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"GIL" 2003 Obituary


GILBERT  GILCHRIST  GILES  GILL  GILLEN  GILLESPIE  GILLIES  GILLIS  GILMORE  GILMOUR  GILPIN 

GILBERT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-19 published
Mary Elizabeth LANKTREE
Passed away peacefully on Sunday March 9, 2003 at the Salvation Army AR Goudie Eventide Home, Kitchener.
Mary (née MacDONALD) LANKTREE in her 85th year was the beloved wife of the late Harry LANKTREE (February 27, 1999.) Dear mother of Myrna TIDD of BC, Gloria PRIMEAU of Kitchener, June KAWA and her husband Larry of Val Caron, David LANKTREE and his wife Suzanne of Kitchener and Denise GILBERT and her husband Dana of Kitchener. Loving grandmother of twelve grandchildren and great-grandmother of nine. Dear sister of May KINSLEY, Minerva HALL, Annie McKINLEY. Predeceased by one brother Russell MacDONALD.
Mary's family received relatives and Friends on Tuesday March 11 at the Henry Walser Funeral Home, 507 Frederick Street, Kitchener. Funeral service was held on Wednesday March 12, 2003 in the chapel of the funeral home. Spring interment in Civic Cemetery, Sudbury. Visit www.obit411.com/968 for Mary's memorial.

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GILBERT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-14 published
BESWICK, John Alexander, Col. (retired) M.D., C.D., F.R.C.S. (C).
Died in Toronto on Friday, October 10, 2003. Born August 17, 1916, to the late Mr. and Mrs. John Millet BESWICK, fifth generation Torontonion. Beloved husband of 54 years to the late Eileen Enid (REES.) Loving father of Debra Anne McISAAC and Philip Rees BESWICK. Dear ''Papa'' of Ryan Leonard McISAAC. Dear grandfather of Jeremy John. Predeceased by his sister Marion A. GILBERT and brother William E. BESWICK. Uncle of Barbara A. REES, Thunder Bay, and many nephews and nieces. Cousin of Wayne, Margo, June, Michael and of Martha POWELL, Peterborough. Remembered and respected by many colleagues, patients and good Friends. Served overseas 5½ years with the R.C.E. and Korea for 1½ years. Former chief of Ophthalmology of Canadian Forces Hospital, Kingston; National Defence Medical Center, Ottawa; then Chief of Ophthalmology at Scarborough Centenary Hospital, West Hill for 14 years. Dr. BESWICK took a very active part in the promotion of the Eye Bank in the early 50's and 60's at Sunnybrook Hospital, Scarborough Centenary, and other Toronto Hospitals providing a steady flow of donated eyes for transplants and research. Resident of Sunnybrook Hospital. The family would like to extend a heartfelt thanks to the staff of Sunnybrook ''K'' Wing for the dedicated and compassionate care given to ''Dad'' while he resided there. He was a remarkable man whose strength of character and gentle nature will be sadly missed by everyone. Cremation followed by interment at St. James Cemetery in the plot owned by the BESWICK family since 1874.

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GILBERT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-09 published
BERMINGHAM, Mary Louise (Lou) (née DONALD) -- Died peacefully at her home on Monday, December 8, 2003, in her 75th year, after a lengthy illness, surrounded by her family and assured of their love for her. Predeceased by Bill, her loving husband of 50 years. Reunited with her parents George and Beatrice DONALD. Survived by her children Tim and his wife Candace, Susan (JASPER) and her husband Terry, Patrick and his wife Amy, and Anne, all of whom will so deeply miss her smiles, her warmth and her unfailing cheerfulness. Also survived by her adoring grandchildren Sarah, Christopher, Katie, Hudson, Cabot, Will, Georgia, Carmichael and Alistair. They will always hold her in their hearts as the perfect Granny to them all. Lou will also be greatly missed by her sisters, Joan SINCLAIR and Allison GILBERT, and by her brother, Alex DONALD. Lou embodied the spirit of Christmas all the year and gave her many Friends strength and comfort in their lives. Her gardens and her home were always beautiful and welcoming. The family welcomes all who would like to share their memories of Lou to Otterburn on Thursday, December 11, 2003, from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. A memorial service will be held at Saint John's Church in Ancaster at 11 o'clock a.m. on Friday, December 12, 2003 (Halson & Wilson Streets). In lieu of flowers, donations to Saint John's Anglican Church or to a charity of your choice would be gratefully received.

