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"HAL" 2003 Obituary


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HALE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Vina Mary LANGANKI
November 17, 1931 to January 12, 2003
It is with great sadness that the family announces the passing of Vina Mary LANGANKI, who passed away suddenly on January 12th, 2003.
Vina was born in Sucker Creek, Manitoulin Island on November 17th, 1931. It was there that she enjoyed visiting her grandmother who taught her many life lessons. At the age of 16 she moved to Cleveland, Ohio where she cared for a family who taught her about the many facets of the Jewish religion and traditions. In 1963 she moved to live with her sister Viola, and her brother-in-law Willi HACKL. She met her husband Paul LANGANKI in 1965 and they were married at St. Luke's Anglican Church in Dryden. In 1966 they had their first child Roger David, followed by Gregory Wayne in 1967. Vina enjoyed spending time with family and Friends, gardening, baking, cooking and her dedication to her faith, which lead her to pursue a commitment as a layreader for St. Luke's Anglican Church. Her work with the church involved her in all aspects of church life, as well as, several charitable foundations. She was very appreciative for the fellowship of the church. Her trip to the Holy Land in 2001 was a perfect culmination to her faith. However, her greatest joy was spending time with her grandchildren. Vina was predeceased by her husband Paul, and her mother May and her father John, her brother Clarence and her niece Katherine. Vina is survived by her devoted sons Roger (Debbie) and Wayne LANGANKI both of Dryden. Brothers: Ted NAHWEGHOW of Six Nations, Robert (Delores) NAHWEGAHBOW of Mississauga and Garry NAHWEGAHBOW of Sudbury. Sisters: Viola (Willi) HACKL of Dryden, Beaulah NAHWEGAHBOW of Montana, Colleen (Jack) ANDERSON of Moose Jaw. Grandchildren Zachary and Amy LANGANKI and Dylan HALE, numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held on Thursday, January 16th, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. at St. Luke's Anglican Church. Interment at the Dryden Cemetery.

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HALE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-28 published
Died This Day -- Jonathan HALE, 1966
Friday, February 28, 2003 - Page R13
Actor, born Jonathan HATLEY in Ontario on March 21, 1891; switched from diplomatic corps to acting; stately bearing stood him in good stead for roles as corporate executives, military officers and politicians; best known as Mr. Dithers in 28 Blondie movies made about 220 Hollywood films, not including television appearances committed suicide at Woodland Hills, Calif.

