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"GOO" 2003 Obituary


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GOOCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-16 published
His vision for Canada went sky-high
Aircraft engineer worked at Canadian Vickers during the Second World War and helped in development of Canadair
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - Page R9
Perhaps more than anyone else, Peter GOOCH gave Canada its wings. An aeronautical engineer, he helped to build the company that went on to become Canadair, the aerospace division of Bombardier and the foundation for Canada's success as an aircraft manufacturer.
Like many young men of his generation, the Second World War had thrust him into the job of his dreams: chief engineer of a vast aircraft plant building flying boats for submarine patrols and converting military transports into commercial aircraft.
Mr. GOOCH, who died in February at the age of 88, joined Canadian Vickers at the outbreak of the war. The company was building ships in the east end of Montreal but expanded to build sea planes, including those that landed on floats and skis as well as amphibians, so-called flying boats, which could take off from water or land.
Canadian Vickers moved its aeronautical arm to Cartierville airport, then a three-kilometre streetcar ride from the edge of Montreal.
In May 1942, the federal government got involved by helping to build a 150,000-square-metre plant. Within three months, Mr. GOOCH and his team turned out the first PBY, or Canso, an advanced flying boat which saw extensive service in the war. The technology behind the Canso's ability to take off and land using the fuselage as a hull is still used in Canadair's water bombers.
The assembly line produced 340 Cansos. Then a young man who was not yet 30, Mr. GOOCH supervised a complex engineering project with dozens of engineers and thousands of workers under him. As the war came to an end, the factory expanded to convert military C47s into civilian DC3s.
At one point, Mr. GOOCH was also sent to England to work on the development of the legendary de Havilland Mosquito, an all-wood fighter-bomber that was later made in Canada and used by the Royal Canadian Air Force.
Mr. GOOCH was not only a clever engineer but a man of quiet charm and an accomplished linguist. Both these traits smoothed the path for his winning the contract for Vickers to build Montreal's first subway cars. Because he was fluent in French, he was able to deal with the mayor of Montreal, Jean DRAPEAU, something few English-only speaking businessmen of his day could manage.
By 1964, Mr. GOOCH was vice-president of engineering at Canadian Vickers. He convinced the mayor that his firm, located in a working class, French-Canadian district, could do the job of building the subway cars. Shortly after winning the contract, Mr. GOOCH was promoted to president of Canadian Vickers.
Peter William GOOCH was born on February 18, 1915, in Toronto. His father was a successful businessman who owned and ran a window-manufacturing company.
He attended Upper Canada College and the University of Toronto, graduating with a degree in civil engineering in 1936. A year later, he earned a masters degree in aeronautical engineering. His first job in aviation was with de Havilland and he transferred to the company's home base in England. He worked at its plants until the outbreak of the war when he started at Canadair, which was then owned by Canadian Vickers. After the war, the government wanted to encourage the development of an aviation industry using Canadair as a base. After one postwar re-organization, Canadair was bought by an American firm with the odd name of The Electric Boat Company. It formed the basis of General Dynamics, the defence giant.
Mr. GOOCH opted to stay with Canadian Vickers and moved to its operation on the St. Lawrence River. He left the firm in 1967 and moved to Toronto as president and part owner of the firm that became FluiDynamic Devices Inc., a company that turned exotic inventions developed at the National Research Council in Ottawa into commercial products.
A man of immense curiosity, he would get caught up in many projects, including a windtunnel. Called Airflow, it helped measure industrial emissions as part of an environmental initiative put together long before most people had heard of the word. The firm sold its first wind tunnel to Volvo, in Sweden, to test the aerodynamics of its cars.
In his spare time, Mr. GOOCH read in many languages and in addition to French, he spoke Russian, Spanish, German and Italian. When visiting businessmen arrived from Europe, he was always called upon to entertain them. At the age of 60, he decided to learn Japanese since his firm, FluiDynamics, had picked up a Japanese client.
A devoted family man, he spent his free time at the cottage he built at Lac Oureau, north of Montreal. A patient fisherman, his son remembers him catching just one trout on the fished-out lake in the southern Laurentians. The family would head further north on fishing trips every summer.
His hobbies included carpentry and a whole range of sports from skiing to golf. He was fit even in his later years and last summer was the first time he used a cart instead of walking the course.
Mr. GOOCH died in Toronto on February 27. He leaves his wife Evelyn and his four children.

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GOOD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-05 published
GOOD
-In loving memory of James, Mary and Edwin GOOD.
James deceased February 14, 1990.
Mary deceased September 1, 1972.
Edwin deceased December 22, 1982.
-Forever in our memory, The Family.