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GILCHRIST o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-06 published
Hawley CRESS
In loving memory of Hawley CRESS who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Health Centre on Friday, August 1, 2003 at the age of 82 years.
Predeceased by dear wife Elsie (née PEARSON.) Loving father of Larry and wife Roberta of Tehkummah, Jack and friend Julie of Mindemoya, Danny and wife Anita of Mindemoya, Beryl and husband Shane LAIDLEY of Little Current, Patsy and husband Mervin GILCHRIST of Mindemoya. Cherished grandfather of Brent and wife Pam, Jeff and wife Heather, Trevor and wife Lynn, Luke, Philippe, Michael, Melonie and friend James, Meghan, Matthew. Great grandfather of Zack, Jade, Paige, Haley, Jordan, Damion and Desaree. Remembered by brother Norman and wife Carrie and sisters-in-law Elva, Ann, Nelda and Jessie. Predeceased by brothers Harvey, Paul, William, Goldie, Cecil, Roy and sisters Nelda and Crystal. Graveside funeral service was held on Monday, August 4, 2003 in Hilly Grove Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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GILCHRIST o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-22 published
Quiet minister a Trudeau stalwart
Former Bay Street whiz kid helped revamp Canada's social safety net and served as both secretary of state and labour minister
By Ron CSILLAG Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, September 22, 2003 - Page R7
His children possess no qualms about pronouncing Martin O'CONNELL as having been a bit of a policy wonk. "Oh, totally," says his son John.
"My dad wasn't interested in money -- odd, given his Bay Street successes. Just policy, and formulating policy."
"He was a classic workaholic," concurs Mr. O'CONNELL's daughter Caryn. "He was just driven by his work. It's one of the things that kept him going."
Rare is the politician remembered for self-effacing skills and effectiveness rather than bombast. Mr. O'CONNELL was indeed serious and conscientious. He worked hard and achieved much. But of all the cabinet ministers from the Pierre TRUDEAU era, his name probably rings the quietist bell for Canadians old enough to recall names like Don Jamieson, Otto Lang and Marc Lalonde.
Mr. O'CONNELL, who died in Toronto on August 11 at 87 of complications from Parkinson's disease, served as Canada's labour minister on two separate occasions, and was Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary for two years when Trudeaumania had been replaced by the infuriation of millions with Canada's philosopher-king.
How does one keep a low profile in federal politics, especially in a contentious cabinet post? Mr. O'CONNELL did it by guiding the country with a steady hand through great labour turbulence in the early 1970s, including convincing his boss to pass emergency legislation that terminated work stoppages at the Vancouver and Montreal dockyards.
"He was an exceptionally low-key guy. He liked it that way," recalls Barney DANSON, who served as Minister of National Defence in the Trudeau cabinet. Doubtless Mr. TRUDEAU saw in Mr. O'CONNELL a kind of kinship. Both men were unflappable philosophers and academics at heart who entered politics relatively late in life, both sacrificing cushier lives to hasten Mr. TRUDEAU's vaunted "just society."
For Mr. O'CONNELL, the bug bit in 1965 when he and two other Bay Street whiz kids were summoned to Ottawa by then finance minister Walter GORDON -- still stinging from a disastrous budget two years earlier -- to help revamp Canada's social safety net. The group ultimately designed policies that led to the Canada Pension Plan, the Municipal Loan Development Fund and medicare.
Martin Patrick O'CONNELL was one of four children born in Victoria to a mother from Ontario and a horticulturist father from County Kerry in Ireland who farmed a few acres and raised livestock. Mr. O'CONNELL taught elementary school for six years and completed a B.A. at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, before beginning a wartime stint in the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps and Infantry Regiment. Haunted perhaps by the death of his brother Johnny, cut down in the battle for Caen, France, in June, 1944, Mr. O'CONNELL volunteered for action in the Pacific just as the fighting ceased.
It was while in uniform that he met his future wife of 58 years, Helen Alice DIONNE. The two met at the Art Gallery of Ontario while Mr. O'CONNELL was on leave from his base, and Ms. DIONNE was volunteering at the museum.
He spent the decade after the war at the University of Toronto, earning graduate degrees in economics and political science and lecturing on Plato, John Stuart Mill and liberal democratic principles. He had learned French for his doctoral thesis on Henri Bourassa, one of the first scholarly studies in English on the fiery Quebec journalist and Canadian nationalist.
Academia gave way to Bay Street, where Mr. O'CONNELL spent 11 years in investing and bond underwriting while heading the volunteer Indian and Eskimo Association of Canada, as it was then called, where he represented aboriginal concerns to governments and encouraged the devolution of federal powers to native groups.
He had run and lost in 1965 in the federal seat of Greenwood in Toronto but was swept up in the 1968 Trudeau whirlwind, winning the seat of Scarborough East. In 1971, he was named Secretary of State, and was appointed Labour Minister the following year, just before Mr. TRUDEAU called an election that ended in a minority Liberal government. Mr. O'CONNELL, like 46 other Grit members of parliament, was defeated.
But he bounced back as Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary for those two lean minority years between 1972 and 1974. Mr. O'CONNELL laid the groundwork for Mr. TRUDEAU's first official visit to the People's Republic of China in 1973 and was instrumental in establishing diplomatic relations with Beijing. (His interest in China would later find expression in his role as co-chair of the Canadian Foundation for the Preservation of Chinese Cultural and Historical Treasures.)
Mr. O'CONNELL also reshaped the Prime Minister's Office in an effort to bring the party closer to the grassroots of Canadian society.
The 1974 general election returned a majority Liberal government and Mr. O'CONNELL as the Member of Parliament for Scarborough East. In 1978, he was back as Labour Minister.
Around the cabinet table, "he wasn't terribly assertive," recalls Mr. DANSON. "He only spoke when he knew what he was talking about." During question period, "he was logical and solid. He was never asked the same question twice. He exuded integrity."
Mr. O'CONNELL lost to Tory Gordon GILCHRIST in the 1979 and 1980 elections (the latter by 511 votes) and he took no pleasure in Mr. GILCHRIST's resignation of the seat in 1984 after a tax-evasion conviction.
Mr. O'CONNELL took a stab at the presidency of the Liberal Party, losing by two just votes. Despite the lack of backing by old Friends, he took the losses gracefully, saying they were part of politics. "They all say that," remarked Mr. O'CONNELL's long-time friend David GOLDBERG. "He took it stoically, but hard."
He bid politics farewell and returned to the private sector as a consultant to government agencies and corporations. The only time his name was ever remotely linked to controversy was in 1983. He was acting as a consultant to multinational drug companies when he was hired by the government to consult on legislation the companies wanted repealed. Mr. O'CONNELL disclosed his role with the drug companies immediately, and Ottawa explained he was tapped precisely because he knew his way around the industry.
He was a taciturn man but prescient when he pronounced, in 1984, that tobacco smoke was a legitimate health problem in the workplace. As head of the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, Mr. O'CONNELL commented on the recently changed Canada Labour Code: "My own feeling is that the right to refuse work is an essential right, ... personally, I wouldn't think it would be an abuse [of the legislation] to refuse work because of tobacco smoke.''
Mr. O'CONNELL's daughter Caryn recalls somewhat ruefully that as a child she would sometimes hesitate to tell her Friends' parents about what her father did for a living, fearing a typical tirade about Mr. TRUDEAU.
"But my Dad really was different," she recalls. "He may not have been as colourful [as other politicians] but he taught us to play fair and to accept defeat. He taught us the values of honesty, tolerance, patience and the concept of justice. But we never felt pressured. He never force-fed us. I think he was the rare person who entered politics to do good."
Mr. O'CONNELL leaves his wife, children, a brother, sister, four grandchildren and something rare indeed: a good name.

