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"GOL" 2003 Obituary


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GOLD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-11 published
Murray J. BENNER
By Frank BENNER Tuesday, November 11, 2003 - Page A26
Son, brother, enthusiast, optimist, dreamer, clown, humorist, homesteading pioneer, First World War soldier. Born July 31, 1893 in Bayham, Ontario Died September 4, 1918, Villers-Cagnicourt, France, aged 25.
This letter was written by Frank BENNER. At this stage he was a practising physician in Winnipeg. He wrote this letter home to Mary, his mother, on receiving the telegram from his brother Ward saying that their brother Murray had been killed in action overseas.
"This is going to be a hard letter for me to write. Ward's telegram was delivered at my office about half past three yesterday afternoon and for some reason I felt what was in it before I opened it. Although we were in a way always prepared to receive such news when it did come yesterday it completely upset me in a way that I did not think possible.
"Poor Murray! It hardly seems possible that a cheerful, energetic, buoyant brave boy can be gone. His nature seemed to be such as to almost overcome the shadow of death. We all know that he has faced death and dodged him for a year, that he never feared to meet death when his time came. I am sure he died as he lived, cheerfully, and taking it all as part of the day's events. While we are feeling so badly over it, it is some consolation to think of the nobility of it all, killed in battle in defence of his country, in defence of a great cause, defending right and liberty against oppression, tyranny and wrong. There is surely a 'majesty' in such a death. Murray would wish nothing grander, nor could we wish anything grander for him.
"I would rather get a dozen such messages as I received yesterday (if such were possible) than to know he was wounded like a few I have seen. Men who will suffer intense physical pain the rest of their lives but the mental pain they suffer will eventually drive them mad or drive them to seek the death they missed in battle. Other cases are those who eventually die of wounds, after suffering for weeks or months. I have seen all and I know and I thank God that Murray has not suffered that.
"Murray has given his life; you have given a son. The first is not hard but the second is heartbreaking. I am not in any way trying to minimize Murray's sacrifice but for a year I faced with thousands of others the possibility of death and really one gets so that it has no great terrors. We expected it at any time and were rather surprised that it didn't come. None of us wanted it to come but had it happened I cannot think that my sacrifice would have been so great as yours. From Murray's letters I judge he felt the same way.
"We will always mourn his death as the loss of a loving son and brother but we will always feel proud of him, his life and his death. Canada needed such men as Murray, men who dared the unbroken country and faced its loneliness and its privations, gave their labour and cheer there that it might become a place for a future generation of Canadians. In his memory Murray has left us a great deal and I hope that when my time comes I may leave as much. I fear I shan't fall so nobly.
"It is useless for me to attempt writing more. I know you will all bear up as bravely and as nobly as he would wish, and as bravely and proudly as we have the right. I feel that I should be with you in person as well as in thought. Will anxiously await further details but can't expect anything for four to six weeks. Best love to all, Frank
Frank BENNER was Murray's brother and he served as a physician in Giza, Egypt, with the British Red Cross Hospital during the First World War. The letter is one of about 400 letters written by family members between 1899 and 1918. It was submitted by Murray and Frank's great-niece, Susan GOLD, of Burlington, Ontario

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GOLD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-20 published
BULL, Stewart Hastings (1916-2003) Teacher, soldier, author, historian, churchman, and loving family man. Born in Windsor, Ontario, died peacefully at home in Toronto on November 17, leaving Doris, his loving wife of 55 years, dear daughters Catherine (Richard GOLD) and Muriel (Kenneth OLSEN) and his adored grandchildren, Laura, Susanna and James. Predeceased by brothers, Henry BULL, Q.C. and the Reverend Edgar BULL, and sister Jane DOBROTA, R.N. A World War 2 veteran who served with the Essex and Kent Scottish Regiment, he was severely wounded in Normandy in 1944. He will be remembered first and foremost as a lively and inspiring teacher of History and English at Walkerville Collegiate, the University of Toronto Schools, and the Faculty of Education, U. of T. He encouraged generations of students, and dedicated boundless energy to school spirit, cadets, debating and dramatics. He was regimental historian, museum curator and Council member with the Queen's York Rangers of Toronto. A committed Anglican, he was active in parish work and community outreach at Saint Thomas's and All Saints' Kingsway Churches. Stewart was a steady leader who shared his love of people, creative spirit, and enthusiasm for life with all he knew. Sincere thanks to Dr. SWARTZ, Dr. PREOBRAZENSKI, Olive, Audrey, Karen, and to Colonel Michael STEVENSON, for their care and support. Visitation at Turner and Porter Funeral Home, Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W. on Friday November 21 from 7 - 9 p.m. Funeral service Saturday November 22 at 1: 30 p.m. All Saints' Kingsway Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. at Prince Edward Rd. Memorial donations to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, Médecins sans Frontières or All Saints' Kingsway Church.

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GOLDBERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
BARR, The Honourable Mr. Justice John Roderick (Rod), Q.C., L.L.D.
Born in Toronto on September 9, 1921, died in St. Catharines, Ontario May 30, 2003. Devoted and loving husband to the late Rhoda Marshall BARR. Predeceased by infant daughter Jane. Dearly loved by his son Peter, daughter Elizabeth and their spouses, Sharon BRODERICK and Stephen PERRY. Adoring grandfather to John BARR and Nicholas, James and Christopher PERRY. Brother and great friend of his sisters, Margaret RHAMEY and the late Isabelle MARSH. As dear as a brother to sisters-in-law, Helen CAUGHEY and Nellie MARSHALL.
Rod was grateful for a full and happy life. He grew up in Hamilton, Ontario and enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force at the outset of World War 2. Rod first served as a Flight Instructor in Trenton, Ontario, where he met his future wife Nursing Sister Rhoda MARSHALL. Obtaining the rank of Flight Lieutenant, he served in 426 Squadron as a pilot with Bomber Command at Linton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire.
At the end of the war, Rod studied law at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto and was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1948. At that time, he and Rhoda established their home in St. Catharines where he enjoyed many years practicing civil litigation and where as a trial lawyer he earned the respect of his colleagues. Rod served as a Bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada and was a member of the American College of Trial Lawyers and the Advocates Society. He was appointed to the Supreme Court of Ontario, Trial Division in 1983.
Rod received an Honourary Doctorate of Laws from Brock University. He was an active member of the St. Catharines Flying Club and proud member of the St. Catharines Rowing Club. He took up sculling at the age of 52 and participated in Masters Rowing in Canada and the United States.
He supported a large range of charities. No one less fortunate was ever turned away. Rod's insight and kindness was matched only by his wonderful, inimitable sense of humour. Above all, he loved and was loved by his family.
The family is deeply grateful to Dr. R. MacKETT, Dr. F. MacKAY, Dr. J. WRIGHT, Dr. FERNANDES and Dr. W. GOLDBERG, and to gentle caregivers Virgie PEREZ, Marylou and Risa.
''Pray for me, and I will for thee,
that we may merrily meet in heaven.''
The family will receive Friends at the Hulse and English Funeral Home, 75 Church Street, St. Catharines, on Sunday, June 1, from 7-9 p.m. and Monday, June 2, from 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held at Knox Presbyterian Church, 51 Church Street, St. Catharines, on Tuesday, June 3, 2003 at 11 a.m. A service will also be held in St. Paul's Presbyterian Church, Amherst Island, on Wednesday, June 4, 2003, at 3 p.m. Interment to follow.
Donations may be made in Rod's memory to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Knox Presbyterian Church.

