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"FRE" 2003 Obituary


FREDEEN  FREDERICKSON  FREEDHOFF  FREEDMAN  FREEMAN  FREEZE  FRENCH  FREUD  FREUND  FREY  FREYSENG 

FREDEEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-12 published
FREDEEN, Frederick John Hartley
Fredeen was born in Macrorie, Saskatchewan, on September 23, 1920, and died on September 10, 2003 in Saskatoon. He is survived by his wife, Margaret Stephens NEWSHAM and their six children: Shirley (Robin, Owain and Myfanwy) of Saskatoon; Edward (Judy) and their four children (Tristan, Keisha, Caitlin, and Garrett) of Medicine Hat, Alberta; Alan (Linda) and their three children (Cara, Jonathan, and Trevor) of Truro, Nova Scotia; Kenneth (Katherine LADLY) and their three children (Connor, Patrick, and Ana) of Oakville, Ontario; Arthur (Sabine CORDES) of Prince George, British Columbia and Toronto, Ontario; and Lawrence (Andrea PASTERSHANK) and their two children (Molly and Ethan) of Prince George, British Columbia. He is survived as well by his brother Howard (Joan) of Lacombe, Alberta, Muriel of Macrorie, Saskatchewan, and Phyllis (Charles HEDLIN) of Saskatoon, brothers- and sisters-in-law Lloyd NEWSHAM (Lois) of Victoria British Columbia, Kathleen SWALM (Reece) of Kindersley, Saskatchewan., Gwendolyn Stephens NEWSHAM of Montreal, Quebec, and Ivor NEWSHAM (June) of North Battleford, as well as by numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his father Alvin Hartley FREDEEN, his mother Olive Arasmith FREDEEN, and his sister Elizabeth FREDEEN- PALMER. Hartley was a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan (B.S.A. 1943, M.Sc. 1951). He recently attended the 60th reunion of his B.S.A. graduating class. After graduation, Hartley began his career as a research scientist in entomology for Canada Agriculture. His specialty was the study of black flies and of means of controlling them. He published numerous research papers and was seconded to work in Montreal for three years prior to, and during, Expo 67 and to west Africa with World Health Organization. Through his many interests and the causes he believed in and supported, he earned the respect of many. He was an active member of Grosvenor Park United Church, member of the choir, a long time cub and scout leader, charter member of the Saskatchewan. Insitiute of Agrologists, and a member of Agricultural Institute of Canada for over 60 years. He was a charter member and past chair of the Entomological Institute of Canada, a former member of the International water Apportionment Board, past chairman of the U of S Credit Union and founding member of the Steep Hill Co-op. He was Chairman of the Memorial Society of Saskatchewan from 1986 to 1997, a long time supporter of the Wheat Pool, the Saskatoon Co-op Association and was a life time member of the New Democratic Party of Saskatchewan. He was an active bird watcher and enjoyed his membership in the Golden Eagles and supported many other causes such as the Seniors for Peace and Habitat for Humanity. Hartley was a faithful husband and friend to Margaret for over fifty years. He shared his love for the outdoors with his children, grandchildren and nieces and nephews. Ten years ago he completed a stage in the Jasper to Banff running relay as part of the Fredeen Family team. Every day will present us with the opportunity to celebrate his life and, should we choose, to act upon those beliefs he so strongly held: social justice, equality, the environment and peace. We will miss him. There are few who are so committed and true to their principles.''The true test of nationhood is not the height of its skyscraper nor the amount of its gold reserves, but rather how it cares for the weak, the downtrodden and the underprivileged.'' T.C.Douglas. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, September 13 at 1 o'clock in Grosvenor Park United Church.

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FREDEEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-15 published
FREDEEN, Frederick John Hartley
FREDEEN was born in Macrorie, Saskatchewan, on September 23, 1920, and died on September 10, 2003 in Saskatoon. He is survived by his wife, Margaret Stephens NEWSHAM and their six children: Shirley (Robin, Owain and Myfanwy) of Saskatoon; Edward (Judy) and their four children (Tristan, Keisha, Caitlin, and Garrett) of Medicine Hat, Alberta; Alan (Linda) and their three children (Cara, Jonathan, and Trevor) of Truro, Nova Scotia; Kenneth (Katherine LADLY) and their three children (Connor, Patrick, and Ana) of Oakville, Ontario; Arthur (Sabine CORDES) of Prince George, British Columbia and Toronto, Ontario; and Lawrence (Andrea PASTERSHANK) and their two children (Molly and Ethan) of Prince George, British Columbia. He is survived as well by his brother Howard (Joan) of Lacombe, Alberta, Muriel of Macrorie, Saskatchewan, and Phyllis (Charles HEDLIN) of Saskatoon, brothers- and sisters-in-law Lloyd NEWSHAM (Lois) of Victoria British Columbia, Kathleen SWALM (Reece) of Kindersley, Saskatchewan., Gwendolyn Stephens NEWSHAM of Montreal, Quebec, and Ivor NEWSHAM (June) of North Battleford, as well as by numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his father Alvin Hartley FREDEEN, his mother Olive Arasmith FREDEEN, and his sister Elizabeth FREDEEN- PALMER. Hartley was a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan (B.S.A. 1943, M.Sc. 1951). He recently attended the 60th reunion of his B.S.A. graduating class. After graduation, Hartley began his career as a research scientist in entomology for Canada Agriculture. His specialty was the study of black flies and of means of controlling them. He published numerous research papers and was seconded to work in Montreal for three years prior to, and during, Expo 67 and to west Africa with World Health Organization. Through his many interests and the causes he believed in and supported, he earned the respect of many. He was an active member of Grosvenor Park United Church, member of the choir, a long time cub and scout leader, charter member of the Saskatchewan. Insitiute of Agrologists, and a member of Agricultural Institute of Canada for over 60 years. He was a charter member and past chair of the Entomological Institute of Canada, a former member of the International water Apportionment Board, past chairman of the U of S Credit Union and founding member of the Steep Hill Co-op. He was Chairman of the Memorial Society of Saskatchewan from 1986 to 1997, a long time supporter of the Wheat Pool, the Saskatoon Co-op Association and was a life time member of the New Democratic Party of Saskatchewan. He was an active bird watcher and enjoyed his membership in the Golden Eagles and supported many other causes such as the Seniors for Peace and Habitat for Humanity. Hartley was a faithful husband and friend to Margaret for over fifty years. He shared his love for the outdoors with his children, grandchildren and nieces and nephews. Ten years ago he completed a stage in the Jasper to Banff running relay as part of the FREDEEN Family team. Every day will present us with the opportunity to celebrate his life and, should we choose, to act upon those beliefs he so strongly held: social justice, equality, the environment and peace. We will miss him. There are few who are so committed and true to their principles.''The true test of nationhood is not the height of its skyscraper nor the amount of its gold reserves, but rather how it cares for the weak, the downtrodden and the underprivileged.'' T.C.Douglas. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, September 13 at 1 o'clock in Grosvenor Park United Church.

