All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"GEO" 2003 Obituary


GEORGE  GEORGETTI  GEORGEVSKI 

GEORGE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Ruby WILLSON
In loving memory of Ruby WILLSON, May 15, 1937 to April 30, 2003.
Ruby WILLSON, a resident of Ice Lake, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 at the age of 65 years. She was born in Kagawong, daughter of the late Nelson and Lillian (TRUDEAU) PIERCE.
Ruby was an "Adventuress" and enjoyed life to its fullest. She had worked as a hostess at Harbour Island as well as being a navigator on sail boats, and had sailed many places, including the open seas. She enjoyed many things, such as needlework, baking, reading and especially loved to entertain and host people. Her favourite place was Harbour Island. A loving wife, mother and grandmother, she will be sadly missed, but many happy memories will be cherished. Dearly loved wife and best friend of Chuc WILLSON. Loving and loved mother of Dennis BECKETT and Deanna BENOIT both of Kagawong, Rob BECKETT of Pefferlaw and Juanda GEORGE of Espanola. Proud grandmother of James, Charles, Kevin, Crestienne, Aaron, Brandon and Sheldon. Also survived by Lake WILSON and his daughter Jasmine. Dear sister of Sandra JAMES. Predeceased by husbands Robert BECKETT, Carl REINGUETTE and John PETRIE and brother Reynold PIERCE.
A private family funeral service will be conducted at the Culgin Funeral Home, followed by cremation. A public memorial service will be conducted at Lyons Memorial United Church on Thursday, May 15, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. If so desired, donations may be made to Strawberry Point Christian Camp or the Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270.

  G... Names     GE... Names     GEO... Names     Welcome Home

GEORGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
GEORGE, Graham Heaton
Died peacefully at the Trillium Mississauga Hospital on February 11, following cardiac arrest on February 7 and a long struggle with the consequences of tropical sprue. What his body lacked in strength, his soul had palpably in exceptional measure - a powerful beacon of light for all. Architect, visionary on the cutting edge of the technologies of intercommunication and health care, he touched many lives.
A Memorial Service of remembrance will be held at Trinity College Chapel, 6 Hoskin Avenue, Toronto, at 4 p.m. on Saturday, February His sons Simon and Dylan; wife Michele, sister Dolphi (and Chris) and brother Dan (and Karen), their children Elena, Damera and Michael, and father Jim.

  G... Names     GE... Names     GEO... Names     Welcome Home

GEORGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
GRACE, Dorothy Kathleen (née GEORGE) 1909-2003
At Cobourg on February 20, 2003. Predeceased by her husband John A. GRACE, Q.C, her parents Abel and Martha (McCONNELL) GEORGE, her brother William, all of Ottawa. Happy memories of Dorothy will be cherished by her daughter Patricia and her husband Bob FENNER of Cobourg and by her granddaughters Louisa (Paul SAWA) of Halifax, Kate of Brooklyn, New York and Susannah (Graham SHAW) of Toronto. Luke SAWA and Ethan SHAW have missed a wonderful great-grandmother. Friends May call at the Trull 'North Toronto' Funeral Home and Cremation Centre 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence) on Monday from 7 to 9 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Our Lady of Assumption Church (Bathurst, north of Eglinton) on Tuesday Morning at 10 o'clock. Cremation to follow. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Big Sisters association of Ontario 2750 Dufferin Street, Toronto, M6B 3R4.

  G... Names     GE... Names     GEO... Names     Welcome Home

GEORGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-26 published
BROADHEAD, William ''Bill'' David
Died in the early hours of the morning, on March 24, 2003 at St. Michael's Hospital. In his 87th year, David's health had been failing for some time. It was his greatest wish to depart peacefully. Predeceased by his first wife Kathleen (née MURRAY) and by his son Paul. David will be greatly missed by his second wife, Hazel LOIS and by his three children Anne (Joseph,) Nora ANDERSON (Robert) and John (Ana.) Also survived by his eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Dear brother to Marjory GEORGE of Chatham, Ontario. David, a graduate of McMaster University, was the last of the great Dickensians, having read most of the great classics. He had a particular fondness for Charles Dickens and Thomas Hardy. He wrote short stories and at the age of 70, continued to take courses at U. of T. Up until the end of his life, David took great pleasure in continuing to write fiction. Friends may call the Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home and Chapel, 467 Sherbourne Street (South of Wellesley Street) on Wednesday, from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. A funeral Mass will be celebrated on Thursday March 27, at 10: 30 a.m. at Our Lady of Lourdes Church (Sherbourne and Earl Street). Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations in David's name to either Covenant House or Interval House would be greatly appreciated.
''Dad was a man of honour and integrity. His sense of humour was a great delight to all who met him.''

