All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"GIB" 2003 Obituary


GIBBONS  GIBBS  GIBSON 

GIBBONS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-26 published
Eileen KRIEGER
By Lesley KRIEGER, Karen McDONALD and Bob SILVERMAN Monday, May 26, 2003 - Page A14
Daughter, granddaughter, niece, sister, dancer, student leader. Born January 5, 1981, in Ridgeway, Ontario Died January 20, near Belleville, Ontario, in a car accident, aged 21.
Eileen grew up in a small town where she spent most of her time either dancing at her mother's dance studio or running wild on her grandmother's farm. "Eileen the Bunny Queen" was an early nickname that reflected her love of rabbits. But she spent time with more that just rabbits -- there were also all of those raccoons, squirrels, chickens, turkeys and, of course, horses. Later, she even managed to integrate cats, dogs and rabbits into her university life.
She grew into a beautiful young woman with a dazzling smile and what seemed to be boundless energy. She once told her housemate that she found sleep boring. As she matured she became immersed in myriad activities but family remained at the centre of her life. She was a loving daughter to her father Charlie, and a mentor to her younger brother Karl and sister Meaghan.
Eileen's interests and those of her mother meshed to a greater extent than they do for many mothers and daughters. One of those passions was dance. Her final performances were in Casa Del Sol, Spain. An extraordinary bonding took place among the dance Friends as they travelled and worked together.
Eileen's high school years left their mark on her teachers. One teacher, Ken GIBBONS, found working closely with her at the student leadership camp to be "a joy and learning experience for me. She was a natural teacher who knew the material and showed a genuine concern for those she was leading. The greatest thrill for a teacher is to know even one person like Eileen." Hugh O'BRIAN, founder of Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership, recalls Eileen's qualities at the World Leadership Congress, calling her "a true achiever and a great representative of Canada."
This straight-A student somehow managed to spend a year as president of her high-school student council, stay involved in sports, and receive the 1999 Award for Excellence and the Principal's Leadership Award before entering Queen's University in 2000 where she majored in Development Studies and Sociology.
While at Queen's she took a job as a waitress at Summerhill (the principal's official residence, which is used for entertaining). There, her poise, self-confidence and engaging personality resulted in her meeting and getting to know many people, including members of Queen's Board of Trustees, honorary-degree recipients, and Members of Parliament.
From her first year on campus Eileen became involved in the Canadian Student Leadership Conference (now known as Withinsight) which is a Queen's student-run initiative. This annual conference takes place in Ottawa and attracts students from across the country who come to hear government, business and other community leaders speak or lead workshops. It was at that conference one year, that Eileen met Richard, who became her true love.
Eileen became the national director of the 2003 conference, but she did not get to see the results of her hard work; the accident that took her life occurred three days before the conference was to begin. Her executive team members were devastated by her loss but came together to run a very successful conference in her honour. In future conferences, there will be an annual award offered in her name.
Upon hearing of her death, Al FISHER, a professor of music at Queen's, wrote: "I found her (to be) a vital, intelligent and accomplished young person. The cruelty of a sudden, violent death for such a treasure is profoundly numbing."
Lesley KRIEGER is Eileen's mother, Karen McDONALD her aunt; Bob SILVERMAN, Dean of Arts and Science at Queen's, a friend.

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBBONS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-30 published
GIBBONS, Todd
Died 7 September 1992 - At twenty-two years of age, you were too young to leave us. You packed those years full of joy and vitality; we have those memories. Once again, we will miss you this Thanksgiving at the lake. Much love, Auntie Keak

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBBONS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
BLOCK, Matthew Alexander
Tragically died of injuries sustained when struck by a car on Hallowe'en evening. Matthew passed away peacefully with his family by his side at the McMaster Medical Centre on Saturday, November 1, 2003. He was 12 years old.
Matthew BLOCK (Cambridge, Ontario) is the cherished son of Kelly (née FLOOD) and Robert BROOK, dear brother of Stephen, Kevin, Andrew, Caitlin and Jenny, friend of Brent, and precious grand_son of Ellen and Denis CASE, Dennis and Patricia FLOOD, Stanley and Evelyn BROOK. He will also be sadly missed by his great aunts and uncles.
Loved nephew of Sheryl FLOOD and Douglas RITCHIE, Christopher CASE, Leslie (née CASE) and Rodney GIEBLER, Debbie and Jerry and Dave and Denise; and cousins Nicole and Alexander. Special friend of Keith, Lena, Zeo and Matthew BENNETT; Ted and Joe GIBBONS Doreen BROWN and Lloyd STEWARD/STEWART/STUART; and all of his many Friends and their families.
Matthew was a student at St. Joseph's School in Cambridge, and he enjoyed playing left wing with Hespler Minor Hockey. Matthew was also an aspiring chef who shared his passion for cooking with all who knew him.
We wish to thank all those who have given us their love and support, and we offer our heartfelt gratitude to the staff at Cambridge Memorial Hospital, McMaster Medical Centre, and specifically Dr. Holly SMITH, Nancy FRAM, and Chaplin Steve. We were comforted to know that Matthew gave the gift of life to seven families through organ donation.
Our dear Matthew will be greatly missed by all who knew him. It was a great joy and honour to have shared 12 years with him.
Friends will be received on Tuesday and Wednesday from 6: 00-9:00 p.m. at Littles Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 223 Main Street East, Cambridge www.funeralscanada.com Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Clements R.C. Church, 745 Duke Street, Cambridge on Thursday, November 6th at 10: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. In memory of Matthew, donations would be appreciated to ''Kids Can Play'' and to the school that he loved, St. Joseph's in Preston, for any educational needs.