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FREDERICKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-20 published
CRAWFORD, Margaret (née FREDERICKSON,) B.A. (Tor.,) M.A. (University of British Columbia)
died in Victoria, British Columbia on June 17, 2003 at the age of 78. Long associated in many capacities with the administrative offices of University of British Columbia. Secretary to Walter H. GAGE, who was then Dean of administrative and inter-faculty affairs, 1951-1954; secretary to president, Norman A. M. MacKENZIE, 1954-1962; briefly a programmer in University extension, programs for women and assistant in the office of Helen McCRAE, Dean of women, 1964-1975, with special interest in that office's outstanding contribution to the mature women students who were then arriving at University of British Columbia in increasing numbers and with special needs. Margaret completed a M.A. at University of British Columbia with a research thesis on mature women students in 1976. Married in 1977 to Frank W. CRAWFORD and moved to Edmonton where she continued to be active in women's affairs as a founding member of the Edmonton Women's Network. The CRAWFORD's retired to Victoria in 1982 where Margaret continued her interests in educational resources for mature students and in support systems for women. Margaret is survived by her husband, Frank CRAWFORD; 2 step sons and 2 step daughters and their families. Private cremation entrusted to Royal Oak Crematorium. In lieu of flowers, donations, if so desired, may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or the charity of one's choice. Hayward's of Victoria (250) 386-3505

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FREEDHOFF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-19 published
Harry David (Butch) FREEDHOFF
By Alex STAHL Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - Page A32
Husband, father, grandfather, executive, athlete. Born November 14, 1938, in Toronto. Died May 4, 2002, of Lou Gehrig's disease, aged 63.
To his face, it was almost never Harry. Born redheaded to Anne and Ben, he weighed a sinister 35 pounds after one year, which prompted the lifetime nickname "Butch, " often becoming "Butchie" because of his likeable nature.
His physicality developed early. Anne, a ranked tennis player, and Ben, also ranked, as well as a Hockley Valley Ski Club co-founder, taught him the skills and instilled gritty determination, concentration and self-discipline. He won the Telegram Tennis Tournament at 9; for the next five decades, he ranked among the top of his peer-group at the provincial and national levels. He represented Canada as a 1955 Junior Davis Cup participant, in the 1961 and 1965 Maccabiah Games and during the 1982 Senior World Team Championships.
That early family closeness never left Butch. After first meeting his future wife, Sandra STONE, movie-like, he predicted their fate together to a friend. Married in 1963, Sandy and Butch soon brought Richard and Marla into their lives. In the 1990s, daughter-in-law Meredith and granddaughter Merritt extended and intensified family life.
Butch had compensated for his lack of academic interest with his competitive nature and love of interaction with people. After seven years in high school, his career as an outstanding marketer started ignominiously: from a $50-a-week stockbroker, he became a manufacturer's agent for children's wear. He was later president at Charan Toys, where he triumphed by securing the North American rights to Batman action figures. After a tour with Tyco Toys and Sega Canada, his career culminated in 1994 with Sony Computer Entertainment Canada. There he was instrumental in leading the marketing of Sony's Playstation platforms.
The mark of any man is the character displayed in the face of adversity. Butch dealt with any setback with a touch of philosophy, objectivity and humanity. If his opponent played better, it was acknowledged (and then Butch worked out harder on his machines). If business life proved impossible (such as entrepreneurial bankruptcy on the eve of his son's bar mitzvah), Butch discovered a new source for joke-making, and then another, better job. When his mother developed Parkinson's disease, he became even more devoted.
When personal or professional successes occurred, his spontaneous speechmaking allowed him to openly share his joy with family, Friends and colleagues. His audiences quickly learned to expect hilarious anecdotes, followed by insightful and heartfelt truths that everyone found entertaining and endearing. If his words were persuasive, his actions spoke even louder. Generous and hospitable to virtual strangers (when his condo's doorman couldn't obtain immigration permits for his family in Somalia, Butch spontaneously found and paid for the professional help to make the reunion happen), Butch and Sandy opened their doors and lives to many.
I learned of Butch's affliction on 9/11. Whereas athletics and business offer future opportunities and hope for improvement, the verdict of Lou Gehrig's disease does not. Last March, with his family and close Friends, I spent a week with him in Florida during that time, physical changes were heartbreakingly noticeable. But he regaled us, then as always and until the end, with his comic genius, memory and insightfulness, regularly scrawling one-liners on his writing board and delivering his smiling, nodding, thumbs-up optimism. In body, mind and soul, he remains with me as a mensch to the core, who lived on the high and through the low -- an example to emulate.
Butch's friend Alex wrote this with Butch's wife Sandy and other family members.

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FREEDMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-07 published
Nathan Nauson LEVINNE
By Marsha COLLA and Wilma FREEDMAN Wednesday, May 7, 2003 - Page A20
Doctor, husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather, friend. Born June 30, 1917, in Toronto. Died Feb 1, 2003, in Toronto, of cancer, aged 85.
Nathan LEVINNE was a gentle giant.
This 6-foot, 4-inch tall, handsome family doctor had retired from Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital, following a 52-year career of being devoted to caring for patients and their families with incredible compassion, sensitivity and a unique sense of humour.
Nathan Nauson LEVINNE was born on Toronto's Niagara Street. After graduating from Oakwood Collegiate, he completed his medical degree at the University of Toronto. (He actually later became a professor emeritus at this same university.) Upon seeing a beautiful blonde woman at a fraternity party and mentioning to a friend, "That's the gal I intend to marry, Evelyn STEIN and Nate were wed in Toronto on December 28, 1941.
Immediately after getting married, they left for St. Louis, Missouri, where he completed his internship.
On returning to Canada, he enlisted in the army, served as a medical officer (attaining the rank of captain), and was decorated by both the Dutch and Canadian governments.
After his stint in the army, Dr. LEVINNE set up his first family-practice office on Lakeview Ave. in Toronto. He was a very skilled diagnostician and gave advice with great wisdom and compassion.
In 1966, the first Family Practice Unit was established at Mount Sinai Hospital with Dr. Nathan LEVINNE as its chief. He also was instrumental in organizing Ambulatory Care Services and was the director of Occupational Health and Safety.
He was chief of staff and chairman of the Medical Advisory Committee from 1979 to 1981. He made a tremendous contribution to health care.
It was on his 80th birthday that he retired from active practise, always maintaining that it was important to recognize when to stop. However, he continued to give back to the community.
He participated in a mentoring program for young students who were interested in pursuing medical careers, helped at the Canadian National Institute for the Blind by walking with a non-sighted gentleman once a week, and spent time at The Baycrest Home for the Aged talking to the lonely elderly who had no families with whom to visit.
And, being a very spiritual human being, he would enjoy studying the Bible in his quiet times.
Most importantly, Nathan LEVINNE was a real family man. A devoted, loyal and loving life partner to his wife of 61 years, he was happiest when surrounded by his five grandchildren, for whom he became a great source of life experience and support. For his new little great-grand_son, he was able to provide a big cuddly lap in which to snuggle.
And what an extraordinary father figure he was for me and my sister. He let us play hairdresser on his thick silvery locks, taught us how to swallow capsule pills by likening them to toboggans on the backs of our tongues, and he stayed home with us on Saturday nights if we didn't have dates -- and that added up to a lot of Saturday nights!
Nathan LEVINNE was a father, a friend and a hero. He went through many medical challenges in his life, never allowing anyone to see or feel his pain, protecting his family right until the end.
Dad always joked and encouraged us to ramble on for hours when there was a captive audience but we will stop now, so that he can rest in peace. His memory will beat on in our hearts forever.
Marsha COLLA and Wilma FREEDMAN are Nathan LEVINNE's daughters.

