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"GOR" 2003 Obituary


GORDON  GORELLE  GORETE  GORZYNSKI 

GORDON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Josephine "Joyce" RENAUD
In loving memory of Josephine "Joyce" RENAUD who passed away peacefully on Friday, October 24, 2003 at Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 74 years.
Daughter of Michael Sr. and Sophie MANITOWABI (predeceased.) Predeceased by dear friend Wesley GORDON " Bud" from Sault. Ste. Marie, Michigan. Loved sister of Margaret JACKSON (Robert predeceased) of Manitowaning, Michael MANITOWABI (predeceased 1986,) Alphonse MANITOWABI of Toronto, and Betty CRACK (Mervyn) of Little Current. Joyce was like a mother to her friend Mickie GUERRA and family of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. Will be remembered forever by many nieces, nephews, cousins and Friends.
Visitation was held on Sunday, October 26, 2003. Funeral service was held on Monday, October 27, 2003 at Buzwah Church. Burial in Buzwah Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

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GORDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-15 published
LUCAS, Muriel May (née ROSS)
Died peacefully, at her home in Toronto, on Wednesday, February 12, 2003, in her 97th year. She was born in Brighton, Ontario on December 15, 1906. The ROSS family were early settlers from Ireland in the Brighton region. Muriel's parents were Robert James ROSS and Elva WAITE. Elva WAITE's parents, Sarah Jane and William WAITE, were of United Empire Loyalist background and owned a farm between Brighton and Colborne. Muriel was a Registered Nurse and graduated from The Wellesley Hospital. During World War 2, she volunteered for the Red Cross Blood Donor Clinic and nursing assignments at The Wellesley Hospital to free up nurses for war duty. Muriel devoted much of her time and energy to her church, Deer Park United. Her many years of service included being president of the United Church Women. She was a longtime member of the Philanthropic Educational Opportunity and continued to attend meetings into her last year. Her service to her community also included Board membership of Saint Christopher House and the Toronto Children's Aid Society. Muriel enjoyed spending every summer with family and Friends at her cottage on Lake Scugog. She was the loving wife of J.D. LUCAS, former Solicitor for the County of York, who predeceased her in 1986. Her love was endless for her daughters Jane GORDON, who predeceased her in October 2002, and her husband Ian of Burlington, Ontario, Carol BOTTERELL and her husband Frank of Claremont, California, her grandchildren Bruce GORDON, who predeceased her in December 2002, Sarah LEIKKARI and her husband Rick of Ottawa, Douglas BOTTERELL and his wife Audra, and Kate BOTTERELL, all of California, and great-grand_son Ian LEIKKARI of Ottawa. Funeral Services will be held at Deer Park United Church, 129 St. Clair Avenue West, on Tuesday, February 18th at 2: 30 p.m. If desired, donations in Muriel's memory to the Canadian Cancer Society, 20 Holly Street, Suite 101, Toronto M4S 3B1, would be appreciated.