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBBONS - All Categories in OGSPI

GIBBS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-05 published
Elsie Dorothea GIBBS
November 20, 1909 - January 28, 2003
Elsie GIBBS, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge since 1996, died at the Lodge on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 at the age of 93 years.
She was born in Gore Bay, daughter of the late John and Minnie (TOMLINSON) GIBBS. Elsie had worked as a bookkeeper for James PURVIS and son for about 20 years. She was very active in the Lyons Memorial United Church, having acted as treasurer for 38 years.
Elsie's home was always considered home for her sisters and brothers and their families. She kept her home as long as she could, until she had to move to the Lodge. She truly loved her family, and enjoyed writing to the ones who were at a distance, and visiting and going out with the ones who were close.
Elsie was predeceased by two sisters Olive GIBBS and Florence BAILEY, and brothers Clifford, Harvey, Lyman and Arthur. She is survived by numerous nieces and nephews, grand nieces and nephews and great grand nieces and nephews.
Friends may called the Culgin Funeral Home after 7: 00 pm on Friday. The funeral service was conducted in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel on Saturday, February 1, 2003 at 1: 30 pm with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. Spring interment in Gordon Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home, Gore Bay.

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBBS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-03 published
Ina ADDISON
In loving memory of Ina ADDISON, August 27, 1914 to August 22, 2003.
Ina ADDISON, a resident of Gordon Township, passed away at Manitoulin Lodge on Friday, August 22, 2003 at the age of 88 years. She was born in Gordon Township, daughter of William and Ida (WOOD) LINLEY. Ina was predeceased by brothers William and Herbert and sisters Edith (CAMPBELL, WILSON) and May (MORDEN.) Ina enjoyed quilting, flowers and gardening. Her greatest love other than the cattle was her family and all the gatherings they enjoyed over the years. Ina married Joe WILSON on August 9, 1933 and they lived their married life on the farm in Gordon, where Ken and Beth GIBBS now reside. Joe died on April 27, 1981 and on May 4, 1985 Ina married Clarence ADDISON. Clarence died on March 18, 1995. Ina's daughter, and only child, Eldean GIBBS (Mrs. Jack,) died on March 29, 1995. Ina's faith in God got her through this sad time but she spent many lonely days. Clarence and Ina lived in Evansville where his daughter Sheila and her husband Frank HARLEY now spend their holidays. They then moved to Mill Site Apartments and in October 2002, Ina moved to Manitoulin Lodge. Ina leaves to mourn her son-in-law, Jack GIBBS (friend June,) grand_son Ken GIBBS (wife Beth) and her beloved great-grandchildren, Loren, John, and Krysten GIBBS, and her stepchildren, Chester ADDISON (wife Pat deceased,) Stan and Joan ADDISON, Sheila and Frank HARLEY and step-grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She will also be remembered by many nieces and nephews to whom she was a very special aunt. Friend called the Culgin Funeral Home on Sunday, August 24, 2003. The Funeral Service was held on Monday, August 25, 2003 with Pastor Erwin Thompson officiating. Interment in Gordon Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBBS - All Categories in OGSPI

GIBSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Ruby (MOGGY) RUTHENBERG
In loving memory of Ruby (MOGGY) RUTHENBERG, who passed away Thursday, May 29, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital, Saint Joseph Health Centre at the age of 61 years.
Beloved wife of Bernie RUTHENBERG, predeceased 1987. Loving mother of Pam GIBSON and James McKENZIE (wife Diane) both of Sudbury. Cherished grandmother of Shannon, Sheri-Lynn, Clint and Trevor. Sadly missed by brothers, sisters, nieces and nephews. Funeral service was held on Saturday, May 31, 2003 in the Saint Paul's Anglican Church, Manitowaning. Interment in the Hillygrove Cemetery. Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Mary Elizabeth McCULLIGH (née HANER)
In loving memory of Mary Elizabeth McCULLIGH who passed away peacefully at the Welland Hospital, on Thursday, June 5, 2003 at the age of 54 years.
Predeceased by husband Roy (Nov. 17, 1999). Loving mother of Sharon GIBSON (predeceased,) Robert GIBSON, Lloyd and Michelle GIBSON and Mary Lynn. Step mother of Catherine and Bill GRAHAM and George and Diane McCULLIGH. Cherished grandma of Jesse, Jamilee, Kyle, Ashley, Jessica and Jason. Step grandma of Aaron GRAHAM, Ashley, George, Sebastian McCULLIGH. Dear daughter of Lloyd and Mae HANER. Will be missed by brothers and sisters Bill and Marion HANER, Gertrude and Evan MORRELL, Marilyn HANER, Frank and Anne HANER, Charlie HANER, Nancy and Dale SAGLE and Susan and Derek STEPHENS. Remembered by many nieces and nephews. Visitation was held on Saturday, June 7, 2003. Funeral Service was held on Sunday, June 8, 2003 both at Island Funeral Home, Little Current, Ontario. Burial in Nairn Cemetery.

