawa Citizen food editor and restaurant reviewer Kathleen WALKER remembers Ms. SOLOMON as "literally . . . the kind of person who danced on tabletops. She was just wonderful and wild. We had a ball together. Great sense of humour. A terrific lady."
She will also be remembered as a great friend "who was there in thick and thin if you had a problem," says Mr. GRAY/GREY.
After her husband died in 1991, Ms. SOLOMON moved back to Toronto, where she did volunteer consulting and public relations work for various organizations, including Legal Education and Action Fund and a Greek nursing home. She was also a trustee of the Hyman SOLOMON Award for Excellence in Public Policy Journalism, established to honour her husband's legacy.
Ms. SOLOMON leaves her two sons, Adam and Ben, two grandchildren and two brothers. A celebration of her life is to be held at the National Press Club in Ottawa on January 29 at 5: 30 p.m.
Starr SOLOMON, journalist, public-relations specialist; born Ottawa, February 27, 1938; died Toronto, January 3, 2003.

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