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HALE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-13 published
'What else could it have been but a miracle?'
Rene CAISSE died 25 years ago without gaining the recognition some cancer survivors believe she deserved. Without Essiac, her mysterious remedy, they wouldn't be alive today, they tell Roy MacGREGOR
By Roy MacGREGOR, Saturday, December 13, 2003 - Page F8
Bracebridge, Ontario -- These days, when she looks back at her remarkable, and largely unexpected, long life, Iona HALE will often permit herself a small, soft giggle.
She is 85 now, a vibrant, spunky woman with enough excess energy to power the small off-highway nursing home she now lives in at the north end of the Muskoka tourist region that gave the world Norman BETHUNE and, Iona HALE will die believing, possibly something far more profound.
A possible cure for cancer.
Twenty-seven years ago, Mrs. HALE sat in Toronto's Princess Margaret Hospital and heard that terrifying word applied to her own pitiful condition. She was 58, and had already dropped to 75 pounds when her big, truck-driver husband, Ted, finally got her in to see the specialists who were supposed to know why she had stopped eating and was in such terrible pain.
Mrs. HALE remembers awakening in the recovery room after unsuccessful surgery and being told by a brusque nurse, "You're not going to live long, you know, dear."
"That's what you think!" she snapped back.
Ted HALE had often heard stories of a secret "Indian" medicine that an area nurse had supposedly used to cure cancer patients, but he had no idea where it could be found. He had asked a physician, only to be told, "That damned Essiac -- there's nothing to it."
When they returned to their home near Huntsville, Ontario -- with instructions to come back in three weeks, if Mrs. HALE was still around -- Mr. HALE set out to find the mysterious medicine. With the help of a sympathetic doctor, he discovered Rene CAISSE, a Bracebridge nurse who claimed to have been given the native secret back in 1922. Pushing 90 and in ill health, she agreed to give him one small bottle of the tonic, telling him to hide it under his clothes as he left.
Mr. HALE fed his wife the medicine as tea, as instructed, and it was the first thing she was able to keep down. A few radiation treatments intended to ease the pain seemingly had no effect, but almost immediately after taking the Essiac, she felt relief. When the painkillers ran out and Mr. HALE said he would go pick up more, she told him, "Don't bother -- get more of this."
Twice more, he returned to get Essiac, the second time carrying a loaded pistol in case he had to force the medicine from the old nurse. He got it, and, according to Mrs. HALE, "the cancer just drained away." She returned to Toronto for one checkup -- "The doctor just looked at me like he was seeing a ghost" -- and never returned again.
"What else could it have been," Mrs. HALE asks today, "but a miracle?"
There is nothing special to mark the grave of Rene CAISSE.
It lies in the deepening snow at the very front row of St. Joseph's Cemetery on the narrow road running north out this small town in the heart of Ontario cottage country, a simple grave with a dark stone that reads: " McGAUGHNEY Rene M. (CAISSE) 1888-1978, Discoverer of 'Essiac,' Dearly Remembered."
On December 26, it will be 25 years since Rene -- pronounced "Reen" by locals -- CAISSE died. But in the minds of many people with cancer, the great question of her life has continued on, unanswered, well beyond her death. Did she have a secret cure for the disease?
Ms. CAISSE never claimed to have a "cure" for cancer, but she did claim to have a secret native formula that, at the very least, alleviated pain and, in some cases, seemed to work what desperate cancer sufferers were claiming were miracles.
She had discovered the formula while caring for an elderly Englishwoman who had once been diagnosed with breast cancer and, unable to afford surgery, turned instead to a Northern Ontario Ojibwa medicine man who had given her a recipe for a helpful tonic.
The materials were all found locally, free in the forest: burdock root, sheep sorrel, slippery elm bark, wild rhubarb root and water.
The woman had taken the native brew regularly and been cancer-free ever since.
Ms. CAISSE had carefully written down the formula as dictated, thinking she might herself turn to this forest concoction if she ever developed the dreaded disease. She never did, dying eventually from complications after breaking a hip, but she remembered the recipe when an aunt was diagnosed with cancer of the stomach and given six months to live. The aunt agreed to try the tonic, recovered and went on to live 21 more years.
The aunt's doctor, R.D. FISHER, was intrigued enough that he encouraged Ms. CAISSE to offer her remedy -- which she now called "Essiac," a reverse spelling of her name -- to others, and by 1926 Dr. FISHER and eight other physicians were petitioning the Department of Health and Welfare to conduct tests on this strange brew.
"We, the undersigned," the letter from the nine doctors read, "believe that the 'Treatment for Cancer' given by nurse R.M. CAISSE can do no harm and that it relieves pain, will reduce the enlargement and will prolong life in hopeless cases."
Instead of opening doors, however, the petition caused them to slam. Health and Welfare responded that a nurse had no right to treat patients and even went so far as to prepare the papers necessary to begin prosecution proceedings.
But when officials were dispatched to see her, she talked them out of taking action, and for years after, officials turned a blind eye as she continued to disperse the tonic. She made no claim that it was medication; she refused to see anyone who had not first been referred by their regular physician; and she turned down all payment apart from small "donations" to keep the clinic running.
Her work attracted the attention of Dr. Frederick BANTING, the discoverer of insulin, but an arrangement to work together foundered when he insisted they test the tonic first on mice, and Ms. CAISSE argued that humans had more immediate needs.
Her problems with authority were only beginning. A 55,000-signature petition persuaded the Ontario government to establish a royal commission to look into her work, but the panel of physicians would agree to hear only from 49 of the 387 witnesses: who turned up on her behalf -- and dismissed all but four on the grounds that they had no diagnostic proof. The commission refused to endorse Essiac, and a private member's bill that would have let her continue treating patients at her clinic fell three votes short in the legislature.
She quit when the stress drove her to the verge of collapse, moved north with her new husband, Charles McGAUGHNEY, and dropped out of the public eye. But not out of the public interest.
"You need proof?" laughs Iona HALE. " Just look at me -- I'm still here!"
Not everyone in the medical establishment dismissed Essiac. Ms. CAISSE had permitted the Brusch Medical Center near Boston to conduct experiments after Dr. Charles BRUSCH, one-time physician to John Kennedy, inquired about the mysterious cure. Tests on the formula did show some promise on mice, and the centre eventually reported: "The doctors do not say that Essiac is a cure, but they do say it is of benefit." Dr. BRUSCH even claimed that Essiac helped in his own later battle with cancer.
Other tests, though, were less encouraging. In the early 1970s, Ms. CAISSE sent some of her herbs to the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in Rye, New York but when early tests proved negative, she claimed Sloan-Kettering had completely fouled up the preparation and refused further assistance.
Through it all, she refused to disclose her recipe -- until a rush of publicity after a 1977 article in Homemaker's magazine persuaded her to hand over the formula to the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario for safekeeping and to give a copy to the Resperin Corporation of Toronto in the hopes that, eventually, scientific proof would be found.
She died without gaining the recognition some cancer survivors believe she deserved, and in 1982, the federal government declared Resperin's testing procedures flawed and shut down further studies.
The story of Ms. CAISSE's medicine carried on, however, with more and more people turning to the man who would have been her member of Parliament to see if he could help.
Stan DARLING lives in the same nursing home as Iona HALE. Now 92, Mr. DARLING spent 21 years in Ottawa as the Progressive Conservative member for Muskoka-Parry Sound. He's remembered on Parliament Hill for his crusades against acid rain, but of all his political battles, Mr. DARLING says nothing compares to his fight to gain recognition for Rene CAISSE's mysterious medicine.
"So many people came to me with their stories," he said, "that I couldn't help but say, 'Okay, there must be something to this.'"
Mr. DARLING put together his own petition, 5,000 names, and went to the minister of health and argued that so many were now using Essiac it made sense to legalize it.
His bid failed, but he did persuade the medical bureaucrats to compromise: If Essiac were seen as a "tea" rather than a "drug," it could be viewed as a tonic, and so long as the presiding physician gave his approval, it could be added to a patient's care -- if only for psychological reasons. "On that basis," Mr. DARLING says, "I said, 'I don't give a damn what you call it, as long as you let the people get it.' "
The doubters are legion. "There's no evidence that it works," says Dr. Christina MILLS, senior adviser of cancer control policy for the Canadian Cancer Society. That being said, she says, "There is also little evidence of harmful side effects from it," but cautions anyone looking into the treatment to do so in consultation with their physician.
No scientific study of Essiac has ever appeared in an accepted, peer-reviewed medical journal. But those who believe say they have given up on seeing such proof.
Sue BEST of Rockland, Massachusetts., still vividly recalls that day 10 years ago when her 16-year-old son, Billy, sick with Hodgkin's disease, decided to run away from home rather than continue the chemotherapy treatments he said were killing him.
He was eventually found in Texas after a nationwide hunt and agreed to return home only if the treatments would cease and they would look into alternative treatments, including Essiac.
No one is certain what exactly cured Billy, but Ms. BEST was so convinced Essiac was a major factor she became a local distributor of the herbal medicine.
Rene CAISSE, she says, "spent a whole life trying to help people with a product she found out about totally by accident -- and being totally maligned all her life by the whole medical establishment in Canada."
In some ways, Ms. CAISSE has had an easier time in death than in life. Today, there is a street in Bracebridge named after her, a charming sculpture of her in a park near her old clinic, and Bracebridge Publishing has released a book, Bridge of Hope, about her experiences.
The recognition is largely the work of local historian Ken VEITCH, whose grandmother, Eliza, was one of the cancer-afflicted witnesses: who told the 1939 royal commission: "I owe my life to Miss CAISSE. I would have been dead and in my grave months ago." Instead, she lived 40 more years.
Don McVITTIE, a Huntsville businessman, is a grandnephew of Rene CAISSE and says she used her recipe to cure him of a duodenal ulcer when he was 19. Now 71 and in fine health, he still has his nightly brew of Essiac before bed.
"There's something mentally satisfying about having a glass of it," he says. "I think of it more as a blood cleanser. That's what Aunt Rene always said it was. I think she'd be disappointed it hasn't been more accepted."
"Look," Ken VEITCH says, "this all started back in the 1920s. And I've said a number of times that if there was nothing to it, it would be long gone.
"But there is something to it."
Roy MacGREGOR is a Globe and Mail columnist.
The secret revealed
Debate rages in Essiac circles about the correct recipe. The most accurate rendition likely comes from Mary McPHERSON, Rene CAISSE's long-time assistant. Ms. McPHERSON, currently frail and living in a Bracebridge nursing home, swore an affidavit in 1994 in which she recorded the recipe in front of witnesses. It is essentially the same preparation distributed today by Essiac Canada International, which operates out of Ottawa. The formula appears below:
61/2 cups of burdock root (cut)
1 lb. of sheep sorrelherb, powdered
1/4 lb. of slipper elm bark, powdered
1 oz. of Turkish rhubarb root, powdered
Mix ingredients thoroughly and store in glass jar in dark, dry cupboard. Use 1 oz. of herb mixture to 32 oz. of water, depending on the amount you want to make. I use 1 cup of mixture to 256 oz. of water.
Boil hard for 10 minutes (covered), then turn off heat but leave sitting on warm plate overnight (covered).
In the morning, heat steaming hot and let settle a few minutes, then strain through fine strainer into hot sterilized bottles and sit to cool. Store in dark, cool cupboard. Must be refrigerated when opened.