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GILES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-18 published
Werner SEEGELKEN
By Jennifer LEWINGTON, Jean LEWINGTON and Antji GILES Monday, August 18, 2003 - Page A14
Farmer, opera lover, wine maker, improviser of machinery. Born June 24, 1932, in Gibeon, South West Africa (now Namibia). Died June 16, in London, Ontario, of cancer, aged 70.
The place called "Werner's Paradise" is special, hidden from roadside view on a farm north of London, Ontario The Nairn River, lined with weeping willows, cuts through the rolling property as a fast-flowing stream. On humid summer nights, Sabrina the turtle may poke her head out of a spring-fed pond at the sound of her name. In winter, deer and fox meander through a nearby woodlot of maple, pine and cedar.
This 14-acre sanctuary for people and wildlife is one of the legacies of Werner SEEGELKEN. A farmer "through and through," so aptly described by daughter Antji, Werner had a knack for creating something from nothing.
For example, Werner saw the potential of a rough piece of land on an otherwise productive farm of corn and white beans. He bulldozed aside a few of the thorn trees and tapped into natural springs to create two ponds that attracted birds and wildlife. Year by year, Werner and his family planted native trees, creating a place of beauty and tranquility.
Born in South West Africa, Werner was raised in Germany from the age of 5 and as a young man emigrated to Canada after the Second World War. He came with little money but sharp memories of war-related privation. He decided to be a farmer so he would never be hungry again.
In 1957, temporarily leaving behind his fiancée Marga in Germany, he arrived in Canada and worked on a dairy farm in Ottawa. A year later, Marga joined him and they were married in the fall of 1958. At first, they lived in London, Ontario, where Werner worked in several industrial jobs to save money for a farm.
Werner and Marga bought their first farm in 1963, after the birth of their two children, Antji and Werner, Jr. During the next 30 years, the SEEGELKENs acquired five farms in the London area, including the Pond Farm of "Werner's Paradise."
Like many farmers, Werner was a frugal and practical man. He had a talent for adapting farm machinery to extend its life. In the wintertime, Werner was busy in the large metal-working shop at the family homestead, tinkering and improvising to get more from a cantankerous combine for the next crop season.
He knew what it meant to respect the natural environment. On one occasion, he found a young heron with a broken wing. Ignoring the bird's angry pecks, Werner nursed it back to health and released it back into the wild.
Spring planting and fall harvest are the most exhausting times for farmers. In addition to farming their own land, Werner and Werner, Jr., worked the land of several neighbours, including my mother Jean's farm some 30 kilometres away. In spring and fall, the SEEGELKENs would arrive with their imposing equipment and work all night, if needed, to beat any forecast of rain. Since there was no time to stop for a meal, my mother would prepare a picnic supper for them to eat on the run.
When Werner pulled up in his big tractor to meet her, he would be singing along with the German operatic music that boomed from his glass-enclosed cab. He always was ready with a joke or a funny story -- or a blunt assessment of the planting conditions or the likely crop yield.
Werner saw any visit to his family's farm as an excuse for little party. Out would come the stubby glasses filled with his homemade beer and wine. He made you feel welcome, even if you had interrupted a sprawling Sunday dinner of the immediate family (six young grandchildren), assorted relatives visiting from Germany and Friends. Werner's big heart embraced family, Friends and the land.
Jennifer and Jean are Friends of Werner and Antji is his daughter.

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GILL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-19 published
COULTIS
-In loving memory of a dear father and grandfather Wilfred Dell who passed away February 18, 1998.
In a little country graveyard
Where gentle breezes blow,
Lies one we loved so dearly,
Calm and peaceful, he is sleeping
Sweetest rest that follows pain.
We, who loved him, sadly miss him,
But trust in God, we'll meet again.
--Always remembered by daughter Corrine GILL, son Don COULTIS, his wife Marlene and grandchildren.

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GILL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-15 published
COULTIS
-In loving memory of Ruby Mae, who passed away one year ago on October 22, 2002.
This is for you,
For the mother, wife and grandma we love,
For the one who helped us
Through all our childhood tears and failures.
For the lady who was a wonderful example of
what more women should be.
For the mother, wife and grandma whose
love and devotion to her family was marked by strength and guidance.
We respected and admired you so.
-Much love and sadly missed by daughter Corrine GILL, son Don COULTIS and wife Marlene, good Friends John and Pat NOVACK and families.

