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"FLY" 2003 Obituary


FLYNN 

FLYNN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-02 published
Clare SCANLAN
By Tom SCANLAN and Larry SCANLAN Monday, June 2, 2003 - Page A16
Mother, wife, grandmother, sister, nurse. Born July 15, 1924, at Tamworth, Ontario Died April 19 in Toronto, of brain cancer, aged 78.
Clare SCANLAN never lied about her age. She simply never acted her age. There was a vitality to her, a vibrancy. She would drum her hands on her knees as punctuation -- exclamation marks! -- to deliver good news: The Jays had bested the Yanks, a Canadian had won a medal, grandchildren were coming 'round for a visit.
The second child of four, Clarissa Mary Catherine FLYNN was born on a farm in southeastern Ontario to Irish-Catholic parents, Leonard and Gertrude FLYNN. Her parents' legacy to her included great good senses: of humour, justice, the divine.
After acquiring her nursing degree at Hotel Dieu Hospital in Kingston, Ontario, she met -- on a blind date in Belleville -- our father, Bernard. Photos of the time capture her soft features, her wavy black hair, her starlet good looks and elegant taste in clothes.
The children came, in batches of four. Larry, Theresa, Tom and Wayne arrived when Nakina, in northern Ontario, was home. In 1956, there was a pause as the family settled in the Scarborough homestead, modest by some standards, but for Clare it was a dream come true. Then followed the rest of the gang: Stephen, Rosemarie, Karen and David. Bernard claims a stranger once asked, "Are they all yours or is it a picnic?"
"They're all mine," he famously replied, "and it's no picnic."
Actually, it was. Mom had a natural ability to make us all feel special and accomplished (while insisting that she herself was neither). Feeding and clothing eight children can't have been easy. Only when we left home, we joke, did we learn to add one can of water to the soup, not four, or that milk was also available in non-powdered form. And if Karen's clothes looked a lot like Theresa's, or David's skates like Wayne's, who cared? We remember only a house full of people, noise, confusion -- and laughter.
"I used to worry more about having too much money," Clare once said, "than I did about having too little." Remarkable. And as the eight of us matured and married, each and every new partner acquired a second mother.
It was not only what Clare did for family and Friends, but how. She unfailingly remembered birthdays, visited the sick, befriended strangers at parties. Hers was a quiet and discreet philanthropy, almost instinctive.
The grandchildren, the ones who call her "Aunie," were especially nurtured. Chickadee, she would call each baby, or "Sweet pie." She'd say, "Oh I love my babes. I worried too much about my own children, but with the grandchildren, I just love to hear their stories and all the things they're doing."
After Clare finally stopped nursing at Providence Manor, she and Bernard took up golfing, got a winter place in Florida, cheered the Jays. They were pals and on the go. Clare always moved quickly (as anyone who ever saw her on a putting green will attest). Life was too precious to move slowly and, besides, she didn't want to miss a thing. When cancer struck, hard and fast, the tears came but the laughter stayed. "Your mother taught us how to live," Dad said, "and now she'll teach us how to die." And so she did, with great dignity and selflessness. And though our mother's death hurt us, and always will, to be such an intimate part of her leave-taking -- at home -- was a privilege.
In our grief, we took comfort when others praised her lack of pettiness and disdain for gossip, her sincerity and compassion, how well she listened and appreciated every kindness, her child-like delight in life itself. We had all been "Aunied" and we will never be the same.
Tom and Larry are Clare's sons.