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HALEWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-11 published
Don MacKINNON
By Bill HALEWOOD, Bill HARRIS Tuesday, February 11, 2003, Page A20
Husband, father, businessman, veteran. Born April 7, 1925, in Longueuil, Quebec Died April 16, 2002, in Kingston, following surgery, aged 77.
'You're not 18."
"Are you calling me a liar?"
Don enlisted when he was 16. Any kid who could contradict an enlisting officer must have had that certain bravado the army was looking for.
He grew up in St. Lambert, Quebec, across the river from Montreal. As a young boy, before the St. Lawrence Seaway was built, the river was his life. Riding the ice flows was a dangerous sport. He was very athletic, excelling in swimming, hockey, football and skiing.
The war broke out and his brother enlisted. Don was bored so he did, too. He had just finished Grade 9.
He did his basic training at Trois-Rivières then volunteered to join a new elite unit to train as a commando. This combined force of Canadian and American soldiers was to form the First Special Services Force, later called The Black Devils Brigade.
Don went with the brigade to the Aleutians to chase out any remaining Japanese forces, then back to the United States and on to Sicily and Italy via North Africa.
The unit was under the overall command of General Mark CLARK and the immediate goal was the capture of Monte Cassino. Their first battles were to take Monte La Defensa and then Monte Majo in February, 1943, in order to block the German supply line to Cassino. Here Don was wounded -- his foot was blown off. It took two platoon members 12 hours to carry him on a stretcher to a field hospital. The stretcher was dropped every time they came under fire. Don was in poor shape, having lost a lot of blood, and remembers the padre reciting the 23rd Psalm over him.
He was in hospital in Italy for more than a year, then back in hospital in England in June, 1944, and home to Canada by August, 1945. Canadian doctors saw the need for further amputation.
He was now 19 and his father said to him, "What are you going to do with your life? You have no education and you can't dig ditches." Don went back to finish high school and then to McGill to obtain a B.A. under a program sponsored by the Department of Veterans Affairs. At McGill, he met his wife Heather; they later had two daughters, Beth and Janet.
Don had a business career in advertising, communications, and public relations which took him to Montreal and England.
With his artificial leg, he learned to ski again, and was better on one leg than many a skier on two. He was the second Canadian amputee to ski with specially built equipment. He was physically imposing in a handsome, broad-shouldered, athletic way that seemed to suppress the difficulty of getting through life on one leg. He was a model of courage and prowess in life and work and sport. He played a very good game of golf. Don's spirit was exemplary and his sense of humour allowed him to laugh when he fell in a sand trap; others would have expressed the miseries of frustration. His was a noble equanimity with iron discipline behind it.
On his retirement, Friends encouraged Don and Heather to move to Port Hope, Ontario, where they had some of the happiest years of their life together. He was a generous and sincere friend who generated respect and admiration. He was also a passionate Canadian who stayed politically engaged and applied his liberal perspective to public events inside and outside Canada. His day was made when he, along with his Friends, erected a flag pole on his front lawn.
Don's was an active life in business; in retirement he volunteered with the Navy League Sea Cadets. After he died, his artificial leg was sent to Honduras.
Bill HALEWOOD and Bill HARRIS are Friends of Don.

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HALICKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-29 published
McLEAN, Joan Elizabeth
Joan Elizabeth McLEAN, daughter of Vera and the late Jack GILMOUR, first of three girls, was born on February 28, 1933 in Russell, Manitoba. She died quietly, in her sleep, at the Credit Valley Hospital, on Saturday, July 26, 2003. Joan McLEAN, better known as, ''Miss Joan'' to her loved ones, received her training as a registered nurse at the Winnipeg General Hospital School of Nursing and was a flight attendant for Trans Canada Airlines prior to marriage and relocation to Ontario. Joan loved traveling, gardening, antiques, animals, art of all kinds, bagpipe music, throwing parties and just being close to family and Friends. She leaves behind her beloved husband, of 46 years, Donald; her mother Vera; her sister Violet and her husband Michael HALICKI sons John, Ross and Thomas; daughters-in-law Sandy and Suzanne grandchildren Katie, James, Daniel, Alex, Donald, Evelyn, Christina and Sean; sister-in-law Carol and her husband Doug GOWAN; her nieces and nephews David, Donald, Michael, Paul, Cathy, Lora and Blake, her devoted caregiver and friend, Ida DUBÉ and a host of relatives and Friends. Joan was predeceased by her dear sister Eleanor in 2000. Joan was a truly remarkable and generous person who will be remembered with great love and affection. As per Joan's wishes, there will be no Funeral Service. Instead, a celebration of her life will be held at her home in Mississauga, a date and time will be announced. Memorial contributions to the Palliative Care Unit of the Credit Valley Hospital Foundation (2200 Eglinton Avenue West, Mississauga, Ontario, L5M 2N1 905-813-2200) are appreciated.