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GOLDBERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-09 published
PRYCE, Maurice Henry Lecorney
Maurice Henry Lecorney PRYCE died at Vancouver, British Columbia, aged 90. He was a theoretical physicist with very broad interests. Following a spectacular early career at Cambridge, Oxford, and Bristol, he spent the second half of his life in the United States and Canada. Born in Croydon, England, on the 24th of January, 1913, he spent part of his childhood with his French mother in France where he learned to speak French 'like a Normandy peasant'. He was always encouraging to his two younger brothers, and fond of risky experiments such as using a magneto to fire a small cannon loaded with home-made gunpowder. Educated at the Royal Grammar School in Guildford he entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1930, graduating in 1933 and continuing to do research there initially with Sir Ralph Fowler and subsequently with the Nobel laureate Max Born. He spent two years as a Commonwealth Fund Fellow at Princeton University in 1935-7 before returning to Cambridge as a Fellow of Trinity College. During this period in Cambridge he made outstanding contributions to the so-called ''New Field Theory'' proposed by Born and Infeld. He also wrote an incisive paper demolishing the then fashionable idea that light quanta might consist of pairs of neutrinos. Paul Dirac, then one of the most influential theoretical physicists, was so impressed (which was a very rare occurrence) that he spontaneously offered to communicate the work to The Royal Society. Maurice PRYCE later remarked that this was the high-point of his scientific life. In 1939 he was appointed to a Readership in Theoretical Physics at Liverpool University, and married Margarete (GRITLI) BORN. At the advent of war he joined the team working on radar at the Admiralty Signal Establishment, and in 1944 transferred to the Joint Atomic Energy Project in Montreal. In 1945 he returned to his fellowship at Trinity College, Cambridge, and a university lectureship, but was soon invited to become Wykeham Professor of Physics at Oxford, a chair which had recently been earmarked for a theoretical physicist after the long tenure of Sir John Townsend. It was a bold appointment for someone aged only 32, who looked even younger than his years. At Oxford he rapidly acquired a large group of research students, many returning from war service, several of whom were to become very distinguished in their fields. His interests and knowledge spread across many branches of physics, and students were put to work on widely ranging topics stretching from field theory, the nuclear shell model, liquid helium, to solid state physics. Maurice PRYCE became most directly involved in interpreting the magnetic properties of atoms which were being studied in great detail through the paramagnetic resonance techniques by Brebis Bleaney and his colleagues in the Clarendon Laboratory. Almost half his published work relates to this area where he elucidated in detail the interaction between the magnetic electrons and the lattice (the crystal field), the effective lattice dynamics (the Jahn-Teller effect) and interaction with the nucleus (hyperfine structure). He also added considerably to the understanding of the magnetic properties of atoms in the actinide series, including the newly discovered transuranics. During his time in Oxford he took sabbatical leave to spend a year as Visiting Professor at Princeton. On his return he acted as the part-time head of the theoretical physics division at the nearby Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell, where he replaced the previous head, Klaus Fuchs, who was arrested in 1950 and convicted on a charge of spying. In 1951 Maurice PRYCE was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. In 1954, frustrated by the constraints of his position and in particular by the autocratic management of Lord Cherwell, he accepted an invitation to succeed Nevill Mott as Henry Overton Wills Professor of Physics at the University of Bristol. With greater administrative duties as head of the department he had less time to develop his research group but he continued with the subjects that he had begun at Oxford. His first marriage had broken down, and he married Freda KINSEY in 1961. He then accepted a tempting offer by the University of Southern California, and moved there in 1964, with the promise of resources to build up, essentially from scratch, a first class physics department. The reality turned out to be less attractive than he had hoped. In 1968 he moved again to a chair at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver where he was to remain until his death, on the 24th of July 2003. During these later years his main contributions were in the quite different field of astrophysics, although others, on molecular photoionisation and on the properties of the hydroxyl radical, continued to display his versatility and his wide understanding of physics. This knowledge was greatly valued by his colleagues who would rely on a critical appraisal of their work and its interpretation. But he did not suffer fools gladly and was a harsh critic; in a seminar, he could devastate the speaker and embarrass the audience with his acerbic comments. He also continued his interest in atomic energy derived from his wartime work and was latterly a member of the Technical Advisory Committee to the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited with a particular interest on nuclear fuel waste management. Some of his last work related to the questions of the safety of deposit of radioactive materials in geological structures. Maurice PRYCE was a keen walker and camper and, in younger days, a dinghy sailor. He was a competent pianist and liked to relax by playing classical music, mainly Bach and Mozart. He was a good cook, which stood him in good stead when entertaining Friends and family after his second wife died in 1990. He inherited from his father a love and knowledge of gardening, which he passed on to all four of his children. He always kept a boyish liking for silly games, from elaborate sandcastles on the beach to noisy card games on the living room floor. Until ill health stopped him, he was a skilful Scrabble player. He created a family tradition, perhaps characteristic of his personal philosophy, of Collaborative Scrabble -- the main aim is, within the rules, to maximize the overall score rather than to beat the other players. The mathematical gene has also passed on to his son John, well known in his field of mathematical software engineering; and to John's son Nathaniel, a professional software engineer. The last 14 years of his life he spent in the company of his great friend Eileen GOLDBERG, the widow of a South African lawyer who had been active in the fight against apartheid. They shared their love of music, literature, and walks in the woods. In December, 1997, he was incapacitated by an osteoporosis-induced bone fracture and subsequent infection, and spent his last five years at the University Hospital in Vancouver, visited daily by Eileen. During this period his mind was unaffected, and he bore immobility and frequent pain with patience, courage and a sense of humour, remaining in exemplary good spirits throughout. He is survived by his son, John, and three daughters, Sylvia, Lois and Suki, all from his first marriage.
Copyright: Roger Elliott and John Sanders/The Independent, London.