  G... Names     GE... Names     GEO... Names     Welcome Home

GEORGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-06 published
Died This Day -- Lord Byng of Vimy, 1935
Friday, June 6, 2003 - Page R11
British Army officer and aristocrat born Julian Hedworth GEORGE on September 11, 1862, at Wrotham Park, England; May, 1916, appointed to command Canadian Corps; April, 1917, directed attack on Vimy Ridge; promoted to command British 3rd Army; April, 1921, named Governor-General of Canada; in June, 1926, refused request for dissolution of Parliament sought by Prime Minister Mackenzie KING; led to King-Byng Affair; departed from Canada under a shadow, even though constitutionally correct; 1928-31, named chief commissioner of London Metropolitan Police.

  G... Names     GE... Names     GEO... Names     Welcome Home

GEORGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-06 published
Died This Day -- Anthony Dudley GEORGE, 1995
Saturday, September 6, 2003 - Page F11
Native activist and seasonal labourer born March 17, 1957; shot and killed by Ontario Provincial Police Acting Sergeant Kenneth Deane during a confrontation between police and a native group that had occupied traditional Chippewa land at Ontario's Ipperwash Provincial Park.

  G... Names     GE... Names     GEO... Names     Welcome Home

GEORGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-11 published
Creator of Savage God
Theatre director was a Canadian nationalist, a fan of the avant garde and a champion of playwright George Ryga. He was also seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, October 11, 2003 - Page F9
John JULIANI was a provocateur in life as on stage. A man passionate about the possibilities of theatre, he roused reverence in some, antipathy in others.
His most infamous act was to challenge the Stratford Festival's newly hired artistic director to a duel. Robin PHILLIPS's offence was that he is British when Mr. JULIANI and others were certain a land as grand as Canada was capable of producing a director for its Shakespearean theatre.
What he called a "romantic gesture with tongue in cheek" earned cheers from Canadian theatre directors and sneers from much of the theatre establishment.
Mr. JULIANI, who has died at the age of 63, was an unabashed Canadian nationalist, a dedicated fan of the avant garde, an ardent defender of the right of actors to a decent living, a champion of playwright George Ryga and a tireless figure so commanding as to develop an intense loyalty among acolytes.
At the same time, he was seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter. One critic called him "the Tiger Williams of Canadian theatre," his pugnacious approach earning him comparison to a notorious hockey goon. In his defence, Mr. JULIANI explained that he was merely a "true believer" with opinions on controversial subjects.
Mr. JULIANI's credits were long and varied, including spontaneous Sixties street happenings such as the staging of his own wedding as a theatrical performance and brief appearances on such 1990s television dramas as The X-Files.
From 1982 until 1997, Mr. JULIANI was executive producer of radio drama for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver. He helped to bring to air many celebrated productions, including the brilliant and provocative Dim Sum Diaries by playwright Mark LEIREN- YOUNG.
Mr. JULIANI also possessed a head-turning beauty, with a profile as striking as a Roman bust. Radio host Bill RICHARDSON commented on his handsomeness at a raucous memorial after his death, calling him a "hunka hunka burnin' love." Some said he had the looks and bearing of a Shakespearean king.
John Charles JULIANI was born in Montreal on March 24, 1940. Raised in a working-class neighbourhood, he attended Loyola College and was an early graduate from the fledgling National Theatre School.
He spent two seasons as an actor at Stratford before being hired as a theatre teacher at Simon Fraser University in 1966. The new university atop Burnaby Mountain east of Vancouver was a hotbed of radicalism in politics and the arts. Mr. JULIANI bristled at an imposed curriculum and so infuriated the administration that he was banned from the campus in 1969.