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GORDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-03 published
Valetta May ROSE
By Jim PATTERSON Thursday, April 3, 2003 - Page A22
Valetta May ROSE
Domestic worker, farmer and comic writer's muse. Born in Warsaw, Ontario, January 9, 1912. Died January 16, in Toronto, of a stroke, aged 91.
On January 16, 2003, Valetta ROSE, 91, spoke with her brother, Ken DRAIN, and her niece, Dora BARR, by phone from her home in Norwood, Ontario Then she got into a limousine to go to a large family party in Toronto, to celebrate her nephew David PATTERSON's birthday. On the way, she sat with her great-nephew Paul, his partner Cathy and their six-week-old daughter, Kira, and was delighted to have the baby beside her for the trip.
There were more than 100 people at the party, but Valetta held court, greeting family members. Then, at 7 p.m., she suffered a stroke, and died instantly in her daughter Beattie's arms.
Born on January 9, 1912, Valetta was the second child of David DRAIN and Christina EDWARDS, who farmed near Warsaw, Ontario The DRAIN household was full of fiddle, piano and song; people arrived by horse and sled for music in the parlour, food in the kitchen and children everywhere. When Valetta's mother went into labour to deliver her sister Cora, Valetta's older brother Ivan was told to take his 20-month-old sister to grandma's house. Ivan was 3 and the house was two kilometres away -- but those were different times. Off the pair toddled, perfectly capable and perfectly safe.
As teenagers, Valetta and Cora set off for Toronto to work as domestics, eventually earning a respectable $25 per month plus room and board.
In 1943, Valetta married the love of her life, Ted ROSE. They farmed together outside Warsaw for 32 years. One night just after they were married, they went to Peterborough to see a movie. Afterward, walking up George Street, Valetta mused aloud about how lovely it would be to own a bedroom suite like the one in a store's display window. The next day, Ted came home with the furniture. Valetta never did discover how he'd afforded it.
In 1975, Ted and Valetta sold the farm and retired to Norwood. Ted died in 1987.
Last year, Valetta set off for Scotland with her daughters Beattie and Judy, their husbands, Bob BECHTEL and David GORDON, and Judy and David's two sons, Ian and Paul. Valetta announced, "On this trip, I just want to enjoy being all together." For three weeks, they drove around staying at bed and breakfasts and exploring the islands off the north coast. She was planning another trip this year -- to Judy's home in Vancouver.
For 40 years, Valetta followed the advice of one Dr. JARVIS, whose book Folk Medicine taught the benefits of lecithin, and she followed his prescription for a daily teaspoon of apple cider vinegar mixed with honey in a half glass of water to keep herself free from the worst of arthritis and other afflictions. Valetta knew that the secret of caring for others was simply to enjoy their company and, as the family "Information Central," loved to share stories of their successes.
She had her own place in Canadian cultural history. Filmmaker Norman JEWISON, a cousin, mentioned Valetta to writer Don HARRON, who immediately claimed her for use as the wife of his fictional character Charlie FARQUHARSON. Soon Valetta was credited with writing down Charlie's Hist'ry of Canada on those days when it was "too wet to plough." A highlight of Valetta's 90th birthday party was a card and framed photo from her "second husband."
Valetta made the best of every minute. She spent her last night on the bed that Ted had bought for her so many years before. Her spirit will delight family and Friends for years to come.
Jim PATTERSON is Valetta's sister Cora's youngest son. He was helped by Beattie, Ken, Cora HENDREN and Stephen PATTERSON.

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GORDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-21 published
CARTWRIGHT, Joan Elizabeth
Joan Elizabeth CARTWRIGHT, 65, died on June 12th, after a long and courageous fight with breast cancer, at her daughter's home in East Hardwick, Vermont. Her daughter Deborah and son-in-law Tim were with her at her final breath. Joan was born in Toronto, Ontario, to William Bovell and Mary Elizabeth (POTTER) CARTWRIGHT. She moved to Montreal, Quebec, where she attended McGill University, and then Concordia University, from where she graduated with distinction. After marriage, she raised her family of four children living in Montreal and then again in Toronto. She moved to Wolcott, Vermont in 1992, and bought and renovated an old schoolhouse in the country. Her household consisted of several cats, all of which were orange tigers, and her beloved dog Joey, with whom she spent hours every day walking the back roads, visiting her neighbors, and playing ball. She also kept herself busy by volunteering at local libraries, was an extremely voracious reader and had a wide knowledge of books. She loved her crossword puzzles in the weekend paper, and indeed loved any type of word challenge especially Scrabble! Joan adored her grandchildren, and although she didn't see them often, never missed an opportunity to talk with Friends about them and show off photos. She was an accomplished knitter, and was pleased to give away her beautiful sweaters, dozens of which she donated to local charities. She is survived by her sister, Eleanor HUNT of Ontario; her ex-husband, L. Lamont GORDON of Toronto, Ontario; her children: Katharine GORDON and husband Chuck MITCHELL of Wolcott, Vermont, Deborah and husband Tim HARTT of East Hardwick, Vermont, James GORDON and wife Shannon McQUILLAN of Kamloops, British Columbia, and Pamela GORDON of Toronto, Ontario; her grandchildren, Keaven, Connor, Seamus, Haley, Walker, Sam, Laura and Angus; and several nieces, nephews and cousins. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, June 29th, in Toronto, Ontario. Memorial donations may be made in Joan's name, to The Frontier Animal Society of Vermont, 502 Strawberry Acres Road, Newport, Vermont 05855.

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GORDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
ROBSON, Mary Virginia (née SKILLING)
On June 27, 2003, died from natural causes at age 73. She is survived by her husband of 49 years, James Thomas, her children David and Marianne of St. Albert (Edmonton), Mark of Toronto, Andrew and Jackie MARSH of Mississauga, Marthanne and Bruce GORDON of Owen Sound, Jennifer and Reidar TRONNES of Reykjavik, and 11 grandchildren. Visitation at Fawcett Funeral Home - Collingwood Chapel, 82 Pine Street at Second Street, Collingwood, on Sunday, June 29, 2003 from 2-4 in the afternoon. Funeral Mass at St. Mary's Church, 63 Elgin Street at Ontario Street, on Monday, June 30 at 11: 30 a.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the General and Marine Hospital Foundation, John Howard Society or your favourite charity will be appreciated.

