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"FOS" 2003 Obituary


FOSTER 

FOSTER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-27 published
Hannah Vivian McKAY
In loving memory of Hannah Vivian McKAY, September 6, 1932 to August 18, 2003. Vivian McKAY, a resident of Gore Bay passed away at the Manitoulin Lodge on Monday, August 18, 2003 at the age of 70 years.
She was born at Long Bay, daughter of the late Richard and Josephine (VANMEER) FOSTER. Vivian was very active and well known in the community, as a member of the United Church, United Church Women, Cancer Society, volunteered at the Lodge, and enjoyed curling, baking, cooking, lottery and scratch tickets, cribbage, feeding and watching birds and deer and her flower garden. She will be remembered for her love of people, visiting Friends and family, and in particular as a professional Nana.
Vivian was predeceased by her beloved husband Reginald. Loving and loved mother of Sandra and husband Rick RAYNER and Keith and his wife Judy McKAY. Proud and loving grandmother of Aaron, Stacy, Andrew, Nikki, Krystian (predeceased) and Jodi and soon expected great grandchild. Dear sister of Elaine McCAULEY, Fledda RYDER and Tom and Joe FOSTER. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home on Wednesday, August 20. The funeral service was conducted in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel on Thursday, August 21 with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. Interment in Gordon Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home.

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FOSTER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
Patricia Marilyn THORPE (née THOMAS)
Passed away suddenly on August 28, 2003 in London, Ontario, at the age of 70 years.
Patricia was born October 7, 1932 in Saint Thomas, Elgin County, Ontario. Daughter of the late Hon. F. S. (Tommy) Thomas (1957) and Myrtle (SYMES) THOMAS (1982.) Wife of the late Cameron George THORPE (1969,) partner of William Henry WADDELL. Beloved mother of James (Suzanne) THORPE, Burbank, California and Jane THORPE, Ottawa. Sister of Carolyn THOMAS, Saint Thomas, Shirley (Harry) FOSTER and Robert (Margery) THOMAS and aunt of Brien, Bruce, Kate and Mark THOMAS, all of Union, Ontario. Dear friend of the late John M. PECK (1994,) Grand Bend, Ontario (son Jeffrey, daughter Sandra,) and the NITSCHE family, London, Ontario. Adoptive "grandmother" to Emily, Valerie, and Jamie.
A dedicated teacher, Patricia touched the lives of thousands of children. She began her educational career in 1951 in Ottawa and subsequently taught for various Ontario school boards including Windsor, Toronto, Welland, Port Stanley, Lynhurst and ending with her retirement from the London Board of Education in 1986.
Patricia was also a talented musician and composer who played the piano and accordion, as well as a published poet, author and photographer. Her passion for learning continued on into her retirement years where she continued to pursue higher education in the arts and foreign languages.
Once met, never forgotten -- Patricia was a vibrant spirit whose gifts of love, courage, laughter and song will continue to bring joy and inspiration to her family and Friends for many years to come. Cremation, no service.

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FOSTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
Walter Lenord Gordon FOSTER
Walter FOSTER died peacefully after a short illness at St. Michael's Hospital in his 80th year on February 19, 2003. Born in Toronto on June 9, 1923, Walter served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. Walter was a Charter dancer with the National Ballet of Canada, 1951-1953. He joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1959, retiring in 1985, and serving in many roles including Classical Music Programming, Announcer and Benefits Counselor. Walter was predeceased by his life-long companion, David WALKER in May, 1994. Walter is survived by his beloved sister Anne, his brother Owen, and by many nephews and nieces and their children and grandchildren. Walter will be greatly missed by his dear friend Mary McDONALD and his neighbours Frances and Amber, Paul and Mary, Mike, Maddy, Heather and Nadine and by his friend Adrian. A memorial service will be held later in the Spring, after the release of Walter's remains by the School of Medicine, University of Toronto. Donations to St. Michael's Hospital or the Canadian Cancer Society.

