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"FOW" 2003 Obituary


FOWLER  FOWLIE 

FOWLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-20 published
FOWLER, Barbara C.
On Saturday, May 24, 2003, the family of Barbara Christina FOWLER will celebrate her life with a memorial service at the Comstock Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 356 Rubidge Street, Peterborough. Barbara died on January 16, 2003. The service begins at 10: 00 a.m. and will be followed by interment at Little Lake Cemetery. A reception will be held at the Holiday Inn in Peterborough beginning at 11: 30 a.m. The family invites her Friends to join them in this celebration.

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FOWLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-28 published
Mary Amelia Fowler ATKINSON
By Bob ATKINSON Thursday, August 28, 2003 - Page A20
Wife, mother of 12, grandmother of 23 and great-grandmother of seven. Born May 9, 1913, in Joggins, Nova Scotia Died January 20 in Saint Mary's, Ontario, of a stroke, aged 89.
Constancy is the word that best describes Mom. The namesake of Amelia Earhart, she was the youngest daughter of immigrants from Scotland, James FOWLER and Amelia Christine McCORMICK.
Mom shared many memories of life along Nova Scotia's Gold Coast. "The warmest water north of Florida," she used to say. And she was always fascinated by the power of the Fundy tides. Her Dad managed a coal mine in Joggins and her mother cared for a family of six. As a child, Mom excelled at school, eventually ending up at a local business school where she graduated at the top of her class.
She married Harold (Pat) ATKINSON from Amherst in 1936. Getting married and living during the Depression had a profound influence on Mom. She learned how to do without and I think she instilled a bit of that in all of us. Mom and Dad eventually left the east coast and moved to Hamilton, Ontario During the early years, they moved around... 11 times in seven years. They lived in Hamilton, Galt, Jackson, Michigan -- eventually settling down in Saint Mary's in 1952. Mom loved Saint Mary's and the big house on Widder Street. Ours was always the home where the neighbourhood kids found refuge if they needed a bandage for a scraped knee or relief from the weather. Our home was always full of kids! In spite of the challenges running a household with 12 kids (six boys, six girls), Mom still found time for others. She would often take time to fix our old clothes and give them to folk in the town who needed them.
Mom was the single most interesting person I ever knew. She would debate anyone on any subject -- politics, business, religion. I think this is best seen in the personalities that Mom read and listened to: Mordecai Richler, Robbie Burns, Stephen Leacock, Ogden Nash, Barbara Amiel, Diane Francis, Barbara Frum, Rex Murphy, Gordon Sinclair, Jeffrey Simpson. All very bright, articulate people with strong convictions. She didn't always agree with them but she always listened... just as she took the time to listen to her children.
Mom had a natural curiosity and a real thirst for learning. Books were her window to the rest of the world. She always wanted to travel but her devotion to her kids kept her close to home. I think this devotion was best seen when her father died and Mom felt she should not leave us to travel home for Papa's funeral. When she had the rare opportunity to travel with Dad, she really enjoyed it.
After Dad died in 1997, we had talked about a trip to Scotland so Mom could visit the birthplace of her parents, but it never happened. Caring for Dad in his final years had taken its toll. She was completely devoted to her children and as she neared the end of her life, she feared that we would lose touch with each other. In Mom's will, she instructed us to exchange the family rings, in person, to the next child in line every year. In this way, Mom will continue to touch us. Her greatest joy was getting together with everyone -- she loved a party. But she never made you feel guilty if you couldn't make it home. She always understood.She never made you feel like she was owed something. Her impact on people's lives is best seen in the grandchildren who rarely missed an opportunity to drop in and visit with her.
She loved to watch hockey and baseball... but she loved radio most! She never took herself too seriously; had very quick wit and a great sense of humour. She loved to laugh. She taught us all not to take life too seriously, but she will always remain our constant: our touchstone.
Bob is one of Amelia's sons.

