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"GAL" 2003 Obituary


GALBRAITH  GALIPEAU  GALLAGHER  GALLIGAN  GALLON  GALLOWAY  GALT 

GALBRAITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-19 published
GRACE E. GALBRAITH
November 27, 1903 - February 14, 2003
Grace GALBRAITH, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge, Gore Bay, died at the Lodge on Friday, February 14, 2003 at the age of 99 years. She was born in London, England, daughter of the late Edward and Emily (RAYNER) GRIFFIN and at the age of 8 years came to Stratford, Ontario with her brother and sister, through the Thomas Bernardo Child Care Organization. She later came to the Island and at the age of 14, lived and worked for William and Mable McDONALD at Providence Bay, until her marriage to James GALBRAITH on February 20, 1920. She and James raised their family on the 12th line of Campbell Township. In 1952, she and James moved to Espanola, and Ransford took over the family farm. James predeceased her in 1970, but she continued to live in Espanola until 1991, when she came to live at Manitoulin Lodge.
Grace enjoyed sewing, knitting, crocheting, tatting and canning. Loved and loving mother of Evelyn PATTISON (husband Warren LEGGE, predeceased 1972 and Jim PATTISON, 1986,) Lorma MIDDAUGH (husband Bill predeceased 2002,) Mildred McCORMICK (husband William predeceased 1998,) Leona SLOSS and husband Chester of Espanola and Ransford and his wife Lavina GALBRAITH of Mindemoya. Proud grandmother of 22 grandchildren, 46 great grandchildren and 35 great great grandchildren. Predeceased by brother Edward (Ted) GRIFFIN and sister Lilly GRIFFIN.
Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home from 1-2 pm on Monday, February 17, 2003. The funeral service was conducted at 2 pm with Reverend Frank HANER officiating. Spring interment in Mindemoya Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270.

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GALBRAITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-26 published
GALBRAITH- MESZAROS
-In loving memory of Lois Lynn, May 18, 1967 to November 20, 2001.
To touch our lives God did send
A daughter, wife, mother, sister, aunt
They took her back when time was good,
A fact that's still misunderstood.
We miss her smile, her laugh, her ways.
The heartache stronger with passing days
But we know the promise made
For our lives a price was paid.
So when our time on earth does end
This daughter, wife, mother, sister, aunt
Will be ours to hold again.
-Love you forever, Mom, Peter and Dimitri, Cecile, Kevin and Chantale

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GALIPEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
Patricia Joan STERRITT
In loving memory of Patricia Joan STERRITT (née MORRIS) a resident of Manitowaning, died at Laurentian Hospital, Sudbury, on Sunday, October 19, 2003 at the age of 69.
Pat was born in Brampton, daughter of the late Gilbert and Mona (TRIMBLE) MORRIS. Will be dearly missed by her loving husband Malcolm SINCLAIR STERRITT and her children Richard (Rick) STERRITT of Brampton, Wendy (GRAY/GREY) and husband Jim of Palgrave, Robert and wife Lorie of Caledon East, Carl and wife Karen of Alton. Her six grandchildren Mandy, Laura, Nicole, Samantha, Jake and Benjamin will miss their "Nanny"
Predeceased by brothers Robert and Brian and survived by dear sister Virginia and husband Yvon GALIPEAU of Milton, Gail GRIFFITH of Brampton, Mary (CLARIDGE) and husband Hap of Salmon Arm, BC, Julie (CAMPBELL) and husband Brian of Brampton, brothers John, of Brampton and Grant and wife Pam of Chatham. Visitation was held on Monday, October 20, 2003. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, October 21, 2003 all at St. Paul's Anglican Church, Manitowaning, Ontario. Reverend Canon Bain PEEVER officiating. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery.

