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"FRY" 2003 Obituary


FRY  FRYE 

FRY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-01 published
Stanley ROSS (Johnny) ROSE
Passed away peacefully at Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga on Sunday, August 24, 2003 in his 81st year, beloved husband of Connie BAMBROUGH, loved father of Linda CUNNINGHAM of Orangeville, John and his wife Barbara of Lindsay, Ron and his wife Sandra of Cobourg, Laurie LAWSON and her husband Gord of Orangeville, and Don and his wife Susan of Orangeville, dear grandfather of Crystal, Melissa, Michael, Kimberely and her husband Neil, Emily and Emma, also sadly missed by his sister Marjorie FRY and her husband Bruce, predeceased by his brother Donald.
Friends called at the Dods and McFair Funeral Home and Chapel on Wednesday, August 27, 2003. Funeral Service was held in the chapel on Thursday, August 28, 2003. Interment in Forest Lawn Cemetery.
A tree will be planted in memory of Johnny in the Dods and McNair Memorial Forest at the Island Lake Conservation Area, Orangeville.
A dedication service was held on Sunday, September 7, 2003.

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FRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-02 published
Collecting art was his passion
British Columbia business leader donated 800 works, worth $5-million, to Vancouver gallery
Canadian Press and staff files Monday, June 2, 2003 - Page R7
Vancouver -- Vancouver businessman and art philanthropist J. Ron LONGSTAFFE has died of cancer. He was 69.
While Mr. LONGSTAFFE made his name in business at Canadian Forest Products and was also a lawyer and a Liberal Party activist, he will be best remembered for his donation of 800 works of art, valued at more than $5-million, to the Vancouver Art Gallery.
"One of the things I basically believe in is that art is there to be seen and enjoyed, not squirrelled away in vaults," the Ontario-born Mr. LONGSTAFFE once said of his collection. "I'm not one of those collectors who, having bought a work, says it's all mine and nobody else can see it."
Andy SYLVESTER, a partner at the Equinox Gallery, said that over the years, Mr. LONGSTAFFE and his wife Jacqueline donated a major and significant amount of art to the Vancouver Art Gallery.
"It is almost the core of the [gallery's] contemporary Canadian art collection," Mr. SYLVESTER said.
At shows, Mr. LONGSTAFFE loved to play a little game that involved picking a work to donate to the Vancouver Art Gallery and another to keep for a lifetime, Mr. SYLVESTER said.
Included in the LONGSTAFFEs' recent gift of 75 pieces of art to the gallery are works by Robert Davidson, Gathie Falk, Simon Tookoome, Maxwell Bates, Ann Kipling and Betty Goodwin. There are also various works on paper by Chuck Close, Richard Hamilton, Pablo Picasso and Alexander Calder.
Over the years, Mr. LONGSTAFFE, who was at one time executive director of Canadian Forest Products (now called Canfor), donated major works to the gallery by international artists such as David Hockney, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Paul-Emile Borduas, Charles Gagnon and Claude Tousignant.
Born and raised in Toronto, where he attended Upper Canada College, Mr. LONGSTAFFE went west to attend the University of British Columbia in the mid-fifties. Even then the pattern of buying art was already established in his life. His father had provided all the LONGSTAFFE children with money to buy art starting when they were 16.
During university, Ron LONGSTAFFE told The Globe and Mail in 1985, art collecting became a way of "livening up the walls of my apartment." Over the next decade, it became "a form of addiction," one that had seen him buy as many as five paintings a day.
Although he originally found the art world intimidating, he later counted a number of artists, such as Christopher and Mary Pratt, as Friends. He said that artists, as a group, are "more stimulating than a lot of businessmen.... They have a wider range of interests and are in touch with what young people are doing."
However, he remained deliberately untutored in fine-art history and found most art criticism "unreadable," and preferred to go with his gut instinct about work that "challenges me, stimulates me, and that I like enough to buy."
He said he never bought art as an investment, or simply because "it matched the drapes or looked good over the fireplace. That I couldn't house it was no reason not to have it."
In a private tour of the Vancouver Art Gallery, the LONGSTAFFE donations at that time revealed a surprising variety that was rich in contemporary art in general and French-Canadian painting in particular (including important works by Borduas, Gagnon, Lemieux and Tousignant). Little preference was shown for any one artist (except for Hockney and Vasarely, represented by 17 prints each, only a few of which were on display). Sculpture was rare. "Canada is short of really strong sculptors," he said at the time.
In the interview he said that, although his tastes changed greatly over the years, he intended "to collect until the day I die."
In recognition of Mr. LONGSTAFFE's donations, the gallery's third-floor exhibition space was named the J.R. LONGSTAFFE Gallery in 1983.
Senator Jack AUSTIN said from Ottawa that he had known Mr. LONGSTAFFE since he was a young man in law school during the mid-1950s.
"I was his law teacher in first year -- in contracts," he said.
Sen. AUSTIN said he knew Mr. LONGSTAFFE as a successful businessman, an active member of the federal Liberal Party and an art collector.
"He did many things and he did them well," he said. "I can only wish that there were more British Columbians that took part in federal politics with his energy and initiative."
In the 1993 federal election, Mr. LONGSTAFFE managed the campaign of Liberal Member of Parliament Hedy FRY, who defeated then prime minister Kim CAMPBELL.
His many positions included director of the Bank of Canada, vice-chairman of the Vancouver Board of Trade, and director of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet.
In 2001, Mr. LONGSTAFFE was inducted into the Order of Canada.