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GORDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-14 published
O'CONNELL, The Honourable Martin, Ph.D. (Privy Councilor)
Born on August 1, 1916 in Victoria, Martin O'CONNELL passed away in Toronto, on Monday, August 11, 2003. He died peacefully with his family at his side after a fight with Parkinson's disease.
Martin believed in serving the public, giving back to his country and advancing the cause of those who where not as fortunate. Throughout his full and varied life the principals of honesty, fairness, justice and humility, treating others with dignity and respect, always guided him as he set about distinguishing himself as a man to be honoured.
He leaves his wife Helen Alice O'CONNELL (born DIONNE) with whom he celebrated 58 years of marriage. Their love and dedication to each other was a model for all who knew them.
He also leaves his daughter Caryn (John JOHNSTON) and their two sons Nicholas and Kyle, his son John Martin (Martine BOUCHARD) and their two children Jean Christophe and Stéphanie. His children, their spouses and grandchildren were the pride of his life.
A brother Monsignor Michael O'CONNELL of Victoria and a sister Ellen RICHERT (widowed) of Saskatoon survive him. A sister Dr. Sheila O'CONNELL of Victoria and a brother Sgt. Johnny O'CONNELL who was killed in the battle for Caen in June 1944 predecease him.
Martin O'CONNELL started his career as a public school teacher in the British Columbia school system then completed a B.A. at Queen's University. As a veteran of the second world war (Captain, Royal Canadian Army Service Corp) he completed his education at the University of Toronto with an M.A. then PhD in political economy. His PhD dissertation studied the nationalism of Henri BOURASSA. He learned French so that he could read the documents and study the Bourassa archives in Ottawa and Montreal. Martin served on the Senate of the University of Toronto.
He left the academic world for the financial one and joined Harris and Partners in the late 1950's. In 1965, while on loan to Walter GORDON then Minister of Finance and as one of the three ''Whiz Kids'', he helped design policies, which ultimately led to the Canada Pension Plan, Medicare, and the Municipal Loan Development Fund.
Throughout the 1960's he served as the President of the Indian and Eskimo Association. During this time, he wrote many policy papers to improve aboriginal conditions and thus helped to bring attention to the difficulty that indigenous peoples where suffering.
In 1965 he ran for Parliament and failed to win a seat in Greenwood, he tried again in the federal riding of Scarborough East in 1968 and was elected. He was appointed Minister of State and later Minister of Labour in the Trudeau cabinet. He was co-chairman of the important hearings that shaped the immigration policies of this country. Defeated in 1972 he served as the Prime Minister's principal secretary throughout the minority years reshaping that office to bring the Party closer to the grass roots of Canadian society.
He was reelected in the 1974 election. He chaired the policy committee of two national conventions of the Liberal party and rejoined the cabinet as Minister of Labour late in that mandate. Defeated in 1979 he retired from politics and became Chairman of the Canadian Center For Occupational Health and Safety an entity he created while Minister of Labour.
In 1993 he was the Co-Founder and first Co-Chairman of The Canadian Foundation for the Preservation of Chinese Cultural and Historical Treasures. He served actively in this role and experienced real pleasure and pride in participating in this extraordinary work.
His many Friends will want to celebrate the life of a man who gave real meaning to the words service, integrity and honourable. He is remembered as one who pursued a life that was full and dedicated to improving the life of all Canadians. May he rest in peace.
A private family funeral will be held. All Friends are welcome to a celebration of Martin's life at the Granite Club on Bayview Avenue, Toronto on Wednesday, August 20, 2003 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Donations can be made to The Honorable Martin and Helen O'Connell Charitable Foundation can be sent in trust to his son John Martin O'CONNELL at 200 Bay Street, Suite 3900, Toronto, Ontario M5J 2J2.