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
MacLELLAN, Robert Gordan Primrose April 6, 1919 - March 2, 2003
Robert G. P. MacLELLAN, of Calgary, Alberta retired General Counsel of the Husky Oil Company, died on Sunday, March 2, 2003 of pneumonia, at Rockyview General Hospital in Calgary. He was a month short of his 84th birthday. Born in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, on April 6, 1919, Robert was the only child of Dr. Robert Gordon MacLELLAN and Hazel Carré Primrose MacLELLAN. His father died in 1930, and his mother in 1937. An aunt helped his widowed mother raise him. Robert attended local schools and university in Halifax, Nova Scotia, graduating in law from Dalhousie University, Halifax, after World War 2. Robert enlisted in the Canadian Army in 1942 until 1946, as a Lieutenant in the British Columbia Dragoons (the 9th Canadian Armoured Regiment), serving in Italy, Belgium and Holland. He served as General Counsel of the Husky Oil Limited, the parent company with its two wholly-owned subsidiaries, Husky Oil Company, and Husky Oil Canadian Operations, for 35 years, based in Calgary, until he retired in the early l980's. Robert, (his Friends called him 'Bob'), enjoyed the Friendship of his colleagues at Husky Oil and after his retirement, he and others formed a dining club, the Husky Dining Club. It still operates at the Hospitality Inn.A bachelor, he enjoyed life at his Riverdale Avenue bungalow, where he had a large library. A fall and a stroke weakened him five years ago, and he entered Scottish Extendicare on 25th Avenue South West. Due to its imminent closure, Robert was moved to the Colonel Belcher nursing facility in February. Robert came from a distinguished Nova Scotian family. His paternal grandfather, for whom he and his father were named, Robert MacLELLAN, a distinguished educator, was Principal of Pictou Academy from 1889 to 1923. The elder MacLELLAN helped to prepare young minds for the challenges of the 20th century. Pictou Academy, through its principals and graduates had strong links to Dalhousie University. Robert's maternal grandfather was Senator Clarence PRIMROSE, also of Pictou. Robert is survived by several cousins, among them, Janet Maclellan TOOLE of Fredericton, New Brunswick, Judith Ann (MacLELLAN) GIBSON, of Saint John's, Newfoundland, and Ann MacLELLAN of Amherstview, Ontario. His family is greatly indebted to the care-giving services of 'Tip' Pornthip WONGTHONGLUA, whose intelligence, gentleness and devotion were always exceptional, during his stay at Scottish, Colonel Belcher and Rockyview Hospital. A committal service in Nova Scotia will take place in the summer. Friends who wish to pay their respects to Robert's memory and sign the memorial book may visit Mcinnis and Holloway's 'Fish Creek Chapel' (14441 Bannister Road S.E., Calgary, Alberta). To e-mail expressions of sympathy: condolences@mcinnisandholloway.com Subject Heading: Robert MacLELLAN. In living memory of Robert MacLELLAN, a tree will be planted at Fish Creek Provincial Park by Mcinnis & Holloway Funeral Homes, 'Fish Creek Chapel', 14441 Bannister Rd. S.E. Calgary, Alberta Tel: (403) 256-9575

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
JONES, Hazel Ethyl
85, of Brooklyn, Hants Co., Nova Scotia, passed away Wednesday, March 5, 2003, at Queen Elizabeth 2nd Health Sciences Centre, Infirmary Site, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Born in Elora, Ontario, she was a daughter of the late Gilbert and Daisy WHEELER. Hazel is survived by her husband, Harrison 'Gray' JONES, Brooklyn daughters Judith 'Judy' (Gerry) JOHNSTON, Rawdon, and Wendy JONES, Brooklyn; granddaughter, Jenni JOHNSTON; great-granddaughter, Moira JOHNSTON; a sister, Helen WILSON, Peterborough, Ontario Besides her parents, she was predeceased by a brother, Blake. Cremation has taken place. Memorial service will be held Sunday, March 9, 2003 at 3: 00 p.m. in Windsor United Church, Windsor, Nova Scotia, Reverend Bill GIBSON officiating. Private interment at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Lohnes-Beazley Funeral Service Ltd., 419 Albert Street, Windsor, Nova Scotia Messages of condolence may also be made on-line at www.familycare.ca

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-13 published
GIBSON, Karen Grace
Died March 13, 1982 at age 16. Lovingly remembered by Barbara and Keith, David and Trish, Bruce and Sue.

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-27 published
POWLESS, Alex Ross September 29, 1926 - May 26, 2003.
Peacefully, surrounded by his loving family, at the Willett Hospital, in Paris, Ontario, at 5: 00 a.m., on Monday, May 26, 2003, Alex Ross POWLESS, in his 77th year, went to meet his creator after several months of illness. Ross was born in Ohsweken on the Six Nations Reserve on September 29, 1926. Ross was a devoted husband and loving father and was married to Margaret Wilma POWLESS (nee BOMBERRY) for 55 years. Together they raised 14 children, 27 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. Ross was predeceased by his sons: Victor in 1955, Gaylord in 2001 and Gregory in 2002, his parents: Chauncey and Jessie, and his siblings: Mary Ella and Alice Maracle, Amy and Maude Martin, and Raymond and Jean Powless.
Ross is survived by his loving wife Margaret Wilma POWLESS (nee BOMBERRY) and sister Vernice Maizie JONATHAN, and his children, including daughter in law Patti, Gail (Mark AYRES,) Gary, Audrey (Jim BOMBERRY), Harry, Arlene (Dan MARTIN), Richard (Effie PANOUSOS), Darryl (Naansii JAMIESON,) Karen (Jerry MARTIN,) Tony (Cheryle GIBSON,) Jeffery, and Jacqui baby (Ron LYNES.) Ross is a cherished uncle to many nieces and nephews.
Ross had a passion for hunting and also loved fishing, pool and playing cards. He demonstrated his love for his grandchildren in many ways. He's fondly remembered for making up nicknames for them. Ross' sense of humour and storytelling was renowned and he was often asked to speak at public functions because of it.
Ross POWLESS distinguished himself in lacrosse both as a player and a coach. He was a member of the Ontario and Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame and won four Mann Cups (Canadian Lacrosse Championships) with the Peterborough Timbermen from 1951 to 1954, including an Most Valuable Player award in 1953. Ross coached the Brantford Warriors to the Canadian Senior B Championship in 1968 and the Rochester Chiefs to a Can-Am Lacrosse League Championship in 1969. In 1974, Ross coached six of his sons on the Ontario First Nations Team, which captured the All Indian Nations Championship Cup.
The family will honour his life with a visitation at Styres Funeral Home, Ohsweken after 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 27. Evening prayers 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 28 where Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Thursday, May 29, 2003 at 2 p.m. Interment: St. Paul's Anglican Cemetery, Sour Springs Road. Memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association, the Iroquois Lodge or the Canadian Cancer Society can be made in lieu of flowers.

