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"GAU" 2003 Obituary


GAUCHER  GAUDAUR  GAUDETTE  GAUL  GAULIN  GAUTHIER  GAUTREAU  GAUVREAU 

GAUCHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-30 published
PICK, Archibald Roy (Archie)
After a long courageous battle with pancreatic cancer, Archie PICK died peacefully on August 23, 2003. His wife, Jeannie, was at his side.
Archie was born August 18, 1938, in a log cabin in Red Lake, Ontario. He moved to Winnipeg with his parents in 1941. He attended public schools in Winnipeg, Rathwell and Notre Dame de Lourdes, Manitoba.
He was preceded in death by his first wife, Marcia, brother, Leonard, sister, Barbara and father William. Archie is survived by his loving wife, Jeannie, his mother Mary, son David (Christine McCREADY,) daughters: Kirsten Ann GAUCHER (John) and Jennifer Marie SANCHEZ (Christopher) and grand_son Jacob GAUCHER. Archie was very proud of his family and loved them all dearly.
Archie attended the University of Manitoba and the University of North Dakota. He received his B.S. in Civil Engineering (1962) and M.S. in Civil Engineering (1966). Archie started his professional career with the Structural Division of Manitoba Hydro in 1962, and after receiving his Master's degree in 1966, he joined the Metropolitan Corporation in Greater Winnipeg (City of Winnipeg) in the Waterworks and Waste Division. In 1973, Archie moved with his family to Edmonton to join the newly formed Environment Canada as head of Water Pollution Control for the Western Region (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Northwest Territories). In 1976, he was appointed Chief, Environmental Conservation Branch, Western Region, Environment Canada. Subsequently, he left Public Service and joined the consulting engineering firm of James F. MacLaren Limited as General Manager of Western Canadian Operations (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Northwest Territories, Yukon). One of the highlights of this position was acting as Project Manager for the clean-up and recovery of the Russian Cosmos satellite which crashed in the Northwest Territory in the region of Great Slave Lake. In 1980, Archie became the Executive Vice President of MacLaren Plansearch, division of Lavalin. In 1982, he joined Interprovincial Pipe Line Limited (Enbridge, Inc.) and was appointed as Manager, Design and Construction, for the Norman Wells Pipeline Project, drawing on his experience in the north, engineering, and environment. The successful completion of this project was clearly the highlight of his career. His career at Interprovincial Pipe Line involved him in the company's endeavours in Canada, U.S.A., Mexico, Venezuela and Ecuador. He retired in 1998 as a result of health concerns.
At various times, Archie taught as a part time professor in the faculty of Engineering at the University of Manitoba and the University of Alberta. During his working career, he had been registered as a Professional Engineer in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territory. He was a Life Member of the Association of Professional Engineers, Geologists, and Geophysicists.
Archie, along with Marcia and his children, was an avid skier and was involved with Alpine Ski Racing throughout most of his adult life. He was a Life Member of the Edmonton Snow Valley Ski Club; a senior official of the Alberta Alpine Division of the Canadian Ski Association; served as North Zone Chairman for Canadian Ski Association-Alpine Division; was a long time member of the Edmonton Superbowl Ski team.
Archie and Jeannie were married in 1993 and lived in Edmonton until Archie's retirement in 1998. Since then they have divided their time between their cottage at Clear Lake and their home on Vancouver Island, enjoying family, Friends, and time together.
A bright, shining, steady light has gone from our lives, but will remain in our hearts forever. A memorial service was conducted in Erickson, Manitoba and another memorial service will be held on Sunday, October 19, 2003, at 2: 00 p.m. in the Knox United Church, Parksville, British Columbia.
In lieu of flowers, memoriam to Canadian Diabetes Association, Heart and Stroke Foundation or Cancer Research.
Rae's Funeral Service of Erickson, Manitoba, were in care of the arrangements. (204) 636-7727.

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GAUDAUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-10 published
The backroom brain of the Canadian Football League
For 37 years, he was 'Facts Fulton,' the head-office man who made things work and who wrote the complex rules that govern the Canadian Football League
By Dan RALPH, Canadian Press; Globe and Mail files Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - Page R5
For 16 years, former Canadian Football League commissioner Jake GAUDAUR never relied on a computer to draw up the league's regular-season schedule. Instead, he looked to Greg FULTON to do it in his head.
"We used to run it [the Canadian Football League schedule] in the computer for days," said Mr. GAUDAUR, who served as league commissioner from 1968 to 1983. "But in the final analysis, Greg would always have it worked out in his mind."