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GORDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-22 published
Quiet minister a Trudeau stalwart
Former Bay Street whiz kid helped revamp Canada's social safety net and served as both secretary of state and labour minister
By Ron CSILLAG Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, September 22, 2003 - Page R7
His children possess no qualms about pronouncing Martin O'CONNELL as having been a bit of a policy wonk. "Oh, totally," says his son John.
"My dad wasn't interested in money -- odd, given his Bay Street successes. Just policy, and formulating policy."
"He was a classic workaholic," concurs Mr. O'CONNELL's daughter Caryn. "He was just driven by his work. It's one of the things that kept him going."
Rare is the politician remembered for self-effacing skills and effectiveness rather than bombast. Mr. O'CONNELL was indeed serious and conscientious. He worked hard and achieved much. But of all the cabinet ministers from the Pierre TRUDEAU era, his name probably rings the quietist bell for Canadians old enough to recall names like Don Jamieson, Otto Lang and Marc Lalonde.
Mr. O'CONNELL, who died in Toronto on August 11 at 87 of complications from Parkinson's disease, served as Canada's labour minister on two separate occasions, and was Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary for two years when Trudeaumania had been replaced by the infuriation of millions with Canada's philosopher-king.
How does one keep a low profile in federal politics, especially in a contentious cabinet post? Mr. O'CONNELL did it by guiding the country with a steady hand through great labour turbulence in the early 1970s, including convincing his boss to pass emergency legislation that terminated work stoppages at the Vancouver and Montreal dockyards.
"He was an exceptionally low-key guy. He liked it that way," recalls Barney DANSON, who served as Minister of National Defence in the Trudeau cabinet. Doubtless Mr. TRUDEAU saw in Mr. O'CONNELL a kind of kinship. Both men were unflappable philosophers and academics at heart who entered politics relatively late in life, both sacrificing cushier lives to hasten Mr. TRUDEAU's vaunted "just society."
For Mr. O'CONNELL, the bug bit in 1965 when he and two other Bay Street whiz kids were summoned to Ottawa by then finance minister Walter GORDON -- still stinging from a disastrous budget two years earlier -- to help revamp Canada's social safety net. The group ultimately designed policies that led to the Canada Pension Plan, the Municipal Loan Development Fund and medicare.
Martin Patrick O'CONNELL was one of four children born in Victoria to a mother from Ontario and a horticulturist father from County Kerry in Ireland who farmed a few acres and raised livestock. Mr. O'CONNELL taught elementary school for six years and completed a B.A. at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, before beginning a wartime stint in the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps and Infantry Regiment. Haunted perhaps by the death of his brother Johnny, cut down in the battle for Caen, France, in June, 1944, Mr. O'CONNELL volunteered for action in the Pacific just as the fighting ceased.
It was while in uniform that he met his future wife of 58 years, Helen Alice DIONNE. The two met at the Art Gallery of Ontario while Mr. O'CONNELL was on leave from his base, and Ms. DIONNE was volunteering at the museum.
He spent the decade after the war at the University of Toronto, earning graduate degrees in economics and political science and lecturing on Plato, John Stuart Mill and liberal democratic principles. He had learned French for his doctoral thesis on Henri Bourassa, one of the first scholarly studies in English on the fiery Quebec journalist and Canadian nationalist.
Academia gave way to Bay Street, where Mr. O'CONNELL spent 11 years in investing and bond underwriting while heading the volunteer Indian and Eskimo Association of Canada, as it was then called, where he represented aboriginal concerns to governments and encouraged the devolution of federal powers to native groups.
He had run and lost in 1965 in the federal seat of Greenwood in Toronto but was swept up in the 1968 Trudeau whirlwind, winning the seat of Scarborough East. In 1971, he was named Secretary of State, and was appointed Labour Minister the following year, just before Mr. TRUDEAU called an election that ended in a minority Liberal government. Mr. O'CONNELL, like 46 other Grit members of parliament, was defeated.
But he bounced back as Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary for those two lean minority years between 1972 and 1974. Mr. O'CONNELL laid the groundwork for Mr. TRUDEAU's first official visit to the People's Republic of China in 1973 and was instrumental in establishing diplomatic relations with Beijing. (His interest in China would later find expression in his role as co-chair of the Canadian Foundation for the Preservation of Chinese Cultural and Historical Treasures.)
Mr. O'CONNELL also reshaped the Prime Minister's Office in an effort to bring the party closer to the grassroots of Canadian society.
The 1974 general election returned a majority Liberal government and Mr. O'CONNELL as the Member of Parliament for Scarborough East. In 1978, he was back as Labour Minister.
Around the cabinet table, "he wasn't terribly assertive," recalls Mr. DANSON. "He only spoke when he knew what he was talking about." During question period, "he was logical and solid. He was never asked the same question twice. He exuded integrity."
Mr. O'CONNELL lost to Tory Gordon GILCHRIST in the 1979 and 1980 elections (the latter by 511 votes) and he took no pleasure in Mr. GILCHRIST's resignation of the seat in 1984 after a tax-evasion conviction.
Mr. O'CONNELL took a stab at the presidency of the Liberal Party, losing by two just votes. Despite the lack of backing by old Friends, he took the losses gracefully, saying they were part of politics. "They all say that," remarked Mr. O'CONNELL's long-time friend David GOLDBERG. "He took it stoically, but hard."
He bid politics farewell and returned to the private sector as a consultant to government agencies and corporations. The only time his name was ever remotely linked to controversy was in 1983. He was acting as a consultant to multinational drug companies when he was hired by the government to consult on legislation the companies wanted repealed. Mr. O'CONNELL disclosed his role with the drug companies immediately, and Ottawa explained he was tapped precisely because he knew his way around the industry.
He was a taciturn man but prescient when he pronounced, in 1984, that tobacco smoke was a legitimate health problem in the workplace. As head of the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, Mr. O'CONNELL commented on the recently changed Canada Labour Code: "My own feeling is that the right to refuse work is an essential right, ... personally, I wouldn't think it would be an abuse [of the legislation] to refuse work because of tobacco smoke.''
Mr. O'CONNELL's daughter Caryn recalls somewhat ruefully that as a child she would sometimes hesitate to tell her Friends' parents about what her father did for a living, fearing a typical tirade about Mr. TRUDEAU.
"But my Dad really was different," she recalls. "He may not have been as colourful [as other politicians] but he taught us to play fair and to accept defeat. He taught us the values of honesty, tolerance, patience and the concept of justice. But we never felt pressured. He never force-fed us. I think he was the rare person who entered politics to do good."
Mr. O'CONNELL leaves his wife, children, a brother, sister, four grandchildren and something rare indeed: a good name.