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GALLAGHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-31 published
GALLAGHER, Paul, Member of the Order of Canada
Aged 73 years, on March 27th, 2003. A husband, father, grandfather and brother as well as friend of and mentor to many, he died peacefully at home, surrounded by family, after a long battle with cancer. Paul was a distinguished educator and enthusiastic and dedicated volunteer. He was also a passionate Canadian who served as a Citizenship Judge from 2000 until his death. Paul is survived by his wife Grace; daughter Katherine (Jeff PARSONS) sons Stephen (Donna), Edward (Michelle) and Peter; and grand_sons Richard and Charles. Paul's family wishes to thank the North Shore Palliative Care Team. Special thanks go to Joanne LAPIN, our closest family friend, for her care and devotion to Paul and family. A Memorial Service will be held 2: 00 p.m. Tuesday, April 1st, 2003 in the Boal Chapel of First Memorial Funeral Services, 1505 Lillooet Road, North Vancouver. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the North Shore Palliative Care Program c/o Lions Gate Hospital Foundation or to Adult Learning Development Asscociation.
First Memorial Funeral Services North Vancouver (604) 980-3451

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GALLAGHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-13 published
WEBSTER, Eric Taylor
Died on Saturday, October 11, at Queensway-Carleton Hospital in Ottawa, at the age of 87. Eric was the youngest and last surviving of the six children of Senator Lorne WEBSTER and Muriel Taylor WEBSTER of Montreal. He was predeceased by brothers Colin, Stuart, Howard and Dick, and by their sister, Marian. Born in Montreal on March 1, 1916, he attended Selwyn House School and Lower Canada College, then graduated from Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick. Already a licensed pilot, in 1939 he volunteered for the Royal Canadian Air Force, in which he served until 1945, rising to the rank of Wing Commander. In 1940 he married Elizabeth (Ibby) PATERSON, daughter of Senator Norman and Eleanor PATERSON of Fort William, Ontario. After the war, they settled in Sherbrooke, Quebec, where he became President of J.S. Mitchell and Co. and established Eastern Townships Warehousing Ltd. He was a leader in a wide range of community activities including Trinity United Church, the Sherbrooke Hospital, the Eastern Townships Protestant School Board, Bishop's College School, Bishop's University and Stanstead Wesleyan College. He also went into farming in North Hatley and served a term as President of the Canadian Hereford Association. His interests included antique and classic cars and family motor coaches, in which he traveled widely. He could install an oil burner, design a cottage or lead a fund- raising campaign, but never seemed happier than when under a motor vehicle, tinkering with its innards. When Ibby died in 1974, he married Jane Sweny ARMITAGE of Ottawa, where they lived until he died. Eric leaves his widow, Jane, and children Norman WEBSTER of Montreal (with wife Pat,) William WEBSTER of Vancouver (Diana,) and Maggie GALLAGHER of Oakville, Ontario (Tom.) Two other children, David and Ruth WEBSTER, died in infancy. He also leaves stepsons Mark ARMITAGE of Montreal (Pam,) Bill ARMITAGE of Ottawa (Jan) and David ARMITAGE of Ottawa. There are 12 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. There will be a memorial service at Plymouth-Trinity United Church, 380 Dufferin Street, Sherbrooke, on Thursday, October 16, at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Queensway-Carleton Hospital Foundation, 3045 Baseline Rd., Nepean, Ontario, K2H 8P4.