Mr. JULIANI was heavily influenced by the writing of Antonin Artaud, a Surrealist who championed a theatre based on the imagination. He long sought to erase the barrier between scripted text and sensory impression, between performer and audience, to mixed success.
After moving to the West Coast, Mr. JULIANI launched a series of experiments in theatre. He credited these productions to Savage God, which was less a troupe in the traditional sense than a title granted to any performance involving Mr. JULIANI. The name came from William Butler Yeats's awestruck reaction to Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi: "After us, the Savage God?"
Savage God defied explanation, though many tried and even Mr. JULIANI offered suggestions. Savage God was "an anthology of question marks," he once said. (It was, after all, the 1960s.) "Savage God is simply the Imagination," he told the Vancouver Sun, "insatiable, unrelenting, fiercely energetic, wary of categorization, fond of contradiction and inveterately iconoclastic."
In January, 1970, Mr. JULIANI married dancer Donna WONG, a ceremony conducted as a Savage God performance at the Vancouver Art Gallery. He repeated the process at the christening of his son. Ms. WONG- JULIANI would be his domestic and drama partner for more than three decades.
In 1971, the streets of Vancouver were the scene of several spontaneous and sometimes incomprehensible -- performances under the aegis of PACET ("pilot alternative complement to existing theatre.") The $18,000 project, funded by the federal government, incorporated Gestalt therapy sessions in street performances.
Theatrical events took place willy-nilly across the city, including malls, the airport, the library and Stanley Park. Admission was not charged, nor did all spectators appreciate their role as audience to avant-garde performance. A scene in which bicyclists wearing gas masks pedalled along city streets left many scratching their heads in puzzlement.
In 1974, Mr. JULIANI moved to Toronto to set up a graduate theatre-studies program at York University.
He called the program PEAK (" Performance, Example, Animation, Katharsis") and perhaps should have found an acronym for PEEK, as the instructor and his class stripped naked to protest against a lack of classroom space.
The challenge to the new Stratford artistic director in 1974 was written on a piece of parchment and delivered in London by Don RUBIN, a York colleague. Alas, Mr. RUBIN could not find a proper gauntlet and wound up ceremoniously striking Mr. PHILLIPS with a red rubber glove, an absurd note to a theatrical protest.
In 1978, Mr. JULIANI took the stage in a Toronto production of Children of Night, portraying Janusz Korczak, a doctor and teacher who ran an orphanage in the Warsaw ghetto. The critics were appalled.
Gina MALLET of the Toronto Star said Mr. JULIANI's performance sullied Dr. Korczak's memory. Jay SCOTT of The Globe and Mail, noting "the dreadfulness" of Mr. JULIANI's acting, said the production robbed the dead of their dignity.
From the stage, Mr. JULIANI challenged the Star's critic to a public debate on the aesthetics of theatre. He also wrote a letter to the editor, noting that Holocaust survivors in the audience had wholeheartedly embraced the production.
Mr. JULIANI wound up in Edmonton, where he continued to condemn the "exorbitance, elitism and museum theatre" of the establishment.
In 1982, he directed and co-wrote Latitude 55°, a feature film with just two characters -- a slick woman from the city and a Polish potato farmer -- set in a snowbound cabin. "It is filled with a passionate conviction that evaporates in pretentious pronouncements," The Globe's Carole CORBEIL wrote, "filled with truthful moments that evaporate in the desire to use every narcissistic trick in the book."
In a 1983 book examining the alternative theatre movement in Canada, author Renate USMIANI devoted most of a chapter to Mr. JULIANI, a decision that got her a scathing rebuke from a reviewer who considered him worthy of little more than a footnote.