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-12 published
Three cheers for a funny fellow
Like his hapless Canadian hero, he often found himself in hilarious situations
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, June 12, 2003 - Page R9
Once in the middle of an interview at the Toronto airport, writer Donald JACK left to fetch a document from his car. Notorious for a sense of direction so poor he found it difficult to navigate through a city park, let alone the airport's massive parking lot, Mr. JACK took so long to find his vehicle that by the time he returned the interviewers had gone.
Like Bartholomew Bandy, the hapless hero of The Bandy Papers, Mr. JACK's eight-volume comic-novel series describing an Ottawa Valley boy's adventures during both world wars and between, the author often found himself in hilarious situations, made the more so by his telling.
A three-time winner of the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour, Mr. JACK died last week at his home in England. He was Listeners were reduced to tears of laughter by his tales of construction disasters while having a villa built in Spain; a house sale falling through on closing day; and an aging bright yellow car named Buttercup, whose sun roof shattered soon after it was searched for drugs at the Spanish-French border, showering Mr. JACK with glass, insects and rust.
Once, while being toured with his daughter around the offices of his publisher, McClelland and Stewart, Mr. JACK entered the boardroom and shouted with surprise. There on the carpet lay a large amount of dog excrement left by an employee's pet. In his Bandy-like way, the writer very nearly stepped into it.
"If you could choose one author out of the entire world who during a visit to his publisher would stumble across this, it would be Donald JACK," said Douglas GIBSON, president and publisher of McClelland and Stewart, who knew the writer for more than 30 years.
"Things would go wrong for Don, very seldom caused by himself," said Munroe SCOTT, a close friend of more than 45 years. "He would narrate all this stuff either in person or in a letter and make it all hilarious, because he always saw, in retrospect at any rate, the funny side of things. You'd be doubled up with laughter."
Despite Mr. JACK's incident-prone nature, it would be a mistake to see Mr. JACK as a buffoon, said Mr. SCOTT, also a writer. "He was enormously well read, erudite and could handle the language with aplomb at many levels. He could make me feel like a Philistine."
Said author Austin CLARKE, who was Mr. JACK's neighbour for five years during the 1960s. "He was a quiet, reserved, retiring kind of man. You would never have known he was a writer."
Mr. JACK's Leacock medals came for three volumes of The Bandy Papers: Three Cheers for Me, in 1963, That's Me in the Middle, in 1974 and Me Bandy, You Cissie, in 1980. Published between 1963 and 1996, they still enjoy a loyal following, including a Web site which draws mail from around the world. Six of the eight volumes were recently reissued by McClelland and Stewart.
Drawn from Mr. JACK's fascination with the First World War, the rural people he met in the Ottawa Valley and his time in the Royal Air Force, The Bandy Papers feature the blundering Bartholomew Wolfe Bandy, who in the first volume, Three Cheers for Me, inadvertently becomes a hero, despite capturing his own colonel by mistake.
Ensuing volumes follow Mr. Bandy's adventures through to the Second World War. Although devastatingly funny, they also describe war's horrors and the realities of the home front, and lampoon war's leaders.
Mr. Bandy encounters and influences historical figures, such as then British minister of defence Winston Churchill, and generously offers him use of the altered Bandy phrase "blood, sweat, toil and tears."
While best known for The Bandy Papers, Mr. JACK wrote countless documentary film scripts, stage, television and radio plays, as well as two non-fiction books: the history of a Toronto radio station, Sinc, Betty and the Morning Man, and another about medicine in Canada, Rogues, Rebels and Geniuses.
His third play, The Canvas Barricade, won first prize in the Stratford Shakespearean Playwriting Competition in 1960. Produced in 1961, it was the first, and remains the only, original Canadian play performed on the main stage of the Stratford Festival.
Mr. JACK, however, did not see much of its opening. He left the auditorium for the lobby. "During the performance, we'd be aware of a crack of light from a door opening slightly and a white face would stare through, then vanish for a while, before another door would open a crack, and the same apparition would fleetingly appear," Mr. Scott said.
Born on December 6, 1924 in Radcliffe, Lancashire, England, Donald Lamont JACK was one of four children of a British doctor and a nurse from Prince Edward Island. After attending Bury Grammar School in Lancashire and Marr College in Scotland, he gained enough qualifications to attend London University.
While stationed in Germany with the Royal Air Force in the last year of the Second World War, Mr. JACK attempted short-story writing, but thought he lacked talent. After his mother asked him, "Isn't it about time you left home?" Mr. JACK immigrated to Canada in 1951.
Interspersed with jobs as a member of a surveying crew in Alberta and a bank teller in Toronto, Mr. JACK studied at the Canadian Theatre School in Toronto run by Sterndale BENNETT. There he wrote two plays, one of which drew praise from theatre critic Nathan COHEN and a job offer from a film Company. Mr. COHEN later wrote Mr. Scott, decrying Canadian theatre's "shameful treatment" of Mr. JACK, which largely ignored him.
A theatrical background enhanced Mr. JACK's writing, according to Mr. Gibson. "His dialogue was terrific and his scene-setting was excellent."
After leaving the school, with the encouragement of his wife, Nancy, whom he married in 1952, Mr. JACK worked in the script department of Crawley Films in Ottawa. Two years later in 1955, the company's head, Budge CRAWLEY, let him go because he thought Mr. JACK would never make a good writer.
A dry first year of freelancing followed, until in 1957 Mr. JACK sold the play version of his novelette Breakthrough, published in Maclean's, to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television. It became the first Canadian television play to be simultaneously telecast to the United States.
He never looked back. By 1972, A Collection of Canadian Plays, Vol. 1, which included Exit Muttering by Mr. JACK, noted he had written 40 television plays, 35 documentary film scripts, several radio plays and four stage plays. The works included Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Armed Forces training films for the National Film Board and often demanded a great deal of research.
Mr. JACK wrote with military discipline, beginning at 9 a.m., taking tea at 11 a.m., lunch at 1 p.m., tea again at 3 p.m. and finishing at 5 p.m. "All my life, I swear, that routine never altered," said one of his daughters, Lulu HILTON.
Persisting in writing drafts in pen and ink long before adopting the typewriter and, much later, a word processor, Mr. JACK often developed storylines while walking. A 1959 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation press release explains Mr. JACK's dedication: "My self-discipline is to keep reminding myself of how lucky I am to be able to be the only thing I ever really wanted to be -- a writer."
During the early 1980s, Mr. JACK and his wife returned to England to be near their daughters who had emigrated there, and their grandchildren. Mr. JACK missed Canada's open spaces and its classless society, and visited often.
At the time of his death, he was working on the ninth volume of The Bandy Papers. He died on or about June 2 of a massive stroke at his home in Telford, Shropshire, England. He leaves his two daughters, Maren and Lulu, six grandchildren and one great-grandchild, a brother and a sister. His wife Nancy died in 1991.