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GALLAGHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-22 published
ARDIEL, Ruth Winnifred (née FRANCIS) 89 years.
Died peacefully at Windsor Regional Hospital-Western Campus on Tuesday, October 21, 2003. Dearest wife of the late J.R. ARDIEL (1973.) Beloved mother of Joan DUFF, Karen MEYERS and Susan and David RUCH. Dearest sister of June and Fred ROEMMELE. Loving grandmother of Melissa MEYERS and Jim DONOHUE, Jay MEYERS and Tina ROBBINS, Allison RUCH and Ryan SMITH, Dave RUCH and Anne Marie PETTINATO, Julie SANDO, and John PECARARO, Jackie and Frank HAMILTON, Michelle and Joe GRECO and Natalie DUFF. Great grandmother of Max and Miranda PECARARO, Scott and Mathew HAMILTON and Kaity and Nicholas GRECO. Dear Aunt to her special nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews. Remembered by several cousins in London and Toronto. Born on a homestead in Marengo, Saskatchewan to the late Anne and Alfred FRANCIS; pre-deceased by brothers Lloyd (1912), Bruce (Royal Canadian Air Force, 1943) and her sister Dorothy HENDERSON (1964.) Ruth was a long-standing member of Beach Grove Golf and Country Club, Windsor and Tamarac Golf and Country Club, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Visiting in the Walter D. Kelly Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1969 Wyandotte St. East, Windsor, Ontario on Thursday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. The complete funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday, October 24, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend William GALLAGHER officiating. Cremation with interment later in Greenlawn Memorial Cemetery. In kindness memorial tributes to the charity of you choice, Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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GALLIGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-13 published
Edward James HOUSTON
By Jim HOUSTON, Thursday, November 13, 2003 - Page A28
Lawyer, judge, war veteran, "sports nut," father, friend to many. Born September 15, 1918, in Arnprior, Ontario Died May 27 in Ottawa, of colon cancer, aged 84.
Ed HOUSTON accomplished much in his life: He was a bomb aimer in Lancaster bombers in the Second World War, a prominent lawyer and judge in Ottawa for almost 50 years, and the National Hockey League's first arbitrator. But it was his family and Friends, not his accomplishments, which mattered most to him. Speaking at Ed's funeral in Ottawa on a sunny Friday in late May, the Honourable Patrick GALLIGAN (Ed's former law partner and long-time friend) said there are "legions of people" whose lives have been affected for the better by Ed HOUSTON.
Ed was a product of his generation -- the people that came of age in the "dirty thirties," served their country in wartime, and then made their contributions (and let off some steam) as civilians in a more prosperous post-war Canada. Born and raised in modest circumstances in the Ottawa Valley town of Arnprior, Ed left home in the Depression to find work. He ended up working in a drug store in Schumacher, Ontario, near Timmins. There he met a Torontonian, Joe GREENE, who was to become his best friend and my godfather. Like thousands of other young Canadians, Ed volunteered for military service in the Second World War. His air force days changed his life. In January, 1944, he was shot down over Berlin, with five of seven aboard perishing, and became a prisoner of war for 15 months (he escaped in April, 1945). The veteran's benefits he earned through his wartime service gave him the opportunity to attend the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall Law School, which opened the door to a successful career and countless Friendships in the legal fraternity. While at university, Ed met and married Mary McKAY of Galt, Ontario, and the first of their two sons, Bill, was born. In 1950 they moved to Ottawa where Ed began his legal career as an assistant Crown attorney. Later -- as a lawyer in private practice and then as a judge -- Ed became known for helping younger lawyers learn the ropes.
Ed was, by his own admission, a "sports nut." As a participant, golf was his passion -- and on the course he was known as Steady Eddie for his straight drives and sure putting. As a spectator, he was an avid fan of almost every sport. Even in the final days of his life, when you handed him a newspaper -- another benign addiction of his -- he would still dive for the sports section, and be lost in it for hours. On the day before his death, he rejoiced in the Blue Jays having just swept the Yankees in a four-game series.
As a judge, Ed had to make lots of tough decisions. However, the decisions that got him the most publicity took place outside the courtroom, in his capacity as arbitrator for the National Hockey League. In 1991, Brendan SHANAHAN became a free agent and jumped from the New Jersey Devils to the St. Louis Blues. Under the free-agency compensation regime then in effect, Ed had to decide which player the Blues would have to give to the Devils as compensation for signing SHANAHAN. When Ed chose defenseman Scott STEVENS (who captained the Devils to the Stanley Cup earlier this year), his decision was greeted with a storm of media criticism. But Ed never second-guessed himself, and moved on.
In a letter Ed received a couple of years ago, another friend of his, the late Ray HNATYSHYN, former Governor-General of Canada, summed up how he will be remembered by family, Friends and acquaintances alike: "Ed, you have served your community, province and country with great distinction, and I am privileged to call you my friend." My sentiments exactly.
Jim HOUSTON is Ed's son.