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HALIDAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-28 published
Elsie (KRUGE) WOOD
By Eric NOAKES Friday, February 28, 2003 - Page A18
Tennis player, gardener, crafter, Girl Guide leader, sister, mother. Born June 2, 1915, in London, England. Died January 3, in Ottawa, of natural causes, aged 87.
Elsie KRUGE was a child with brilliant blue eyes and a ready smile, born to Arthur KRUGE, a stage electrician, and Nellie Grimshaw. She was raised in Barnes, a suburb of London. When Elsie was 14, her mother died. In spite of the loss of Nellie, Elsie's life was joyful, highlighted by socializing with Friends and playing tennis. Nellie instilled in Elsie and her sister Joan her terrific sense of humour. Elsie would often embarrass her sister when they were commuting to London together by breaking into hoots of laughter at a book she was reading. She was a noted tennis player, winning local tournaments and defeating her cousin Eric regularly -- to his dismay.
Elsie's life was happy, but marked by tragedy. Her first husband, Wally HALIDAY, an army sergeant in the Second World War, was the victim of a shooting accident in 1941. During the war, there was little time for mourning. Elsie continued to work for Britain's General Nursing Council and met Garnet WOOD, a Canadian serviceman who was convalescing from a combat wound. A wartime romance ensued, culminating in marriage in 1946 in Kemptville, Ontario, and a move to Ottawa where Garnet worked for the defence department.
Adjusting to life in Canada was a challenge for Elsie. Ottawa was distant from family and Friends and, in 1946, was a small, straight-laced city with few of the amenities of London. However, because of her optimistic outlook and her sociable nature, Elsie was soon engaged in activities in Ottawa's Carlingwood area.
After the birth of her two children, Susan and Robert, Elsie became heavily involved in Guiding and was keenly engaged in helping her children get a good education. Garnet was plagued with health difficulties and as a result, Elsie had to raise the children on her own. She was very proud to see Susan become a PhD in literature and Robert working as a stage-lighting technician, continuing the family tradition. Elsie always extended a welcome to Friends of her children and relatives, especially if they were new to Canada. She was a founding member of the "Craft Girls, " a group of ladies who regularly gather to make crafts and partake in potluck lunches. In addition to this, Elsie demonstrated her green thumb by producing prolific gardens of flowers and vegetables.
Garnet died at age 55. Tragedy struck again in Elsie's life when her daughter Susan, who had become a renowned scholar of science fiction and professor of literature at Simon Fraser University, died from a brain aneurysm at 33. Several years later, Elsie's beloved niece, Jill, also died.
In spite of these heartbreaks, Elsie was able to soldier on, hosting the Craft Girls for crafting sessions, going to Ottawa's Byward Market for lunch and supplies and maintaining a regular correspondence with sister Joan. When Elsie was in her 80s and slowed down by rheumatism and osteoporosis, she overcame this by using a walker to work in the garden.
Two years ago, Elsie had to relocate to a nursing home. Typically, at the time, she was more concerned with the health of family members rather than herself. This move for her was a temporary measure, and her stated intention, once she was able, was to return home. She kept active by crocheting afghans for Friends of her son, keeping a small garden on her windowsill, reading and receiving visits from family and Friends with her ever-present smile and her plants as company. Lately, visitors noticed she was subject to extreme fatigue. She passed away in January, to see again missed loved ones.
Eric NOAKES is Elsie's cousin. He wrote this with help from her sister, Joan.

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HALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Margaret Clara LEWIS (Nee WHIDDON)
In loving memory of Margaret Clara LEWIS who died peacefully, January 19, 2003 at the Manitoulin Lodge, age 91 years.
Beloved wife of William LEWIS (predeceased in 1996.) Loving mother of Jack (Myrna,) Carol (Carl HALL,) Lyle (Paulette.) Very special grandmother to Wendy, Michael, David, Stacey and Sherry. Cherished great grandmother to Justin, Adrien, Parker, Ally and Hunter. Dear sister of Bill (Lena) and Nora (Nick predeceased), predeceased by John and Dorothy. Dear sister-in-law of Doreen GRANGER (George,) Madeline HOLOWACK, Mary KERHANOVICH (Earl), Catherine GIFFEN (Garth). Predeceased by Ina and George BREATHAT and Margaret and Arden LEWIS. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews.
Margaret was born in Fort Frances, Ontario and graduated as a registered nurse in 1932. She moved to Manitoulin Island where she married her husband in 1941. A hard working woman, Margaret raised her children, worked on the family farm, and nursed until her retirement. She lived her later years in Little Current, and most recently at the Manitoulin Lodge in Gore Bay. Visitation from 10: 00 until Funeral Service 11:00 a.m. Wednesday, January 22, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Cremation with burial of ashes in Elmview Cemetery.

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HALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-19 published
Mary Elizabeth LANKTREE
Passed away peacefully on Sunday March 9, 2003 at the Salvation Army AR Goudie Eventide Home, Kitchener.
Mary (née MacDONALD) LANKTREE in her 85th year was the beloved wife of the late Harry LANKTREE (February 27, 1999.) Dear mother of Myrna TIDD of BC, Gloria PRIMEAU of Kitchener, June KAWA and her husband Larry of Val Caron, David LANKTREE and his wife Suzanne of Kitchener and Denise GILBERT and her husband Dana of Kitchener. Loving grandmother of twelve grandchildren and great-grandmother of nine. Dear sister of May KINSLEY, Minerva HALL, Annie McKINLEY. Predeceased by one brother Russell MacDONALD.
Mary's family received relatives and Friends on Tuesday March 11 at the Henry Walser Funeral Home, 507 Frederick Street, Kitchener. Funeral service was held on Wednesday March 12, 2003 in the chapel of the funeral home. Spring interment in Civic Cemetery, Sudbury. Visit www.obit411.com/968 for Mary's memorial.

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HALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-17 published
John "Darrel" McGAULEY
In loving memory of John "Darrel" McGAULEY a resident of South Baymouth on Monday, September 8, 2003 at Mindemoya Hospital at the age of 57 years.
Beloved husband of Colleen "Bids" (née SISSON.) Loving father of Stacy, Lisa and friend Steve. Grandfather of a very special little girl, Reegan. Predeceased by parents Hubert and Helen (née HALL) McGAULEY. Will be greatly missed by brothers and sister, Keith and wife Elva of Little Current, Vance and Mary of Mindemoya, Dwight (predeceased) and Elaine of Tehkummah, Greg (predeceased) and Lori LEESON of South Baymouth, Diane McGAULEY (predeceased) and in-laws Nancy and Danny Leeson and Red McCarthy. Forever remembered by many nieces and nephews. Memorial Service was held on Saturday, September 13, 2003 at Fairview United Church, Tehkummah. Island Funeral Home

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HALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-01 published
HALL
-In loving memory of a dear mother and grandmother, Pearl, who passed away October 4, 2001.
Even though we're all grown up,
I never really knew
How many ways and many times
I've missed and needed you.
You were the Grandma, Mom and friend
We all depended on
The day we had to let you go
A larger part of life was gone.
You were the one we all went to
In times both good and bad
You always made things better
The best Mom we could have had.
There are so many different things
I'd tell you now if you were near.
But most of all, I miss you Mom
And wish you were still here.
--We will always love and miss you Mom. Lori and family.

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HALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
Wesley " Wes" Edward HALL
In loving memory of Wesley "Wes" Edward HALL who passed away on Sunday, October 26, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital, St. Joseph's Health Centre at the age of 70 years.
Beloved husband of Lucille (FORTIER) HALL predeceased 1995. Loving father of Wesley (wife Valerie) of Toronto, Michael (wife Colleen) of Ottawa, Allison (husband Alvin LANDRY) of Oshawa, John (wife Marie-Anne) of Ponty Pool, Sharon (husband Danny GIRARD) of Arlington, Texas and Sherri-Lynn (husband Joseph BORLAND) of Milan, Mich. Cherished grandfather of Jennifer, Samantha, Jessica, Kaela, Kaitlyn, Bradley, Rebecca, Nicholas and Ashley. Dear son of Harold and Florence HALL, both predeceased. Dear brother of Harold predeceased (wife Valerie) of Cambridge, Kenneth (wife Eleanor) of Grimsby, Bruce of Toronto, Inez (husband Harold COLLINS predeceased) of Sarnia and Beverley predeceased (husband David ARMSTRONG predeceased). Funeral service was held in the RJ Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch St. Sudbury on Thursday, October 30, 2003. Cremation in the Parklawn Crematorium.