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GOLDBERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-22 published
Quiet minister a Trudeau stalwart
Former Bay Street whiz kid helped revamp Canada's social safety net and served as both secretary of state and labour minister
By Ron CSILLAG Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, September 22, 2003 - Page R7
His children possess no qualms about pronouncing Martin O'CONNELL as having been a bit of a policy wonk. "Oh, totally," says his son John.
"My dad wasn't interested in money -- odd, given his Bay Street successes. Just policy, and formulating policy."
"He was a classic workaholic," concurs Mr. O'CONNELL's daughter Caryn. "He was just driven by his work. It's one of the things that kept him going."
Rare is the politician remembered for self-effacing skills and effectiveness rather than bombast. Mr. O'CONNELL was indeed serious and conscientious. He worked hard and achieved much. But of all the cabinet ministers from the Pierre TRUDEAU era, his name probably rings the quietist bell for Canadians old enough to recall names like Don Jamieson, Otto Lang and Marc Lalonde.
Mr. O'CONNELL, who died in Toronto on August 11 at 87 of complications from Parkinson's disease, served as Canada's labour minister on two separate occasions, and was Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary for two years when Trudeaumania had been replaced by the infuriation of millions with Canada's philosopher-king.
How does one keep a low profile in federal politics, especially in a contentious cabinet post? Mr. O'CONNELL did it by guiding the country with a steady hand through great labour turbulence in the early 1970s, including convincing his boss to pass emergency legislation that terminated work stoppages at the Vancouver and Montreal dockyards.
"He was an exceptionally low-key guy. He liked it that way," recalls Barney DANSON, who served as Minister of National Defence in the Trudeau cabinet. Doubtless Mr. TRUDEAU saw in Mr. O'CONNELL a kind of kinship. Both men were unflappable philosophers and academics at heart who entered politics relatively late in life, both sacrificing cushier lives to hasten Mr. TRUDEAU's vaunted "just society."
For Mr. O'CONNELL, the bug bit in 1965 when he and two other Bay Street whiz kids were summoned to Ottawa by then finance minister Walter GORDON -- still stinging from a disastrous budget two years earlier -- to help revamp Canada's social safety net. The group ultimately designed policies that led to the Canada Pension Plan, the Municipal Loan Development Fund and medicare.
Martin Patrick O'CONNELL was one of four children born in Victoria to a mother from Ontario and a horticulturist father from County Kerry in Ireland who farmed a few acres and raised livestock. Mr. O'CONNELL taught elementary school for six years and completed a B.A. at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, before beginning a wartime stint in the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps and Infantry Regiment. Haunted perhaps by the death of his brother Johnny, cut down in the battle for Caen, France, in June, 1944, Mr. O'CONNELL volunteered for action in the Pacific just as the fighting ceased.
It was while in uniform that he met his future wife of 58 years, Helen Alice DIONNE. The two met at the Art Gallery of Ontario while Mr. O'CONNELL was on leave from his base, and Ms. DIONNE was volunteering at the museum.
He spent the decade after the war at the University of Toronto, earning graduate degrees in economics and political science and lecturing on Plato, John Stuart Mill and liberal democratic principles. He had learned French for his doctoral thesis on Henri Bourassa, one of the first scholarly studies in English on the fiery Quebec journalist and Canadian nationalist.
Academia gave way to Bay Street, where Mr. O'CONNELL spent 11 years in investing and bond underwriting while heading the volunteer Indian and Eskimo Association of Canada, as it was then called, where he represented aboriginal concerns to governments and encouraged the devolution of federal powers to native groups.
He had run and lost in 1965 in the federal seat of Greenwood in Toronto but was swept up in the 1968 Trudeau whirlwind, winning the seat of Scarborough East. In 1971, he was named Secretary of State, and was appointed Labour Minister the following year, just before Mr. TRUDEAU called an election that ended in a minority Liberal government. Mr. O'CONNELL, like 46 other Grit members of parliament, was defeated.
But he bounced back as Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary for those two lean minority years between 1972 and 1974. Mr. O'CONNELL laid the groundwork for Mr. TRUDEAU's first official visit to the People's Republic of China in 1973 and was instrumental in establishing diplomatic relations with Beijing. (His interest in China would later find expression in his role as co-chair of the Canadian Foundation for the Preservation of Chinese Cultural and Historical Treasures.)
Mr. O'CONNELL also reshaped the Prime Minister's Office in an effort to bring the party closer to the grassroots of Canadian society.
The 1974 general election returned a majority Liberal government and Mr. O'CONNELL as the Member of Parliament for Scarborough East. In 1978, he was back as Labour Minister.
Around the cabinet table, "he wasn't terribly assertive," recalls Mr. DANSON. "He only spoke when he knew what he was talking about." During question period, "he was logical and solid. He was never asked the same question twice. He exuded integrity."
Mr. O'CONNELL lost to Tory Gordon GILCHRIST in the 1979 and 1980 elections (the latter by 511 votes) and he took no pleasure in Mr. GILCHRIST's resignation of the seat in 1984 after a tax-evasion conviction.
Mr. O'CONNELL took a stab at the presidency of the Liberal Party, losing by two just votes. Despite the lack of backing by old Friends, he took the losses gracefully, saying they were part of politics. "They all say that," remarked Mr. O'CONNELL's long-time friend David GOLDBERG. "He took it stoically, but hard."
He bid politics farewell and returned to the private sector as a consultant to government agencies and corporations. The only time his name was ever remotely linked to controversy was in 1983. He was acting as a consultant to multinational drug companies when he was hired by the government to consult on legislation the companies wanted repealed. Mr. O'CONNELL disclosed his role with the drug companies immediately, and Ottawa explained he was tapped precisely because he knew his way around the industry.
He was a taciturn man but prescient when he pronounced, in 1984, that tobacco smoke was a legitimate health problem in the workplace. As head of the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, Mr. O'CONNELL commented on the recently changed Canada Labour Code: "My own feeling is that the right to refuse work is an essential right, ... personally, I wouldn't think it would be an abuse [of the legislation] to refuse work because of tobacco smoke.''
Mr. O'CONNELL's daughter Caryn recalls somewhat ruefully that as a child she would sometimes hesitate to tell her Friends' parents about what her father did for a living, fearing a typical tirade about Mr. TRUDEAU.
"But my Dad really was different," she recalls. "He may not have been as colourful [as other politicians] but he taught us to play fair and to accept defeat. He taught us the values of honesty, tolerance, patience and the concept of justice. But we never felt pressured. He never force-fed us. I think he was the rare person who entered politics to do good."
Mr. O'CONNELL leaves his wife, children, a brother, sister, four grandchildren and something rare indeed: a good name.