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GALLON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-09 published
Activist established blue box program
Radical became known for putting pressure on government, corporations
By Martin MITTELSTAEDT Wednesday, July 9, 2003 - Page R7
Toronto -- One of Canada's most influential environmental activists, Gary GALLON, died Thursday in Montreal after a long battle with cancer.
Although Mr. GALLON may not have been a household name, Canadians almost everywhere will recognize one of his major achievements, the setting up of the country's first blue box recycling program in Ontario during the late 1980s.
He also had a hand during the 1970s in establishing Greenpeace, and maintained a lifelong passion for environmental causes evident in his series of twice-monthly newsletters, called the GALLON Environmental Letter.
"I've always been bothered by excess consumption and wanton destruction of habitat. Human ethics must allow space for other creatures," he said recently.
Born in the United States in 1945, Mr. GALLON moved to Canada in the late 1960s to avoid the draft during the Vietnam war. He settled in Vancouver and began working by writing newsletters promoting mining stocks listed on the Vancouver Stock Exchange.
After work, he turned to his true passion, the environment, joining the nighttime meetings of the Society for the Promotion of Environmental Conservation, a group that at the time opposed the use of the British Columbia coast for supertanker routes.
"He became concerned that what he was doing [by selling stocks] was causing environmental damage," said David OVED, a Toronto environmental consultant who worked with him in the Ontario government.
Mr. GALLON's biggest impact on the country's conservation movement occurred when he was senior policy adviser for Jim BRADLEY, Ontario's Liberal environment minister from 1985-90, one of Mr. BRADLEY's surprise hires.
It was a risky move for the new Liberal government to employ one of Canada's leading environmental radicals for such a post.
Mr. GALLON instantly became known as one of " BRADLEY's brats," the moniker given the group of dedicated environmentalists assembled by Mr. BRADLEY within the Ontario government who helped originate such programs as the blue box and the province's acid rain reduction program.
In the mid-1980s, municipal recycling had been an experimental effort in a few communities.
Mr. GALLON worked to establish the blue box across the province. Mr. OVED said Mr. GALLON could often influence opponents within the government through his use of the inventive turn of phase or image.
In one particularly bitter debate, cabinet was discussing preservation of Ontario's Temagami forest region, an area containing some of Canada's last remaining stands of towering old growth red and white pines.
Mr. OVED said some politicians were questioning why environmentalists in Toronto and elsewhere in Southern Ontario were arguing to preserve a forest in the north that they might never see.
Mr. GALLON said forest preservation was part of the ideal that Canadians held of the society they would like to be part of.
"Gary's comment was 'People here may never see those forests, but they value green spaces in their minds,' Mr. OVED said.
Mr. OVED said the turn of phase impressed then-premier David PETERSON, who began to affectionately call Mr. GALLON and Mr. BRADLEY's other environmental activists "space cadets."
Some of the biggest run-ins that Mr. GALLON had during the 1980s were with Inco, one of Ontario's major emitter of chemicals that cause acid rain.
At one testy meeting, Mr. GALLON, dressed in a pink shirt, had exchanges with Inco's former chairman, Chuck BAIRD, who was later so annoyed at being pressed on the company's pollutants, that an Inco official called Mr. BRADLEY to complain.
"I got a call the next day asking who where those young radicals in pink polo shirts asking those impertinent questions," Mr. BRADLEY said.
Television broadcaster and Greenpeace founder Robert HUNTER said that Mr. GALLON related to him that the Inco chairman "had never run into such serious sass from mere political minions."
Of his experience in government, Mr. GALLON once said "you have less room to rail but more power to get things done."
Mr. GALLON suffered from colon cancer, which had spread to his lungs and liver.
Despite the pain of the disease and its treatments, he kept up his hobby of competitive swimming, winning in his age group in a Quebec swim meet last year, according to Mr. OVED.
Last month, the Royal Canadian Geographic Society's magazine gave Mr. GALLON its national environmental award for lifetime achievement.
Mr. GALLON was picked in 1977 to be executive director of the Nairobi-based Environment Liaison Centre International, where he met his wife-to-be, another prominent Canadian environmental activist, Janine FERRETTI.
Ms. FERRETTI was executive director of the North American Free Trade Agreement Commission for Environmental Cooperation and now holds a senior position with the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington. Mr. GALLON is survived by his two children, Kalifi and Jenika.