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GILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
Eric Reginald HOARE On a sunny morning walk with his dog Cody and wife Rosemary (both beloved), Eric died a beautiful, sudden, death on March 3, 2003. Eric was born April 8, 1918 and raised in Orillia, Ontario in a close and loving family. He attended Queen's University before joining the Tropicana Oil Company and with his new bride moved to El Centro, Columbia. Returning to Canada, Eric joined Imperial Oil and raised his growing family of Geoff, Tony and Wendy. They lived in Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver and Edmonton before he and Roey retired in 1981 to British Columbia's Sunshine Coast. His retirement years were spent exploring the love for his wife, children, son-in-law Jerry, step grandchildren, grandchildren, dogs and cat. Any and all felt his love flood into them through a hug, a tick removed or biting into one of his many favourite varieties of cookies. 'Uncle Eck's' wealth of family includes Peter and Bev HOARE, David and Willy BOHME, Katie DRINKWATER, Rob and Pat GILL, Dave and Marlene GILL, and their families in Ontario, Mardee and Bruce BUDD and family in Alberta and the FRAZEE family on the west coast. Since Dad always enjoyed a party, two celebrations of his life will take place, one in Sechelt, British Columbia and the other in Orillia, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Sargeant Bay Society, Box 1486, Sechelt, British Columbia V0N 3A0 or the Sunshine Coast Hospice, c/o R.R.8, 308 Skyline Drive, Gibsons, British Columbia V0N 1V8.

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GILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-10 published
GRESSER, David Lloyd
Died peacefully in the arms of his loving wife after 11 years of marriage at Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, on Monday September 8th, 2003. David was 48 years of age, of Waterloo. He had been employed with Apotex Pharmaceutical Co. of Toronto for 18 years.
Loving husband of Diana LOBB. Will be missed by his father and mother-in-law, Roland and Iona LOBB. Brother-in-law of David and his wife Rebecca LOBB all of Georgetown, and Rita, Rena, Dainty and Pat.
David is survived by his father Bruno GRESSER of Brantford. Brother of Richard and his wife Carol of Ottawa and Robert of Brantford. He is survived also by a niece Hope and a nephew Noah.
Predeceased by his mother Helen GRESSER.
Friends are invited to share their memories of Dave on Wednesday 7-9 p.m. The funeral and committal service will be held in the Edward R. Good Funeral Home Chapel, 171 King Street South, Waterloo, on Thursday, September 11th, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Reverend Julia GILL officiating.
Cremation.
In Dave's memory donations to the Hamilton Health Sciences Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be greatly appreciated by the family by calling the funeral home at (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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GILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-09 published
GILL, Martha Elizabeth (née BARBER)
Formerly of Montreal and King City, Ontario, died peacefully at The Maple Health Centre, on December 7, 2003. Beloved wife of the late Frederick P. (Perc). She will be missed by her many Friends, especially Cathy Goodier POTE and Sally O'Neill LEWIS. Cremation has taken place. Interment in Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal, Quebec. If desired, memorial donations to the Ontario Humane Society would be appreciated. A celebration of Martha's life will be held at a later date.

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GILLEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-15 published
GENDRON, Jacqueline (Jackie)
Jacqueline GENDRON (née COOPER) was born 18 September 1909, Toronto and died peacefully at Avalon Nursing Home, Orangeville, Ontario on Thursday, 13 February 2003 in her 94th year. She was predeceased by her husband 'Vince' and son Jim, her sisters Blanche PITMAN and Glad GILLEN, brother Jim COOPER and recently her daughter-in-law Margaret (Mrs. Michael GENDRON). She is survived by her sons Peter (Judy), Owen Sound and Michael, Brockville; grandchildren Greg, Steven, Mark (Shaune) and Andrea (Anthony); sisters Audrey IRWIN and Alma WILLIAMS (Al;) sister-in-law Barb COOPER; many nieces and nephews and several close Friends. Jackie lived life her way. She was a responsible stay at home wife and mother, roles of which she was proud. She was a good mom. She loved New Year's parties with Friends, played golf, curled, skied, volunteered and travelled in Europe, East Asia and Africa into her 80's. Her Friends meant a great deal to her. She will be remembered for her flair and skill in cooking, carpentry, ceramics, wood carving, sewing, millinery and home decorating. Jackie was awarded a life membership in the Lord Dufferin Chapter of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire after 35 years of dedicated service. She was a member of Westminster United Church. At Jackie's request she was cremated and a memorial service, for immediate family, will be held during the summer, followed by burial in the family plot at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Orangeville. Special thanks to the staff of both Lord Dufferin Centre and Avalon Nursing Home, Dr. MARIEN and Dr. VEENMAN. Your care and sensitivity were much appreciated. Arrangements by Egan Funeral Home Baxter and Giles Chapel, 273 Broadway, Orangeville L9W 1K8 (519-941-2630).