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FREEDMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-28 published
ANSPACH, Herbert Kephart
Born in Ada, Ohio on September 3, 1926, died in Toronto, Ontario on November 22, 2003. Herb was a man of character who exemplified integrity, fairness, hard work, lifelong learning, and who made a remarkable impact on the world and people around him. He was a business leader in the U.S. and Canada, a patriotic citizen and supporter of the communities in which he lived, a dedicated husband, a good-humoured friend to many, and an inspirational father, grandfather, and father-in-law. His intelligence and hard work earned him an Engineering Degree from University of Wisconsin, a Law Degree from University of Michigan, many scholarships and academic awards, and a productive career from GoodYear to the U.S. Patent Office to Whirlpool, where he was a Patent Lawyer, Vice-President of Personnel, subsidiary President (Inglis, Toronto), and ultimately President of Whirlpool Corporation of St. Joseph, Michigan. He was successful in his work, inspirational in his coaching of all those he took under his wing, and generous with his wisdom and counsel to many through his profession, educational endeavours, and personal life. In his retirement years, Herb and his wife, Elizabeth, resided in Boca Raton, Florida while he continued to remain active in international business consulting, investing, Pro-Am Golf Tournaments, betting on every sports play-off, and keeping in touch with his family and Friends. Upon his illness in 1999, he moved to Toronto, Ontario with his wife, both under the care of their daughter, Heather Anspach FRASER. Here, he spent his valuable final years with his wife Elizabeth, granddaughter Ceilidh, and son-in-law Neil FRASER. A special thanks to those who have made his last years a rich and wonderful experience, from the folks at Baycrest Hospital (particularly Dr. Morris FREEDMAN,) the caring staff of the Bradgate Arms (guided by Stephanie REGENT,) the incredible team at Sunnybrook who made his last days comfortable (led by Dr. Robert FOWLER,) and the loving caretakers who stayed by his side until the end (Cecilia, Angie, Cora, Janet, Anna and Asher). Herb touched many lives in many places around the world. He leaves many who will miss him dearly but will remain inspired by his character for the rest of their lives. Private memorial services will be held in Toronto and in the U.S. Contributions will be accepted for the Herbert and Elizabeth Anspach Family Foundation, a charitable learning foundation established by their daughter to advance education and medical research. Those wishing to contact the family may do so through the Humphrey Funeral Home A. W. Miles Chapel, Toronto (1-800-616-3311).

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FREEMAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Captain Lynn Gerald FREEMAN, 1930-2003
"We all must sail sometimes with the wind and sometimes against it, but we must sail and not drift nor lie at anchor"
It is with sadness and regret that we announce the passing of our dad, Lynn Gerald FREEMAN, after a lengthy illness, on Saturday, January 11, 2003, with his family at his side, at the Hotel Dieu hospital in St. Catharines. Lynn was born in Tehkummah, the son of the late Mildred (RUSSELL) and Ernest FREEMAN.
Lynn is survived by: the mother of his children, Sandra FREEMAN and his kids, Jerry, Cindy, Mark, Angela and Kim, his grandchildren who he loved very much: Sandra, Christa, Natacha, Mark Jr. and Jake, his brothers and sisters: Earl (Effie,) Gelena HOPKIN, Lorraine EADIE (Ted), Marion CASE (Harold), Dick (Lois), Betty LAWSON, Margaret DIBONAVENTURA, Conrad (Judy), Myrna BEATON (Ken) and Brenda ROBINSON. Lynn was predeceased by his brother Larry.
Besides his family, Lynn's passion in life was sailing on the Great Lakes. He was at home on the water and took great pride in the ships he sailed for some 45 years. He will be remembered and missed by those who sailed with him during those years. Until Lynn became ill he was current with all traffic in the Welland Canal. At Lynn's request, cremation will take place with a private family service. A memorial service will take place on Manitoulin Island at a later date.

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FREEMAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-12 published
FREEMAN
-In loving memory of a dear mother, grandmother and great grandmother, Mildred, who passed away February 12, 1998.
Memory drifts to scenes long past,
Time rolls on but memories last,
Sunshine passes, shadows fall,
Love's remembrance outlasts all.
-Lovingly remembered and sadly missed by Brenda, Stephanie, Melanie and families.

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FREEMAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Orma "Laureen" ROBINSON
In loving memory of Orma "Laureen" ROBINSON who passed away peacefully at the Manitoulin Health Centre on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 at the age of 74 years.
Predeceased by dear husband Seward (Nov. 9, 1998). Loving mother of Beverly MONTGOMERY of Sudbury, Larry and Debra of Manitowaning, Jimmy and Mary of Little Current, Perry and Angela of Manitowaning. Cherished grandmother of David (wife Jenny), Danny (fiancée Catherine), Devon, Amanda, Crystal, Paige and Taylor. Special great grandmother of Jarred, Joshua and Eric. Will be missed by brothers and sisters Glenna and (husband Raymond predeceased) Wilkin, Harold and Marion CASE, Effie and Earl FREEMAN, Thelma, Harry and Jean CASE, Lyman (predeceased) and Gretta CASE, Les and Pat CASE and Albert and Margaret CASE.