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GOLDENBERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-20 published
He helped build a media giant
Newly graduated accountant brought order to Thomson Corp. in early days
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, May 20, 2003 - Page R7
The astute accountant who provided the financial wizardry to pull the fledgling Thomson Corp. through its shaky early days and see it become one of the world's greatest media enterprises, has died. Sydney CHAPMAN was 93.
With Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and Jack Kent COOKE, Mr. CHAPMAN helped transform a Depression-era Northern Ontario radio station and The Timmins Press into Canada's largest newspaper group.
By the 1970s, with the aid of Mr. CHAPMAN's guiding hand, Thomson Corp. owned 180 newspapers, including The Times of London, 160 magazines, 27 television and radio stations and interests in North Sea oil.
"He certainly did great things for my father in the early days when my father desperately needed a right-hand man of his calibre and his integrity," said Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON's son, Kenneth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON.
"Of all the things he did, the thing I will be most grateful to Sid for is the fact that he was there when my dad needed him and he never, ever let him down."
Mr. CHAPMAN was a newly graduated accountant working at Silverwood Dairies in London, Ontario, when he answered a help-wanted ad Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON had placed for a financial man. Soon after being hired, Mr. CHAPMAN moved to the northern Ontario town of Timmins to sort out the finances of the growing media company.
"I didn't have any equity in Silverwood's; I was just an employee and my superiors were not old," he is quoted as saying in Susan GOLDENBERG's book The Thomson Empire. "I wanted to join something that was going somewhere and have equity in it."
At the time, Mr. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Mr. COOKE and a secretary shared one room in a Toronto building. Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON began buying radio stations and newspapers in Northern Ontario in the 1930s and bought his first newspaper in Canada, The Timmins Press, in 1934.
"Roy was so busy on the telephone, he could hardly talk to me. I had been making $40 a week at Silverwood's and Roy agreed to pay me $45," Mr. CHAPMAN said of the initial meeting.
Mr. CHAPMAN also insisted on buying $10,000 worth of stock in the company. Mr. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, not keen on the idea of anyone but himself owning stock in his company, said he would discuss this proposal with Mr. CHAPMAN at the end of his first month.
"At that time, he asked if I had the cash and said, 'That settles it,' when I said I didn't. But I was determined to have that stock," Mr. CHAPMAN said.
The young accountant went to the Bank of Nova Scotia manager in Timmins, where he was working at the time, and asked for a $10,000 loan. For collateral, he offered his group insurance. It took more than two decades for Mr. CHAPMAN's investment to become worthwhile. "I didn't get any dividends for 22 years but when the company went public, there was a 30 to one split," Mr. CHAPMAN said.
Sydney (Sid) CHAPMAN was born on January 22, 1910, in Bromley, England, on the border of London. One of five children born to Robert CHAPMAN, a house painter who had been wounded in the First World War, and his wife Sarah, the family scraped by with little money. When Mr. CHAPMAN was still a young boy, the family packed up and emigrated to Canada, making their way to Toronto.
Not long after arriving in the new country, Robert CHAPMAN decided he didn't like the place and wanted to return home to England. His wife decided not to join him. Left to raise the children alone, Mrs. CHAPMAN took a job cooking and cleaning for a wealthy family. Sid got a job as an office boy at what is now Deloitte & Touche. While working there, he completed his high-school equivalency through Queen's University and went on to earn his chartered accountant certificate.
After spending five years at Silverwood Dairies, Mr. CHAPMAN began his long relationship with the THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON family. Arriving in Timmins, Mr. CHAPMAN found the business affairs of the newspaper and radio station in less than immaculate order.
Mr. CHAPMAN complained to Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON about the cramped office space and CKGB's accounts and files being stacked in the bathroom and having to keep all his own books in a suitcase.
"Yes, well, that's why we got you up here -- to straighten things out," Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON replied.
Mr. CHAPMAN did just that. He was so reliable that Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON put him in charge of his northern business at the end of 1940, less than a year after he was hired. In the early days, the job was a balancing act. "I used to say about Roy's motto of 'Never a backward step, ' that he had better not step backwards or he would fall in a hole," Mr. CHAPMAN said in The Thomson Empire.
Mr. CHAPMAN got involved in the northern community through the Kinsmen service club, eventually becoming its president. It was in Timmins where he met his future wife Ruby, who was born and raised in Northern Ontario. The couple married in 1948 and had two sons. The couple later moved to Toronto with the growing Thomson company.
Mr. CHAPMAN told his young bride that he intended to work long hours. Even his honeymoon was a business trip to look into the purchase of a newspaper in Jamaica, said his son, Neil.
"He loved to work," said Neil CHAPMAN. " There was always a love of what he was doing. There was no way he was going back to being poor."
His most gratifying business moment was travelling back to England in the 1960s to be part of the acquisition of The Times of London, said Neil CHAPMAN. He was so proud to be with Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and to be staying at the grand Savoy Hotel after his poor beginnings in life, Neil CHAPMAN said.
Mr. CHAPMAN's financial skill extended beyond the balance sheets. He played a large role in the addition of trucking and insurance to the Thomson empire. The origin of Dominion-Consolidated Truck Lines is said to have been linked to Mr. CHAPMAN's habit of eating breakfast at Kresge's, a five-and-ten-cent chain, in Timmins in the 1940s.
"I used to sit at the counter beside a trucker named Barney QUINN who wanted my advice on buying the trucking business of Ford cars from a Windsor widow.
"Although the trucks were rusty, with bald tires, and business was slow because of the war, I expected a revival in business and decided to go in on the venture," Mr. CHAPMAN said in The Thomson Empire.
Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON tried to dissuade him, saying he didn't know that business or have the money. After some persuasion, Mr. CHAPMAN convinced him to invest. They went on to buy smaller firms and consolidated them under Dominion-Consolidated.
Mr. CHAPMAN was also a force behind the acquiring of Scottish and York Insurance, growing out of his belief in consolidation and lowering expenses.
"He was a good and tough negotiator," said Toronto lawyer John TORY, who began working for Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON in the 1950s. "He negotiated a lot of deals for the Thomson group.... He liked to win."
Kenneth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said that what he learned most from his early days working with Mr. CHAPMAN was his positive attitude toward life and people. "He was an extremely positive person. He loved people."
Described as a cheerful and decent man, Mr. CHAPMAN retired from the position of senior financial vice-president at Thomson Newspapers in 1975, but remained as senior vice-president of the Woodbridge Co. and as a director of Thomson Newspapers until 1982.
After retiring from Thomson, Mr. CHAPMAN had no intention of slowing down. He commuted daily into his 80s to a private Bay Street investment office he ran with his two sons. While he was extremely hard-working, serious and focused, he did allow himself to have some fun. He enjoyed golfing and ballroom dancing.
"He loved to dance with his wife Ruby," Mr. TORY said. "They danced well together."
Mr. CHAPMAN, who died on May 9, leaves Ruby, his wife of 55 years, and sons Neil and Glen.
"Dad was a good judge of character and he certainly judged Sid well indeed," Kenneth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said. "He was so dedicated and so extraordinarily loyal."