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FLYNN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-19 published
Principal was 'a girl's best friend'
The head of Toronto's elite girls' school raised women's issues long before the rise of feminism
By Allison LAWLOR Thursday, June 19, 2003 - Page R9
Catherine STEELE, a dedicated educator who influenced thousands of young women during her 20 years as head of Havergal College, has died at age 93.
When Miss STEELE was appointed principal of the private school for girls in North Toronto in 1952, she became its first Canadian principal. The earlier principals were British, "typical of private-school education," Miss STEELE once said. She held the position until 1972, but remained closely connected to the school long after her retirement.
Miss STEELE had a lifelong relationship with the school, being herself a Havergal "old girl." She attended from 1923 to 1928, and taught history there in the 1940s.
"She was just a remarkable woman. A woman that truly lived her values," said Susan DITCHBURN, Havergal's current principal. "She understood that schools like ours couldn't just stand still."
Considered ahead of her time, Miss STEELE was talking about women's issues during the 1930s and 1940s, long before feminism was popular. She encouraged her young female students to use their talents, and to try to make a difference in the world. She told them to be ready to take on leadership roles, at a time when men held most of the top positions.
"I believe," Miss STEELE once said, "that when we realize we are world citizens, we shall be on the road to winning the peace."
Inside the walls of Havergal, Miss STEELE was admired and feared by the girls. "She wouldn't tolerate nonsense," said her long-time friend and colleague Marcelle DEFREITAS. Yet behind the imposing presence was a quick and mischievous sense of humour. One morning, as she took her usual place at the lectern in the school's assembly hall for morning prayer, she looked down and found a dead mouse that some of the girls had left for her. She quietly picked up the mouse and scanned the room for the biology teacher. "I think this is for you," she said.
After learning that the students had given her the nickname "Stainless STEELE," she posted on her office door a magazine picture of a young girl with a mouthful of shiny new braces. The caption below the picture read: "Stainless [ STEELE] is a girl's best friend."
Catherine Irene STEELE was born in Toronto on March 31, 1910. She was the only daughter of Irene Wilson STEELE and Robert Clarke STEELE, who built up a successful seed business. She grew up with her three brothers in the affluent Forest Hill neighbourhood and was sent to Havergal in 1923.
Miss STEELE went on to study at the University of Toronto and the Ontario College of Education. After graduating in the 1930s, she spent a summer travelling and then she went to teach at a private girls' school in England.
Back in Canada, she returned to Havergal, this time as a history teacher. She taught for several years there as well as at St. Clement's, another girls' school in the city. In between, she decided to further her education. After saving up enough money, she headed to New York, where she completed her master's degree at Columbia University.
At the onset of the Second World War, England was desperately short of teachers, and Miss STEELE answered the call. She boarded a ship and headed to London, where she taught in the East End during the Blitz.
She returned to Toronto after the war and found herself without work. Prospective employers often told her that, at age 35, she was just too old. Eventually she found a job at Ryerson Rehabilitation Centre, where she taught veterans.
"I never taught more eager pupils," Miss STEELE said.
Wanting to help a man who had been blinded during the war, Miss STEELE read him the entire history course. He passed.
From there, Miss STEELE went to the Royal Ontario Museum, where she headed the education department. One of her fondest memories was loading museum objects into a truck and travelling north to remote communities to bring the museum objects to children unable to visit Toronto.
While at the Royal Ontario Museum, she got a call from Havergal asking her to return, this time as principal. During her 20 years as the school's principal, Miss STEELE was a fixture.
"She was a presence that was always there," said Harriet BINKLEY, who graduated in 1972. "She lived and breathed the school."
Described as a careful, frugal woman, Miss STEELE lived on the school's campus in simple quarters. One of her rituals every night was to walk around the school making sure all the lights were turned off.
As principal, Miss STEELE made efforts to attract girls from different countries and ethnic and religious backgrounds, broadening the school beyond its Anglican roots. She also tackled inadequate staff salaries and pensions, and encouraged teachers to take leaves and pursue their education.
Miss STEELE "lived a life of service," said Reverend Kevin FLYNN, minister at the Church of St. Stephen-in-the-Fields in downtown Toronto. She encouraged others to do the same. At Havergal, she urged the girls to become involved in community organizations. She also had them evaluate the annual reports of different charities to determine which group had the greatest percentage of funds going directly to programs.
Outside Havergal, Miss STEELE sat on several boards, including the Elizabeth Fry Society. She also spent many hours at the Church of St. Stephen-in-the-Fields, helping with the church's programs for the poor and homeless.
It was not uncommon to see Miss STEELE's station wagon loaded with used clothes and furniture for delivery, Reverend FLYNN said.
In honour of her lifelong work, Miss STEELE was given two honorary degrees from the University of Toronto and York University.
Miss STEELE never married nor had any children of her own. "She was too busy," Ms. DEFREITAS said.
Miss STEELE died in a Toronto hospital on April 18. She leaves her brother, Clarke Wilson STEELE.

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FLYNN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-21 published
FREEMAN, Willard Arthur, 1922-2003
Arthur, dear husband of Margaret, died June 18, 2003. He was the loved and respected father of James, Donald and Peter and grandfather of Jamie, John, Jeffery, Jennifer, Dustin, Wyatt and Skyler. He is survived by his sisters-in-law Lorna FREEMAN, Helen LOVE and Alison FLYNN (Michael). Uncle Art will be missed, especially at the cottage, by his nieces and nephews, Wendy and Paul Sherwood, Malcolm and Elizabeth GRAHAM, David and Judy LOVE, Barbara LOVE, Jane and Tim ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, Joe FLYNN and their children. Grandpa will also be remembered by Jane MacCabe FREEMAN, mother of Jamie, John, Jeffery and Jennifer and Laila RAHNASTO, mother of Dustin, Wyatt and Skyler. Cremation has taken place. A service will be held at Central Presbyterian Church (Charlton and Caroline, Hamilton, Ontario) on Monday, June 30th at 11 a.m. A reception will be held in the Guild Room of the Church following the service. Flowers gratefully declined.