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
Peter Gordon CROMPTON
Son, brother, friend, athlete, businessman. Born December 5, 1975, in Toronto. Died July 13 as a result of a boating accident, aged 27.
By Josh DOLAN, Bryce GIBSON, Blake HUTCHESON, Adam LAZIER, Rob MAGWOOD, Ian SULLIVAN
Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - Page A24
In the words of Pete's father Ken, "Pete did not live only 27 years. He lived 9,946 days and every one to the fullest!" Somehow this number is both more palatable and more appropriate when speaking of Pete's life.
Pete was born at Toronto General Hospital, weighing in at a larger-than-life 11 pounds, 10 ounces. From that day forward, "larger-than-life" was an apt description -- physically and otherwise. Pete grew up, along with brother Jeff, in a household that loved competition, outdoor activity, a good challenge, the odd healthy debate and, most of all, each other. The family went back and forth from Toronto to Collingwood, Ontario, to enjoy the best of both areas, depending on the season and the opportunity. His parents, Ken and Judy, loved watching their sons excel and gave them every opportunity to do so.
Pete was on skis at the age of 3 at Osler Bluff Ski Club, had a golf club in his hand by 5, and was windsurfing by 6. He took all three sports to incredible heights. He enjoyed and excelled at so much in life, yet did not seem to need or seek recognition. His low-key manner and his quiet confidence kept everyone at ease and drew people to him.
In skiing, Pete was a member of the Ontario Ski Team, competing nationally and internationally in the NorAm Race Series, the U.S.A. Junior Championships and the World University Games. He won several championships and had a natural gift on snow. He also became a scratch golfer and loved to take on Friends and family.
Perhaps his greatest passion, however, was windsurfing. He found every excuse he could to hit the surf on Georgian Bay, but his sense of adventure took him to beaches all over the world, including the southwest coast of Australia, Maui, the Colombian River Gorge in Oregon and Cape Hatteras in North Carolina. In the words of one of his lifelong Friends, "Pete loved life and life loved him right back!"
Pete was a generous, loyal and reliable friend who developed strong and lasting relationships at every phase of life: his youthful years of sports, competition and family; his fun and challenges at the National Ski Academy; his university years at Laurentian University and the University of Guelph (B.A. in Economics); his career launch at Nesbitt Burns; and his last several years at C.B. Richard Ellis where he was in commercial real-estate investment sales. At every turn he met with success with his long graceful stride and disarming smile.
It was going to be fun just to sit back and watch him perform in the decades ahead.
Looking through the family photo albums Pete had a mischievous smile and a sense of adventure in every picture. In virtually every snapshot either something spectacular had just happened, or it was about to happen. He was always surrounded by Friends and family as his easygoing style and sense of fun were infectious. His determination to improve and grow were never overt but always present. The results speak for themselves. As one good friend suggested: "Men wanted to be like Pete. Women wanted to be with him." More than 1,500 people attended his funeral.
Pete was quite simply a great human being who would have continued to win in his unpretentious manner and contribute on a kind-spirited and decent level to any situation. We are among his many Friends who have been brought together because of this fine person and who have had the good fortune of sharing a small piece of Pete's life -- all 9,946 days of it.
Josh, Bryce, Blake, Adam, Rob and Ian are Friends of Pete's.