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FREEMAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Margaret Ann (FREEMAN) DI_BONAVERNTURA
Peacefully at Mindemoya Hospital on Tuesday, June 3, 2003 at the age of 67 years.
Margaret was born in Tehkummah to Ernest and Mildred FREEMAN (both predeceased). She moved to Toronto in 1955. She owned her own flower shop on Eglington Avenue in Toronto for several years. In 1973 she started working at the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce and retired from there in 2001. Margaret enjoyed traveling, shopping for bargains, good food and her family and Friends. Dear sister of Gelena (husband Morley predeceased) HOPKIN of Tehkummah, Earl and wife Effie FREEMAN of Little Current, Marion and husband Harold CASE of The Slash, Lorraine and husband Ted EADIE of Little Current, Dick and wife Lois FREEMAN of Goderich, Conrad and wife Judy FREEMAN of Merickville. Betty (husband Ed predeceased) LAWSON of Deseronto. Myrna and husband Ken BEATON of Toronto, Brenda (husband Randy predeceased) ROBINSON of Tehkummah. Predeceased by two brothers Larry and Lynn FREEMAN. Will be missed by many nieces and nephews and great great nieces and nephews. Memorial Funeral Mass will be held on Saturday June 14, 2003 at 3: 00 p.m. in the Mindemoya Catholic Church. Burial of ashes in Hilly Grove Cemetery.

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FREEMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-21 published
FREEMAN, Willard Arthur, 1922-2003
Arthur, dear husband of Margaret, died June 18, 2003. He was the loved and respected father of James, Donald and Peter and grandfather of Jamie, John, Jeffery, Jennifer, Dustin, Wyatt and Skyler. He is survived by his sisters-in-law Lorna FREEMAN, Helen LOVE and Alison FLYNN (Michael). Uncle Art will be missed, especially at the cottage, by his nieces and nephews, Wendy and Paul Sherwood, Malcolm and Elizabeth GRAHAM, David and Judy LOVE, Barbara LOVE, Jane and Tim ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, Joe FLYNN and their children. Grandpa will also be remembered by Jane MacCabe FREEMAN, mother of Jamie, John, Jeffery and Jennifer and Laila RAHNASTO, mother of Dustin, Wyatt and Skyler. Cremation has taken place. A service will be held at Central Presbyterian Church (Charlton and Caroline, Hamilton, Ontario) on Monday, June 30th at 11 a.m. A reception will be held in the Guild Room of the Church following the service. Flowers gratefully declined.

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FREEMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-24 published
FREEMAN, Willard Arthur, 1922-2003
Arthur, dear husband of Margaret, died June 18, 2003. He was the loved and respected father of James, Donald and Peter and grandfather of Jamie, John, Jeffery, Jennifer, Dustin, Wyatt and Skyler. He is survived by his sisters-in-law Lorna FREEMAN, Helen LOVE and Alison FLYNN (Michael). Uncle Art will be missed, especially at the cottage, by his nieces and nephews, Wendy and Paul SHERWOOD, Malcolm and Elizabeth GRAHAM, David and Judy LOVE, Barbara LOVE, Jane and Tim ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, Joe FLYNN and their children. Grandpa will also be remembered by Jane MacCabe FREEMAN, mother of Jamie, John, Jeffery and Jennifer and Laila RAHNASTO, mother of Dustin, Wyatt and Skyler. Cremation has taken place. A service will be held at Central Presbyterian Church (Charlton and Caroline, Hamilton, Ontario) on Monday, June 30th at 11 a.m. A reception will be held in the Guild Room of the Church following the service. Flowers gratefully declined.

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FREEMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-22 published
MATHER, Naomi
Peacefully, at her home in Waterloo, surrounded by the love of her family, Naomi died early Monday morning, July 21, 2003. She was 20. Naomi struggled with Ewing's Sarcoma since January of 2002. Her indomitable spirit sustained all who knew her. Precious daughter of Susan (COOKE) and Fred MATHER and dearest sister of John. Naomi will be lovingly remembered by her Paternal grandmother, Ivey MATHER of Perth; her special friend Marjorie MALLORY, Aunts and Uncles, Marilyn CURRY of Headingly, Minnesota, Catherine and Richard FREEMAN of Vancouver, Lorna and Jim PEDEN and Sheila PRESCOTT (Dave McGRATH) of Perth; cousins, Tyler, Jennifer and Andrew CURRY, Harry and Gabby FREEMAN, Corinne, Trent and Colin PEDEN and Patricia PRESCOTT. Naomi's life included a wide circle of Friends, especially Cara DURST. Her Scottish Terrier Ghillie and Tabby cat Tamara had a special place in her heart. She was predeceased by Maternal grandparents, Roy and Edith COOKE and her Paternal grandfather, John MATHER. In Naomi's short life, she involved herself in many activities. She was a graduate of Waterloo Collegiate Institute and was enrolled in Science studies at Queen's University when she became ill. Some of her involvements and interests included Strathyre Highland Dancers, Children's International Summer Villages, working as a lifeguard and swimming instructor and playing the piano. Friend's and relatives are invited to share their memories of Naomi with her family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo from 7 to 9 pm this evening (Tuesday) and 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 pm Wednesday. A service to celebrate Naomi's life will be held on Thursday, July 24, 2003, 11 am, at Westminster United Church (The Cedars,) 543 Beechwood Drive, Waterloo, with Reverend John ANDERSON officiating. A committal service will follow in Parkview Cemetery Crematorium Chapel, Waterloo. Following the committal at the Cemetery, Friends and relatives are invited to return to Westminster United Church for refreshments and a time to visit with the family.In Naomi's memory, in lieu of flowers, donations to the Sarcoma Fund at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto or the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and can be arranged through the funeral home, phone (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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FREEZE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-09 published
Double-killing suspect found dead in hotel
By Colin FREEZE Crime Reporter Thursday, January 9, 2003, Page A16
A manhunt for a suspected killer led police yesterday to a $100-a-night highway motel, where 31-year-old Joseph Braga PRIETO was found dead of an apparent suicide.
Mr. PRIETO, 31, was the main suspect in last weekend's triple shooting inside a Mississauga apartment. Two of the victims, aged 19 and 21, died.
Yesterday morning, police tracked the suspect to a Scarborough Quality Inn, where he barricaded himself for several hours. He exchanged words with police in the afternoon before gunshots were heard inside.
Police were cautious before opening the room door; the motel was evacuated, tear gas was used and a bomb-detecting robot was brought in before the suspect was found face down, dead.
The province's Special Investigation Unit, which probes cases of death or serious injury involving the police, was made aware of the situation yesterday at 3: 30 p.m. It began its investigation three hours later when Mr. PRIETO was discovered dead.
In 1997, a police officer said Mr. PRIETO "came out like a madman" when cornered during a drug bust. He grabbed a police officer's gun during the takedown. After police grabbed the gun back, he fled into a ravine, then tried to steal a cement truck. It proved to be a poor choice of getaway vehicle; he was caught.
"He's a very lucky man. Twice during the incident he could have been shot by officers," an officer said at the time.
Yesterday, the head of the Toronto Police organized-crime squad was present at the motel, though Peel Police was the lead investigating agency.
Mississauga is emerging as the Greater Toronto Area's crime hot spot. In addition to this past weekend's double homicide, Peel Police are investigating an accidental shooting in which a seven-year-old girl shot and killed her six-year-old brother while playing with a sibling's illegal handgun.
On Tuesday, Peel Police investigated a domestic murder-suicide in which a husband strangled his wife before hanging himself.
Peel Region investigated nine homicides last year. By contrast, Toronto Police investigated 60 homicides in 2002, but have yet to launch an investigation this year.