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GALLOWAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-04 published
First World War veteran dies in Toronto at age 105
By Gloria GALLOWAY Tuesday, February 4, 2003, Page A4
The sparse ranks of Canada's living First World War veterans have been further diminished by the death of Iden Herbert BALDWIN, who emerged from the conflict with a medal for his heroic capture of a German machine-gun post.
Mr. BALDWIN died Friday in Toronto at the age of 105.
When interviewed by a reporter just before Remembrance Day last year as part of The Globe and Mail's tribute to Canada's oldest veterans, he recalled the day an enemy shell blew him into the air.
The blast threw him into the newly formed crater, and a mound of earth buried him alive. Fortunately, his helmet had fallen over his nose, creating a small air pocket that kept him conscious until "some fellow's fingers moved some dirt away from my mouth and I was able to breathe."
His death reduces to 12 the number of living First World War veterans located by The Globe. When stories about their lives ran in mid-November, there were 16.
Until the end, the war remained a major event in his life, Michael BARRACK, his step-grand_son, said after the funeral yesterday.
"It would bring back vivid, vivid memories, you could tell, right until the day he died."
In recent days, fatigue often confined Mr. BALDWIN to a hospital bed set up in the dining room of the midtown home he shared with his second wife, Anna, but he remained lucid and full of humour.
"On his 105th birthday last November, I said to him 'You look great today, Uncle Herb,' Mr. BARRACK said. "And he looked at me and said: 'I look great every day.' "
In 1999, France honoured Mr. BALDWIN and 110 other survivors as Knights of the Order of the Legion of Honour, "and he was counting heads then," Mr. BARRACK said.
Mr. BALDWIN was born in Kent, in southern England, in November of 1897 and emigrated to Canada in 1911. He settled in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, where he found work as a plumber's helper.
At 17, he enlisted in the army and was quickly sent to France. He asked to be sent to the front lines in place of a friend who was a family man. He saw action in several battles, including the infamous Vimy Ridge, where he was injured.
When the war ended in 1918, he served another two years, in Germany, then returned to Prince Albert to be a plumber.
Mr. BALDWIN moved to Toronto in 1922, and got a job distributing essential oils. He remained single until 1954, when he was 57. After the death of his first wife, Elaine, he married Anna, a family friend.