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GILLEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-19 published
ASSEFF, Chris
Age 84, resident of Thornhill and former resident of Thunder Bay, died in Toronto on Thursday December 11, 2003. After the war he started up a business in Fort William and he was elected to the Fort William R.C.S.S. Board as a trustee in 1947. This was the start of a long and very passionate involvement with Catholic Education in Ontario. Following his tenure with the Fort William Board he and his family moved to Toronto in 1964 and he became the Executive Director of the O.S.S.T.A. remaining as the Executive Director until his retirement in 1984. The contributions Chris made to the Catholic Education System in Ontario have been immeasurable and for many years he has been affectionately called 'Mr. Catholic Schools'. One of if not the high point of his life was his receiving communion from His Holiness Pope John Paul II when he visited Ontario. Chris was first and foremost a man devoted to his family and Friends. He was married to Anne (nee MIKELUK) who predeceased him in 1984 and he is survived by and will be missed by his daughter Sandra LADOUCEUR and her husband Jerry of Thunder Bay, his sons Chris and Philip of Toronto, his grand_son Sean (Lori) LADOUCEUR of Thunder Bay, several nephews, nieces and other relatives also survive. He will also be missed by his best friend Theresa BASLER. Chris was predeceased by his brothers Manere, Fred and Phil and sisters Isabel, Margaret and Emelien. Funeral services were held on Monday December 15, 2003 when Friends and family gathered for Funeral Mass at 2: 00 p.m. in St. Patrick's Cathedral, Thunder Bay, Ontario celebrated by Rev. David GILLEN. A private family interment was held in Mountain View Cemetery. Vigil services were offered on Sunday afternoon in the Blake Funeral Chapel, Thunder Bay. If Friends wish to remember Chris, please make donations to the Canadian Cancer Society in his memory.

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GILLESPIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
SNETSINGER, Mary Claire
Suddenly on Wednesday, March 5, 2003 at Oakville. Claire SNETSINGER beloved daughter of the late Viola and Dr. H.A. SNETSINGER. Loving sister of the late Joan SNETSINGER. Loved cousin of Anne TAILOR/TAYLOR, and Mary Adele GILLESPIE. Dear friend of Bill BOWEN. Lovingly remembered by her many Friends. Funeral Mass 11 a.m. Wednesday, March 12, 2003 at Saint Dominic Parish, 2415 Rebecca Street, Oakville. Interment Mt. Hope Cemetery 1: 45 p.m. Wednesday afternoon. In lieu of flowers, donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated. Kopriva Taylor Community Funeral Home (905) 844-2600.

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GILLESPIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-12 published
COATSWORTH, Helen Campbell (GILLIES) (1907-2003)
We regret to announce the death of our mother and friend. She died under protest on Friday, March 7, 2003, at the Sun Parlour Home, Leamington. She stoically survived the loss of her husband, Grover (1983), grand_son, Murray (1990), and son, Alfred (2001). She will be sadly missed by her daughters, Bev GILLESPIE (John) of Wheatley, and Ginny ALLEN (John) of Newmarket; her daughter-in-law, Bonney COATSWORTH of Guelph; and fondly remembered by her grandchildren, Jeff COATSWORTH (Sue,) Margot and Robert GILLESPIE, Duncan, Graham, and Michael ALLEN; and great granddaughters, Elizabeth and Katherine COATSWORTH. Helen was predeceased by her brother, J.D. GILLIES, and is survived by her sisters, Katharine McEACHERN and Janet GOUGH. She valued a special relationship with her many nieces and nephews. Helen contributed to her community as a farmer, historian, journalist, teacher and was awarded for her community service with county, provincial, and federal awards. With the wonderful help of her neighbours, she was able to remain on the COATSWORTH farm for 69 years. Her spirit lives on. A memorial service will be held at Talbot Street United Church on Saturday, March 22, 2003, at 2: 00 pm.

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GILLESPIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
GILLESPIE, Harriet Louise (née MORTON)
Died peacefully on June 21, 2003. Harriet was born May 24, 1926 in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, daughter of Edith L. and W. Douglas MORTON. Devoted wife of John B. GILLESPIE, Q.C., Toronto, for almost 55 wonderful years. Loving mother of Joan (Andrew POTTINGER,) Jill, Jay (Lili HOFSTADER) and Susan (Paul NICHOLAS). Grandmother of Leigh and Drew POTTINGER of W. Vancouver, Ben and Claire SCOTT of Sydney, Australia, Sean and Jackie GILLESPIE of Toronto and Hattie NICHOLAS of Ottawa. Sister of Douglas B. MORTON and Scott MORTON, Nova Scotia. Service will be held on Wednesday, June 25, 2003 at 3 p.m. at St. Leonard's Anglican Church, 25 Wanless Avenue. No visitation is planned. In lieu of flowers, donations in Harriet's memory may be made to either Sunnybrook Hospital or The Canadian Cancer Society.