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FREEZE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-24 published
Truth is emerging in Trinidad deaths
By Colin FREEZE Crime Reporter; With a report from Ken THOMAS in Port of Spain. Friday, January 24, 2003, Page A5
The bruised and bloated bodies of the young newlyweds washed ashore on a remote beach in Trinidad.
Even in death, they lay close together. Inside the woman's belly was their unborn baby. A suspicious double drowning cruelly ended the promise of a new family.
Today, one veteran homicide investigator says that the 1994 honeymoon deaths of Geoff BARNES, 23, and Sherelle Ann IMPERIO- BARNES, 22, are the result of one of the most elaborate conspiracies he has witnessed. Yet another theory calls the tragedy an accident. Only now is the truth beginning to surface in court.
For years, criminal investigators have believed that the vacationing Toronto couple was drugged and drowned in a scheme hatched by conspirators intent on collecting life-insurance money.
Yet only one man has ever been formally accused of murder: Roland (Bobby) DOORGADEEN, whose trial has begun in the capital of the Caribbean island nation of 1.5 million people.
After a lengthy investigation by Trinidadian authorities, Mr. DOORGADEEN was charged with the murders in 1998. The former Trinidadian police officer and convicted car thief has pleaded not guilty. But he will be hanged if a jury finds him guilty.
On the witness stand yesterday was the prosecution's star witness his estranged wife.
Nicole DOORGADEEN testified that in May, 1994, two men in a rental car came to pick up her husband. She said he returned much later in the evening, bellowing from the car: "Don't come outside. Send a scrubbing brush for me."
After the two men drove away, Mr. DOORGADEEN came into the house in his underwear, Mrs. DOORGADEEN testified. He held a bottle of chloroform, she said, adding that she later found his clothes covered with sand.
She also testified that her husband later said he was expecting a "large sum" of about $50,000. And that "one day, while looking at television, he told me that he killed the Canadians and explained how he did it," she told the court.
Her husband said he and two other men drugged the couple and dragged them into the sea, she said. A previous witness has testified he saw Mr. DOORGADEEN with the Canadian couple at a beach house.
Next week, the jury is expected to hear from former Toronto homicide detective Tom KLATT. "I had given my word to the family that I would follow this through to the end," Mr. KLATT said a few hours before boarding his flight to Trinidad yesterday.
Working with insurance adjusters and Trinidad police, Mr. KLATT said he discovered that a former boyfriend of Sherelle-Ann IMPERIO- BARNES had taken out a $100,000 life-insurance policy on her. The insurance, which would have paid double if her death was ruled accidental, survived the relationship.
Despite the breakup and Ms. IMPERIO's marriage, the ex-boyfriend didn't sever his ties. In fact, Mr. KLATT said, he bought the newlyweds tickets to his home country -- Trinidad.
The ex-boyfriend still lives in Canada and has not been charged in connection with the deaths.
"There's a simple explanation," he told a Toronto Star reporter a year after the killings. He then referred questions to his lawyer, who refused to say anything more.
With matters still before the courts, Mr. KLATT did not want to discuss the investigation further, except to say the insurance was never collected. But the veteran of 70 homicide investigations called the Barnes' case "one of the most complete conspiracies that I've ever been involved in."
The nine-year wait for justice has been excruciating for the victims' families.
"From the day it happened we said it would take a long time," Tom BARNES, Geoff's 60-year-old father, said in an interview from his home in Georgetown, Ontario
The court has already heard that autopsies uncovered traces of cocaine in the dead couple's systems. The judge has asked the jury to consider whether the couple might have accidentally drowned.
But Mr. KLATT, who once investigated international drug networks, said this theory is inconsistent with his investigation.
"There was zero information, evidence, hearsay, assumption or guesses that would suggest that either one of these two had ever been involved with drugs, or alcohol for that matter," he said.

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FREEZE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-04 published
Crowd hostile to police at scene of slaying
By Colin FREEZE Tuesday, February 4, 2003, Page A16
The city's latest investigation into a fatal shooting has hit a stumbling block: an overtly hostile crowd that had nothing to say -- except that police shouldn't have been at the crime scene.
Matthew OSBOURNE, 29, was shot in a car outside a Scarborough nightclub early on Sunday. A friend survived the shooting, but Mr. Osbourne died in hospital soon after.
Officers said a crowd of 150 people grew angry at the police officers who reached the scene ahead of paramedics.
Tensions grew to the point where some members of the crowd shouted at police for being there, and the officers feared for their safety.
No officers were hurt. Investigators are appealing for help in identifying witnesses.

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FREEZE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-10 published
Police investigating retailer's death
By Colin FREEZE Monday, March 10, 2003 - Page A10
John ASA, a boyhood survivor of the Hiroshima bombing who grew up to co-found the Japan Camera retail chain, died after falling from a car said to have been driven by his wife.
"All of us are just waiting to find out what happened, really, said Mr. ASA's nephew, Bryan, in an interview last night.
He said the entire family is grieving for his uncle, whom he described as an inspiring and visionary Canadian entrepreneur who never tired of building his business or of taking snapshots.
According to CFTO News, Mr. ASA had just left his home in the hamlet of Leaskdale, northeast of Toronto, about 8: 30 a.m. on Thursday when he saw his wife of two years driving the other way.
According to the report, they pulled over to the side of the road and he got into her car. But after about 15 metres, he fell out of the passenger side and hit his head.
Mr. ASA died of the head wounds in hospital.
Police in Durham Region are investigating the case. Constable Robert HAWKES, the lead officer, said he expects to receive a reconstruction of the incident tomorrow from investigators. The Durham homicide squad is not involved.
John ASA was born in Canada but was brought to Japan as a child shortly before the Second World War started. When he was about 7, he and his older brothers heard the U.S. bomber Enola Gay fly over their small village about 10 kilometres from Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. Then they saw the tremendous mushroom cloud engulfing the city.
The explosion at Hiroshima killed his mother.
With his two older brothers, Kenji and Roy, Mr. ASA made his way to Canada in 1954. They opened the first Japan Camera store near Yonge Street in 1959.
Twenty years later, the enterprise had grown into a leading chain with outlets across Canada.
Japan Camera was the first company in North America that allowed customers to have their photos developed within an hour.