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FRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-09 published
Harriet Ethel (FRY) KILLINS
By Sharon Anne COOK Wednesday, July 9, 2003 - Page A18
Wife, mother, aunt, grandmother, nurse, community activist. Born April 17, 1911, in Jordan, Ontario Died November 19, 2002, in London, Ontario, of old age, aged 91.
In the far-off jungle of Papua New Guinea, the brothers in the religious community called her "Florence" after Nurse Nightingale, because of the kerosene lantern Ethel carried each evening as she visited ailing boys in the residential school. Then well into her 60s, Ethel was a Canadian University Services Organization volunteer (along with her school-teaching husband), serving as the village's nurse, as well as running the infirmary at the school. The challenges were many. Ethel loathed driving, yet in Papua New Guinea in the early 1970s, she intrepidly took a battered car over the dirt tracks of the back-country to make her rounds to villages rarely seen by a doctor. Here, she worked with women to improve family nutrition and reduce infant mortality. She always had a sense of fairness, social equity, selflessness, and courage.
Yet Ethel didn't stand out in a crowd, although she was a tall, willowy and attractive woman. Her congenital deafness made her unusually shy in public. Not sure of what she might be missing in a crowded gathering, she was hesitant to voice her social, religious or political views. But she thought carefully about public and private issues, read widely and held to her convictions for good reason, whether popular or not, and voiced them well one-on-one.
Ethel (née FRY) was descended from one of Ontario's pioneer families: Her FRY ancestors had joined 16 other Mennonite families in 1800 to trek from Pennsylvania to southwestern Ontario. They took up a land grant and built an imposing two-story log-and-frame house.This building is now part of the Jordan Museum, and is filled with the pioneer objects, including jacquard-woven coverlets made by her grandfather, Samuel Nash FRY.
As a young woman, Ethel enrolled in the nursing program at Hamilton General Hospital just as the Depression was beginning. Graduating in 1934, she joined an earlier odyssey of nurses leaving Ontario for better wages and more job security. With several Friends, she found work in Albany, and later in Buffalo, New York A romance, started a decade earlier, was rekindled in 1939-40, when she returned to Canada and married the man who would be her partner for 62 years, Harold KILLINS.
With marriage, she became a busy farm wife, working alongside her husband during busy periods and raising three children, two sons and a daughter. In 1963, just as their own children were leaving home, Ethel and Harold accepted a second family, taking on the parenting of a treasured niece and nephew who had been orphaned. Most of the day-to-day nurturing fell to Ethel, and the respect and love returned to her testifies to the quality of the stable relationships she created for these two children in their adolescence.
Following their period in Papua New Guinea, Ethel and Harold settled in London, Ontario Ethel remained a community activist through a United Church Women's group, the Canadian Save the Children Organization, Operation Eyesight Universal, Amnesty International, Meals on Wheels, and the Unitarian Service Committee. She also worked for many years with a group of quilt-makers, who donated the profits from their work to international development projects. One memorable Christmas, well into her eighties, she made matching wall hangings for every woman in her family.
Public and private acts of kindness sustained the quality of her life through her final sad chapter, a six-year battle with Alzheimer's disease. Visited often by her admiring family, Friends, and most of all by her devoted husband, Ethel descended into her final rest with the assurance that, as she had nurtured and protected others, so she now found herself comforted.
Sharon is Ethel's daughter.