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GOLDFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-12 published
Lionel GOLDFIELD
By David GOLDFIELD Friday, September 12, 2003 - Page A26
Wrestler, entrepreneur, inventor, father. Born October 3, 1922, in Ottawa, died June 9, 2003, in Ottawa, of heart complications, aged 80.
Born into extreme poverty in Lower Town Ottawa, the eldest of five children, my father never seemed to have time for a childhood. The Depression scarred him, like so many from his generation, but also helped to make him the man he became.
His own father abandoned the family when he was 13; shortly after, his mother suffered a nervous breakdown and was hospitalized for more than a year. So from his early youth, Lionel struggled to take over the role of father figure for the family. It was he who fought to keep scraps of food on the table and a bit of heat in the stove. It was a role he never abandoned and which he assumed without self-pity.
We all are amazed by the family's stories of how in those difficult times on Murray Street, they burned the furniture to keep warm in January. Going to school hungry with no money to buy lunch, Lionel would get a free cup full of hot water from the cafeteria, find some ketchup -- and voilà! Instant tomato soup.
Big and burly, Lionel battled to defend his family and Friends. In an anti-Semitic neighbourhood, the Jewish gang that he grew up with always walked to York Street Public School behind big Lionel. He led their defence with his fists and iron resolve.
Later at high school he joined the wrestling team and became the intercollegiate champion for Eastern Ontario. Man Mountain Goldfield, they called him.
He went on to Kemptville Agricultural College, and then, during the Second World War, joined the army. He became a captain, and was stationed in British Colombia, where he was involved in managing an army cattle operation.After the war, he and his brothers Morley and Jack started a series of businesses that led to a mini-empire in the Ottawa area, in meat, meat processing, hides and leather, wool processing, property development, metal recycling and other fields. The restless, cigar-smoking Lionel would battle to get the business up and running, and then get bored, hand things over to his brothers or other partners, and move on to his next venture. He was an ideas man and a builder, with less enthusiasm for detailed administration or management. He made others rich those who came after to pick up the pieces.
Lionel was an inventor, too, and was always coming up with his own design for smoke-houses, wool-pulling equipment, tannery machines, or copper-recycling devices to solve a problem that came up in business. With no research and development budgets, he'd go to the National Research Council, cajole its scientists and engineers to give him some time -- and then, after picking their brains, create his own solution with angle iron and bailing wire.
Not a religious man, Lionel was deeply affected by the struggles of being a Jew. When others wouldn't give him a job, he created his own. The atrocities of the Holocaust were never far from his consciousness. He joined Hashomer Htzair, a youth movement dedicated to rebuilding a Jewish homeland in Palestine in the face of Nazi persecution, and always remained a firm supporter of Israel.
Lionel was never predictable and always controversial. He taught us to question everything and never to live by codes of conduct imposed by a conventional world. In that way, he lived life to the full. Every new problem was a challenge to defeat. Never fret about the past and don't think about the future, was his philosophy. He was an inspiration to us all.
David GOLDFIELD is Lionel's son.