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GILLIES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-08 published
Photographer, reporter and royal press attaché
After years at The Globe and Mail, he went on to craft speeches for William DAVIS and to co-ordinate royal tours
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, January 8, 2003, Page R5
John GILLIES, a former reporter at The Globe and Mail, who later served as press attaché for the royal tours in the 1970s, died recently at his home in Mississauga, Ontario He was 74.
Known as "a two-way man," Mr. GILLIES was both a reporter and photographer at The Globe throughout the 1960s. He travelled extensively around Ontario, covering everything from fires and train derailments to inquests and trials.
Reporting was in his blood, said Rudy PLATIEL, a fellow two-way man who worked with Mr. GILLIES at The Globe.
He loved digging up stories and talking to people, Mr. PLATIEL recalled.
"For John, the worst time was when nothing was panning out, and he didn't get a story.
"We were sort of the generalists in the sense that we were ready to take on any story," Mr. PLATIEL added. "I think he enjoyed not knowing what was coming up next."
After more than a decade at The Globe and Mail, Mr. GILLIES left the paper for a job with the Ontario government.
Working as a communications officer in the Ministry of Education, his job, among others, was to field media calls and write speeches.
He frequently wrote them for William DAVIS -- who would later become the Premier of Ontario -- when Mr. DAVIS was the education minister. Mr. GILLIES spent 20 years working for the government before retiring in the late 1980s.
Of all the press officers at Queen's Park at the time, Mr. GILLIES was the most up-front, said Rod GOODMAN, a former ombudsman of The Toronto Star.
"If he knew something, he would tell you," Mr. GOODMAN said. "He was very straight and very honest."
During the 1970s, on leaves from the Ministry of Education, Mr. GILLIES served as press co-ordinator for the royal tours to Canada.
He would ride on the press bus, following the Royal Family on their visits to various parts of the country, arranging interviews and ensuring that things ran smoothly for the press.
"Several times, he got to meet the Queen," said his daughter, Laurie SWINTON. "He always said Prince Philip was a real card."
Her father was not known for his impeccable style: Ms. SWINTON recalls a photo taken of him standing with the Queen, wearing a rumpled $29 suit from a local department store. It was not uncommon for Mr. GILLIES to be seen with a crooked tie and untucked shirt. "He was probably one of the only guys at Queen's Park that dressed worse than me," said author and broadcaster Claire HOY.
John GILLIES was born in Toronto on March 4, 1928, the only son of George and Sarah GILLIES. The family lived in a tiny row house in the city's west end. His father worked in the rail yards, and his mother in a chocolate factory, often bringing home boxes of candy for her only son.
Not fond of school, Mr. GILLIES dropped out in Grade 10.
Later, in search of work, he walked into the office of the weekly newspaper in Port Credit (now a part of Mississauga), telling them he needed a job and would do anything. It just so happened that they required a sports editor and hired him.
"He just sort of fell into writing," Ms. SWINTON said.
In 1954, when Hurricane Hazel ripped through Toronto, killing 81 people, Mr. GILLIES's instinct was not to seek shelter in the basement of his home, but to hit the streets to talk to people and gather stories.
When Mr. GILLIES reached an area of the city where a number of new townhouses had been wiped out, a police roadblock met him, recalled his son, Ken GILLIES. A friend who was with him at the time pulled a badge from his coat pocket and flashed it at the officer. After police let the pair through, Mr. GILLIES turned to his friend and asked where he got the badge. "From my kid's Cheerios box this morning," his friend replied.
An avid golfer, it was on the greens in Port Credit that Mr. GILLIES met Frances SMITH, a woman who shared his passion for golf.
The couple married in 1954, and later had three children. Ms. GILLIES died of cancer in 1984.
A helpless optimist when it came to golf, Mr. GILLIES was known to go out under the most dire conditions. He would look at a dark, looming sky and declare that it was clearing, Ken GILLIES recalled. By contrast, said Mr. HOY, the task of getting Mr. GILLIES on the greens when he hadn't scheduled a golf game was next to impossible.
"I don't know anyone else who was that structured," Mr. HOY added, noting that his golfing buddy stuck to his weekly schedule, where each day was dedicated to a particular task. For example, shopping was done not on Thursday but on Saturday. "He had this one little idiosyncrasy," Mr. HOY joked.
A good-hearted man who was also a big lover of dogs, Mr. GILLIES was known to carry a stash of dog biscuits on his daily walks to give to the neighbourhood pooches. "He was a very simple guy," said his son Ken. "He didn't like a lot of ceremony and fanfare."
Mr. GILLIES leaves his three children, Don, Ken and Laurie, and two grandchildren, Corey and Grace.
John GILLIES, reporter / photographer, communications officer born in Toronto on March 4, 1928; died in Mississauga, Ontario on December 4, 2002.

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GILLIES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-12 published
COATSWORTH, Helen Campbell (GILLIES) (1907-2003)
We regret to announce the death of our mother and friend. She died under protest on Friday, March 7, 2003, at the Sun Parlour Home, Leamington. She stoically survived the loss of her husband, Grover (1983), grand_son, Murray (1990), and son, Alfred (2001). She will be sadly missed by her daughters, Bev GILLESPIE (John) of Wheatley, and Ginny ALLEN (John) of Newmarket; her daughter-in-law, Bonney COATSWORTH of Guelph; and fondly remembered by her grandchildren, Jeff COATSWORTH (Sue,) Margot and Robert GILLESPIE, Duncan, Graham, and Michael ALLEN; and great granddaughters, Elizabeth and Katherine COATSWORTH. Helen was predeceased by her brother, J.D. GILLIES, and is survived by her sisters, Katharine McEACHERN and Janet GOUGH. She valued a special relationship with her many nieces and nephews. Helen contributed to her community as a farmer, historian, journalist, teacher and was awarded for her community service with county, provincial, and federal awards. With the wonderful help of her neighbours, she was able to remain on the COATSWORTH farm for 69 years. Her spirit lives on. A memorial service will be held at Talbot Street United Church on Saturday, March 22, 2003, at 2: 00 pm.