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GOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
HARMER, Robert William (Herb)
Passed away peacefully in Toronto, on Wednesday March 5, 2003. Bill (Herb) HARMER of Toronto and Southhampton, at the age of 70. Beloved husband of Mary HARMER (née DROESKE) of Toronto and Southampton. Loving father of Robert of Toronto, Alexandra of Orangeville and Lesley of Toronto. Also survived by his sister Margaret and her husband Gordon GOOD of Burlington. Fondly remembered by his many relatives and Friends. At Herb's request there will be no visitation. A reception in Herb's memory will be held at the Granite Club, Toronto, on Thursday March 13, 2003 at 5 p.m, as well, a Memorial Service to Celebrate Herb's Life will be conducted in the Chapel of the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton, on Saturday April 26, 2003 at 11 a.m. A Time of Fellowship will follow in the Family Centre of the Funeral Home. Private Family Interment of Ashes Southampton Cemetery. If so desired, memorial donations may be made to the Chantry Island Restoration Project or to the charity of your choice. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com

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GOODCHILD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
ALLAN, Gavina Y. (née BROWN)
Survived by her husband William, brother Donald Grant BROWN (Katherine,) sister Olga Marion COUSINS (William,) nephews and nieces Ian BROWN (Wendy), Kevin BROWN (Katherine), Randolph COUSINS (Anne), Anne GOODCHILD (Wayne,) grand nephews and nieces Graham, Colin, Andrew and Shawn BROWN, Russell and Kerry COUSINS and Monica and Justine GOODCHILD. Private family arrangements have been made. In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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GOODERHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-13 published
GOODERHAM, George Kentner 1927-2003
Died at the Ottawa Heart Institute after a brief illness on Friday, October 10, 2003. Born in Calgary and raised on the Blackfoot reserve at Gleichen, Alberta where his family lived and his father worked as the Indian agent. Kent married Helen Rea CRAWFORD of Winnipeg in 1955 and then worked as a school superintendent in the Peace River, Alberta for three years before moving to Ottawa in 1966. As an anthropologist and as an educator, he focused on education for Indian people and later became Director of Indian education for the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. In addition to his 17 years in the public service, Kent was a patron of the arts and an avid traveller. After his retirement, he and Helen pursued many interests and spent the winters in Vancouver and the summers at the family cottage in Elgin, Ontario. Kent is survived by his wife, Helen; his four sons, George, Rory, Adam, and Nicholas; his daughter, Sara; his sisters, Elizabeth Gooderham ROBINSON and Eleanor Gooderham CRAWFORD; and eight grand children: Elizabeth, Rachel, Noah, Graham, David, Eilish, Maaike, and Willem. The family wishes to extend its most sincere thanks to the doctors and nurses of the Intensive Care Unit of the Ottawa Civic Hospital and the Cardiac Care Unit of the Ottawa Heart Institute for their excellent care and compassion and encourages Friends to make a donation in Kent's memory to the University of Ottawa Heart Institute Foundation at 40 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1Y 4W7.

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GOODFELLOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-02 published
WEAVER, Clare Thorne
Died on Monday, September 29th, 2003, at the South Muskoka Memorial Hospital, Bracebridge, at the age of 64. Beloved daughter of the late Harriet and Bill WEAVER. Much loved sister of Brink (Margaret) and Stewart (Carol) of Toronto and Muskoka and Vicky WEAVER (and the late Richard BIRD) of Lake of Bays. Miss WEAVER, formerly of CosCob, Connecticut, enjoyed a happy year with David and Jackie GOODFELLOW of Gravenhurst where she received special care. Fondly remembered by her five nieces and nephews and in particular Harriet. Friends will be received at the Reynolds Funeral Home ''Turner Chapel'' 1 Mary Street, Bracebridge (877) 806-2257 on Friday, October 3rd, 2003 from 1: 00 p.m. until time of service in the Chapel at 2: 00 p.m. Burial in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto, on Monday, October 6th, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Memorial gifts to the South Muskoka Hospital Foundation, 75 Ann Street, Bracebridge, Ontario P1L 2E4 would be appreciated by the family.

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GOODING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-25 published
HYDE, Shelagh Jane (née LAWSON)
Died peacefully, at her home on Stoney Lake, in her 73rd year, on August 22, 2003. Shelagh was the cherished wife of Kenneth for 47 years. Beloved mother of Elizabeth (Victor SPEAR) and Joanne (Brian GOODING) and Grandma to David, Andrew, Jillian and Charlie. Shelagh was born in Winnipeg and graduated from St. Boniface Hospital School of Nursing. Shelagh came to Toronto in 1953 and was active in church and community affairs throughout her life. A Memorial Service will be held at Rosedale United Church, 159 Roxborough Drive at Glen Road, on Wednesday, August 27th at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Kidney Foundation of Canada (Central Ontario Branch) or to Parkinson Society Canada would be appreciated by the family.