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GOLDKIND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-22 published
Champ didn't tell his mother
Toronto fighter was talked into boxing by his brothers during the Thirties as a way to make more money
By Barbara SILVERSTEIN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, March 22, 2003 - Page F11
When Leon SLAN became Canada's champion heavyweight boxer, he didn't tell his mother. She disapproved of the sport, so he kept the news to himself -- though not for long. Mr. SLAN, who died last month at the age of 86, had for years fought under another name and managed to escape his mother's wrath until 1936, when he won the national amateur title and the irresistibility of fame upset his comfortable obscurity.
The modest Mr. SLAN went on to become a successful Toronto businessman who had so allowed boxing to settle into his past that in 1986 most of his Friends were surprised when he was inducted into the Canadian Boxing Hall of Fame. It astonished everyone that the man they knew as the co-owner of a luggage-making company was known in boxing circles as Lennie STEIN, holder of the Canadian amateur heavyweight title from 1935 to 1937.
A quiet and unassuming giant of a man, his wife described him as invariably soft-spoken. "I never heard him raise his voice once in all the years we were married, Isabel SLAN said.
By all accounts, Mr. SLAN's mild demeanour belied his prowess in the ring, said his son, Jon SLAN. " For a man who was a champion at a blood sport, he was the gentlest person you ever met."
Born in Winnipeg to Russian immigrants on June 28, 1916, Mr. SLAN was the second of three sons. In 1922, the family moved to the Annex area of Toronto where he attended Harbord Collegiate Institute. His father, Joseph SLAN, was a struggling tailor with interesting ideas about the garment industry. In 1931, he headed a co-operative called Work-Togs Limited. It consisted of a small band of tailors who were to share in the profits. The project suffered from poor timing: It came on the scene at the height of the Depression and failed dismally.
In 1934, Joseph SLAN died in poverty and Leon and his two brothers Bob, who was born in 1914, and Jack, born in 1918 -- had to provide for their mother. Bringing home meagre paycheques from what little work they could find, the three decided to find a supplement.
At the time, boxing was a popular spectator sport and one of the few that was open to Jewish athletes. Bob and Jack knew that a good fighter could earn a decent living in the ring. Their eyes fell on Leon. At 17, their 6-foot-2, 200-pound, athletic brother towered over most grown men.
"Leon was big and strong and Bob and Jack thought he should be boxing, Mrs. SLAN said. "The family needed the money."
They persuaded him to give it a try and promised their support, she said. "They took him to over the gym. There they were, the three boys walking down the street arm-in-arm with Leon in the middle. They all walked over together to sign Leon up."
They didn't consult their mother. In fact, the brothers decided to enter the fight name Lennie STEIN, so she wouldn't read about Leon in the papers and worry.
As it turned out, the new Lennie STEIN was a natural. Mr. SLAN won his first major fight in a Round 1 knockout over the Toronto Golden Gloves title holder. " STEIN is durable and exceptionally fast for a heavyweight, " The Toronto Star reported in 1935. "He has the ability to rain punishment on his opponents with both hands."
In this way, he won almost all of his major fights. It helped, too, that his coach happened to be Maxie KADIN, a legend in Ontario boxing. Out of 40 bouts, Mr. SLAN netted 34 wins, 22 by knockout, and six losses.
A fighter who possessed a dogged and implacable manner, he was popular with the fans.
"He was known for not staying down on the canvas, Jon SLAN said. "On those rare times when he was decked, he always refused the referee's outstretched hand and picked himself up."
Yet, for all his success, Mr. SLAN rejected the opportunity to go fully professional. A manager and promoter from New York had seen him in a bout with a certain German boxer and saw possibilities.
"He wanted to promote him as the Great White Jewish Hope, " Jon said.
The German boxer happened to be the brother of Max SCHMELING, the Aryan protégé of Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich, who in 1936 had defeated the otherwise invincible Joe LOUIS in the upset of the century. To make it even more interesting, the manager proved to be the famous John BUCKLEY, who called the shots for Jack SHARKEY, a heavyweight who had beaten SCHMELING four years earlier.
"The promoter got so interested in this meeting of German and Jew that he offered my father a contract, but he didn't offer enough money, " Jon said.
The problem, it turned out, was that Mr. SLAN couldn't afford to turn professional, he once told a Globe and Mail reporter. "I was making good money then, $25 a week, and I was supporting my mother, " he said in 1988. "I asked him [Buckley] to put up $5,000 [and] he just laughed at me. He said he had hundreds of heavyweights."
Negotiations ended right there. "He was [only] interested in me because I was Jewish and that would go over big in New York."
It wasn't the only time that race emerged as an issue. Mr. SLAN had boxed under the auspices of the Young Men's Hebrew Association until 1936 when it was blackballed by the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada for withholding a portion of its proceeds. The money was earmarked for the Canadian Olympic effort, but the Young Men's Hebrew Association had refused to support the upcoming 1936 Berlin Games because of Germany's poor treatment of Jews. In the end, the Amateur Athletic Union permitted Mr. SLAN to enter as an independent and he went on to fight unattached to win the Toronto and national titles.
"It seemed so easy at the time, " he said in 1988. "I was a very quiet kid, but when I won, I became such a hero."
That glory turned out to be the undoing of Lennie STEIN, the fighter -- though it was all something of an anticlimax. The one thing Leon SLAN had feared on his way up through the ranks came to nothing: his mother finally found out that he boxed and then failed to react -- at least, not that anyone in the family can remember.
"She just took it in her stride, said Isabel SLAN. " She was a Jewish mother from the old country. I don't think she really understood what boxing was all about."
Perhaps, too, it helped to smooth matters that her son's secret endeavours had ended in triumph. She can only have felt a mother's pride.
In 1937, Mr. SLAN retired from boxing and found a job at a produce stall in Toronto's old fruit terminal on Colborne Street and was later hired by his brother Bob, a proprietor of Dominion Citrus Ltd. It was tough work with long hours, Mrs. SLAN said. "Leon would have to get up at 2 o'clock in the morning to go unload the fruits and vegetables off the trucks."
Even so, he still had some time for boxing. After working long days at the market, he taught athletics at the Young Men's Hebrew Association and it was there that he met Isabel MARGOLIAN. A concert pianist newly arrived from Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, she happened to take one of his boxing classes for women.
"We were all lined up in a row, punching bags, " she remembered. "Leon came up to me and told me I wasn't punching hard enough. Then he took my hand and hit it into the bag to show me how to do it. I felt my bones crunch, but I didn't say anything."
As it turned out, he had broken her hand. When he learned what had happened, he phoned her and thus began a different relationship. They married in 1942 and later that year Mr. SLAN enlisted in the army where he ended up in the Queen's Own Rifles. While in the army, he returned to boxing and won the 1942 Canadian Army heavyweight title.
After the war, the SLAN brothers founded Dominion Luggage in Toronto's garment district, a company that started small with eight workers and grew into a successful enterprise employing 200. Each brother had a different responsibility -- Jack was the designer, Bob took care of the administration and Leon was the salesman.
"It was a job that really suited him, Mrs. SLAN said. "He was very personable [and] sold to Eaton's, Simpsons, Air Canada -- all the big companies. He became good Friends with many of the buyers."
The three brothers enjoyed a comfortable relationship built on affection and loyalty, Jon said.
"Bob liked to fish, so he took Thursdays and Fridays off to go to his cottage. My father took Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons off to golf."
Jack, the creative force among them, rarely left the business but never begrudged his brothers their leisure time.
"They had the perfect partnership, " said Jon, a relationship anchored by their mother. "They were her surrogate husbands. I don't think there was a SLAN wife who felt that she wasn't playing second fiddle to my grandmother."
The brothers went to her house every day for lunch until she was 90. "She made old-time Jewish food. Her definition of borscht was sour cream with a touch of beets, " Jon said. "She cooked with chicken fat and the boys loved it."
Sophie SLAN died in 1984 at the age of 93.
In 1972, the SLANs sold Dominion Luggage to Warrington Products, a large conglomerate. "Warrington made them an offer they couldn't turn down, " Isabel said.
Even so, the brothers' relationship continued into retirement. "They called each other every day, even when their health was failing, " Jon said. "Bob died in 2000 and Jack in 2002. My father took their deaths very hard."
Although he never boxed again, Mr. SLAN played sports well into his 70s and could still show his mettle. He had taken up tennis at about the age of 40 and, when he couldn't get a membership at the exclusive Toronto Lawn Tennis Club in Rosedale, he co-founded the York Racquets Tennis Club. It opened in 1964, directly across the street from the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club.
Mr. SLAN died of heart failure in Toronto on February 11. He leaves his wife Isabel, son Jon and daughters Elynne GOLDKIND and Anna RISEN.