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FRYE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-06 published
Arline GORELLE
By Nancy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON Tuesday, May 6, 2003 - Page A18
Wife, mother, grandmother, teacher, choreographer, dancer. Born September 12, 1932, in Toronto. Died November 26, 2002, in Orangeville, Ontario, of cancer, aged 70.
Arline danced her way through life. When she was at the University of Toronto, her love of dancing shone through. She choreographed creative pieces for the engineers' annual show, Skule Night. As well, the Varsity Review took her on memorable trips to McGill University in Montreal and Princeton in the United States.
Arline was famous for sharing the stage at the Canadian National Exhibition with such celebrities as Danny Kaye, Bob Hope and Victor Borge. The Canadettes, as the chorus line was called, followed behind the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Musical Ride on their way to the stage, making footing somewhat treacherous. Finishing the show, the dancers ran backstage, fireworks falling overhead. Arline loved showbiz!
University days were exciting for her. Classes in anthropology, where she dreamed of archeological digs in Egypt, and in English Literature with Northrop FRYE, were her favourites.
After graduation from university and The Ontario College of Education, Arline worked as a teacher, then as phys-ed co-ordinator and as a vice-principal for the Peel Board of Education. While working full-time and raising two children, she also received her M.A. in education.
Her marriage to Gary (and family soon after), became her top priority. Arl fervently believed in motherhood and was determined to lay a solid foundation for their children. One friend remembers Christmases when she and Arline dressed their little ones to the hilt: Arline's daughter Lianne in a white fur coat at the age of 3, big brother David in trousers, shirt, jacket and tie. Off they went, with Nana May and Auntie Betty joyfully following, to visit Santa Claus; then to the Arcadian Court for lunch. Arline worked at creating a sense of family and nourished it with ongoing family traditions.
She always had a dream: her dream of the perfect home came true with the acquisition of Lissadell, their farm at Violet Hill. There she welcomed Friends, children and grandchildren, who loved to be with her, enjoying the pastoral life. Garden Island, their cottage, reverberated with joy even during days without electricity and with an outhouse in the woods!
"Club" was a big part of Arline's life. Most called it the Study Group, but to Arl, it was a special club of 16 close women-friends who have learned and laughed together for 40 years. She loved the mind-expanding challenge of presenting her yearly speech. Despite her refusal to use computers, faxes and answering machines, she always managed to give the best talk of the year. One member referred to her as "a great and shining person." "If I were a poet, " said another, "Arl would be one of my muses. She cared and she listened and this caring gave strength to the whole circle."
Arline's love of the arts and dance led to involvement with the Dufferin Arts Council where she transformed the speakers' luncheons and assisted with fundraising. One year she orchestrated a men's kick-line. This group of 60ish-year-old men, dressed in flowing skirts, rehearsed weekly and Arline refused to give them their coffee and cookies until they got their steps just right. A fun fundraiser!
As a tribute to Arline, the council established The Arline Gorelle Award for Excellence in the Field of Dance; donations support students pursuing dance studies.
She gave of herself and her greatest gift was true Friendship. "Friends are angels, " she said, "who lift us to our feet when our wings have trouble remembering how to fly." Arline was the angel in our lives.
Nancy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON wrote this with help from Lianne GORELLE.