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-25 published
GIBSON, James Alexander, C.M., M.A., M.Litt., (D.Phil.Oxon,) LL.D President Emeritus, Brock University
After a long and useful life, clear-headed to the end, died in Ottawa on October 23, 2003. Born in Ottawa in 1912, elder son of John Wesley GIBSON and Belle Crawford McGEE; school and college in Victoria, Rhodes Scholar from British Columbia in 1931; Foreign Service Officer, Department of External Affairs (1938-47); served with the Prime Minister on missions to Washington, Quebec Conferences, San Francisco, London and Paris.
Original member of Faculty of Carleton College, (1942); from 1952, first Dean of Arts and Science, Carleton University; later Dean of Arts and Deputy to the President; in 1963, named Founding President of Brock University.
A founding member of the Canadian Association of Rhodes Scholars, he held various offices and served as editor of the newsletter for 19 years. For over 60 years, he was a member of the Canadian Historical Association and of the Canadian Institute for International Affairs, as well as national and regional voluntary organizations.
He is survived by his daughters, Julia MATTHEWS and Eleanor S. JOLY (Gerald,) and his son Peter James; grandchildren Alison MATTHEWS- DAVID (Jean Marc), Colin MATTHEWS (Nathalia), Micheline, Nina (Jean-Marc BERNIER) and Gerald JOLY, Anna GIBSON (Robert) and Hilary TERHUNE (Peter;) two great-grandchildren. His wife Caroline died in 1995; also surviving are his brother William and his sister Isobel SEARLS in Victoria.
Memorial services will be held in Ottawa (December) and in St. Catharines at Brock University on November 7th, at 3 p.m. If desired, memorial remembrances may be made to the James A. Gibson Library, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1.

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-12 published
James Alexander GIBSON
By David FARR, Wednesday, November 12, 2003 - Page A30
Secretary to a prime minister, teacher, university builder, scholar. Born January 29, 1912, in Ottawa. Died October 23 in Ottawa, of natural causes, aged 91.
The sudden death of James Alexander GIBSON has taken from the scene a man who served a great prime minister during the crowning moments of his career. James GIBSON was the last survivor of the small group of men and women who toiled at the side of Mackenzie KING throughout the Second World War.
GIBSON joined KING's personal staff in 1938, seconded from the Department of External Affairs to Laurier House, KING's home and office. Prime Minister KING was also Secretary of State for External Affairs and GIBSON's job was to liaise with the department. The lonely prime minister, totally dedicated as he was to his office and to the place he was forging in Canadian history, revealed himself to be a severe taskmaster. GIBSON had been married only a few months after he started work at Laurier House but KING paid little attention to the family circumstances of his staff. His absorption in his work was almost total, even including nights, weekends and holidays.
GIBSON met these demands with an even temper and a willingness to subordinate his time to that of his master. It cannot have been an easy role but GIBSON rarely showed impatience. Shortly after he joined Laurier House, GIBSON was plunged into the mass of arrangements connected with the Canadian visit of King George Virgin Islands and Queen Elizabeth in 1939. Later, during the Second World War and after, he travelled with KING to conferences in Quebec City, San Francisco, London and Paris.
GIBSON was aided immensely, through an extraordinarily crowded life, by a phenomenal memory. He could tell you something about each of more than 50 trips, by sea and air, that he had made across the Atlantic. He could recall when he had read a book or met a person; when someone had held office, diplomatic or political or when someone had died. One of his most striking feats of memory, expressed casually, was to point out to the Parks Canada staff at Laurier House, when he revisited his old quarters after 30 years' absence, that they had moved many of KING's pictures! When he taught at Carleton University after leaving External Affairs in 1947, his fund of knowledge on Canada's constitution and politics amazed his students. His prodigious memory remained with him, clear and accurate, to the last.
Unfortunately James GIBSON never wrote the "big book" that was in him on his life with Mackenzie KING. He completed a number of short articles on war-time incidents in KING's time in office which revealed the prime minister's manner of dealing with matters of state. His recollections are also to be found in taped interviews. Sadly his conversations are no more for, in a city of notable raconteurs, he was superb.
His historical interests were mostly directed toward the office of governor-general, especially to those governors-general around the time of Confederation. His Oxford thesis was a study of Sir Edmund Head, whose wife painted the water colours that persuaded Queen Victoria to settle Canada's capital in a remote lumber village. His knowledge of the careers of our governors-general won him the Jules and Gabrielle Leger Fellowship in 1980, a fully merited honour.
Behind GIBSON's formidable knowledge and long experience dwelt a gentle soul, a kindly and considerate man who remembered families and occasions without fail. He was always a delight to be with, a companion who gave more than you were ever able to return. Vigorous to the end, his death leaves a sad emptiness in many lives.
David FARR is a friend of James GIBSON.