Mr. FULTON, who spent 54 years with the Canadian Football League as a player, statistician and historian, died in Toronto on Monday. It was his 84th birthday. The cause of death was not provided but he reportedly suffered a stroke last week that caused him to fall into a coma from which he never emerged.
"He worked behind the scenes and received so little credit," Mr. GAUDAUR said. "There was no one in Canadian history who knew as much about the league as Greg did."
Doug MITCHELL, who succeeded Mr. GAUDAUR as Canadian Football League commissioner in 1984, marvelled at Mr. FULTON's ability to draw up a Canadian Football League schedule.
"He did it on a sort of a blackboard," he recollected. "What the computer kicked out invariably never worked but Greg's schedules always did. It really was incredible."
Current Canadian Football League commissioner Tom WRIGHT said Mr. FULTON's passion and commitment were an inspiration. "While he served our league with distinction and honour, he will best be remembered for the warmth of his smile, the wit of his stories, and the depth of his recollections."
Mr. FULTON, a Winnipeg native, moved to Calgary in 1930 and began his career as a player with the Stampeders in 1939. During the Second World War, he served with the Calgary Regiment of the First Canadian Armoured Brigade and participated in the abortive Dieppe raid on August 19, 1942.
Returning home in peacetime, he attended the University of Alberta to get a bachelor of commerce degree and soon after found a job with Revenue Canada.
So, how exactly did a Calgary tax man end up as one of the Canadian Football League's most influential people? It started with a love affair for facts and figures that first led to a part-time job in Calgary as a statistician for the Stampeders. When Clark DAVEY, who was later appointed to the Senate, was appointed in 1966 as the Canadian Football League's first full-time commissioner, he lured Mr. FULTON to Toronto.
Sen. DAVEY "made some quick enemies because he was outspoken and the job wasn't really ready for him," Mr. FULTON told former Globe and Mail sportswriter Marty YORK. So 54 days after he took the job, much of which consisted of feuding with Canadian Football League officials, Sen. DAVEY resigned. Mr. FULTON was kept on under Mr. GAUDAUR, Sen. DAVEY's successor.
"Jake usually approaches me every day to ask me something," Mr. FULTON once said in an interview. "A lot of the times, I think he knows the answers to the questions he is asking, but I think he might feel better if he hears something from me. I guess you could call me his confidant, but there are times when I do mention something that he has overlooked and that often can have an effect on the league and the fans."
What was most important, wrote Marty YORK in 1981, was Mr. FULTON's status as assistant commissioner -- a title he did not hold but a role he filled seven days a week. A walking Canadian Football League encyclopedia, he was soon nicknamed Facts Fulton. He was also known as Jake GAUDAUR's memory bank.
When Mr. GAUDAUR became commissioner, he delegated a number of the commissioner's key duties to Mr. FULTON who already administered the pension funds and had the challenging task of drawing up the Canadian Football League schedule. Consequently, the nine Canadian Football League general managers became accountable to Mr. FULTON.
He was authorized to issue orders, regulations and memoranda to all club officials, including coaches and players. Also, he was responsible for roster control, player personnel, registration of all contracts, waiver procedures, negotiation lists and draft lists.
"He did the work of three people but the last thing he wanted to do was talk about it," Mr. GAUDAUR said.
At the same time, however, Mr. FULTON was a confessed nag. "I wouldn't be doing my job if I wasn't," he once said.
Managers of Canadian Football League clubs across the country sometimes came to dread the sound of the phone ringing. "He'll bug you when he calls to remind you that you didn't do such-and-such a thing," said Montreal Alouette general manager Bob GEARY in 1981. "It gets on your nerves sometimes, but I guess if he didn't do that kind of stuff, no one would, and we'd be suffering more than we do."
Mr. FULTON was also something of a Canadian Football League policeman who had to lay down league laws. At one time, Canadian Football League clubs were strictly limited about who could attend training camps. Under the terms of an agreement with the Canadian Football League Players Association, clubs were allowed to conduct pre-training-camp practices only for rookies, quarterbacks and veterans who had surgery the previous year. Veterans were allowed to work out on their own, but coaches were forbidden to order them to participate. In a case in which the Argo felt they had good reason to start camp early, Mr. FULTON had to consult his regulations.
"I told them it was fine," he decreed. "As long as the veterans were running around on their own."
Clubs that violated pre-training-camp rules by practicing with veterans faced fines, he said.
All things considered, though, it was drawing up the schedule that was Mr. FULTON's most time-consuming job. It was also the one for which he suffered the most criticism.