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FOWLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-28 published
ANSPACH, Herbert Kephart
Born in Ada, Ohio on September 3, 1926, died in Toronto, Ontario on November 22, 2003. Herb was a man of character who exemplified integrity, fairness, hard work, lifelong learning, and who made a remarkable impact on the world and people around him. He was a business leader in the U.S. and Canada, a patriotic citizen and supporter of the communities in which he lived, a dedicated husband, a good-humoured friend to many, and an inspirational father, grandfather, and father-in-law. His intelligence and hard work earned him an Engineering Degree from University of Wisconsin, a Law Degree from University of Michigan, many scholarships and academic awards, and a productive career from GoodYear to the U.S. Patent Office to Whirlpool, where he was a Patent Lawyer, Vice-President of Personnel, subsidiary President (Inglis, Toronto), and ultimately President of Whirlpool Corporation of St. Joseph, Michigan. He was successful in his work, inspirational in his coaching of all those he took under his wing, and generous with his wisdom and counsel to many through his profession, educational endeavours, and personal life. In his retirement years, Herb and his wife, Elizabeth, resided in Boca Raton, Florida while he continued to remain active in international business consulting, investing, Pro-Am Golf Tournaments, betting on every sports play-off, and keeping in touch with his family and Friends. Upon his illness in 1999, he moved to Toronto, Ontario with his wife, both under the care of their daughter, Heather Anspach FRASER. Here, he spent his valuable final years with his wife Elizabeth, granddaughter Ceilidh, and son-in-law Neil FRASER. A special thanks to those who have made his last years a rich and wonderful experience, from the folks at Baycrest Hospital (particularly Dr. Morris FREEDMAN,) the caring staff of the Bradgate Arms (guided by Stephanie REGENT,) the incredible team at Sunnybrook who made his last days comfortable (led by Dr. Robert FOWLER,) and the loving caretakers who stayed by his side until the end (Cecilia, Angie, Cora, Janet, Anna and Asher). Herb touched many lives in many places around the world. He leaves many who will miss him dearly but will remain inspired by his character for the rest of their lives. Private memorial services will be held in Toronto and in the U.S. Contributions will be accepted for the Herbert and Elizabeth Anspach Family Foundation, a charitable learning foundation established by their daughter to advance education and medical research. Those wishing to contact the family may do so through the Humphrey Funeral Home A. W. Miles Chapel, Toronto (1-800-616-3311).

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FOWLIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-18 published
Former Member of Provincial Parliament, journalist Frank DREA dead at 69
By Jonathan FOWLIE Saturday, January 18, 2003, Page A25
Frank DREA, Progressive Conservative Member of Provincial Parliament of 14 years and a journalist best known for his consumer advocacy column in the Telegram, died Wednesday.
He was 69.
"He accomplished a great deal and was very tenacious," his wife Jeanne said last night.
"He used to say, 'What's the use of having power if you don't use it to help people?' He did, and I think that's how he'd like to be remembered."
First elected to office in 1971 as the Member of Provincial Parliament for Scarborough Centre, Mr. DREA was known as a crusader who often fought for the underdog.
In 1977, Mr. DREA was appointed to the cabinet of then premier Bill DAVIS, where he served as Minister of Correctional Services, of Consumer and Commercial Relations and of Community and Social Services.
During his time in politics, he worked to reform Ontario's prison system, introduced legislation to protect workers and tradespeople and helped to modernize the insurance industry.
Mr. DREA opted to leave politics in 1985 after Frank MILLER took over as premier and shuffled him out of the cabinet.
An avid horse-racing fan, Mr. DREA was named chairman of the Ontario Racing Commission later that year.
"Frank was tough, but he was fair," Premier Ernie EVES said in a statement yesterday.
"He will be missed by colleagues from both sides of the house," added Mr. EVES, who worked with Mr. DREA for a number of years during the early 1980s.
Toronto Sun columnist Peter WORTHINGTON, who worked with Mr. DREA at the Telegram before it folded, remembered Mr. DREA last night as an aggressive and driven reporter.
"He was certainly one of the Telegram's strongest street reporters," Mr. WORTHINGTON said.

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FOWLIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
Three men sought after east-end death
By Jonathan FOWLIE, Wednesday, October 29, 2003 - Page A15
Police are looking for three men thought to have caused the death of David ANDERSON, a 42-year-old man who lived in east-end Toronto.
witnesses: saw Mr. ANDERSON in an argument with three men outside a hair salon near Gerrard Street East and Pape Avenue at about 7: 05 p.m. on October 20. Police say the men pushed Mr. ANDERSON to the ground. An autopsy showed he died from a skull fracture he suffered when his head hit the sidewalk.
Police have set up a command post near the scene, which will be open daily this week from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. They are urging anyone with information to go to the command post, or to call Crime Stoppers.

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FOWLIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
Police identify man shot on Walmer Road
By Jonathan FOWLIE, Wednesday, November 5, 2003 - Page A17
Police have identified the man who was shot in his apartment on Walmer Road near Bloor and Spadina as 41-year-old Craig Lee McELROY.
Mr. McELROY was shot several times early on Monday morning, after two people came to visit him in the high-rise building.
Police said he was self-employed as an exotic masseur, and is believed to have conducted his business out of his residence. They released descriptions of two suspects, a black male in his early 20s with very light complexion and a slim build, and a white female, aged 20 to 25, with shoulder-length dark hair.