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GALLOWAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-10 published
Acting up helped PoW survive camp
But working in the salt mines took its toll on Canadian soldier in First World War
By Gloria GALLOWAY, Monday, November 10, 2003 - Page A3
First World War soldiers were rarely taken prisoner.
Most of the Allied casualties died in the mud with a German sniper's bullet in their head, or riddled with shrapnel, or drowned in their own mucus after poison gas filled their lungs. Of the more than 600,000 Canadians who fought in the War To End All Wars, only 4,000 were captured.
Private William McLEISH was among the unfortunate few. He was captured in France in April of 1915 and spent the last 2½ years of the war at Rennbahn PoW camp near Munster, Germany.
Pte. McLEISH survived, while nearly 60,000 other Canadians perished, but it would be wrong to say he was lucky. The hardships he endured took away his ability to function in a postwar world. He could not provide for his family or enjoy the life he had fought to protect.
In Rennbahn, at the age of 22, Pte. McLEISH was put to work in the salt mines, a gruelling task overseen by civilian bosses who treated the PoWs like slaves.
But camp life was a world of bizarre contrasts and the unfortunate souls who found themselves the unwilling guests of the Germans did what they could to alleviate the cycle of toil and tedium. Thus the Rennbahn Empire, a stage troupe of prisoners, was formed.
Mr. McLEISH died in 1966 after spending his last decades in and out of mental hospitals, a victim of what is now called post-traumatic stress disorder. He left a box of mementos that his daughter, Glen FAYET, submitted to the Memory Project organized by The Globe and Mail and the Dominion Institute.
They include cast photos of the plays her father and other prisoners performed. The men took all parts, slipping into dresses, wigs and hats as required by the script. In the yellowing photos they pose with faces contorted into character.
Jonathan VANCE, a history professor at the University of Western Ontario and a leading expert on the lives of prisoners of war, says it wasn't uncommon for First World War PoWs to be permitted to put on plays.
"It kept them out of trouble, for one thing," he said. "For another thing, international laws provided for prisoners to take advantage of recreation opportunities, including intellectual opportunities. So most camps had not only theatres, but libraries and art classes and occupational therapy classes... orchestras in some cases."
A book of remembrance created by prisoners of Rennbahn thanks family and Friends for sending props, costumes and even grease paint into the camps.
"In the First World War, you could get in pretty well anything. You could get food hampers sent in from major London department stores," Dr. VANCE said.
The theatrical paraphernalia made it possible to stage performances at Rennbahn every Wednesday. The shows had titles like Roll on Blighty! and Le Danseur Inconnu. Listed on the playbills is one W. McLEISH.
"We didn't think that he had that type of outgoing personality," Pte. McLEISH's daughter, Ms. FAYET, said with a quiet laugh.
Her father had immigrated to Montreal from Scotland in 1911 when he was 18 and joined the army reserve soon after his arrival. He signed up when war was declared and was quickly shipped overseas.
While on leave in Britain, Pte. McLEISH visited an aunt in Edinburgh, where he met Margaret WATSON. Love quickly followed, and the Canadian in uniform remained in Ms. WATSON's thoughts after he returned to the front.
Then came word of his capture. Ms. WATSON wrote to the Red Cross, asking his whereabouts. He was in the camp near Munster, she heard. But "this man does not write very often," said the official response.
Many soldiers emerged from captivity "with job-related injuries that would prevent them from earning a living for the rest of their lives," Dr. VANCE said. "You have all kinds of stories about people losing hands and feet, getting arms mangled in machinery, getting bit of their bodies blown off in mine explosions."
This was William McLEISH's life for nearly three years. It must have been a very strange existence, Dr. VANCE said, to be working in such trying conditions for 12 to 14 hours then return to camp to take part in a music hall or a play.
Certainly the men would have derived some comfort from the performances. But the evening diversions weren't enough to keep Pte. McLEISH whole.
When he was freed after Germany surrendered, he found the Scottish lass and they wed. They settled in Canada and had a son and a daughter.
"He was quite well to begin with," Ms. FAYET said, "but then he had problems dealing with everyday life and eventually he could no longer go into the office to work."
He quit his job at the Grand Trunk Railway and his wife became the family's breadwinner.
"She took any job that she could in order to supplement the income. As I understand it, they received $25 a month for four people to live on from the government," Ms. FAYET said.
Her father's nerves were shot and he became a regular patient at the veterans' hospital in Ste. Anne de Bellevue. "People knew that there was such a thing as shell shock, but, in a lot of minds, that was a moral failing rather than a physical or psychological failing," Dr. VANCE said. "It wasn't really appreciated, the degree to which prolonged stress has physiological impacts on the brain."
But Mr. McLEISH's family knew the toll it had taken. Ms. FAYET said he never talked about the war, except occasionally to mention a practical joke someone had played or an amusing anecdote.
The horror of the war remained buried inside Mr. McLEISH until he died. Perhaps it was softened by a box of photographs and fading playbills that bear his name.

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GALT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
Died This Day -- John GALT, 1839
Friday, April 11, 2003 - Page R13
Author and land agent born on May 2, 1779, at Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1779; wrote Scottish novels The Ayrshire Legatees and Lawrie Todd; appointed agent of claimants of Upper Canada for losses incurred during War of 1812; founded Canada Company and town of Guelph, Ontario; returned to Britain, bankrupt; father of Alexander Tilloch GALT, a father of Confederation; died in Greenock, Renfrewshire.

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