"I've never yet been able to satisfy everyone with the schedule," he said. "I'm convinced that that's impossible because of the uniqueness of our league. We only have nine teams, which means that one team has to sit out every week. Also, because some of our clubs play in stadiums where baseball and soccer are played, I have to work the schedule around that too."
In 1990, Mr. FULTON received the first Commissioner's Award for his contribution to football in Canada. Five years later, he was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in the builder's category. In 1995, he was named the honorary secretary-treasurer and was active in head office as a consultant and historian until his death.
Mr. FULTON, who was reappointed by the Canadian Football League to his primary role about 10 times eight times, sometimes felt guilty about his job because he puts it ahead of everything else in his life.
"I've never been able to take an extended holiday," he said in 1981. "But I wouldn't change it for anything in the world... I'm one of those rare people who actually enjoys his job."
To a sometimes troubled league, he was a godsend.
"Thank goodness we have a guy like him," Bob GEARY told Marty YORK. "I hate to think what would happen to us if he wasn't around."
Mr. FULTON leaves children Robert, Byrne and Rebecca. He was predeceased by wife Angela BOMBARDIERI in 1990. Funeral details are pending.

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GAUDAUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-10 published
FULTON quietly kept the Canadian Football League in running order
By Stephen BRUNT, Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - Page S8
Less than a month back, during Grey Cup week, Greg FULTON picked up his phone to answer a few questions from a reporter.
Frail health had kept him from making the trip to Regina, but in conversation he was sharp as a tack and again proved himself to be a one-man encyclopedia of Canadian football history.
Paul MARTIN, the prime minister to be, was going to make a much publicized pregame appearance at Taylor Field, fresh from the Liberal leadership convention.
Aside from Pierre TRUDEAU, FULTON was asked, did he remember any other prime minister taking the time to attend the Grey Cup? "Well," he said, "I don't remember Mackenzie KING being there. Or Louis SSAINTURENT."
Of course, he knew because he was there. It seemed he was always there -- a player beginning in Winnipeg in 1939, a statistician and treasurer for the Calgary Stampeders from 1950 to 1966, a fixture in the Canadian Football League office from 1967 on, and, finally in his last job, the Canadian Football League's honorary secretary and official historian, a title surely unique in all of pro sports.
The National Football League still has a few owners with connections to the game's early days, and in hockey and baseball there are at least a handful of sportswriting elders who still remember when. But only the Canadian Football League actually employed someone who had an inside view extending back more than 60 years.
Considering how tumultuous some of those seasons have been and considering the game's highs and lows and the cast of strange and wonderful characters who came and went, what a tale FULTON could tell.
He was 84 when he died on Monday, and with him, sadly, is lost much of the anecdotal story of the league. (Commissioner Tom WRIGHT, who during his relatively short term on the job had come to appreciate FULTON's special role, planned to have FULTON's memories committed to tape and transcribed. Sadly, that didn't happen before FULTON fell ill.)
FULTON's tenure with the league office was perhaps the only significant legacy of Keith DAVEY's 54-day reign as commissioner in 1967. Davey lured FULTON to Toronto from Calgary to act as the league's treasurer. When Jake GAUDAUR took over from DAVEY, he decided to keep FULTON on.
"It would be the most important decision I would make," GAUDAUR says now, which, given the events of his 16 years in office, is quite a statement. Every subsequent commissioner -- and there have been a bunch -- endorsed and echoed that original decision.
Not that anyone on the outside would really understand. "All of those beneficial things he did for the league were all out of public view," GAUDAUR said. "He never received any sort of media credit, nor did he want any. Clearly, it was a labour of love for him. That's kind of corny to say that, but I really believe it was."
In those early days, the league was a two-man, two-secretary operation. FULTON, an accountant by profession, kept the books, kept an eye on club finances and kept the minutes during league meetings -- all during a period when the game grew into a multimillion-dollar sports business. He was also charged with producing the schedule every year, a trickier proposition than it might seem, given the uneven number of teams, the east-west split and the importance of certain dates in certain places.
At one point, GAUDAUR remembers, they turned the task over to a computer. And then, after the computer coughed out its work, they handed it to FULTON, who fixed it. "He had what I consider to be a computer mind," GAUDAUR said. "It was an incredible mind."
The Canadian Football League took a turn for the worse after GAUDAUR left the post. Commissioners came and went, the league at times teetered on the brink of insolvency, the disastrous U.S. expansion played itself out and the owners at times resembled a bag of mixed nuts.
But there was always FULTON, quietly keeping things in running order, breaking the tension with his wry, quiet sense of humour, loyal first and foremost to the game he loved.