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GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-08 published
Photographer, reporter and royal press attaché
After years at The Globe and Mail, he went on to craft speeches for William DAVIS and to co-ordinate royal tours
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, January 8, 2003, Page R5
John GILLIES, a former reporter at The Globe and Mail, who later served as press attaché for the royal tours in the 1970s, died recently at his home in Mississauga, Ontario He was 74.
Known as "a two-way man," Mr. GILLIES was both a reporter and photographer at The Globe throughout the 1960s. He travelled extensively around Ontario, covering everything from fires and train derailments to inquests and trials.
Reporting was in his blood, said Rudy PLATIEL, a fellow two-way man who worked with Mr. GILLIES at The Globe.
He loved digging up stories and talking to people, Mr. PLATIEL recalled.
"For John, the worst time was when nothing was panning out, and he didn't get a story.
"We were sort of the generalists in the sense that we were ready to take on any story," Mr. PLATIEL added. "I think he enjoyed not knowing what was coming up next."
After more than a decade at The Globe and Mail, Mr. GILLIES left the paper for a job with the Ontario government.
Working as a communications officer in the Ministry of Education, his job, among others, was to field media calls and write speeches.
He frequently wrote them for William DAVIS -- who would later become the Premier of Ontario -- when Mr. DAVIS was the education minister. Mr. GILLIES spent 20 years working for the government before retiring in the late 1980s.
Of all the press officers at Queen's Park at the time, Mr. GILLIES was the most up-front, said Rod GOODMAN, a former ombudsman of The Toronto Star.
"If he knew something, he would tell you," Mr. GOODMAN said. "He was very straight and very honest."
During the 1970s, on leaves from the Ministry of Education, Mr. GILLIES served as press co-ordinator for the royal tours to Canada.
He would ride on the press bus, following the Royal Family on their visits to various parts of the country, arranging interviews and ensuring that things ran smoothly for the press.
"Several times, he got to meet the Queen," said his daughter, Laurie SWINTON. "He always said Prince Philip was a real card."
Her father was not known for his impeccable style: Ms. SWINTON recalls a photo taken of him standing with the Queen, wearing a rumpled $29 suit from a local department store. It was not uncommon for Mr. GILLIES to be seen with a crooked tie and untucked shirt. "He was probably one of the only guys at Queen's Park that dressed worse than me," said author and broadcaster Claire HOY.
John GILLIES was born in Toronto on March 4, 1928, the only son of George and Sarah GILLIES. The family lived in a tiny row house in the city's west end. His father worked in the rail yards, and his mother in a chocolate factory, often bringing home boxes of candy for her only son.
Not fond of school, Mr. GILLIES dropped out in Grade 10.
Later, in search of work, he walked into the office of the weekly newspaper in Port Credit (now a part of Mississauga), telling them he needed a job and would do anything. It just so happened that they required a sports editor and hired him.
"He just sort of fell into writing," Ms. SWINTON said.
In 1954, when Hurricane Hazel ripped through Toronto, killing 81 people, Mr. GILLIES's instinct was not to seek shelter in the basement of his home, but to hit the streets to talk to people and gather stories.
When Mr. GILLIES reached an area of the city where a number of new townhouses had been wiped out, a police roadblock met him, recalled his son, Ken GILLIES. A friend who was with him at the time pulled a badge from his coat pocket and flashed it at the officer. After police let the pair through, Mr. GILLIES turned to his friend and asked where he got the badge. "From my kid's Cheerios box this morning," his friend replied.
An avid golfer, it was on the greens in Port Credit that Mr. GILLIES met Frances SMITH, a woman who shared his passion for golf.
The couple married in 1954, and later had three children. Ms. GILLIES died of cancer in 1984.
A helpless optimist when it came to golf, Mr. GILLIES was known to go out under the most dire conditions. He would look at a dark, looming sky and declare that it was clearing, Ken GILLIES recalled. By contrast, said Mr. HOY, the task of getting Mr. GILLIES on the greens when he hadn't scheduled a golf game was next to impossible.
"I don't know anyone else who was that structured," Mr. HOY added, noting that his golfing buddy stuck to his weekly schedule, where each day was dedicated to a particular task. For example, shopping was done not on Thursday but on Saturday. "He had this one little idiosyncrasy," Mr. HOY joked.
A good-hearted man who was also a big lover of dogs, Mr. GILLIES was known to carry a stash of dog biscuits on his daily walks to give to the neighbourhood pooches. "He was a very simple guy," said his son Ken. "He didn't like a lot of ceremony and fanfare."
Mr. GILLIES leaves his three children, Don, Ken and Laurie, and two grandchildren, Corey and Grace.
John GILLIES, reporter / photographer, communications officer born in Toronto on March 4, 1928; died in Mississauga, Ontario on December 4, 2002.

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