"His works are curiosities; at best, they are worthy experiments in Artaudian theory," Boyd NEIL wrote in a Globe review. "But they are neither popular... nor influential."
Mr. JULIANI's years at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver were both productive and successful. Among the many projects he directed was a three-part adaptation of Margaret Laurence's The Diviners; King Lear, starring John COLICOS; a 13-part series titled, Disaster! Acts of God or Acts of Man?" and, famously, Ryga's The Ecstasy of Rita Joe, with Leonard GEORGE portraying a role once assumed on stage by his late father, Chief Dan GEORGE. The surprise selection of Mr. GEORGE was typical of Mr. JULIANI's often brilliant casting.
Mr. JULIANI directed a 1989 production of The Glass Menagerie at the Vancouver Playhouse with Jennifer Phipps and Morris Panych. Globe reviewer Liam LACEY praised a production that "opens up the play like an old treasure chest, and lets in some fresh air without rearranging or disturbing the work's original grandeurs and caprices."
Four years later, Mr. JULIANI was directing a production of the mystery thriller Sleepwalker when actor Peter HAWORTH took sick shortly before opening night. The director suddenly found himself as the male lead. "Not even the most colossal egotist would want to do this," he said.
Dim Sum Diaries, a series of monologues written by Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG, received protests when aired by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in 1991. One episode, entitled The Sequoia, in which the white vendor of a luxury home launches a tirade against the Hong Kong immigrant who cuts down two rare and spectacular trees on the property, was accused of being racist. The playwright's well-intentioned exploration of stereotyping was charged with fostering those very prejudices.
After directing Dim Sum Diaries, Mr. JULIANI urged the playwright to tackle an issue that was dividing his church. Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG remembers replying: "You're talking same-sex marriage in the Anglican church and you want a straight Jewish guy to write this?"
The resulting play, titled Articles of Faith: The Battle of St. Alban's, was staged at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Vancouver to great acclaim.
The collaborations between young playwright and veteran director succeeded in achieving Mr. JULIANI's goal of inspiring dialogue through theatre.
Mr. JULIANI had a reputation as a demanding taskmaster for novice and veteran actors alike. Rehearsals were jokingly called "Savage God Boot Camp."
He maintained a breakneck pace, both in the theatre and in the boardroom. He was artistic co-director of Opera Breve, a small company dedicated to nurturing young singers; president of the Union of British Columbia Performers (Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists); and, a former national president of the Directors Guild of Canada, among many boards on which he served.
Feeling fatigued in early August, Mr. JULIANI was diagnosed with liver cancer. The end came swiftly. He died on August 21 at Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver.
He leaves his wife of 33 years, Donna WONG- JULIANI, and a son, Alessandro JULIANI, an actor. He also leaves brothers Richard and Norman.
(Wit was long a part of the JULIANI mystique. The family pet, a canine named Beau Beau, was referred to in the family's paid obituary notice as a Savage Dog.)
For one who roused such passions, Mr. JULIANI felt that he led a conservative life. "I have always been a square," he once said.
A theatrical farewell to Mr. JULIANI attracted hundreds to St. Andrew's Wesley Church in Vancouver on Labour Day, a Monday and traditionally a quiet date on the theatre calendar. Those in attendance were encouraged to write remembrances on Post-It notes, which were then stuck to the church's pillars.
The City of Vancouver has declared next March 24, which would have been Mr. JULIANI's 64th birthday, to be Savage God Day.