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HALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
Margaret "May" KINSLEY
In loving memory of Margaret "Kay" KINSLEY who died at Sudbury Memorial Hospital on Sunday, November 16, 2003 at the age of 87 years.
Former resident of Tehkummah, Orangeville and Sudbury. Born to Alex and Martha McDONALD on September 7, 1916. Predeceased by both husbands Clarence KINSLEY and Archie McLENNAN. Loved by her children, Florence and husband Gilbert PYETTE of Mindemoya, John and wife Jean of Mindemoya, Russell and wife Fern McLENNAN of Bradford, David KINSLEY of Tehkummah. Will be missed by her grandchildren, Rodney, Anita, Frank, Doug, Don, Mark, Dennis, Janice, Patty (Patricia). Predeceased by granddaughter Barb. Great grandmother of ten. Remembered by siblings, "Russell" (William Alexander)(predeceased) and wife
Kathleen McDONALD, Mary and husband Harry LANKTREE (both predeceased,) Minerva HALL
of Orangeville and Annie and husband Arther (predeceased) McKINLEY of Sudbury.
Visitation from 2-4 and 7-9 on Wednesday, November 19, 2003 and Funeral at 11: 00a.m. Thursday, November 20, 2003 all at Tehkummah Pentecostal Church. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

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HALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-22 published
HALL--In loving memory of our Mom, Pearl, who passed away October 4, 2003.
We just wanted to wish you Merry Christmas Mom and let you know how
much we miss you!
We know that times were hard for you
But you always did come through
We just wanted to tell you that we remember
The most precious gifts we received from you.
The greatest gifts you gave us
Don't require batteries
They never need assembly
But have life time guarantee.
You gave the gift of Christmas
The love of Friends and family
You taught us to be thankful
And to share what we did have.
You gave the gift of kindness
And respect for everyone
You always made us realize
There were "lots" worse off than us.
You gave the gift of memories
They need no wrap or bows
They last through generations
And are worth far more than gold
These treasures will last a lifetime
An heirloom, never to tarnish or fall apart
You tenderly gave each one with love
And wrapped them in our hearts.
Now every year at Christmas
When the choir of angels sing
We know that you're among them
'Cause you gave us everything.
--Merry Christmas Mom! We love you, "The Gang"

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HALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
MAHONEY, Leo James, C.M., B.A., M.D., M.I., Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Canada, F.A.C.S.
It is with great sadness that the family of Dr. Leo MAHONEY announces his peaceful passing, surrounded by his family, on February 27, 2003, at Princess Margaret Hospital.
The son of Dr. James Leo and Esther MAHONEY (BEAUPRE,) Leo was born in Niagara Falls, New York, on September 17, 1920. Predeceased by his children Helen and Joseph, he is survived by his loving wife of 57 years, Dr. Margaret MAHONEY (née YOUNG) and his children: Dr. Jim (Mary Anne) of Toronto; Dr. Bill (Mary Margaret) of Dundas, Ontario; Tom (Jeanne) of Oakville; Mary of Toronto; Peggy (Byron) of Victoria, British Columbia; Anne of Toronto; Dr. John (Karen) of Ottawa; David (Camilla) of Truro, Nova Scotia; Katy (David) of Toronto; Jenny (Craig) of Toronto and his 21 grandchildren. He is also survived by his brothers and sisters Eileen MURRAY of Toronto; Hugh of St. Catharines; Jack of London, Ontario Earl of Castro Valley, California; Anne HALL of Renfrew, Ontario, and his many nephews and nieces.
Leo received his medical degree and his Master of Surgery, from the University of Toronto. He served during World War 2 as a Surgeon-Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve, and as Surgeon-Lieutenant Commander on the H.M.C.S. Micmac. A R.S. McLaughlin Fellowship gave him the opportunity to travel and study in England and Sweden in 1953 and 1954 respectively.
After returning to Canada in 1954, he joined St. Michael's Hospital as a staff surgeon and became head of the Division of General Surgery. For almost half a century, Leo has dedicated his career to improving the techniques of early detection and treatment of breast cancer as a surgeon, clinician, teacher and researcher.
He was the founder, director emeritus and senior consultant of the St. Michael's Hospital Breast Centre. Established in 1972 to improve the quality of life and the treatment for women with breast disease and breast cancer. The Breast Centre still maintains the gold standard for all such centres in Canada. He was also a consultant surgeon at Princess Margaret Hospital and associate professor of surgery at the University of Toronto and received the coveted Bruce Tovee award in 1992 for excellence in undergraduate teaching in the Department of Surgery.
One of his many great moments was receiving the Order of Canada in 2001 and the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal in 2002. He was also appointed a lifetime member of the O.M.A. and C.M.A. and was designated an honorary consultant of St. Michael's Hospital in 2003.
Leo was also a member of the Janes Surgical Society, the Breast Committee of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, the Canadian Oncology Society, Canadian Association of General Surgeons, Canadian Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, The Rocky Mountain Trauma Society and was a consultant with Canadian Trauma Consultant Inc.
He was also a member of the Franklin Club, The Badminton and Racquet Club of Toronto and the Hillsboro Club (Florida). Leo was a living example of one who lived each day to its fullest and shared his love for fishing, skiing, tennis and windsurfing with his children, grandchildren, colleagues and Friends.
Leo believed in striving for excellence in everything that he did. His love of life and pursuit of greater achievement is a legacy that will live on in those who love him and remember him as a husband, father, grandfather, brother, uncle, physician, teacher and exceptional friend.
Visitation will take place at the Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home & Chapel, 467 Sherbourne Street (south of Wellesley), on Sunday, March 2nd from 2 to 9 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be held at Holy Rosary Church at 10 a.m. Monday, March 3rd with interment at Fairview Cemetery, Niagara Falls. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the St. Michael's Hospital Breast Centre Fund, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 1W8.
Special thanks to the doctors and staff at Princess Margaret Hospital.

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HALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-05 published
HENRY, Christina (née MITCHELL)
Died Wednesday, April 2nd, 2003, in Ottawa, after a lengthy illness. She left this world as she lived her life with dignity, courage and grace. Survived by her loving family, husband, Dr. Sandy HENRY, sons Blair and Neil (Wendy,) brother Ian MITCHELL of Stornoway, Scotland and nephew Christopher MITCHELL (Karen) of Chicago. Her grandchildren Alexandra and Mitchell will dearly miss their beloved Seanny.
The family wish to thank the staff of the palliative home care program for their great help in maintaining Chris at home. Special thanks as well to Dr. Pippa HALL and her family General Practitioner, Dr. Brian GRIFFITHS.
Cremation. A service in memory of Christina will be held on Monday, April 7th, 2003 at 2 p.m. at the First Unitarian Church at 30 Cleary Avenue (off Richmond Road near Woodroffe) to be followed by a reception there.
Arrangements by Kelly Funeral Home, Carling Avenue (613-235-6712).