"He was a remarkable person," GAUDAUR said. "It really was a pleasure to be around the guy."
Several generations of those who spent time in the Canadian Football League orbit share those sentiments and mourn the loss.

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GAUDETTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-05 published
Kenneth Peter BARR
Died peacefully at home on Monday, June 2, 2003 with dignity and courage, after a brief battle with cancer, his wife Trish by his side. Ken was born November 25, 1949 and raised in St. Catharines, Ontario. Predeceased by his mother Isabel. Ken is survived by his father David BARR, wife Patricia, sons Paul and Craig HANSON and grand_son T.J. Also survived by his sister Judy and family, father-in-law John STOTT, and extended family members Normande GAUDETTE and Margaret HANSON- BROWN. Ken spent 35 years in the telecommunications industry in Canada and is well respected by colleagues, customers and business partners. Ken's caring, Friendship and respect for all individuals are hallmarks of his personality and his leadership style. Ken's extensive career included President of CTI, President of Lucent Canada's, Business Communications Systems, and a variety of sales, marketing, regulatory and management roles at American Telephone and Telegraph, TTS, Nortel, BCSI and Bell Canada. Most recently Ken was President and Chief Executive Officer of Vancouver based Security Biometrics. Ken's involvement with the community included the United Way, Junior Achievement, the Bay Street Rat Race and Ronald McDonald House. Ken balanced his business life with his love for his family. His special place for himself, family and Friends was Oak Lake, where he loved to relax and appreciate the wonders of nature. Ken's love of life is exemplified by his genuine concern for family and Friends and his many hobbies and interests including flying, boating, snowmobiling. His spirit will live on in all of us. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West on Monday, June 9th at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Ken's memory to the Canadian Cancer Society, 20 Holly Street, Suite #101, Toronto M4S 3B1 or the Ronald McDonald Children's Charities of Canada, McDonald's Place, Toronto, Ontario M3C 3L4.

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GAUDETTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-04 published
GAUDETTE, Barry Douglas
Born April 2, 1947 in Edmonton, Alberta, Barry died October 1, 2003 in the Ottawa Civic Hospital surrounded by family and Friends after a brief yet valiant struggle with multiple myeloma. Pre-deceased by his mother Orvie, father Douglas, and father-in-law Jim CLARK, he is survived by his beloved wife, Leslie Ann, and two children Darrell Lorne (University of Waterloo) and Lisa Marie (Acadia University). Loving brother to Allan (Gloria), Montreal; Neil (Merrilyn) and Dawn, Edmonton: Shelley (Glen), Nanaimo; and Douglas, Guelph. Also loved by his mother-in-law Mary CLARK, sister-in-law Mary-Jane GARNETT (Jim), Surrey, British Columbia; and brothers-in-law Jim (Shirley) and Norman (Gwen), Langley, British Columbia. Beloved nieces and nephews include Taryn, Jaden, Brynne, Ariel, Nathaniel, Sarah, Robin, Willow, Gaelan, Maxwell, Leanna, Tracey, Tara, Melissa, Sandra, Teresa, Angela, John and Shyan.
Barry earned a B.Sc (Honours) in Chemistry from the University of Calgary in 1969. He served 33 years as a Forensic Scientist with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, most recently as Manager of the Canadian Police Research Centre, a collaboration of the National Research Council, Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police. An internationally recognized expert in hair and fibre analysis, he published innovative research articles on forensic hair comparison, chaired international expert committees, and appeared as an expert witness in courts in both Canada and the United States. Envisioning the potential of DNA analysis in forensic science, he managed the implementation of DNA technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police labs across Canada, and contributed to the 1997 National DNA Databank legislation. A member of the Canadian, American and United Kingdom Forensic Science societies, he also served on the U.S. / Canada Bilateral Counter-Terrorism Research and Development Committee, 1999-2002. His contributions were recognized in 1996 with the Government of Canada Public Service Award of Excellence and in 2003 with the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Commemorative Medal for his work in hair comparison, implementation of the National DNA Databank, and international standardization forensic methodologies.
Barry loved God's world and his greatest joys were found while enjoying the many miles of recreational trails around Ottawa and in his garden. An active community leader, he volunteered his time as Cub leader, Soccer Coach and Chair of the Colonel By High School Parents Association.
Friends may visit at the St. Laurent Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 1200 Ogilvie Road at Aviation Parkway on Tuesday October 7, 2003 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 pm. A Celebration of Barry's life will be held at the Church of the Epiphany, 1290 Ogilvie Road, Ottawa on Wednesday, October 8th at 1 pm with a reception to follow. A private interment will be held at Beechwood Cemetary.