  G... Names     GE... Names     GEO... Names     Welcome Home

GEORGE - All Categories in OGSPI

GEORGETTI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-14 published
Former Canadian Labour Congress president McDERMOTT dies at 81
Friday, February 14, 2003, Page A7
Labour union titan Dennis McDERMOTT has died. He was 81.
Nearly 22 years ago, Mr. McDERMOTT led a massive rally at Parliament Hill, said to be the largest such demonstration in Canadian history, to protest against the oppressive burden of high interest rates that created high unemployment and economic instability.
At the time, Mr. McDERMOTT was president of the Canadian Labour Congress, a post he held from 1978 to 1986.
"Dennis McDERMOTT's career was a model of effective trade-union leadership," Canadian Labour Congress president Ken GEORGETTI said last night.
"All his actions were grounded in bread-and-butter issues, yet he will be remembered for advancing human-rights issues, labour's political action and outreach to workers and their unions around the world."
Mr. McDERMOTT's interest in trade unionism began just after the Second World War, when he started working as an assembler and welder at a Massey-Ferguson plant in Toronto. In short order, he became an activist with the United Auto Workers, now known as the Canadian Auto Workers-Canada.

  G... Names     GE... Names     GEO... Names     Welcome Home

GEORGETTI - All Categories in OGSPI

GEORGEVSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-06 published
His passion was coaching
He worked at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children for 40 years, but his spare time was devoted to training athletes
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, May 6, 2003 - Page R7
An era has ended in Canadian track-and-field athletics. Don MILLS, coach, administrator and volunteer, died in Windsor, Ontario, last month. He was 75.
The folklore surrounding Mr. MILLS, who was most recently an assistant coach with the University of Toronto's track-and-field and cross-country teams, was that he never missed a meet, often attending more than one on a weekend.
Mr. MILLS was at the Canadian Interuniversity Sport championships assisting with the university's Varsity Blues team when he died peacefully in his sleep.
"For Don, track-and-field coaching and working with young people was his passion, said Carl GEORGEVSKI, head coach of Varsity Blues track and field.
Mr. MILLS's involvement in track and field began in 1963 when he co-founded the Toronto Striders Track Club. He went on to form Track West, in the city's west end, in the 1970s and was a club coach there until the end of the 2002 season. One of his highlights as a coach was the 1978 World Cross Country Championships. Three of the six Canadian junior men there were from Track West. They took home a silver medal.
"If [a runner] didn't have a coach and needed one they would saddle over to Don, said Ian ANDERSON, a friend and fellow coach at Track West and at the University of Toronto.
Known for devoting hours of his spare time to typing out the results of athletes' workouts, giving nutritional advice, supervising workouts and attending what seemed like every track-and-field and cross-country race in the country, Mr. MILLS made each of the athletes feel they were the most important.
"You thought you were his only athlete, said Paul KEMP, a runner who trained with Mr. MILLS at both Track West and at the University of Toronto. But Mr. KEMP soon realized that the same time and individual attention Mr. MILLS gave to him, he also gave to 20 other athletes.
Jerry KOOYMANS, who ran with Track West in the late 1970s and early 1980s, remembers Mr. MILLS dropping by his hotel room the night before a big race to discuss race strategy. Mr. MILLS would pull out the list of opponents and discuss their strengths and weaknesses and how to beat them.
"By the time I got to the starting line, I felt like I was the best-prepared runner in the race, Mr. KOOYMANS said in a written tribute to his old coach.
When he wasn't busy coaching, Mr. MILLS, who lived in Oakville, Ontario, west of Toronto, was volunteering with the Ontario Track and Field Association as an official or meet director. His meticulous administrative skills and painstaking attention to detail are widely remembered. It was not uncommon for Mr. MILLS to travel across the city on a Sunday night to drop off race results to an athlete or fellow coach. He received the government of Ontario's special achievement award for his work as a volunteer administrator.
Mr. MILLS joined the Varsity Blues staff in 1999, where he focused on men's middle-distance running. But his connections with the University of Toronto go back to the early 1960s, when he spent time coaching the men's boxing team. One of the young men he is reported to have coached was former Ontario premier David PETERSON.
Outside of coaching, Mr. MILLS worked at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children for 40 years. He started out in biochemistry research in 1954 and later transferred to occupational health and safety where he was involved in purchasing radioactive materials. He routinely ate breakfast at the hospital cafeteria and, even after he retired, continued to visit the hospital daily and spend time in its library.
Don MILLS was born on August 29, 1927, in Trois-Rivières, Quebec. He lived a quiet life, never marrying or having children of his own. He acted as a father figure to many athletes and maintained connections with them. Over the holidays, he would often spend time with the families of former athletes. Not one to talk about himself, his athletes and colleagues knew little about him. Not much is known about his own athletic achievements except that he is said to have played hockey in his younger years. Mr. MILLS, however, remained fit throughout his life.
"He was very quiet, Mr. ANDERSON said. "He was never the centre of attention."
While his workouts could be tough, Mr. MILLS knew when an athlete had endured enough, Mr. KEMP said. He was not one to yell or scream.
"He was patient, he was dedicated. He was committed, Mr. GEORGEVSKI said.
Renowned for never owning a car, Mr. MILLS mastered bus and train routes from coast to coast. Being without a vehicle didn't deter him from getting to a track meet or practice session, no matter where it was held. He became legendary for his uncanny ability to get to meets without driving.
In recent years he refused to fly. Even so, that didn't stop him from attending a National Cross Country Championship in British Columbia.
In order to be with his team, Mr. MILLS left Ontario a week ahead of schedule to travel across the country by train. Two years ago, Mr. KEMP flew to Edmonton to attend a tournament only to be met by Mr. MILLS, who had arrived earlier by bus.
"He was an individual who cared deeply about all his athletes, " whether it was a young, struggling runner or one who was performing among the top at the national level, Mr. GEORGEVSKI.
A track scholarship has been established in Mr. MILLS's name at the University of Toronto. He died on March 16.

  G... Names     GE... Names     GEO... Names     Welcome Home

GEORGEVSKI - All Categories in OGSPI