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HALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-29 published
Mcleod CRAIG
The Honourable McLeod A. CRAIG, Q.C., retired judge Superior Court of Justice, died peacefully, on Sunday, April 27, 2003, surrounded by his family at the William Osler Health Centre (Etobicoke General Hospital); after a short battle with cancer. He is survived by his loving wife Frances ('Bidy',) 3 children Jo-Ann HALL of Kitchener, George CRAIG of Barrie and his wife Judy, Susan BRICK of Dallas and her husband Bill, 8 grandchildren, Christine, Jana, Becky, Allison, Sarah, Chelsea, Natasha, Andrew and 2 great grandchildren, Macleod and Tyler. He was predeceased by parents, George and Minnie CRAIG, brothers, George Jr. of Toronto and Kenneth of Owen Sound and two grandchildren, John HALL and Jessica BRICK. 'Mac' was born, June 13, 1917, in the Village of Paisley, Ontario. In 1935 he attended Dr. KENNEDY's Law Course at the University of Toronto where he graduated in 1939. While at university he played Varsity Blues hockey. He then entered Osgoode Hall Law School and graduated in 1942. He was wounded in 1944, while serving in northern Italy with the West Nova Scotia Regiment. After convalescing he returned to England where he met and married his wife Bidy in 1945. Discharged as a Captain in 1946, he was called to the bar and practiced law in Walkerton, Ontario; 3 years with the late Campbell GRANT, Q.C.. From 1951 to 1952 he was deputy reeve of the Town of Walkerton. In 1952 he relocated his law practice to Owen Sound and was later appointed Queen's Counsel in 1958. During his years in Owen Sound, he was actively involved in a number of Royal Commissions, Chairman of the Board of Governors of Owen Sound General and Marine Hospital and active in numerous other organizations. In 1976 he was appointed a Justice of the Trial Division of the Supreme Court of Ontario where he served with much pleasure. He loved the law and retired, reluctantly, from the bench in 1992. For several years he continued work, mediating in the Private Court. In retirement Mac continued to be a doting grandfather and enjoyed his sports; especially golf. He will be greatly missed by all. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Funeral Home, 2357 Bloor Street West at Windermere (east of the Jane Subway), Wednesday from 7-9 p.m. and Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at Kingsway-Lambton United Church, 85 The Kingsway, Etobicoke on Friday, May 2, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m.. At a later date the family will hold a private burial service. Memorial donations may be made to a charity of your choice.

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HALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
HALL, Louise Mary
Born Rainham, Kent, England, 22 June, 1911; died Victoria British Columbia, 30 April, 2003. Predeceased by her beloved husband Alfred (d. 2001) and survived by their two children Patricia (Ted WILSON) of Ancaster, Ontario, and Roger (Sandra MARTIN) of Toronto. She will be missed by all, especially her grandchildren Michael (Judy), Timothy (Susan), Laurie (Edwin), Jeffrey and Louisa; and her great-grandchildren, Ann, Matthew, Jackie and Madelyn. Lou was an original. She came to Canada with her war-widowed mother after World War 1, and settled in Regina, where she began a career as a legal secretary and bookkeeper. In 1933 she married musician Al HALL, a fact that had to be concealed because of social strictures at the time that frowned on the employment of married women. Her quick mind and analytical skills helped build a career lasting more than half a century that was capped by successful business ventures in partnership with her husband first on the prairies and later in Victoria. Lou was a voracious reader. Well into her nineties she followed complex social, economic and political issues with a clear eye and firm criticism of those who did not live up to her high standards. A skillful writer, she particularly liked good prose, and was a fierce defender of individual talents. In retirement, she was a founding member of the Fairfield New Horizons Senior Centre and was much looking forward to the celebration of their 25th anniversary later this month. In lieu of flowers please send donations in her memory to the British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals or the Cowichan Cat Hospital. A funeral service will be held at First Memorial Funeral Services, 1155 Fort Street, Victoria, on Monday, 5 May at 12: 00 Noon. All of her many Friends are welcome.

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HALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-19 published
HALL, Harold John
At Providence Centre, Toronto, on Tuesday, June 17, 2003. Harold died peacefully, in his 87th year. Predeceased by his beloved wife Patricia. Father of Ken, Carol, and son-in-law Tom GRIFFITHS. Grandfather of Alexander and Sarah. Brother of Helen and brother-in-law of Betty. Missed by Mabel BURROUGHS and family. A private family service will be held. In memory of Harold, donations to Providence Centre, 3276 St. Clair Avenue East, Toronto M1L 1W1, would be appreciated.

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HALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-07 published
POLACSEK, Erich Paul
Died of old age at 96 on Saturday, July 5, 2003, surviving spouse of 62-year marriage to Elise POLACSEK, father of Haide (William AIDE), Lise (Guther KUNZELMANN), Uta (Sergio MENDES), Eric (Sheelagh O'DONOVAN), Antje, Heliane (Michael HALL) and Martin; grandfather of Christopher M., Anya, Stephen, Shaun, Rachel, Daniel, Cornelia, Oliver, Tanya, Mark, Alexis, Christian, David, Orla, Thomas, Una, Christopher A., Ivan, Johann and Tobias; great-grandfather of Erin, Hilary, Catherine, Frances, Adriane, Eric, Jakob, Emma M., Sebastian and Emma G. Funeral Services at Christ the King Dietrich Bonhoeffer Lutheran Church, 149 Baythorne Drive, Thornhilll, Wednesday, July 9, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. Interment at York Cemetery, Senlac Avenue, Toronto. Reception to follow at Church. Special thanks to all the caregivers on the 4th Floor at the York Central Hospital, Long Term Care Unit.

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HALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-11 published
HALL, Ross Hume
On Thursday, October 9, 2003 Ross Hall died peacefully at home in Danby, Vermont after a long and courageous battle with cancer. Much loved husband of Anne. Beloved father of Stewart (Diana), Donald (Martha) and Mary Beth (Vince), and stepfather of Anne (Ed), Margaret (Bill) and James (Larissa). Dear brother of Marion RIVERS. Adored and proud grandfather of Chris, Rebecca, Kristen, Madeline, Ashley, Kirill, Adam, Bridget, Josselyn, Rachel, William, Nikita, Lucas, Bradford, Kyra and Enoch. Survived by his first wife, Rachel. Born November 22, 1926, Winnipeg. Raised in Agassiz. University of British Columbia, U of T, Cambridge University (Ph.D., Biochemistry). Researcher, Lederle Laboratories, New York and Roswell Park Memorial Cancer Research Institute, Buffalo. Founding Chairman, Biochemistry Department, McMaster University, retired Professor Emeritus in 1987. Advisor to the Canadian Minister of the Environment, co-Chairman of the Human Health Committee of the International Joint Commission, Chairman of the Board of Pollution Probe. In addition to numerous scholarly papers and international conference presentations and over 200 magazine and newspaper articles, author of Modified Nucleosides in Nucleic Acids (1971), Food for Naught: The Decline in Nutrition (1974), Health and the Global Environment (1990), and The Unofficial Guide to Smart Nutrition (2000). Ross was a voracious reader, fitness enthusiast, gardener, organic cook, sailor, traveler, opera buff, steam train aficionado and accordionist. His last project was an account of his father's World War 1 experience. Above all Ross loved, and was loved by, all those around him, especially his family. For memorial information, contact Donald HALL at 613-567-0796 or donaldhall@tweedsmuir.com.