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FREEZE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-10 published
Japan Camera co-founder dies in car accident
John Asa was a passenger in his wife's car when he fell out and hit head, reports say
By Colin FREEZE With a report from Jennifer LEWINGTON Monday, March 10, 2003 - Page A10
John ASA, a boyhood survivor of the Hiroshima bombing who grew up to co-found the Japan Camera retail chain, died after falling from a car said to have been driven by his wife.
"All of us are just waiting to find out what happened, really, said Mr. ASA's nephew, Bryan, in an interview last night.
He said the entire family is grieving for his uncle, whom he described as an inspiring and visionary Canadian entrepreneur who never tired of building his business or of taking snapshots.
According to CFTO News, Mr. ASA had just left his home in the hamlet of Leaskdale, northeast of Toronto, about 8: 30 a.m. on Thursday when he saw his wife of two years driving the other way.
According to the report, they pulled over to the side of the road and he got into her car. But after about 15 metres, he fell out of the passenger side and hit his head.
An witness who came on the scene told the Uxbridge Times Journal that "when I saw the amount of blood I was surprised he was still alive."
Mr. ASA died of the head wounds in hospital.
Police in Durham Region are investigating the case. Constable Robert HAWKES, the lead officer, said he expects to get a reconstruction of the incident tomorrow. The Durham homicide squad is not involved in the probe.
Bryan ASA, who is a Japan Camera vice-president, described his uncle as the youngest and most charismatic of three brothers who overcame hardships early in life.
John ASA was born in Canada but was brought to Japan as a child shortly before the Second World War started.
When he was about 7, he and his older brothers heard the U.S. bomber Enola Gay fly over their small village about 10 kilometres from Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, then saw the tremendous mushroom cloud engulf the city. The explosion killed his mother, who was travelling, but the radiation-filled smoke blew away from his village.
With his two older brothers, Kenji and Roy, Mr. ASA made his way to Canada in 1954. They settled in Toronto, where their first jobs were picking mushrooms.
As a teenager, John ASA went on to become his high-school class president. He and his brothers opened the first Japan Camera store near Yonge Street in 1959.
Twenty years later, the enterprise had grown into a leading chain with outlets across Canada.
Japan Camera was the first company in North America that allowed customers to have their photos developed within an hour.
For the last 20 years, Mr. ASA had lived in Leaskdale, a tiny village in the community known as Uxbridge. His first wife died five years ago, and he had remarried.
Bryan ASA said his uncle never stopped urging people to take pictures.

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FRENCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-26 published
Niagara police chief led force 6 years
Wednesday, February 26, 2003 - Page R7
Niagara Falls, Ontario -- Former Niagara Region police chief John SHOVELLER has died of brain cancer.
Mr. SHOVELLER, a Niagara Falls native who devoted 34 years to policing, died Saturday at age 67.
Mr. SHOVELLER began his career in Elliot Lake, Ontario, before moving back to Niagara region.
"He was a consummate police officer, said his wife, Leah SHOVELLER. "He loved his job so much."
Mr. SHOVELLER accomplished a long-time goal when he became chief in 1987. During his watch, a judicial inquiry looked into, and cleared, the Niagara force of corruption allegations. Later, in 1991 and 1992, when schoolgirls Kristen FRENCH and Leslie MAHAFFY were found murdered in St. Catharines, Ontario, he survived the criticism that dogged the investigation that eventually led to the convictions of Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka. He retired in 1993.
Canadian Press

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FRENCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
Cardinal felt at ease with politics, power
Corporate Friends, conservative image concealed complexities, contradictions
By Michael VALPY Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page A9
Gerald Emmett CARTER presided over the Roman Catholic Church in Toronto for 12 years with panache, deftness, wit and worldliness too much worldliness, some of his critics thought.
The retired cardinal archbishop, who died at 91 yesterday morning after a brief illness, chummed with the powerful of business and politics and became the most influential cleric in Canada.
He was a personal friend of Pope John Paul 2nd. His weight was felt in Vatican circles and his administrative expertise -- and connections with the elite world of corporate finance -- were valued by the church's governing Curia.
He raised millions of dollars for charity through his annual cardinal's dinner, pressed governments for social housing and worked energetically to improve race relations in a city being transformed from a WASPy bastion into a multicultural and multiracial metropolis. His was the largest and wealthiest English-speaking diocese in Canada.
In the North American church's tumultuous years after the 1961-65 Second Vatican Council, the most significant reassessment of the Catholic Church since the 16th century, Cardinal CARTER was branded a conservative by many Catholic liberals. It was a superficial label for a complex and astute pastoral theologian and a man whose intelligence was described as commanding.
The conservative label, for one thing, did not take into account Cardinal CARTER's publicly tepid response to Pope Paul 6th's reaffirmation of the church's opposition to birth control.
Or that he once said Catholics were "not required to agree with [the Pope's] every word or act." Said the cardinal: To think that a good Catholic is obliged to agree with the Pope on everything "would, at the very least, make for a very dull church."
But he strained ecumenical good fellowship in Ontario by relentlessly and, eventually, successfully -- prodding the provincial government to legislate full financing for the Roman Catholic separate school system. He intervened in the Newfoundland constitutional referendum on ending public financing of denominational schools.
He publicly defended his church's rules for an all-male, celibate priesthood. He wrote a pastoral letter calling Dr. Henry MORGENTALER's abortion clinic an "abomination" and calling on Christians to oppose its operations. But he also ordered his priests to stop distributing literature of militant anti-abortion groups.
When the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops swung to the left in its criticisms of the national government's fiscal policies, Cardinal CARTER bluntly took the opposite direction.
And he objected to the conference's decision in 1984 to study a plan to give women and girls a more prominent role in the church and attracted noise and notoriety three years later when he ordered a suburban Toronto church not to allow a teenaged girl to be an altar server at mass.
Cardinal CARTER, a Montreal typesetter's son who made his mark as an academic and teacher before climbing the church's ranks, looked stern in public, gave arid homilies and was known to intimidate his priests.
But he was mischievous and funny in private, played a superb game of tennis and was a sought-after dinner guest in the homes of Toronto's business and political elite.
He was, among other things, credited with converting Conrad BLACK to Catholicism, and his name often appeared in the press alongside those of political leaders such as former Ontario premier William DAVIS, prompting Globe and Mail columnist Orland FRENCH to write: "His presence at glittering Tory functions is overly noticeable and it would be fair to speculate that he discussed with the Premier the advantages of extending funding to separate schools."
Born in Montreal in 1912, Cardinal CARTER was a priest for nearly 66 years and a bishop for 40 years. His brother Alexander, who died last year at 93, had retired as bishop of the Ontario diocese of Sault Ste. Marie. Two sisters were nuns, one of them the head of her order.
Cardinal CARTER was educated at the Grand Seminary of Montreal and the University of Montreal. He spent the first 25 years of his priesthood working in various educational fields in the province of Quebec.
In 1939, he founded St. Joseph's Teaching College in Montreal and was its principal until 1961. For 15 years, he was English commissioner for the Montreal Catholic School Commission. He was a professor of catechetics -- the formation of faith -- for 25 years.
He was installed as the first auxiliary bishop in the diocese of London, Ontario, in 1961 and became the eighth bishop of London in 1964.
In 1971, he headed the International Committee for English in the Liturgy, which was responsible for translating Latin texts for the mass and the sacraments.
In 1977, he was elected a member of the Permanent Council of the Synod of Bishops in Rome, which sets the topics for the International Synod of Bishops in Rome every two or three years.
Pope John Paul named him a cardinal, one of only four in Canada, in May of 1979, a year after he became archbishop of Toronto.
From the moment he was installed as archbishop, promising to serve all who "would like to see Toronto as something more than an asphalt jungle," Cardinal CARTER put his job in the spotlight and, very often, himself in the hot seat. He tackled controversial issues with a candour that won him arrows and acclaim from politicians, minority groups, the church laity and sometimes fellow clergy.
At the same time, he was loyal to the Pope and to the official teachings of the church, declaring in 1979 that the time had come to end the dissent within the church that had followed Vatican 2 and turn the 1980s into a time of reaffirmation of faith.
"We have had enough of confusion, enough of confrontation, enough of dissent. We are the believers. Those who go looking for dissent are not Catholic."
His ties with the Pope were personal. John Paul, as archbishop of Krakow, had visited Cardinal CARTER in London, Ontario, and had him stay as a houseguest in Poland. Cardinal CARTER, in turn, was host to the Pope at his Rosedale home when the pontiff visited Toronto in 1984.
His funeral will be held at 10: 30 a.m. Thursday in St. Michael's Cathedral, Toronto.