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GORDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
MEAKES, Elizabeth Joyce ''Betty'' (née POWELL)
Betty died suddenly at home in the evening on Thursday, December 18th, 2003. Betty was born in Liverpool, England and was the daughter of Evan and Alice POWELL. She was predeceased by her husband, J.R. MEAKES, former publisher of the Sudbury Star. She was also predeceased by her good friend of many years, Michael DUDOWICH. Betty was a special Aunt and like a mother to Nephew Michael MEAKES as well as Great Aunt to Meredith. Dear cousin of Joyce APPLETON and Elsi GORDON from England. After graduating from the Royal Conservatory of Music in her mid teens, Betty pursued a career in journalism. She was a long-time columnist at the Sudbury Star. Betty was a great supporter of arts and culture in the Sudbury area. She keenly followed politics at all levels of government and attended regular press events over the years. Many a person can share a story about meeting Betty and experiencing her clever sense of humour. She was a truly generous person and assisted many charities. Betty will be missed by her 'extended family' of Friends inside and outside of the Sudbury region. Resting at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury. Funeral Mass in Christ the King Church, 30 Beech Street, Sudbury, Monday, December 22nd, 2003 at 10 a.m. Interment in the Parklawn Cemetery. Prayers 3 p.m. Sunday. Donations to 2nd Floor Acute Care Unit, St. Joseph's Health Centre would be appreciated. Friends may call 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Sunday.