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FRYE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-16 published
Jerome Hamilton BUCKLEY
Husband, father, professor. Born August 30, 1917, in Toronto. Died January 28 in Cambridge, Massachusetts., of natural causes, aged 85.
By Margaret ATWOOD and David STAINES, Page A24
Every American Thanksgiving, Jerry and Elizabeth Buckley would invite at least one of Terry's graduate students to their home in Belmont, Massachusetts., for the customary turkey dinner. (In the 1960s, the graduate student was Margaret ATWOOD; in the '70s, David STAINES.) There, surrounded by their three children, Nicholas, Victoria, and Eleanor, and other guests, Jerry would regale everyone with tales of Puritan ancestors, though they were not "his" ancestors both Jerry and Elizabeth were born and raised in Toronto, and they were distinctly Canadian in their gracious manners, their widespread generosity, and their affections. At a large institution such as Harvard, Jerry stood out for his kindness and humanity.
Jerry attended Humberside Collegiate Institute and then Victoria College in the University of Toronto, where his courses included Elizabethan literature offered by Northrop FRYE and Shakespeare offered by E. J. PRATT. As a young poet and critic, he reviewed new works by Robinson Jeffers and Virginia Woolf, and won a prize for an essay titled New Techniques in Contemporary Fiction. Graduating with a B.A. in 1939, he chose Harvard Graduate School, obtaining his PhD in 1942. On June 19, 1943, in Toronto, he married Elizabeth ADAM/ADAMS, his confidante and soul mate.
University teaching posts were thin on the ground in Canada during the Second World War. Jerry used to describe his one job interview with a Canadian university: They were less interested in his a academic credentials, he said, than in whether he was a Christian and whether he drank. If he did the latter, they made it clear that he must do it with the curtains closed so as not to corrupt the students. He took a job in the United States.
His teaching career took him to the University of Wisconsin, where he rose from instructor in 1942 to full professor in 1954 to Columbia University from 1954 until 1961; and to Harvard University, where he taught for 26 years 1987. Named Gurney Professor of English Literature in 1975, in this distinguished chair he followed Douglas BUSH and B. J. Whiting; BUSH, another ex-Canadian, welcomed Jerry BUCKLEY to Harvard, as Jerry recollected, "with open arrns... filled with theses."
A Harvard seminar on Victorian critics led by Howard Mumford Jones prodded Buckley's interest in William Ernest Henley, and his dissertation on Henley became his first published book, William Ernest Henley: A Study in the Counter-Decadence of the Nineties (1945). In 1951 he secured his reputation as a major Victorianist with The Victorian Temper, and in 1960 he re-established Tennyson's stature in literary studies with his Tennyson: The Growth of a Poet. The rise of Victorian studies owes very much to his dedicated scholarship and his inspiring leadership.
He was passionately devoted to his subject, so much so that he often seemed to become the incarnation of it. Former students remember with affection riveting oral performances of his favourite authors, such as Dickens. Striding across the room, long arms waving, he would "become" Mr. Micawber or Ebenezer Scrooge. His performances would be interspersed with strange bits of gossip, which he would also act out, becoming Tennyson at an advanced age, creeping around behind an alarmed woman at a garden party to inform her that her stays were creaking, or reciting with verve and relish one of Edward Lear's parodies of his beloved Tennyson. Many of Terry's former graduate students were at his funeral to pay tribute to a superb humanist and an equally superb friend.
Margaret ATWOOD and David STAINES were among Jerry BUCKLEY's graduate students.

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