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FOSTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-25 published
FOSTER, Walter Lenord Gordon
Walter FOSTER died peacefully after a short illness at St. Michael's Hospital in his 80th year on February 19, 2003. Born in Toronto on June 9, 1923, Walter served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. Walter was a Charter dancer with the National Ballet of Canada, 1951-1953. He joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1959, retiring in 1985, and serving in many roles including Classical Music Programming, Announcer and Benefits Counselor. Walter was predeceased by his life-long companion, David WALKER in May, 1994. Walter is survived by his beloved sister Anne, his brother Owen, and by many nephews and nieces and their children and grandchildren. Walter will be greatly missed by his dear friend Mary McDONALD and his neighbours Frances and Amber, Paul and Mary, Mike, Maddy, Heather and Nadine and by his friend Adrian. A memorial service will be held later in the Spring, after the release of Walter's remains by the School of Medicine, University of Toronto. Donations to St. Michael's Hospital or the Canadian Cancer Society. Further information may be obtained from Dr. Adrian HILL at (416) 694-8438.

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FOSTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-13 published
Jim NOBLE: 1924 - 2003
Toronto beat cop who went on to become a deputy chief was 'one of the most highly respected operatives in the history of Canadian justice'
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - Page R5
He was a gentleman cop who rose through the ranks of the Toronto police force to become deputy chief. Jim NOBLE, who devoted 37 years to Canadian law enforcement, has died at the age of 78.
Mr. NOBLE's career was marked by an almost continuous advancement through the ranks. As a divisional detective, he worked on a gamut of crimes that included "housebreaking, frauds, sex offenses, robberies -- a little bit of everything," he once explained.
Later promoted to the homicide squad, he investigated more than 100 murders. He was known for his painstaking legwork, his meticulous attention to detail and his uncanny ability to weave an assortment of disparate clues into what he once called "a nice rope of circumstantial evidence."
He eventually headed the homicide squad, where up-and-coming detectives like Julian FANTINO, the current police chief, worked under his command.
"He was one of the most highly respected homicide investigators that the Toronto Police Service ever had," Mr. FANTINO said. "I always found him to be of impeccable integrity and a man of very strong character and loyalty to the profession."
"He was one of the guys that knew all the answers,"said Walter TYRRELL, a retired deputy chief who also once worked in homicide under Mr. NOBLE's command. "If you needed advice, Jim was the guy you would go to."
Mr. NOBLE was promoted to inspector in 1973, staff superintendant in 1974 and deputy chief in 1977. He retired in 1984 with 61 letters of commendation in his file.
Besides homicide investigation, he was an expert on deportation and extradition and lectured on those subjects at police colleges.
An outspoken critic of what he saw as an overly-liberal legal system that put the rights of criminals above those of law-abiding citizens, he once penned an article titled "The Pampered Criminal." Convinced that the immigration department was equally soft on criminals, he helped spurred the government into tightening up the process by which criminals are deported.
"He was really upset with the system," said his former partner, Jack FOSTER, a retired staff sergeant from the detective branch. "He felt they were too soft on immigrants. We'd go to all the trouble of a deportation hearing, they'd escort a guy over to the United States, and within an hour he'd be back on our side again."
Born in Whiteabbey, near Belfast, Northern Ireland, in 1924, James Melvyn NOBLE came to Canada with his family at the age of four and grew up in a working-class neighbourhood on Toronto's Shaw Street. After grade 12 he entered the Royal Canadian Air Force and earned his pilot's wings, but, to his immense disappointment, he never served overseas. Leaving the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1946, he began looking for "something with a little bit of action, a little bit of excitement." When his father, a carpenter, suggested that he apply for a position with the police department, the 22-year-old laughed -- hard -- but agreed to talk to a friend of his father's who was a police inspector. After two lengthy discussions, Mr. NOBLE was ready to "give it a try."
For six months he pounded a beat in a police uniform. Then, paired with a partner in a patrol car, he worked a graveyard shift and became familiar with the "usual cases -- fights on the streets, drunks, domestics, robberies." Often, after an overnight shift, he would be obliged to make an appearance in court the next day.
Promoted to detective in 1957 and to the homicide squad in 1961, he once explained that he'd watch for certain telltale signs in an accused upon introducing himself as a police detective: "a darting of the eyes, the mouth becomes dry and there's a wetting of the lips, a throbbing of the artery in the neck. The person gets pale, he's trembling."
He was often amazed at how readily criminals, once apprehended, will confess their misdeeds. "There's almost a compulsion of people to confess, especially in murder cases," he once said. "It makes them feel that they have salved their conscience to some degree by telling about it."
In one of many infamous cases that he handled, NOBLE solved the murder of an 89-year-old female doctor, Rowena HUME, who was viciously beaten to death by a derelict who had stayed at a Salvation Army shelter and whom she had hired to do a few odd jobs. Two days after the murder, having followed a series of clues, Mr. NOBLE nabbed the suspect on a downtown street; the man blurted out a confession almost instantly. Mr. NOBLE was also part of the gruesome homicide investigation involving the notorious Evelyn DICK of Hamilton, Ontario
Mr. FOSTER, who was paired with Mr. NOBLE for about eight years, recalled that though he took his job very seriously, he also "had a good sense of humour -- he enjoyed a good laugh."
On one occasion, after a painstaking, six-month investigation into a complex case of insurance fraud, the duo were finally ready to collar the perpetrator, a well-known socialite named Irene.
"I remember Jim and me driving up Yonge Street to make the final arrest, and he was singing, 'Irene, Goodnight, Irene,' " Mr. FOSTER recalled. Irene, needless to say, was convicted.
For all of Mr. NOBLE's acumen as an investigator, however, not all of his professional faculties were in operation the day he and Mr. FOSTER visited a Yonge Street ladies' wear shop to check into a routine fraud. Getting back into the patrol car, Mr. NOBLE commented on how attractive he had found the store manager and that he wished he could get to know her better.
"But she's probably married," he lamented.
"Jim, what kind of detective are you?" Mr. FOSTER said. "Didn't you notice that she's got no wedding ring on her finger?"
"No, I didn't. I guess I was too busy taking notes."
Mr. FOSTER insisted that Mr. NOBLE, then 35 and single, make the requisite follow-up call on his own. He did, and he and the store manager, Barbara, were married in 1961.
Although he could play rough when the situation demanded, Mr. NOBLE was known as an impeccable gentleman and a guardian of old-fashioned standards and family values.
He once upbraided some bikers for using profanity in the presence of their girlfriends; the biker girls explained they weren't typical ladies but seemed touched by his courtesy all the same.
According to his daughter, Elaine NOBLE Tames, Jim NOBLE rarely spoke about his professional life at home.
"Being in a house with two ladies, the typical gentleman side of him would say, 'That's not the sort of thing to discuss with your wife and daughter,' " she said.
Mr. NOBLE was the subject of a cover story in Toronto Life magazine in 1972 that used him as a prism through which to view the entire police force. The article described him as "gentle, thoughtful and courteous," and noted that, except in target practice, he had never fired the snubnosed Smith and Wesson.38 revolver that he wore on his right hip.
American authors Bruce Henderson and Sam Summerlin devoted a chapter to him in their 1976 book The Super Sleuths, and described him as "one of the most highly respected operatives in the history of Canadian justice."
"He was the embodiment of professionalism in everything he did, and that was the standard to which he held other people," Mr. FANTINO said.
Jim NOBLE died in Toronto on July 15, leaving his wife Barbara, daughter Elaine and sister Pat WILKINSON, all of Toronto.