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GORELLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-06 published
Arline GORELLE
By Nancy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON Tuesday, May 6, 2003 - Page A18
Wife, mother, grandmother, teacher, choreographer, dancer. Born September 12, 1932, in Toronto. Died November 26, 2002, in Orangeville, Ontario, of cancer, aged 70.
Arline danced her way through life. When she was at the University of Toronto, her love of dancing shone through. She choreographed creative pieces for the engineers' annual show, Skule Night. As well, the Varsity Review took her on memorable trips to McGill University in Montreal and Princeton in the United States.
Arline was famous for sharing the stage at the Canadian National Exhibition with such celebrities as Danny Kaye, Bob Hope and Victor Borge. The Canadettes, as the chorus line was called, followed behind the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Musical Ride on their way to the stage, making footing somewhat treacherous. Finishing the show, the dancers ran backstage, fireworks falling overhead. Arline loved showbiz!
University days were exciting for her. Classes in anthropology, where she dreamed of archeological digs in Egypt, and in English Literature with Northrop FRYE, were her favourites.
After graduation from university and The Ontario College of Education, Arline worked as a teacher, then as phys-ed co-ordinator and as a vice-principal for the Peel Board of Education. While working full-time and raising two children, she also received her M.A. in education.
Her marriage to Gary (and family soon after), became her top priority. Arl fervently believed in motherhood and was determined to lay a solid foundation for their children. One friend remembers Christmases when she and Arline dressed their little ones to the hilt: Arline's daughter Lianne in a white fur coat at the age of 3, big brother David in trousers, shirt, jacket and tie. Off they went, with Nana May and Auntie Betty joyfully following, to visit Santa Claus; then to the Arcadian Court for lunch. Arline worked at creating a sense of family and nourished it with ongoing family traditions.
She always had a dream: her dream of the perfect home came true with the acquisition of Lissadell, their farm at Violet Hill. There she welcomed Friends, children and grandchildren, who loved to be with her, enjoying the pastoral life. Garden Island, their cottage, reverberated with joy even during days without electricity and with an outhouse in the woods!
"Club" was a big part of Arline's life. Most called it the Study Group, but to Arl, it was a special club of 16 close women-friends who have learned and laughed together for 40 years. She loved the mind-expanding challenge of presenting her yearly speech. Despite her refusal to use computers, faxes and answering machines, she always managed to give the best talk of the year. One member referred to her as "a great and shining person." "If I were a poet, " said another, "Arl would be one of my muses. She cared and she listened and this caring gave strength to the whole circle."
Arline's love of the arts and dance led to involvement with the Dufferin Arts Council where she transformed the speakers' luncheons and assisted with fundraising. One year she orchestrated a men's kick-line. This group of 60ish-year-old men, dressed in flowing skirts, rehearsed weekly and Arline refused to give them their coffee and cookies until they got their steps just right. A fun fundraiser!
As a tribute to Arline, the council established The Arline Gorelle Award for Excellence in the Field of Dance; donations support students pursuing dance studies.
She gave of herself and her greatest gift was true Friendship. "Friends are angels, " she said, "who lift us to our feet when our wings have trouble remembering how to fly." Arline was the angel in our lives.
Nancy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON wrote this with help from Lianne GORELLE.

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GORETE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
SANTOS, Felicidade
Peacefully at home on Saturday, March 1, 2003 in her 80th year. Beloved wife of the late Joao. Loving mother of Joao LUIS, Jose MANUEL, Fernando, Maria FELICIDADE, Maria GORETE and Tony. Dear grandmother of sixteen and great-grandmother of one. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter 'Peel' Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga, (Hwy. 10 north of Q.E.W.), from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. on Tuesday. Parish Prayers at 7: 30 p.m. Tuesday. Funeral Mass at S. Salvador do Mundo Church, 1225 Melton Dr., Mississauga on Wednesday March 5 at 10 a.m. Interment Saint Mary's Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to the Trillium Health Centre-Mississauga (Oncology).

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GORZYNSKI o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-05 published
Marcel Alexander GORZYNSKI
In loving memory of Marcel Alexander GORZYNSKI, born January 16, 1925 in Poland, died February 23, 2003 at his residence on Manitoulin Island.
He married in 1948 in Germany to Lena (KAPPLER,) and they came to Canada in 1949 to Montreal. In 1950 he came to Sudbury and was hired at INCO. He was a millwright retiring in 1985. In 1975 he went camping on Manitoulin Island. While he was there he and his wife went out looking for waterfront property. They bought one on Lake Manitou and started building a camp. In 1986 he moved to Manitoulin Island permanently. Marcel enjoyed his life on Manitoulin Island to the fullest. He grew everything in the garden. He planted trees all around, Chestnut, Walnut, Apple, Pear and Grape. The flower garden was started too. Roses were his favourite. He had a green thumb for gardening and took great pride in his flowers and fruit. He was predeceased by his canine friend, Lady. Marcel battled non-Hodgin's lymphoma for two years. He died peacefully in his beloved home. We all miss him. Beloved husband of Lena (KAPPLER) GORZYNSKI of Sudbury. Loving father of Madeline (husband Terry BUCKMAN,) Patricia (husband Norm BODSON,) and Raymond (partner Debbie ROBERTSON) all of Sudbury. Cherished grandfather of Andrea and Stephanie. The Memorial Service was held in the R. J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street Sudbury on Thursday, February 27, 2003. Cremation at the Park Lawn Crematorium.

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