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FOWLIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
Crash kills promising teen
By Jonathan FOWLIE, Thursday, December 18, 2003 - Page A18
An 18-year-old man was killed and another seriously injured when their white Toyota Celica slammed into a hydro pole yesterday afternoon on Kingston Road near Danforth Avenue.
Allen BELLEHUMEUR died immediately, and was identified by his distraught parents who arrived at the scene shortly after the crash.
His close friend, Chris THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, was in the passenger seat and was rushed to intensive care at St. Michael's Hospital. He was in critical condition last night after suffering internal head injuries.
Mr. BELLEHUMEUR graduated from nearby Birchmount Park Collegiate last year, where Mr. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON was still attending classes.
Darryl MOREY, a physical-education teacher at the school, described Mr. BELLEHUMEUR as a driven student who was always pushing to improve himself. "I know academically he did very well. He fought for everything he could get. He hated getting a 70 [per cent]."
Mr. MOREY, who has been teaching for 16 years, said Mr. BELLEHUMEUR also loved hockey and was a "huge Leaf fan" who often wore the team's jersey.
Mr. BELLEHUMEUR was engaged to his long-time girl friend, the daughter of a teacher at Birchmount Park and a student at the school, Mr. MOREY said. The young man's parents run a variety store on Danforth Avenue, Mr. MOREY said, where the teenager used to work.
The school held an emergency staff meeting yesterday at which a crisis counsellor delivered the news of the crash, the teacher said. Students will be given the news today.
Police said yesterday afternoon that Mr. BELLEHUMEUR had been "changing lanes erratically" when his car jumped a small median on the ramp where Danforth Avenue feeds onto Kingston Road.
After the car cleared the median, it swerved across two lanes before knocking over a hydro pole, Sergeant Rob GREGORY of traffic services said last night.
Skid marks showed the path the car took over the median and directly into the hydro post, which broke in many places as a result of the collision. After hitting the post, the car bounced back onto the road and came to rest on its roof.
No one else was hurt and no other cars were involved in the collision. Sgt. GREGORY said that the teens had definitely not been drinking but that "speed certainly will be a factor we will be looking at."

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FOWLIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
Family struck by tragedy this Christmas
By Jonathan FOWLIE, Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - Page A8
Matthew BONDER and his sister Michelle sat virtually expressionless yesterday, describing their lives in the week since they were wakened in the early morning by the screams of their dying mother, who had just been stabbed inside their Mississauga home. Matthew, 20, took the lead, saying how important it has been to do anything, just to trick the mind into believing that life is anywhere near normal.
Sixteen-year-old Michelle, who called 911 last Wednesday morning, solemnly agreed. "We just have to continue living like we did two weeks ago," she said. "We're just going to have to get together and work as a family."
The two are not only grieving the loss of their 45-year-old mother, Zofia, but having to make sense of the fact that their father has been charged with second-degree murder in connection with her death.
Matthew and his sister say this is not the time to judge or lay blame. "You have to look through both sides of the story," Matthew said in a voice far too soft and gentle to match his hulking frame.
"What my father went through, or my mother -- the mind is a sensitive thing," he continued. "Wrong things can be said at the wrong time and you cannot have control over your own body, your actions."
That response lacks the anger and passion one would expect. Perhaps it is because he is training to be a police officer, and has learned that tepid, calculated reactions are often the most fruitful. Or perhaps he saw how the stress of the family's financial problems was causing his parents to snap at each other, and he believes it is possible no one is really to blame for what happened.
As he spoke through a vacant stare, it was apparent yesterday that the 20-year-old was not ready to revisit the memories of last week.
He would have been doing just about anything else, had a giant problem not resulted from an already grim situation. About two weeks before his mother died, the BONDERs received a notice from the bank threatening a power of sale on the house where they have lived for the past 15 years. The family also owes a sizable amount in back taxes to the city, and recently had to return their two cars because of financial problems.
Matthew, Michelle and their nine-year-old sister Andrea are all in school, so the only reliable income the family now has is coming from their godmother, a close family friend who also lives in the house and is caring for the children.
Given the size of the mortgage, and the fact that the godmother needs to support everyone, it's almost inevitable the family will soon have to move. To ensure this does not happen, Peel Regional Police have established a trust fund. Donations can be made at any TD Canada Trust branch to the BONDER Family Trust Fund.
"I see the immense potential these children have," Acting Det. GIOANNETTI said yesterday, explaining why he has taken the family under his wing.
"The debts that are on them are heavy. These children shouldn't be encumbered for the rest of their lives... and have opportunities taken away from them because of this."
Acting Det. GIOANNETTI also helped get the Salvation Army and Victim Services of Peel to provide the family with a proper Christmas.
Both groups combined to provide a decorated tree and gifts for the family.
This is especially important tomorrow since Christmas Day is also Zofia's birthday.
Matthew added that Andrea, his youngest sister, has yet to absorb everything that has happened, and has been looking forward to Christmas throughout the past week.
"Andrea, she's small; she realizes that Mommy is gone," he said.
"It's affecting her, but not to a great extent because she hasn't realized."

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