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GILLIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
Linda STEARNS: 1937-2003
As ballet mistress and artistic director of the esteemed Montreal company, she nurtured personality, flair and a risk-taking approach to dance
By Paula CITRON Wednesday, August 6, 2003 - Page R5
In the cutthroat, competitive world of dance, Linda STEARNS was an anomaly. As artistic director of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, she never played games or held grudges. Whether good or bad news, she bluntly told her dancers what they had to hear, and in return, her open-door policy allowed them to vent their own feelings. National Ballet of Canada artistic director James KUDELKA, who spent almost a decade as a member of Les Grands Ballets, likens her approach to wearing an invisible raincoat upon which unhappy dancers spewed their venom. At the end of their tirades, she would serenely remove the garment and say, "Now let's talk."
Linda STEARNS died at her home in Toronto on July 4, at age 65.
She was born into privilege on October 22, 1937. Her father, Marshal, was an investment broker; her mother, Helen, was heavily involved in charity work. The family lived in the posh Poplar Plains area of central Toronto, where Ms. STEARNS attended Branksome Hall.
Despite their wealth, the STEARNS children (Linda, Nora and Marshal) were expected to earn their own livings. Helen STEARNS had studied dance in her youth, but a career was never an option. When eldest daughter Linda showed a strong talent, history might have repeated itself had not Marshal Sr. set aside his reservations after seeing his daughter perform.
After graduating from high school, Ms. STEARNS went to London and New York for advanced training. It was the great Alexandra Danilova, one of Ms. STEARNS's New York teachers, who pointed the young dancer in the direction of the upstart Les Grands Ballets Canadiens. Ms. STEARNS joined Les Grands in 1961, and was promoted to soloist in 1964. In a Who's Who of Entertainment entry, Ms. STEARNS was once listed as joining the company in 1861, and she liked to joke that, at 103 years, she held the record for the longest time spent in the corps de ballet. In fact, one of Ms. STEARNS's hallmarks was her sense of humour, much of it at her own expense.
Les Grands was known for taking dancers who did not necessarily have perfect ballet bodies, but had personality and flair, a policy Ms. STEARNS continued during her own administration.
Although Ms. STEARNS had very unballetic, low-arched feet, she was a fine classical dancer. She excelled, however, in the dramatic repertoire: Mother Courage in Richard Kuch's The Brood, or the title role in Brydon Paige's Medea. In later years, while teaching and coaching, Ms. STEARNS wore high heels to conceal her hated low arches -- while showing off her attractive ankles.
Her performing career was cut short in 1966 when artistic director Ludmilla CHIRIAEFF recognized that Ms. STEARNS would make a brilliant ballet mistress, and by 1969, Ms. STEARNS was exclusively in the studio. In fact, giving up performing was one of the great disappointments of her life, although she did in time acknowledge that she had found her true destiny. Ms. STEARNS's astonishingly keen eye allowed her to single out, in a corps de ballet of moving bodies, every limb that was out of position. She could also sing every piece of music, which saved a lot of time, because she didn't have to keep putting on the tape recorder. Because of her intense musicality, Ms. STEARNS also insisted that the dancers not just be on the count, but fill every note with movement.
Ms. STEARNS loved playing with words -- she was a crossword-puzzle addict, for example -- and gave the dancers nicknames, whether they liked them or not. Catherine LAFORTUNE was Katrink, Kathy BIEVER was Little Frog, Rosemary NEVILLE was Rosie Posie, Betsy BARON was Boops, and Benjamin HATCHER was Benjamino, to name but a few. One who escaped this fate was Gioconda BARBUTO, simply because Ms. STEARNS loved rolling out the word "G-I-O-C-O-N-D-A" in its full Italian glory. The dancers, in turn, called her Lulubelle, Mme. Gozonga and La Stearnova or, if they were feeling tired, cranky and hostile -- and were out of earshot -- Spoons (for her non-arched feet) and even less flattering names. As reluctantly as she became ballet mistress, Ms. STEARNS became artistic director, first as one of a triumvirate in 1978 with Danny JACKSON and Colin McINTYRE (when Les Grands and Brian MacDONALD came to an abrupt parting of the ways;) then with Jeanne RENAUD in 1985 and finally on her own in 1987. She retired from Les Grands in 1989. Both Mr. JACKSON and Mr. McINTRYE still refer to Ms. STEARNS as the company's backbone.
These were the famous creative years that included the works of Mr. KUDELKA, Paul Taylor, Lar Lubovitch, Nacho Duato and George Balanchine. Les Grands toured the world performing one of the most exciting and eclectic repertoires in ballet. It was a company that nurtured dancers and choreographers, many of whom reflected Ms. STEARNS's risk-taking, innovative esthetic.
She also had time to mentor choreographers outside the company, including acclaimed solo artist Margie GILLIS. Her post-Grands career included writing assessments for the Canada Council, setting works on ballet companies, coaching figure skating, and most recently, becoming ballet mistress for the Toronto-based Ballet Jörgen. When she was diagnosed with both ovarian and breast cancer two years ago, she continued her obligations to Ballet Jörgen until she was no longer able, never letting the dancers know how ill she was.
Ms. STEARNS loved huge dogs -- or what Ms. GILLIS refers to as mountains with fur -- and always had at least two. Her gardens were magnificent, as was her cooking. Her generosity was legendary, whether inviting 20 people for Christmas dinner, or hosting the wedding reception for dancers Andrea BOARDMAN and Jean-Hugues ROCHETTE at her tastefully decorated Westmount home. After leaving Montreal, whether, first, at her horse farm in Harrow, Ontario, or at the one-room schoolhouse she lovingly renovated near Campbellville, northwest of Toronto, former colleagues were always welcome.
She continued to keep in touch with her dancers, sending notes in her beautiful, distinctive handwriting. Her love of sports never left her, and after a hard day in the studio, she would relax watching the hockey game. Religion also filled her postdance life, with Toronto's Anglican Grace-Church-on-the-Hill at its epicentre. Ms. STEARNS was very discreet in her private life, although another disappointment is that neither of two long relationships resulted in marriage or children.
Ms. STEARNS was always ruthlessly self-critical, always striving for perfection, never convinced she had rehearsed a work to its full potential. As a result, she never made herself the centre of her own story. Her homes, for example, did not contain photographs glorifying the career of Linda STEARNS. Only at the end of her days, as she faced death with the same grace with which she had faced life, was she finally able to appreciate how many lives she had touched, and accept her outstanding achievements with Les Grands Ballets. Linde HOWE- BECK, former dance critic for the Montreal Gazette, sums up Ms. STEARNS perfectly when she says that she was all about love -- for her Friends and family, for life, but most of all, for dance.
Paula CITRON is dance critic for The Globe and Mail.