In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or to the Trans-Canada Trail Association.

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GAUDETTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-25 published
A world-class forensic scientist
Expert in hair and fibre analysis and DNA techniques helped revolutionized police investigations worldwide
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, November 25, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- A simple demonstration using a red pullover and an ultraviolet light during one of the United State's most infamous murder cases helped cement Barry GAUDETTE's reputation as an internationally renowned forensic scientist.
While testifying as an expert witness during the 1981 trial of Wayne WILLIAMS for the murder of several black children in Atlanta, Mr. GAUDETTE asked members of the jury to pass the sweater back and forth. Then he switched off the lights in the courtroom and shone an ultraviolet light on the jury members, revealing fibres from the pullover all over them..
His testimony made a strong connection between carpet fibres from Mr. WILLIAMS's residences and vehicles, and fibres found on several of the young victims, including some whose bodies were found submerged in water. Soon after, Mr. WILLIAMS was convicted as the first black serial killer in the U.S.
"It was a graphic, innovative and very compelling demonstration that showed how fibre transfer worked, and it led to a conviction," said Skip PALENIK, a forensic scientist and president of Microtrace in Chicago, who was involved in the WILLIAMS trial.
"Barry's demonstration helped the jury buy into the theory of fibre transfer... they were hostile to the idea that a black man could kill other blacks, but it tied WILLIAMS to the victims. It was the kind of demonstration that brought science home to a jury.'' Mr. GAUDETTE, a native of Edmonton, died in Ottawa on October 1 after a brief battle with multiple myeloma. He was At the time of the Atlanta child-murders case, Mr. GAUDETTE, a forensic scientist by training, was an expert in hair and fibre analysis. Later, he would help implement the use of DNA technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police laboratories across Canada. His findings in hair and fibre analysis and his legwork in DNA helped revolutionize police investigative tools in Canada and around the world, so much so that his work became instrumental in tracking down society's most feared criminals.
Born in Edmonton on April 2, 1947, the oldest of six children, Mr. GAUDETTE received an honours bachelor of science degree in chemistry from the University of Calgary in 1969 and that year was hired by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to work as a forensic scientist in its hair and fibre section in Edmonton. In 1971 he married Leslie Ann CLARK, whom he'd met while the pair worked at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., in Pinawa, Manitoba
He worked for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Edmonton until 1980, during which time he wrote a groundbreaking paper and published various research articles on the high probability that human scalp hair comparisons could be used to link persons to crimes. "His work proved hair comparisons were even more conclusive than blood," said Ms. GAUDETTE, an epidemiologist for Health Canada in Ottawa.
"Barry showed for the first time scientifically that human hair comparisons were a legitimate type of examination to pursue. His work put what had been conventional wisdom onto a scientific footing," adds Mr. PALENIK, whose company provides expert scientific analysis and consultation in the area of small-particle analysis.
After undergoing a year's training with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in hair and fibre analysis, Mr. GAUDETTE was accredited in 1970 as an expert witness and often testified in court cases in Edmonton and later across Canada and in the United States. In 1980, he was transferred to Ottawa to be the chief scientist for hair and fibre analysis at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's central forensic laboratory.
"Barry developed the hair and fibre field and brought it to prominence in the world arena," said John BOWEN, chief scientific officer for Royal Canadian Mounted Police Forensic Laboratory Services in Ottawa, who was trained in hair and fibre analysis by Mr. GAUDETTE in the mid-1980s.
"He was an individual with a lot of vision, a world-class expert in his field.'' In the late 1980s, Mr. GAUDETTE envisioned the potential of DNA analysis in forensic science. He helped implement the technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police labs across Canada and worked to promote the national DNA databank legislation that came into force in 1997.
"Barry did not invent DNA testing," said Mr. PALENIK, "but he saw that it was a powerful tool that could give investigators an ultimate kind of identification. Blood, semen and hair were good, but he recognized that DNA was as good as a fingerprint. He was the one who said the Royal Canadian Mounted Police should put all of its resources into developing DNA as a forensic tool. He said 'let's not waste time on our old ways.' "
It's no stretch, said Mr. PALENIK, to link Mr. GAUDETTE's work in DNA to the conviction of many criminals linked to crimes by their DNA and exoneration of others whose DNA did not match DNA samples taken from crime scenes.
"Barry GAUDETTE made a large contribution to the DNA business because it has significantly changed the investigation procedures in policing," said John ARNOLD, chief scientist for the Ottawa-based Canadian Police Research Centre, a collaboration of the National Research Council, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, which was set up to develop tools for use by police.