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GOLDMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
APPLEBY, Sarah
Love is not changed by death. Died peacefully at her home on April 10, 2003 in her 81st year after a valiant battle with cancer. Cherished wife for 54 years to the late Harry APPLEBY. Dear mother to Laurence and Lynda WENGER and mother-in-law to Marvin WENGER. Devoted and greatly loved grandmother to Meredith WENGER. Caring daughter to the late Isadore and Yetta GRYMEK. Survived by her brothers Lou and Sam GRYMEK and her sisters Ann COMASSAR and Shirley KREM. A wonderful mother has gone, leaving her children to remember her strong presence, graciousness and courage. For the love and happiness we shared we are truly thankful. The family acknowledges with thanks, the efforts of Dr. Joan MURPHY, the other doctors, nurses and support staff of the Princess Margaret Hospital. Also the caring attention of Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and Teresita MADRID. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (1 light west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, April 13th at 3: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Shiva at 342 Spadina Road, Suite 303, Toronto, concluding Tuesday evening April 15. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Foundation, 610 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 2M9 (416) 946-6560.

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GOLDMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-23 published
Rolf O. KROGER, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Psychology University of Toronto
Rolf died, as he lived, with grace, courage, humour and dignity, at home on April 18th, 2003, of advanced prostate cancer. He was the devoted and beloved husband of Linda WOOD. He was the cherished son of Erna KROGER and son-in-law of Adele WOOD; loving brother of Harold and Jurgen KROGER; dear brother-in-law of Wilma KROGER, Edelgard DEDO, Lorraine WOOD, Robert and Deborah WOOD, and Reg WOOD; much loved uncle of Andrew KROGER and Stephen KROGER, Christina and Linda JUHASZ- WOOD, Taylor, Genna and Devon WOOD, Jonathan and Nicole WOOD, Phillippe NOEL, and Jose and David TILLETT, and nephew of Liesl WINTER, Otto WINTER and Alf and Sue MODJESKI. Rolf was born in Hamburg, Germany, on September 28th, 1931. He emigrated to Canada in 1952, and completed a B.A. in psychology at Sir George Williams College (now Concordia University) in 1957. Following his M.A. (1959) at Columbia University, New York, he received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1963. His advisor, Prof. Theodore R. SARBIN (Prof. Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz,) has continued to be a valued colleague and dear friend, together with Rolf's fellow graduate student, Prof. Karl E. SCHEIBE of Wesleyan University and Karl's wife Wendy. Rolf joined the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto in 1964 and continued his research and writing in social psychology after retiring in 1996. Rolf's work addressed a variety of topics concerning the individual in the social system. His articles and papers on the social psychology of test-taking, hypnosis, history, epistemology, methodology and the discipline of social psychology all reflected his dissatisfaction with the status quo combined with proposals for new directions. For more than 20 years he has worked with Linda A. WOOD (University of Guelph) on topics in language and social psychology (e.g., terms of address and politeness), and most recently on a book on discourse analysis. At the time of his death, he was working on a discursive critique of the 'Big Five' personality theory enterprise and on stories of his experiences growing up in Germany during the Second World War. Rolf also took great pleasure in teaching and greatly valued the opportunity to work for almost forty years with so many talented and enthusiastic students, both undergraduate and graduate. Rolf was privileged to have many long-lasting Friendships, and he was grateful for the encouragement, help and comfort given by so many, especially Bogna ANDERSSON, Eva and Fred BILD, Clare MacMARTIN and Bill MacKENZIE, Frances NEWMAN and Fred WEINSTEIN, Jesse NISHIHATA, Anne and Michael PETERS, Andrew and Judi WINSTON and Lorraine WOOD. We have also been sustained by the kindness of our neighbours on Walmer Road. We express our particular thanks and appreciation to family physician and friend, Dr. Christine LIPTAY. Our thanks go also to the staff of Princess Margaret Hospital, to the physicians and nurses of the Hospice Palliative Care Network Project, especially Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and nurses Francine BOHN, Joan DYKE, Dwyla HAMILTON, Lynda McKEE and Ella VAN HERREWEGHE, and to the nurses of St. Elizabeth, especially Liz LEADBEATER, Sylvia McCALLUM and Cecilia McPARLAND. Cremation was private. There will be an Open House for remembrance and celebration on Sunday, April 27th (3-7 p.m.), Monday, April 28th (4-8 p.m.) and Tuesday, April 29th (4-8 p.m.) at 98 Walmer Road, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2X7. Please direct any queries to Frances NEWMAN (416-351-0755.) In lieu of flowers, donations to Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care (700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z5) or Amnesty International would be appreciated.

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GOLDMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-16 published
HERSH, Murray (Mendy)
A beloved teacher at Humberside Collegiate in Toronto for 31 years. Mendy HERSH died Thursday, May 15, 2003 of cancer, at age 57. Mendy met every challenge, as he did his final challenge, far too young, with grace and amazing courage. He passionately taught history and economics to packed classes, where his dedication and caring inspired a multitude of adoring students and the admiration of his colleagues. He was totally devoted and in love with his wife Barbara, whom he married in 1971, and he delighted in their three children, Michael, Lara, and David, who were absolutely central in his life. He also leaves his brother Harvey HERSH, his mother-in-law Mary MENDLEWITZ, and his brother-in-law Syd MENDLEWITZ, as well as many dear Friends. Special thanks to Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and his staff. Donations may be made to the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care, Mount Sinai Hospital (416) 586-8290. Funeral service at Beth Shalom Synagogue, 1445 Eglinton Avenue W., on Friday, May 16th at 1: 30 p.m. Shiva to follow at 31 Tyrrel Avenue.