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FREUD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-04 published
Recollections of an artist whose absence is palpable
By OLIVER Girling, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 4, 2003 - Page R11
Lynn DONOGHUE loved to paint pictures, and her favourite subject was the human form.
A spiritual child of the influential David Mirvish Gallery of the seventies, her work was championed by the gallery's owner as well as its director, Alkis KLONARIDIS, when he later opened on his own. This was noteworthy because the Mirvish Gallery's domain had been modernist, abstract painting and sculpture, to the exclusion of almost everything else.
But Lynn's paintings were a kind of hybrid, marrying the flatness and luminous colour of abstract painting to whimsical representations of the figure and face. For painting in Toronto, this was an important step, a bridge between card-carrying abstractionists like Ric Evans and Jan Poldaas and unabashed figurative artists then just starting, like the ChromaZone and Republic collectives and Joanne Tod. Still, historicism doesn't explain or do justice to the brand new species she invented and practised with lifelong consistency.
The subjects of her pictures seem sort of animated, the result of asymmetries that could only be achieved with a live sitter. Not for her the "95-per-cent Kodak, 5-per-cent art" method (Godard's ironic deflation of cinema's pretensions); unlike other figurative painting contemporaries, her use of photographs as aids was minimal.
The result was people in their gawky particularity who look like they're in the middle of living, rather than idealized, Platonic masks. (Look at her portrait of the company Dancemakers when you're in the lobby of the Premiere Dance Theatre in Toronto).
Lucian FREUD needed four sittings from the Queen for his 6-by-10-inch portrait; Lynn needed at least 20 for her 5-by-6-foot works. I know, because I sat for her twice. The first time, in New York in the eighties, she gave me turquoise pants and punked-out hair in the buttoned-down nineties, I'm more Jimmy Olson, cub reporter. Both were exaggerations; she relished using clothing as a sensual and imagist extension of personality.
The experience was energizing and relaxing. Talking non-stop as she painted, and constantly requiring a response, there was no danger of my going slack-jawed (this may be another part of the animation you see in her paintings).
Erudite about art history, she talked about artists and shows, "the biz," she called it; gossiped big-time; interspersed advice recipes; homilies. I felt honoured to be invited into such an intimate situation, to be present at the creation of a work. The final portraits feel to me like the residue of our conversations, souvenirs of 20 or so encounters at two junctures in our lives.
A prolific artist (http: //www.lynndonoghue.com), there is still new work to look forward to. Rumours also exist of a body of watercolour, male nudes that she was working on which, if true, would bring her back to her origins, when she painted lumpen, youthful abstract painters in their full-bodied glory.
In the art community, we're mourning a much-loved friend and colleague. I don't anticipate meeting her ghost at Dundas and Roncesvalles, our common Toronto neighbourhood; on the contrary, it's her absence that's palpable -- her voice especially. It will be felt by her Friends in various communities, at the Gato Nero on College Street where she had morning coffee for 20 years, at a particular pub on Bloor Street, at the high-Anglican church where she prayed.
Absence has always been one of the clearest motifs in Lynn DONOGHUE's work. When abstraction and representation meet, colours, forms and lines that converge provisionally as a face remember a person not present.
A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday at the Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, 477 Manning Ave., Toronto.

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FREUND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-29 published
STANFIELD, Katherine Margaret (née STAIRS)
Died peacefully December 26, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Born February 1, 1918, eldest of Katherine (DRYSDALE) and Cyril W. STAIRS, Halifax, she attended Halifax Ladies College, Edgehill and the Halifax Business College before working at Wm. Stairs son and Morrow. She married Gordon (Pete) STANFIELD in 1940. They resided in Sydney and New Glasgow before settling in Halifax, summering in Bedford and vacationing in Bermuda. Kay will be remembered as a people person who made a life long contribution to her community through her many interests and activities as a member of the Waegwaltic and Saraguay Clubs, the Junior League, All Saints Cathedral, Victoria Hall and the garden club. She is survived by sisters: Phyllis (MacDOUGALL) Toronto, Doshie (MacKIMMIE- KAUMEYER) Calgary, Betty (FREUND) Johannesburg, South Africa and brother Allan STAIRS, Montreal: daughters Nancy and Pegi, Calgary; sons David (Barbara) Halifax and Gordon (Kay), Dartmouth; grand_sons Peter (Karin SORRA), New Jersey, Michael, Vancouver, John (Julie) Calgary, David K and Matthew, Halifax; great grand_son William, New Jersey. She was predeceased by her husband of 55 years (1995) and brother Arthur STAIRS, Halifax. The family is most grateful for the care and support given to Kay by the staff and Friends at Melville Heights, her home since 1995. The family will receive visitors at Snows Funeral Home, Windsor Street, Halifax on Monday December 29 from 7-9: 00 p.m. The funeral service will be at All Saints Cathedral, Tuesday, December 30, 1:30 p.m.