"Today, they are solving cases that could never have been solved before without this kind of technology."
In 1999, Mr. GAUDETTE became manager of the Canadian Police Research Centre, where his innovative ways continued. Before retiring in 2002, he helped develop a website, scheduled to be up and running next year, to provide Web-based training for police. He was also involved in developing a cross-Canada standard for protective equipment worn by police. The standard is expected to be in place by the end of 2004, Mr. ARNOLD said.
Even when he was in the twilight years of his career, Mr. GAUDETTE had an appetite for fieldwork and was never content to sit in a cushy office chair and watch his subordinates do all of the work.
"When some people get into management they don't want to work. They want to be the one who directs it. That wasn't Barry," Mr. ARNOLD said.
His stellar reputation led to a position on the U.S./Canada bilateral counterterrorism research and development committee from 1999 to 2002. He received numerous accolades for his pioneering forensic work. In 1996, he was awarded the government of Canada Public Service Award of Excellence, and in 2003 a Golden Jubilee Medal.
Friends and colleagues said that away from the job, Mr. GAUDETTE enjoyed time with his family and took part in community affairs.
Mr. GAUDETTE leaves his wife Leslie and children Lisa, 18, and Darrell, 22.

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GAUL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-24 published
GAUL, Kevin Joseph
A native son of Australia who embraced Canada as his home at the age of 23, died in Toronto on November 20, 2003, surrounded by his wife, Madeleine, and his children Alison and Philip. Kevin's life was centred in his family, his Friends, his church and his community. His support to his community was life-long. It ranged from his service in the Reserve Army in the Royal Canadian Ordinance Corps component of the Toronto Service Battalion and his leadership of the Metro Toronto Housing Authority to his countless hours of charitable work, in roles such as Director and President of the Credit Counseling Service of Toronto, and a key facilitator of the Employment Resources Group, an outreach project of the Anglican Church. In addition, he consulted on housing and education extensively throughout the Caribbean, an area that was dear to his heart. Twenty- five years ago, when Kevin's illness was first diagnosed, he was expected to live only a few years. However, his love of life and commitment to the people, causes, and things he loved gave him the strength to exceed all expectations. Until almost the end, few understood the severity of his illness, so strong and relentless was his pursuit of life. Dr. Michael BAKER was with Kevin from the initial diagnosis until the last minutes of his life. The family gives their heartfelt thanks for the last 25 years to Michael and his team, and to the Transfusion team at the Princess Margaret Hospital. They also thank Dr. Marcella MESENSKY, our family physician and friend, the Toronto East General Hospital, 2 special paramedics and a compassionate Emergency team at Mount Sinai. Predeceased by his parents, John and Theresa Clair GAUL, Kevin leaves a part of himself in the hearts and minds of all who knew him, especially his beloved family, Madeleine, Alison and Philip, his brothers Tony, Greg (Carol), Brian (Anne) GAUL, his sister-in-law, Judy (Mike) MARLOW, and his uncles, aunts, nieces, nephews, and cousins and Friends here, in Australia, the United Kingdom Fenelon Falls and Coboconk. Visitation will be at Heritage Funeral Centre, 50 Overlea Blvd. (416-423-1000) on Thursday, November 27th from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service on Friday November 28th at 11: 00 a.m. at St. Columba and All Hallows Anglican Church, 2723 St. Clair Ave East. In lieu of flowers, donations may sent to the Princess Margaret Hospital Leukemia Research Fund or to St. Columba and All Hallows Anglican Church, Toronto.
''And now we see as through a glass darkly, but then we shall see face to face.''

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GAULIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-17 published
A true hero of Canadian science
Professor who won 1994 Nobel Prize didn't think his work was very important but had to change his mind after he got award
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, October 17, 2003 - Page R13
Canadian physicist Bertram BROCKHOUSE once likened winning the Nobel Prize to winning the Stanley Cup.
Dr. BROCKHOUSE, who shared the Nobel Prize in physics in 1994 for his work developing a technique to measure the atomic structure of matter, died on Monday in a Hamilton hospital. He was 85.
After the prize announcement, the visibly abashed emeritus professor of physics at McMaster University told reporters in Hamilton that when the Swedish Academy of Science telephoned him at 6: 45 a.m. his reaction was "enormous astonishment."
"It came as a complete surprise," he said. "I would have otherwise been dressed and ready."
He said at the time he was unaware he had been nominated.