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FOSTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-22 published
Ronald Jess FOSTER
By Fran O'HEARE Wednesday, October 22, 2003 - Page A20
Husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather, golfer. Born May 4, 1919, in Fredericton, New Brunswick Died October 13, of cancer, aged 84.
Ron learned he had lung cancer in May of this year. Although it had been more than 30 years since he smoked, his oncologist told him that "lungs never forget." He was advised to play golf, drive his Lincoln, have a good time and get his affairs in order. So he did. He called his children and grandchildren and implored those who smoked, to quit and those who didn't smoke, not to start. His son Stephen and daughter-in-law Lynn quit smoking.
Ron opted for chemotherapy and despite 42 treatments over four months, maintained his humour, stamina and appetite. The more his tumour shrank, the better he felt, and so he started "the farewell golf tour." Together with his son Graham and brother-in-law Bill, Ron managed to play most of the golf courses in and around Kingston, Ontario, during his final months. Two weeks before he died, "short of air and hair," as he put it, Ron played nine holes on the Gananoque golf course and shot 50 "without cheating which is more than I can say about Jimmy," referring to his brother-in-law who had joined him for the game.
When he turned 80, Ron's children gave him a dog, a miniature schnauzer. Misty was a constant source of great companionship, love and affection. Her favourite spot was Ron's lap where she spent many hours during his final weeks.
Ron enlisted September 3, 1939, right at the start of the Second World War; he served as a sergeant in the 90th battery, 1st Anti-Tank Regiment of the Royal Canadian Artillery. He was wounded twice and decorated by Field Marshal Montgomery. Following the war, he moved to Kingston where he worked as foreman at DuPont.
Upon his retirement in the 1970s, Ron and his wife Barbara purchased a place in Lake Seminole Estates, Florida, where he enjoyed 27 years as a Snowbird. Ron loved Florida and was the life of the party -- and there were parties galore. He will be fondly remembered for his pancake breakfasts, Christmas dinners, and Super Bowl extravaganzas. Regardless of the occasion, Ron would always make his special baked beans, the key ingredient being rum -- and lots of it. They were delicious.
Ron was a lifetime member and past president of the Kingston Lions Club. He enjoyed the camaraderie and worked tirelessly on the club's events and committees. One of his proudest moments was being honoured as a Melvin Jones Fellow by the Lions International Foundation for "dedicated humanitarian services."
Labatt Blue was Ron's favourite beer and he often bemoaned the fact that he had never purchased shares in the company. "There's no bad beer, " he would say, "but some are better than others." The day before he died, he sipped half-a-bottle of beer through a straw.
Ron loved driving his car. His commanding use of the brakes was well known among those of us who were passengers (as well as his mechanic). In the middle of his chemotherapy, at the age of 84, he took and passed his driving test, to his immense satisfaction.
Despite the traditional division of labour in his marriage, Ron was the family shopper. Each week, he would pore over the flyers to identify the best buys on bran flakes, orange juice and toilet paper. He shopped at stores where complimentary goodies were served and noted with pride that, on those days he went grocery shopping, he wouldn't need lunch.
During his final weeks, Ron was visited by all his kids. At one visit, his son Alan advised Ron that he would bring his family to Kingston from Winnipeg for Thanksgiving and wanted Ron to be there. Ron promised he would stay around for the visit. He kept his promise. He died Thanksgiving Day.
Fran is Ron FOSTER's daughter-in-law.