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GILMORE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
In the Estate of Earl Robert GILMORE all persons having claims against the Estate of Earl Robert GILMORE, who died on the 23rd of January, 2003 must file the same with the undersigned by June 30, 2003, after which date the assets of the estate will be distributed having regard for the claims then filed.
Dino J. CIRONE, 2-2034 Danforth Avenue, Toronto Ontario M4C 1J9, Solicitor for the Estate Trustee (416) 423-8515
Page B6

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GILMOUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
FRANCIS, Elizabeth DAWSON
Betty passed away peacefully at home on February 17, 2003 in her 85th year. Cherished wife of the late Al FRANCIS and much-loved mother of Bob and wife Barb, John and wife Cathy, and Jane and husband Dave. Devoted grandmother to Shaun, Kyle, Nicole, Diane and Bill, and loving sister and aunt to twin Barbara GILMOUR, husband Doug and all their family. Betty's love of family is a rich legacy that she has left to us all. Her zest for life and keen caring for others greatly touched all who knew her. We wish to thank the wonderful staff at 4 Teddington Park, your care was exceptional. A private family memorial will be held to celebrate Betty's life. Donations to Alzheimer Society Toronto, 2323 Yonge Street, Suite 500, Toronto, Ontario M4P 2C9 would be appreciated.

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GILMOUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-29 published
McLEAN, Joan Elizabeth
Joan Elizabeth McLEAN, daughter of Vera and the late Jack GILMOUR, first of three girls, was born on February 28, 1933 in Russell, Manitoba. She died quietly, in her sleep, at the Credit Valley Hospital, on Saturday, July 26, 2003. Joan McLEAN, better known as, ''Miss Joan'' to her loved ones, received her training as a registered nurse at the Winnipeg General Hospital School of Nursing and was a flight attendant for Trans Canada Airlines prior to marriage and relocation to Ontario. Joan loved traveling, gardening, antiques, animals, art of all kinds, bagpipe music, throwing parties and just being close to family and Friends. She leaves behind her beloved husband, of 46 years, Donald; her mother Vera; her sister Violet and her husband Michael HALICKI sons John, Ross and Thomas; daughters-in-law Sandy and Suzanne grandchildren Katie, James, Daniel, Alex, Donald, Evelyn, Christina and Sean; sister-in-law Carol and her husband Doug GOWAN; her nieces and nephews David, Donald, Michael, Paul, Cathy, Lora and Blake, her devoted caregiver and friend, Ida DUBÉ and a host of relatives and Friends. Joan was predeceased by her dear sister Eleanor in 2000. Joan was a truly remarkable and generous person who will be remembered with great love and affection. As per Joan's wishes, there will be no Funeral Service. Instead, a celebration of her life will be held at her home in Mississauga, a date and time will be announced. Memorial contributions to the Palliative Care Unit of the Credit Valley Hospital Foundation (2200 Eglinton Avenue West, Mississauga, Ontario, L5M 2N1 905-813-2200) are appreciated.

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GILPIN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-12 published
Elva Margaret GILPIN (née ARMSTRONG)
In loving memory of Elva Margaret GILPIN April 19, 1927 to March 3, 2003.
Elva GILPIN, a resident of Spring Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital, Mindemoya on Monday, March 3, 2003 at the age of 75 years.
She was born in Gore Bay, daughter of the late Alf and Margaret (PHALEN) ARMSTRONG. Elva was a member of the Gospel Hall in Gore Bay, loved gardening, especially tending her flowers, knitting, quilting. She was a hard working farm wife and mother and will be fondly remembered for her pride, love and enjoyment of her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Beloved wife of Elwood GILPIN of Spring Bay. Loved and loving mother of Marie GRANT and husband Joe and Mary Anne HAYDEN and husband Jeff. Predeceased by two children Ronnie and Donna. Dear grandmother of Brandon and friend Tracy, Ryan, Krystal, Daniel and Holly and great grandmother of Jessica and Morgan. Loving sister of Clarence ARMSTRONG, Bill ARMSTRONG and wife Anne, Alfred ARMSTRONG wife Nelda (predeceased,) Ronnie ARMSTRONG and wife Barb and Alvin ARMSTRONG (predeceased.)
Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home on Thursday March 6, 2003. The funeral service was conducted on Thursday, March 6, 2003 with Pastor Alvin COOK officiating. Spring interment in Grimesthorpe Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home

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