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HALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
ORMROD, Ruth Jane
Died peacefully at home, on Monday, December 22, 2003, in her 75th year, after a long and courageous battle with illness. Survived by her brother Paul and his wife Vicky and her sister Beryl HALL and her husband Fred. Dear aunt of Jane, Tom, Mark, Alison and Gillian. Loving great aunt of Max, Claire, Eric, Simon, Andrew, Taylor, Sarah and godmother of Jessica. Ruth was a longtime employee of Manulife and a faithful member of All Saints Church and its altar guild. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, on Sunday, December 28, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at All Saints Kingsway Anglican Church, 2850 Bloor Street West, on Monday, December 29, 2003 at 2 p.m. Interment St. Phillip's Cemetery, St. Phillip's Road. In lieu of flowers, a donation to The Easter Seal Fund or another charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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HALLDORSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-21 published
ROBINSON, May Elizabeth (Tracy) née TRACY- GOULD
Born November 18, 1914 Newcastle (Miramachi City), New Brunswick, died March 17, 2003 at Crofton Manor, Vancouver, British Columbia. Predeceased by her husband James Emerson (Robbie), the love of her life. She is survived by her three daughters, Susan (Mike NICHOLS), Zora (Alf SIMON), and Alice (Allan HALLDORSON), her grandchildren Jesse and Tracy, her brother Perley TRACY- GOULD (Hester) and sister Zora KEDDIE (Ray) and their families. Tracy graduated as a nurse from the Montreal General Hospital and joined the Canadian Army as an operating room nurse in 1939. She served from 1939-1945 following the troops through Europe. She met Robbie in Italy and they were married in the town hall of Brussels, Belgium on April 10, 1945. While raising her three daughters she was active in her community. In Winnipeg this included the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, Deer Lodge Veterans Hospital, the Children's Hospital Book Market and working in the canteen in her local community centre. In Toronto she worked in the gift shop of the North York General Hospital and has been a generous donor to the foundation. In White Rock she worked at the Peace Arch Hospital's Superfluidy Shop. She belonged to and worked with a hospital guild in every city she lived in and remained a member of the Royal Canadian Military Institute until her death. She was an active member of the Nursing Sisters Association of Canada, contributing in many ways over the years. Her hobbies included baking for her family, Friends and charities, travelling, gardening and corresponding with old Friends. Tracy had a real love of life, with a wry sense of humour and a smile that could win anyone's heart. It was such a pleasure to share time with her; she will be sadly missed by family and Friends. Cremation has taken place. A Memorial Service will be held and details will be announced at a later date. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to: Ghurka Benevolent Fund or the Heart and Stroke Foundation or a charity of your choice.

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HALLETT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-23 published
HALLETT
-In loving memory of our dear Dad and Grandpa, Carl, who passed away April 22, 1997.
Never more than a thought away,
Quietly remembered every day.
No need for words except to say,
Still loved, still missed, in every way.
-Lovingly remembered by your children, and grandchildren.

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HALLETT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-18 published
HALLETT-
-In loving memory of our dear Mom and Grandma, Vivian, who passed away June 29, 1997.
We thought of you with love today,
but that is nothing new.
We thought about you yesterday,
and the day before that too.
We think about in silence,
we often speak your name.
Now all we have are memories,
and your picture in a frame.
Your memory is our keepsake,
with which we will never part.
God has you in His keeping.
we have you in our hearts.
-Loving remembered by your children and grandchildren.

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HALLIDAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-25 published
Pilot 'displayed utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty'
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, August 25, 2003 - Page R5
Jack KESLICK, a pilot who won a Distinguished Flying Cross for his several daring bombing missions over Germany in the Second World War, has died in Richmond Hill, Ontario He was 81.
Mr. KESLICK, a flying officer, had several scrapes with disaster, losing engines on two sorties and being hit by flak on two others.
On August 9, 1944, he lost an engine during an attack on a launch site for the V-1 flying bomb at Prouville, France, but managed to return safely to base at Leeming, Yorkshire, home of No. 429 (Bison) Squadron. The following month, he again lost an engine on a mission. Though he had yet to reach his target at Calais on the French coast, Mr. KESLICK continued with his bombing assignment before returning to England.
Four days later, on September 28, a wave of 38 Lancaster and 214 Halifax bombers was assigned to take out coastal guns at Cap Gris Nez. Many crews had to return with their bombs because of poor weather, but Mr. KESLICK was able to strike the target.
On October 12, Mr. KESLICK's Halifax was hit by flak while joining 95 others in a sortie against oil plants at Wanne-Eickel, Germany. His plane was not seriously damaged.
His crew also took part in the massive attack on the Wilhelmshaven naval base on the night of October 15-16, as 119 Halifaxes and 19 Lancasters dropped more than one million pounds of incendiaries and high explosives on the port city.
From July 28 to November 6, 1944, Mr. KESLICK logged more than 165 hours of flight on 31 sorties, but his most harrowing mission was yet to be flown. On November 24, his bomber was one of a baker's dozen on a mining operation on the Kattegat, the strait separating Denmark and Sweden. His Halifax was hit by flak, damaging the bomb bay and the starboard outer engine. He nursed his Halifax back to Scotland.
John Leask KESLICK was born in Toronto on May 25, 1922. He enlisted on July 29, 1942, and had been promoted to pilot officer by the time he left military service.
He was presented his medal at Government House in Ottawa by Governor-General Vincent MASSEY in 1953, according to research by the military historian Hugh HALLIDAY. The citation noted that Mr. KESLICK had "invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty."
Mr. KESLICK died of congestive heart failure at Richmond Hill, Ontario, on July 15. He leaves a son, a daughter and a sister. He was predeceased by his wife, Evelyn.