Aside from his own personal achievement, Dr. BROCKHOUSE is the only Canadian Nobel laureate who was born, educated and completed his life's work in this country.
Dr. BROCKHOUSE shared his Nobel prize with Clifford SHULL, a former professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who died in 2001 at the age of 85. They were honoured for research conducted at the first nuclear reactors in Canada and the United States as early as the 1940s and 1950s.
In announcing the prize, the Royal Swedish Academy said "Clifford SHULL helped answer the question of where atoms 'are' and Bertram N. BROCKHOUSE the question of what atoms 'do.'
Much of Dr. BROCKHOUSE's award-winning work was carried on at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, a facility operated by what is now called Atomic Energy of Canada, where he was a researcher from 1950 until 1962. The original Chalk River reactor, located 190 kilometres northwest of Ottawa, drew curious scientists from around the globe in the 1950s. Dr. BROCKHOUSE used the neutron beams from the nuclear reactors to probe materials at the atomic level. Using a device he built for his research, known as the triple-axis neutron spectrometer, he is recognized for improving the understanding of the way neutrons bounce off atomic nuclei.
His triple-axis neutron spectrometer is still used around the world and parts of the original device he built are still at Chalk River, said Dr. Bruce GAULIN, who holds the Brockhouse Chair in the physics of materials at McMaster.
Dr. BROCKHOUSE worked with simple materials like aluminum and steel. Today the technique he developed, known as neutron scattering, is used in widely differing areas such as the study of superconductors, elastic properties of polymers and virus structure.
Scientists had previously relied on radiation from devices like X-rays to look at the atomic structure of matter. "He is a heroic figure," Dr. GAULIN said.
Described as competitive in his scientific endeavours, Dr. BROCKHOUSE didn't want to miss a single minute. A colleague at Chalk River once asked him why he worked so hard. "Every minute of every day is unique," he replied. "And once that minute is gone, it is lost forever."
While he had little spare time during his years at Chalk River, he did use opportunities to take part in a number of amateur dramatic productions, including three operettas. A great lover of music, particularly for the works of Gilbert and Sullivan, Dr. BROCKHOUSE was known for loudly singing excerpts while working on experiments.
Bertram Neville BROCKHOUSE was born on July 15, 1918, in Lethbridge, Alberta. "My first memories are of a farm near Milk River where I lived with my mother and father and my sister, Alice Evelyn, and a variety of farm and domestic animals," he wrote in an autobiographical sketch for the academy.
His parents Israel Bertram BROCKHOUSE and Mable Emily (NEVILLE) BROCKHOUSE had two other children. One son died in infancy and another went on to become a railroad civil engineer. The family moved to Vancouver while Dr. BROCKHOUSE was still a young boy. He completed high school in 1935 and instead of going to university went to work as a laboratory assistant and then as a radio repairman. When the Second World War came along he used his radio skills as an electronics technician in the Royal Canadian Navy. He spent some months at sea, but most of his war years were spent servicing sonar equipment at a shore base.
After the war, he returned to Vancouver to attend university at the University of British Columbia. He later went to the University of Toronto where he completed his PhD in 1950 with a lofty thesis entitled "The Effect of Stress and Temperature upon the Magnetic Properties of Ferromagnetic Materials".
In 1962, Dr. BROCKHOUSE joined the department of physics at McMaster University and remained there until his retirement in 1984. He and his wife Doris raised their six children in Ancaster, a small community outside Hamilton, in a house they occupied for close to 40 years.
At the university, Dr. BROCKHOUSE was highly regarded as a professor known for having high expectations of his students and for most often being deep in thought.
"You had the sense you were in the presence of an unusual person," said Dr. Tom TIMUSK, an emeritus professor of physics and astronomy at McMaster.
Dr. TIMUSK, who shared an office with Dr. BROCKHOUSE at McMaster for some time, said his colleague jokingly told students after he won the Nobel Prize that he didn't think his work was very important but that had to change his mind after he got the award.
"I think he genuinely believed that what he did was good work, but not so important," Dr. GAULIN said.
Dr. BROCKHOUSE likened himself to an explorer who woke up on any given morning not knowing exactly what he was going to do, except follow some vague instinct about what should be explored next.
He also liked to say that scientists were really just mapmakers with a greater eye for detail. "The metaphor that I think of is that of the atlas you're all familiar with. What we work on in basic science is just a bigger atlas, with places and objects and so on that are not as familiar."
Dr. BROCKHOUSE leaves his wife, children Ann, Gordon, Ian, Beth, Charles and James, and 10 grandchildren.