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GOLDMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-19 published
POTTS, Jason Gareth Thomas
Born May 13, 1990, died peacefully at home May 17, 2003. Beloved son of Christie Thomas POTTS and Joe POTTS. Dear brother of Trevor, Joanna and the late Gavin. Dear grand_son of Hallie THOMAS and Dawn and Joe POTTS. He will be sadly missed and lovingly remembered by his many aunts, uncles, cousins and Friends. The family wish to thank Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and his team at the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care and the Trinity Hospice for their wonderful care. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday, May 20. Service at Rosedale United Church (159 Roxborough Drive) on Thursday, May 22 at 2 o'clock, with a reception to follow in the church hall. Donations in Jason's memory may be made to Brainchild, c/o The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 1X8

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GOLDMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
SHIRRIFF, Barbara Jean (née SLOAN)
Died peacefully at home in Toronto, on Tuesday, May 27, 2003, having recently turned 81. Predeceased by her beloved husband Francis Colin SHIRRIFF. Dear mother of Susan, Cathie Shirriff FORSTMANN, Janet, Joan VAUGHAN (the late Steven VAUGHAN) and Barbara. Loving grandmother of Diana CABLE (Warren), Allyson WOODROOFFE (Roger PEPLER) and Kelly FORSTMANN. Great-grandmother of Kate and Julia PEPLER and Hayley, Stephanie and Scott CABLE. Survived by brothers Manson and Frank, and sisters Neva PAUL and Mary PARKER. Barbara's love, encouragement, strength and ''joie de vivre'' will be cherished always. Our very special thanks to Dr. Wendy BROWN, Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and The Temmy Latner Palliative Care Team, Ella CASE and the Victorian Order of Nurses, and caregivers Ramona and Helen. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 3-6 p.m. on Thursday, May 29. A celebration of Barbara's life will be held at Saint John's Anglican Church York Mills, 19 Don Ridge Drive at 2 p.m. on Friday, May 30. If desired, donations to The Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care, 700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Suite 3000 Toronto M5G 1Z5 will be much appreciated by the family.

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GOLDSTEIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
FOGELL, David 1923-2003
Born December 22, 1923 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died October 27, 2003 at home with his family in Vancouver, British Columbia. He was predeceased by his parents Melach and Surka, brother, Ben and sisters Dora and Netty. Dave is mourned by his wife, Estelle, children, Melanie and her husband Ken GOLDSTEIN, Wayne and Mark. He will be greatly missed by his grandchildren Carie and her husband Stuart, Daniel, Sarah, Kylie; Sammy, Benji and their mother Dorothy ULLMAN as well as great-grand_son, Kade. He will never be forgotten by his many relatives and Friends. Dave was an incredibly charismatic and an intensely joyful human being. He felt deeply and loved unquestioningly. Those who were fortunate enough to be part of his life will be forever enriched by having known him. Dave approached everything in his life with meticulous attention. He had very humble beginnings yet he always remembered those who helped him throughout his life. He had a rare passion for living extending to everything and everyone. His seemingly endless energy led to numerous accomplishments and successes. He will be remembered most for his ability to make those around him feel loved. The funeral is Wednesday, October 29, 2003 at the Beth Israel Cemetary, 1721 Willingdon, Burnaby, at 12 noon. The pallbearers are Sammy and Benji FOGELL, Daniel GOLDSTEIN, Lanny GOULD, Howard DINER and Joel ALTMAN. Honourary pallbearers are Zivey FELDMAN and Harry GELFANT. The family would like to thank caregivers Denyse TREPANIER and Bryan WALKER as well as Dr. Larry COLLINS and Dr. Victoria BERNSTEIN. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Fund or the Jewish Family Service Agency.

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GOLVIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-03 published
Stanley GOLVIN
By Philip MASS, Thursday, July 3, 2003 - Page A26
Businessman, husband, father, and grandfather. Born August 22, 1918, in Kielce, Poland. Died May 5, in Toronto, of an apparent heart attack, aged 84.
Stanley GOLVIN was a man who had a strong impact on others: individuals who literally owe their lives and their livelihoods to him; countless Friends, colleagues, and employees to whom Stanley was a mentor and a benefactor.
Not that Stanley was always an easy guy to be with. He was complicated and a man of many contradictions. He was exacting in his expectations of himself and others. Even so, he commanded unqualified loyalty, affection, and respect from even those of whom he was most relentlessly demanding. On the whole, we will remember Stanley fondly for his penchant for ideas and for his unwavering qualities of generosity, loyalty, courage, and just plain smarts.
Stanley's life was marked forever by the devastation that the Holocaust brought to what had been a rather commonplace life in Poland. Stanley spent most of the war in the Auschwitz concentration camp. Stanley managed to survive years in the camp even as he put his life in jeopardy time and again to bring food to other starving inmates and to help fellow prisoners escape. Astonishingly, he then managed to escape himself. This period in Stanley's life was not one that he could put behind him easily, nor did he wish to; he did his part in memorializing the Holocaust in several ways, including a video testimony as part of Steven Spielberg's Shoah initiative.
Stanley emerged from the war, like so many others, without a country, without a home, without an intact family, and without material resources. He did, however, come away with one thing of incalculable value: a worldwide network of devoted Friends with whom he shared a common experience that only he and they could truly comprehend.
Not long after the war, Stanley came to New York, determined to achieve personal security. In New York he met Sharon GREEN who soon became Sharon GOLVIN. They set roots in Sharon's home city of Toronto and Stanley, with a partner, opened a furniture store. The business flourished and developed into an impressive chain of outlets. Still restless, Stanley then set out to build the real estate business: that was his passion and is his legacy to his children.
Meanwhile Stanley's family flourished as well, with the birth of Stuart and Ilene and the eventual establishment of their own families. Then, in 1992, came the second tragedy of Stanley's life: the passing of Sharon. And yet, for a second time in his life, out of devastation came rebirth. Ella LOTEM, who Stanley had first romanced in Poland some 45 years earlier, moved to Toronto from Israel to marry him. A softer and mellower Stanley started to allow himself to sit back and enjoy some of life's pleasures, particularly his five grandchildren who adored him.
Stanley shared with me recently that he never could have believed that he would live so long. He was truly amazed by his long and fruitful life, grateful for the "mazal" that had been his companion, and I believe he was now resigned that his time had come. As Stanley would say, "I'm on overtime now."
When Stanley's four-year-old grand_son Benn was told that his Zaidy had died, Benn responded uncertainly, "But he'll be alive again, right?" Intent on having Benn understand the situation, we lost sight of the wisdom in his magical thinking. Indeed Zaidy will be alive again in a very real sense as Stanley's memory and his spirit remain alive and continue to guide us for ward. But before we could affirm this notion with Benn, he uttered simply, and in a soft voice, "But I love Zaidy." As we all do.
Philip MASS is Stanley GOLVIN's son-in-law.

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