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HALLILEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-13 published
EADIE, Lt. Colonel G. Fraser, DSO, CD of the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion
Died peacefully at home in Oakville on August 11, 2003. Fraser was born July 20, 1917 in Winnipeg. He worked with the Ford Motor Company in assignments across Canada and Abroad. He retired from Ford with 46 years of service having made many Friends and satisfied many customers. Fraser served overseas during World War 2 earning many decorations including: Distinguished Service Order, 39-45 Star, France and Gemany Star, Defence Medal, Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Class, War Medal 39-45 and the American Silver Star. Fraser is predeceased by his wife Lu (Kathleen HALLILEY) and son David. He is survived by his wife Eileen, sons Jim and Rob, step daughter Kathy NICKLIN, nieces Jane and Charlotte, grandchildren Cayre, Steve, Diane, James, Sarah, Christopher, Brant NICKLIN, Lisa NICKLIN and great grandchildren Ryan, Reese and MacKenzie. Services will be held Friday August 15 at 2: 30 pm at St. Jude's Anglican Church, 160 William Street, Oakville, Ontario with interment following at Trafalgar Lawn Cemetery. Family and Friends are invited back to a reception at the Oakville Conference and Banquet Centre (Holiday Inn, south east corner Bronte Rd and Queen Elizabeth Way Oakville) at 4 p.m. In lieu of flowers donations to the M.S. Society would be gratefully appreciated.

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HALPENNY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-04 published
MERRIAM, E. Jean (née HALPENNY)
Peacefully in hospital on Saturday, March 1, 2003, in her 88th year. Beloved wife of the late Ronald C. MERRIAM, Q.C. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Sandra and Don TAILOR/TAYLOR (Kingston,) Douglas MERRIAM and Alexandra ADAMSON (Ottawa,) Arthur and Joy MERRIAM (Ottawa) and Alan and Joanne MERRIAM (Mississauga.) Cherished grandmother of 15 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Westboro Chapel of Tubman Funeral Homes, 403 Richmond Rd. at Roosevelt on Monday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Tuesday, March 4, 2003, at 11 a.m. Interment Pinecrest Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, a memorial donation to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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HALPENNY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-22 published
MARSHALL, Gwendolyn May (née HALPENNY)
Died peacefully, on July 20, 2003, at Kingston General Hospital. Devoted wife of Borden and loving mother of Mary and her husband Frank PANI, Carole ''Kye'' MARSHALL and Wendy and her husband Stuart CAMPBELL. Proud grandmother of Jackie (Lawrence,) Tracy (Ken), Stephanie, Darren, Alison and Timothy and great-grandmother of Anthony and Bridget. We will always honour Gwen and remember her for her passion for life, joyful service to others, her unconditional love and immovable faith. Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (two lights west of Yonge) on Wednesday, July 23 from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service on Thursday at 10 a.m. from All Souls Anglican Church, 15 Clairtrell Road (one block west of Bayview, north from Sheppard). In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer Society would be gratefully appreciated.

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HALPIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
Hockey News co-founder had winning formula
By James CHRISTIE Friday, April 11, 2003 - Page S10
Toronto -- No one was going to get rich from The Hockey News, Ken McKENZIE freely admitted. The wealth he shared was in the information it contained for fans and those in the hockey industry.
McKENZIE who died Wednesday at Trillium Hospital in Mississauga, was co-founder 1947 -- along with Will CÔTÉ -- of the publication that came to be known as hockey's Bible. He was 79.
His son, John McKENZIE, said Ken died suddenly when he went into septic shock following surgery for colon cancer.
Ken McKENZIE and CÔTÉ birthed a magazine that was a landmark in the Canadian periodicals industry -- a sport publication that survived when so many failed and folded. It evolved from a house organ for the National Hockey League -- McKENZIE was originally an National Hockey League publicist -- into an encyclopedic, authoritative publication. The content matured from reprints of stories by hockey beat writers in six National Hockey League towns to exclusive columns by The Hockey News's own editors and writers such as Steve DRYDEN and Bob McKENZIE (no relation,) who could challenge the National Hockey League and international hockey establishment. Ken McKENZIE was presented with the Elmer Ferguson Award for his pioneering role on the magazine's 50th anniversary in 1997 and inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.
"He loved hockey and sports of all kinds," said John McKENZIE, a correspondent with American Broadcasting Company News in New York. "He had this idea when he was in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He got up on a table in the mess hall and called his buddies around and said 'If I started a hockey paper, would you guys buy it?'
"They all cheered. He started with only $383 and The Hockey News was born."
Ken McKENZIE cited the figure as precisely $383.81 in a 50th anniversary story in The Globe and Mail. He was famed for keeping a close eye on finances down to the penny.
Along with editing associate Charlie HALPIN, McKENZIE operated the paper on a shoestring with a handful of employees. Newspaper beat writers in each team's city were paid only a few dollars.
"When I paid those guys, it was 10 bucks, later on 50 bucks, whatever, it was the going rate," McKENZIE said. "It was always cheap. You weren't going to get rich in this business.... I'd say to a guy, 'You may be big in Calgary or Edmonton or Vancouver, but if you write for this paper, they'll know you all across Canada.' A lot of guys liked that."
As the National Hockey League's publicity director from the 1940s into the late 1960s, McKENZIE developed press and radio guides and had access to teams' statistics and mailing lists. He and CÔTÉ used those to convince almost 4,000 fans to send in $2 each ($3 in the United States) as advance subscription payments to finance the first issue. The circulation was 20,000 by the end of its first year.
The Hockey News under McKENZIE maintained its comfortable relationship with the National Hockey League. McKENZIE bought out COTE's interest in the mid-1960s, then eventually sold 80 per cent of the magazine to New York's WCC Publishing in 1973 for a reported $4-million and the balance in the 1980s. The headquarters moved from Montreal to Toronto and McKENZIE stayed as publisher intil 1981.
He wanted to continue writing and working, rather than retire, and after leaving the hockey paper, he and HALPIN bought into Ontario Golf News. McKENZIE was still associated with the golf paper at his death, said Ontario Golf advertising executive Ted VANCE.
"I know it was first viewed as a house organ, but go through his stuff in the early years and it wasn't strictly milquetoast, said DRYDEN, The Hockey News editor from 1991 to 2002. "He may have had favourites and protected some people. As National Hockey League publicist, he could not be a vociferous critic. But long before the sale of The Hockey News, it was getting an edge to it. In the end, it was a helluva idea."
Added Bob McKENZIE: " Whatever anyone says, it's a good legacy to have started The Hockey News and to see where it's at today." Parent corporation Tanscontinental Publishing said The Hockey News has a paid circulation of more than 100,000.
Ken McKENZIE is survived by his wife Lorraine of Mississauga, four children -- John McKENZIE and Jane Mckenzie KOPEC of New York, Kim McKENZIE in Oakville, Ontario, and Nancy Mckenzie PONTURO in Redding, Connecticut., -- and five grandchildren. His funeral will be 11 a.m., Monday April 14, at St. Luke's Anglican Church on Dixie Road, Mississauga.

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