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GAUTHIER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Ruth Lenora BOYD
In loving memory of Ruth Lenora BOYD, a resident of Centennial Manor in Little Current on Saturday December 21, 2002. Predeceased by husband Doran BOYD (Oct. 31, 1987) and former husband Jack STEWARD/STEWART/STUART (Feb. 12, 1981.) Loving mother of Janis and husband Carl ANNETT. Cherished grandmother of Todd and wife Karen GAUTHIER of Pembroke, Chris GAUTHIER of Little Current, Michelle GAUTHIER of Kingston. Special great grandmother of Aiden, Rachel, Brett and Garret. Will be missed by brothers Bill and Wendell BUIE and sister Norma WAYDA. Visitation was held on Sunday, December 22, 2002. Funeral service was held on Monday December 23, 2002 at Island Funeral Home. Burial in Mountainview Cemetery in the spring.

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GAUTREAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-19 published
SMITH, Margaret Blakely (née BURNS)
Died peacefully at the Scarborough Hospital, Grace Division, of cancer, on February 16, 2003. Daughter of Charles BURNS and Sara Margaret BLAKELY. Sister of Katharine Steele (BURNS, YOUNG) PICKEN. Beloved wife of James Edwin (Ted) SMITH and a wonderful mother to Katharine Blakely SMITH and James Charles SMITH (Cheryl.) Grandmother of Althea ALISON and Michelle Meagan SMITH, and ''Grandma'' to Robin MILLER and Ciera and Ryan GAUTREAU. Born in Ottawa, she was a graduate of Glebe Collegiate and Queen's University where she was a member of the Senior Ladies hockey and basketball teams. For five years she enjoyed teaching high school in Manotick until her marriage to Ted in 1948. The family moved from Ottawa to Toronto in 1963. A memorial service will be held at the Trinity Presbyterian Church, 2737 Bayview Avenue (south of Hwy. 401), on Saturday, February 22, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Spring interment of cremated remains will be held in Norway Bay, Quebec. If you wish, in lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Trinity Memorial Fund, 2737 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M2L 1C5.

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GAUVREAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Donald Gregor McGREGOR
In loving memory of Donald Gregor McGREGOR, December 17, 1931 to December 20, 2002.
Donald Gregor McGREGOR Senior of Whitefish River First Nation, Birch Island who passed on to the Spirit World on Friday, December 20, 2002 at the Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 71 years. Known for his gentle spirit and kind sense of humour, he enjoyed spending time with his family, fishing, hunting, bingo and home projects. He worked for E. B. Eddy for 20 years before retiring in 1996. He also served several terms as Band Councillor on the Whitefish River Band Council and was President of St. Gabriel's Parish Council for many years. He was honoured as an Elder and Eagle Staff Carrier of Whitefish River First Nation. He was of the Eagle Clan and his Ojibway name he proudly carried was Ogimas, given to him by his father when he was a young lad. He played many years with the Sheguiandah Bears and was an avid supporter of minor hockey. Much beloved husband of 41 years and best friend of Mary Grace (nee MANITOWABI.) Loving and cherished father of Lucy Ann (husband Donald TRUDEAU) of Blind River, Patty (husband Leon LIGHTNING) of Hobbema, Alberta, Donald (wife Sandrah RECOLLET) and Kiki (husband Stephen PELLETIER) of Birch Island and Christopher WAHSQUONAIKEZHIK (wife Carol) of Sudbury. Proud and very loving grandfather of Donnelley, Kigen, Akeshia, Paskwawmotosis, Donald, Assinyawasis, Anthony, Kihiwawasis, Kianna Rae, Waasnode, Christina, Charles and Christopher. Survived by sisters Lillian McGREGOR of Toronto, Shirley McGREGOR of Birch Island and brother Peter McGREGOR of Nova Scotia and brother-in-law Roman BILASH. Also survived by brothers-in-law David (Linda), Ron (Nikki), Dominic (Brenda), and sisters-in-law Veronica (Andrew,) Rosie GAUVREAU (Gordon) and Medora(Don). Predeceased by parents Augustine and Victoria and in-laws David and Agatha MANITOWABI. Also predeceased by brothers Robert E. McGREGOR, Allan A. McGREGOR, and sister, Mary JACKO, Colleen FONT, Estelle CYWINK, Violet BONADIO and Olive McGREGOR and sister-in-law Shirley MANITOWABI McKAY. He was also a special uncle to 67 nieces and nephews.
Rested at the Whitefish River Community Centre. Funeral Mass was held at St. Gabriel's Lalamant Church, Birch Island on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 with Father Mike STROGRE officiating. Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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