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FOSTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-01 published
Medical pot activist dies after mishap handling it
Canadian Press, Saturday, November 1, 2003 - Page A10
Ottawa -- An outspoken advocate of marijuana for medicinal purposes has died of burns he suffered when he tried to extract oil from marijuana.
Donny APPLEBY died Thursday in the company of Friends at an Ottawa hospital.
"He ended his life peacefully and surrounded by Friends," said Mike FOSTER, a long-time friend and owner of Crosstown Traffic, a cannabis paraphernalia store.
Mr. APPLEBY was an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome patient on a disability pension and couldn't afford the marijuana he used for his illness.
While his Friends are trying not to turn his death into a political issue, many are blaming the federal government for restricting access to marijuana for medicinal purposes.
"It's a travesty that people don't have access to this stuff - a clean, safe good source and supply of it," said Eugene OSCAPELLA, a lawyer with the Canadian Foundation for Drug Policy and a friend of Mr. APPLEBY.
About two weeks ago, Mr. APPLEBY suffered severe burns while trying to extract oil from low-grade cannabis using butane, which exploded in his apartment.
He was admitted to hospital with no chance of survival and had been on a ventilator until his death on Thursday.
Mr. OSCAPELLA, who was at Mr. APPLEBY's side when he died, described his friend as an "activist who tried to help people."
"The guy didn't have a lot of strength physically, but he had a lot of strength in other ways, and I think you've got to hand it to him," Mr. OSCAPELLA said.
In a July protest on Parliament Hill, Mr. APPLEBY smoked a joint and burned his Health Canada exemptions to demonstrate dismay at the government's handling of medical marijuana.

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FOSTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
FOSTER, Douglas Mortimer
Died peacefully at the South Muskoka Memorial Hospital in Bracebridge, on Saturday, November 22nd, 2003 at the age of 88. Beloved husband of Mary Jean (née LYALL.) Predeceased by his first wife Marnie (née KERR.) Lovingly remembered by his children Lynn ARMSTRONG (Brock,) Wendy SHELLEY (Steven,) Doug FOSTER (Nancy,) Lesley FOSTER (Leslie HENDY), his stepchildren Susan BELL, Sharon JONES, Donald BELL and Lyall BELL. Loving grandfather of Craig, Carolyn, Stuart, Adam, Katelynn, Samantha, Marcella, Natalie, Alexandra, Sachi and Hunter. A private memorial service was held at the Reynolds Funeral Home ''Turner Chapel'' in Bracebridge 877-806-2257. Donations in memory of Doug to the South Muskoka Hospital Foundation would be gratefully appreciated by the family.

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