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FREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-12 published
Man of peace died with his boots on
Christian-based, stop-the-war mission to southern Iraq ended in tragedy for Canadian peace activist
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, February 12, 2003, Page R7
He was an educator who tried to stop a war before it began. Instead, George WEBER, a former Ontario high-school teacher who was touring Iraq as part of an effort to stave off a war, died there in a road accident. He was 73.
Mr. WEBER was killed instantly when the vehicle he was travelling in as a passenger rolled on an Iraqi highway between Basra and Baghdad.
When the left rear tire blew out of the Chevrolet Suburban, the truck hit the shoulder of the road and flipped over before rolling to a stop upside-down beside the road, said Doug PRITCHARD, Canadian co-ordinator for the Christian Peacemaker Teams, a church-based group dedicated to non-violent activism.
Mr. WEBER, who was travelling in the back seat, was thrown from the vehicle and sustained massive head injuries. Two other activists with the group were injured in the accident.
An investigation has shown that on the day of the accident, the vehicle was in excellent condition, the tires were new and the truck was travelling on a six-lane, lightly travelled highway on a clear day, Mr. PRITCHARD said.
Mr. WEBER, a retired high-school history teacher from the town of Chesley in southwestern Ontario, was among 17 Canadian and American peace activists who arrived in Iraq on December 29. They were committed to living up to a mission statement of the Christian Peacemaker Teams of reducing violence by "getting in the way," Mr. PRITCHARD said.
The group travelled to the country despite warnings from the Department of Foreign Affairs advising Canadians to stay away from Iraq for security reasons. With war looming there, antiwar activists from around the world have been heading to Iraq to act as "human shields" if the bombs start falling, and in solidarity with Iraqis.
"He was a student of world politics," said Reverend Anita Janzen of the Hanover Mennonite Church, where Mr. WEBER and his wife Lena attended. "He was very upset [by] the threat of war [in Iraq]."
Mr. WEBER felt he wouldn't be able to live with himself if war broke out in Iraq and he had failed to do anything, she said.
Yet, when people told him they thought his actions were courageous, his reply was: " 'I'm no hero,' " said his wife Lena. "It was what he felt he needed to do," she said.
In Iraq, Mr. WEBER and the Christian Peacemaker Team visited hospitals, farms and schools to talk to Iraqis about the Persian Gulf war, the United Nations sanctions and the current possible U.S.-led war.
Shortly after arriving in Baghdad, he made a trip to the marketplace to have a local tailor make him a suit. He had planned to pick it up after his trip to Basra but he never made it back to the marketplace. But someone else did. Mr. WEBER wore the suit at his funeral.
Having the suit made in Baghdad fit with Mr. WEBER's personal philosophy of trying to help those most in need. It was not uncommon on his various travels to developing countries to seek out the most decrepit taxi, saying it was that driver who was the most in need of the fare, Lena WEBER said.
"He was really kind of an unassuming and a genuinely humble man who in a quiet way lived his beliefs," said Jim LONEY, a fellow Canadian who was in the truck but escaped serious injuries. Mr. LONEY accompanied Mr. WEBER's body back to Canada from Iraq. Mr. WEBER had been scheduled to return home on January 9. "He was a deeply committed Christian, and deeply committed to peace."
Mr. WEBER's trip to Iraq wasn't his first with the Christian Peacemakers Team. After retiring from teaching, he applied to take part in a Peacemakers mission to Chiapas, Mexico. In his application in 1999, he noted that throughout his life he had been interested in current events and was aware that it was the poor and disadvantaged people in the world who end up suffering the most.
"I think that most of the calamities that befall ordinary folk could be alleviated if it were not for the selfishness and greed that motivate the power structures, which are in place throughout the world.
"But there are also many people of goodwill who wish to treat everyone fairly and with charity. I try to be among this group," he wrote.
He was part of a two-week delegation to Chiapas in February, 2000. This trip was followed by another six-week mission to Hebron in the West Bank in 2001, and another six weeks there in 2002.
In the West Bank, Mr. WEBER was particularly moved by the plight of the Palestinian children and would accompany them to school through military checkpoints ensuring that they arrived safely.
Mr. WEBER had also been a member of the Peace Justice and Social Concerns Committee of the Mennonite Conference of Eastern Canada between 1994 and 1998.
George WEBER was born on July 28, 1929, and grew up on a farm near Elmira, Ontario He was the fifth of seven children born to Ion and Geneva WEBER. After his father died when he was in his 50s, George was left to take over the family farm. A young man, just 20, he helped his mother raise his younger siblings.
When George felt one of his younger siblings was able to take over the farm, he got on a boat headed for Europe. It was during his travels that he decided he would like to one day attend university.
He returned to Canada in his mid-20s and enrolled in the history department at the University of Toronto. After graduating with a degree, he went into teaching. His first job was teaching history at Western Technical-Commercial School in Toronto.
It was through the Mennonite church that he met Lena FREY. The couple married in 1959 and not long afterward went to Africa. Mr. WEBER taught in Ghana and Nigeria during the 1960s for the Mennonite Board of Missions teaching school and his wife worked as a nurse.
After returning to Canada, he taught at a Toronto high school before settling in Chesley, Ontario, where he taught history at a local high school, farmed and was active in the Hanover Mennonite Church.
"George was a very critical thinker," said Barry WOODYARD, a retired vice-principal at Chesley District High School. "He used to challenge his students not to accept anything they heard on the news," or from politicians. "He felt they needed to do their own thinking."
A quiet, hard-working man, he was known among his colleagues for having a particular talent for forming relationships with the difficult students the other teachers often didn't want to deal with.
"If people needed help he would help them," Mr. WOODYARD said.
Mr. WEBER leaves his wife Lena, children Reginald and Tania and four grandchildren. He also leaves two brothers and one sister.
George WEBER, teacher, farmer, missionary, born on July 28, 1929, in Elmira, Ontario; died near Basra, Iraq, on January 6, 2003.

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FREYSENG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-18 published
DUNCANSON, Andrew Austin (1914-2003)
Died in Toronto, on Saturday, February 15, 2003, after a courageous battle with heart and kidney disease. Andrew was predeceased by his beloved wife of 56 years, Harryette Coulson DUNCANSON (1917-1995). He is survived by his loving family, which include his brother and sister John William DUNCANSON and Anne Colhoun MORRISON; his children Daphne Duncanson HOOD and Andrew Coulson DUNCANSON; his grandchildren Signy Freyseng MARCYNIUK, Adam Duncanson FREYSENG, Caitlin Ruth DUNCANSON and Andrew Noble DUNCANSON. Andrew was a soldier with the Royal Regiment of Canada during World War 2, serving in Iceland, England and Burma. He retired from service after the war with the rank of Major and earned the Burma Star for his efforts. His distinguished business career took him through the ranks of Unilever and he finished his career as Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Thomas J. Lipton & Co. Andrew was a Knight of the Order of St. Lazarus and had the privilege of being their Grand Prior for the period of 1987-1992. His latter life was devoted to his many charitable endeavors, his family and Friends. He will be remembered for his kindness and generosity. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 6-9 p.m. on Thursday, February 20th. The Funeral Service will be held at the Chapel of St. James-The-Less, 635 Parliament Street, on Friday, February 21st at 3 o'clock. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Order of St. Lazarus, 39 McArthur Avenue, Ottawa K1L 8L7, would be appreciated. 'The character of a man is his principles drawn out and woven into himself.'

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