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
A scholar and a gentle man
'Fine example of a great Canadian' who founded Ontario's Brock University was once private secretary to prime minister Mackenzie KING
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, November 26, 2003 - Page R9
In an almost Zen-like fashion, James GIBSON knew the value of not acting. In the late 1960s, when a group of student radicals seized part of Brock University, hoping to be dragged away kicking and screaming, Dr. GIBSON, who had helped found the institution a few years earlier, reacted in a way no other university president did when faced with the same problem: He did nothing. The protesters, he reasoned, may have had legitimate grievances, but their unseemly actions offended his firm sense of propriety. In time, the students simply went away.
It was an effective, though uncharacteristic, action for a man who embodied Brock's Latin motto: "Surgite," freely translated as "push on." That he did, through some 65 rich years of advancing higher education and in public service, most notably as a private secretary to former prime minister Mackenzie KING, whose penchant for soothsaying and assorted eccentricities Dr. GIBSON kept mainly to himself until later in life.
Just five days before his death in Ottawa on October 23 at the age of 91, Dr. GIBSON was doing what he loved: Watching a new group of graduates receive their diplomas at the fall convocation of Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, the school he had launched as founding president in 1963.
At a recent memorial service at Brock, David ATKINSON, the university's president and vice-chancellor, recalled a man whose attributes a strong moral fibre, clarity of thought and a general uprightness, all tempered by a warm and gentle touch -- harkened to a quaint, bygone era. "It's unlikely we will meet anyone like him again," Dr. ATKINSON said.
In the House of Commons on October 27, Dr. GIBSON was praised by St. Catharines Liberal member of parliament Walt LASTEWKA as "a fine example of a great Canadian."
Dr. GIBSON, whose knowledge of Canadian history and government were legend, was in the news this past summer as the oldest of over 1,000 Rhodes Scholars who flew to England for a five-day bash honouring the centenary of the trust. With his brother William, also a Rhodes Scholar, Dr. GIBSON dedicated a re-leaded stained-glass window at the chapel of Oxford's New College.
A normally discreet man, he had sharp words for former prime minister Brian MULRONEY, not an Oxford graduate, who surprised guests at the alumni dinner -- and raised a few eyebrows -- when he took a seat on the podium alongside Oxonians Bill CLINTON and Tony BLAIR, and guest Nelson MANDELA. Many alumni, Dr. GIBSON included, felt that Mr. MULRONEY, who had been invited by The Independent newspaper chain, had no business being there. Though upset, Dr. GIBSON retained his dignity, saying simply, "I was offended."
James Alexander GIBSON was born in Ottawa, in 1912, to Canadian-born parents of Irish-Scottish stock with strong Methodist and Quaker leanings. Raised in Victoria, he graduated with a B.A. in history from the University of British Columbia at age 18. Less than a year later, he was one of the youngest boys at Oxford.
"That was the real dividing line in my life," he told The Globe and Mail last July. "The economic depression was beginning to take over and some of the graduates in my year at University of British Columbia ended up digging ditches, but I had a guaranteed income for three years."
The annual stipend was only £400 but it enabled Dr. GIBSON to live comfortably and travel to the rest of Europe when he wasn't studying modern history, debating in the Oxford Union Society and keeping wicket for the New College cricket squad, the Nomads.
Back in Ottawa and armed with a doctorate in history, he joined the Department of External Affairs. On his second day on the job, he was whisked to the prime minister's office for a six-month secondment that lasted nine years. Mr. KING, who was also External Affairs minister, blocked Dr. GIBSON's promotions to postings abroad three times because "he told me I stopped him getting into trouble."
The prime minister was a notorious taskmaster, calling on his assistant to work most evenings and weekends to draft letters and speeches. Throughout, "Dad never complained about anything," said his daughter Julia MATTHEWS. " But as he got older, he loosened up a little."
According to his daughter, he came to describe the famously erratic leader as "a very grumpy man and a very lonely man, insensitive, and quite damaging to work for."
Ultimately, it occurred to the clan that perhaps the unmarried prime minister was simply jealous of Dr. GIBSON's status as a beloved family man and father of three children. "Whenever we went on a family holiday, Dad always got called back," remembered Ms. MATTHEWS.
But a high point came in the spring of 1945, when Dr. GIBSON accompanied Mr. KING and 380 other delegates to San Francisco and the founding of the United Nations. During the historic two-month conference, Dr. GIBSON got personal glimpses of such leaders as the Soviet Union's Andrei GROMYKO and Britain's Anthony EDEN, but the task at hand, he later recalled, was to keep the Canadian prime minister "on the rails."
Fearing he would never advance in the public service, Dr. GIBSON resigned in 1947 and took a teaching post at Ottawa's Carleton University, where he later served as the first dean of arts and science and deputy to the president. By the early 1960s, he was courted by a group of community leaders in the Niagara peninsula to establish Brock University. When he began as founding president, the school had seven faculty (known as "the magnificent seven"), 29 students and a "library" consisting of a shelf of books. Today, it boasts more than 15,000 students and 47,000 alumni.
His first order of business at Brock was the creation of a library.
Now housed in the campus's Schmon Tower, it has become something of a landmark on the Niagara Escarpment. Dr. GIBSON, fondly known by faculty as "James A.," remained as Brock's president until 1974. He was named to the Order of Canada in 1992, and the library was named after him in 1996.
He was also a leading figure in the Unitarian faith, serving for a time as chaplain of the Unitarian Congregation of Niagara.
Asked what dinner-table conversation was like at home, Ms. MATTHEWS sighed good-naturedly. "Oh, God. There was a lot of current events. He had all the answers. He was always lecturing, but he could be really charming." Even after his vision started to fail, he travelled, read and wrote. "He never felt old."
After moving from his beloved St. Catharines to an Ottawa retirement home, Dr. GIBSON lectured residents on "governors-general I have known."
Dr. GIBSON was predeceased by his wife of 57 years, Caroline (née STEIN,) and leaves three children, seven grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, his brother, and a sister, Isobel SEARLS.
His final days were summed up poetically by Josephine MEEKER, a former professor at Brock. After attending the university's convocation last month, Dr. GIBSON "went for a long walk, returned to his residence, went into the lounge area, took off his coat and folded it up, put it on the back of his chair, sat down, folded his hands in his lap, closed his eyes, and died."

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-01 published
'Curtain up, laugh, laugh, laugh, curtain down'
Versatile comic actor appeared in a string of hit revues, as well as at the Shaw and Stratford festivals, in London and on Broadway
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, December 1, 2003 - Page R7
At the mere mention of his name some people would just start giggling. In fact, wherever the wonderfully comic actor Tom KNEEBONE went there was laughter. He loved not only to make other people laugh but also to let out his own deep laugh, which Friends say seemed to start in his gut and make its way up through his body, gathering force as it went.
"Tom could make me laugh longer and harder than anyone else," said Gary KRAWFORD, a long-time friend who first worked with him in the mid-1960s. "He was without a doubt the funniest man I've ever met in my life."
Mr. KNEEBONE, who has been described by some critics as one of the world's top cabaret performers, died in a Toronto hospital on November 15 after suffering a heart attack and other complications. He was 71.
The versatile performer appeared for many years at the Shaw Festival and the Stratford Festival of Canada, where during the 1976 season he played Puck opposite Jessica TANDY in A Midsummer Night's Dream. He also performed at London's Old Vic, the Charlottetown Festival and on Broadway. He was a guest with the Canadian Opera Company and the National Ballet of Canada, a company he greatly admired.
Toronto audiences may remember him best for the string of hit revues he performed with Dinah CHRISTIE, which included Ding Dong at the Dell, The Apple Tree and Oh Coward! "I was absolutely in awe of the man," Ms. CHRISTIE said, recalling the first time they performed together 38 years ago.
They developed an enduring partnership that resulted in appearances across the country performing everywhere from cabarets to big concert halls with symphony orchestras. In Toronto, they performed together at Massey Hall and Roy Thomson Hall. Over the years, working with Mr. KNEEBONE became like "working with kith and kin," Ms. CHRISTIE said.
"We made each other laugh," she said, adding that they worked so well together because they were complete opposites.
While Mr. KNEEBONE was happy living and working in the big city, Ms. CHRISTIE feels more at home on her farm in rural Ontario with her animals and open space.
Born in Auckland, New Zealand, on May 12, 1932, Mr. KNEEBONE later moved to England to study at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. After graduation, he went with the company on a 1963 North American tour. When the tour folded in New York, Mr. KNEEBONE went out looking for work. He travelled to Toronto and joined the Crest Theatre Company, where he got a job performing in a production of She Stoops to Conquer. He later starred with the Canadian comic actor Barbara HAMILTON in the hit revue That Hamilton Woman. The road was paved for him after that and, as he was quoted as saying, it was 40 years of "curtain up, laugh, laugh, laugh, curtain down."
Over the years, several critics remarked on Mr. KNEEBONE's unique facial features. Walter KERR in The New York Times once wrote: "His eyes are all right, but I think his nose is crossed."
In Time magazine, comparisons were made between Mr. KNEEBONE, Pinocchio and Charlie Brown. "With leprechaun whimsy, and a pace as assured as the Dominion Observatory Time Signal, his major weapon is a wonderfully mobile face that he seems never to have grown accustomed to. Small wonder," the writer wrote. "His features might have been drawn by a child. Eyes like silver dollars, a nose that wobbles to a Pinocchio point, and a mouth tight and tiny as Charlie Brown's when he is sad."
The moment the sun came up in the morning, Mr. KNEEBONE was up and out of bed, opening his curtains and declaring: "Let's get on with the show," his friend Doug McCULLOUGH recalled. "You cannot take the theatre out of Tom," Mr. McCULLOUGH said. "Tom was always on stage."
Mr. KNEEBONE was never without a story to tell, whether it was a tale about the crazy person who gravitated to him on a Toronto subway or a character he met while performing in a small town. "Everything had a theatrical dimension," Mr. McCULLOUGH said.
In recent years, Mr. KNEEBONE turned his attention toward writing and directing plays for the Smile Theatre Company. Once again he and his long-time friend Ms. CHRISTIE were collaborators. Together they brought professional theatre to senior citizens' homes, long-term care facilities and hospitals. Mr. KNEEBONE had been the company's artistic director since 1987.
Known for his extensive research, he spent hours combing through books and old musical recordings at libraries and theatrical museums collecting information to use in his productions. He charmed all the librarians at Toronto's public libraries, Ms. CHRISTIE said.
He loved the process of gathering Canada's little-known stories, whether it was the tale of a war bride or the country's first black doctor, and then bringing them to audiences. He also saw it as a way to give something not only to people whose health prevented them from getting to the theatre, but to the country that has accepted him so warmly when he arrived.
Despite his writing and directing, he never stopped performing. Just weeks before he died, Mr. KNEEBONE and Ms. CHRISTIE performed some of Noël Coward material together for a benefit.
"He was one of the masters of Noël Coward," Mr. Krawford said.
In addition to his stage work, Mr. KNEEBONE performed in film and television, including the movies The Luck of Ginger Coffey and The Housekeeper.
A proud Canadian, Mr. KNEEBONE was honoured by his adopted country with the Order of Ontario, and was named a Member of the Order of Canada in October, 2002.
He leaves his cousin, Robert GIBSON, in Australia.

  G... Names     GI... Names     GIB... Names     Welcome Home

GIBSON - All Categories in OGSPI