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FLYNN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-24 published
FREEMAN, Willard Arthur, 1922-2003
Arthur, dear husband of Margaret, died June 18, 2003. He was the loved and respected father of James, Donald and Peter and grandfather of Jamie, John, Jeffery, Jennifer, Dustin, Wyatt and Skyler. He is survived by his sisters-in-law Lorna FREEMAN, Helen LOVE and Alison FLYNN (Michael). Uncle Art will be missed, especially at the cottage, by his nieces and nephews, Wendy and Paul SHERWOOD, Malcolm and Elizabeth GRAHAM, David and Judy LOVE, Barbara LOVE, Jane and Tim ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, Joe FLYNN and their children. Grandpa will also be remembered by Jane MacCabe FREEMAN, mother of Jamie, John, Jeffery and Jennifer and Laila RAHNASTO, mother of Dustin, Wyatt and Skyler. Cremation has taken place. A service will be held at Central Presbyterian Church (Charlton and Caroline, Hamilton, Ontario) on Monday, June 30th at 11 a.m. A reception will be held in the Guild Room of the Church following the service. Flowers gratefully declined.

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FLYNN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-01 published
EBBS, Adèle ''Couchie'' Page (STATTEN)
Died serenely, at peace, on Saturday, June 28, 2003, in her own home 10 days before her 94th birthday. Lovingly cared for by her son John, his partner Bill YEADAN and other compassionate caregivers. Companion since 1924 of the late Dr. Harry EBBS (1906 - 2000). ''Their portages often diverged but they paddled as one.'' Daughter of the late Taylor ''Chief'' and Ethel ''Tonakela'' STATTEN. Sister of Dr. Tay STATTEN and the late Dr. Page STATTEN. Wonderful mother to Bobsie, Susan, John EBBS. ''Geeya'' was so proud of her grandchildren (children of Jim HAYHURST and Sue EBBS) Cindy HAYHURST (Scott HANSON), Jimmy HAYHURST (Beth) and Barbara HAYHURST (Paddy FLYNN.) ''NanaGeeya'' was joyously entertained by her great-grandchildren Ben, Cameron, Griffen HANSON; Statten, Quinn, Tatum HAYHURSAINT_Dear to her always, Eleanor PARMENTER and Jean BUCHANAN. From birth Couchie summered under canvass, first at Geneva Park, Lake Couchiching, where her father directed the Central Toronto Young Men's Christian Association camp and from 1913 when the Stattens took a lease on Canoe Lake, Algonquin Park. In 1921 and 1924 Camps Ahmek and Wapomeo were founded. Graduate of Brown P.S., Bishop Strachan School, University College U31T, O.C.E. Inductee of the University of Toronto Sports Hall of Fame. Teacher at Oakwood Collegiate, after which she assumed full-time directorship of Wapomeo until retirement in 1975. Involved member of the Canadian, Ontario and American Camping Associations, Bolton Camp Committee, Young Men's Christian Association Board. Founding member of the Society of Camp Directors. Supporter of the Taylor Statten Bursary Fund and Camp Tonakela in Madra, India. Recipient of the Directors' Award of Friends of Algonquin. Patron of the Tom Thomson exhibit, in memory of her husband, at the Algonquin Park Visitors Centre. Loyal sister of Kappa Kappa Gamma. Avid member of the Federation of Ontario Naturalists, Toronto Mycology Society, the Toronto Camera Club, Rotary Club of Toronto Inner Wheel, Women's Auxiliary at the Hospital for Sick Children, University Women's Club. Enthusiastic member of Osler Bluff Ski Club and Rosedale Golf Club. Founding member of Lawrence Park Community Church. She and Harry travelled widely sharing their passion for children in camping, paediatric medicine and other youth causes. Her strong leadership, fairness, integrity, wisdom and instinct to see the good in all has touched thousands and will be her legacy for generations. If you wish, remember Couchie by donating to The Camping Archives, Bata Library, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7B8 or to any of the above organizations. In early September a Celebration of her Life will be held at Lawrence Park Community Church, Toronto. Friends on Canoe Lake are invited to renimisce and tell tall tales at her beloved Little Wapomeo Island on Monday, July 7th, 3-6 p.m. Memories may be posted at www.firesoffriendship.com. ''Here Let the Northwoods' Spirit Kindle Fires of Friendship.''

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FLYNN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-20 published
Ex-politician and war hero FLYNN dies
Was chairman of Metropolitan Toronto
By James RUSK Municipal Affairs Reporter Wednesday, August 20, 2003 - Page A17
Dennis FLYNN, a war hero who parachuted into France on D-Day and eventually rose to be chairman of Metropolitan Toronto, died yesterday morning as he was preparing to observe an army reserve exercise at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa.
Mr. FLYNN, 79, who had been in poor health in recent years, collapsed, apparently of a heart attack, at his hotel in Pembroke, and was pronounced dead at Pembroke General Hospital, the Canadian Armed Forces said in a statement.
Mr. FLYNN was mayor of Etobicoke from 1972 to 1984, the longest-serving mayor of the Toronto suburb, and was chairman of Metropolitan Toronto from 1984 to 1988. He continued to serve on Metro Council until the 1997 amalgamation that created the new City of Toronto.
He served on the Toronto Police Services Board and was awarded the Order of Canada in 2001.
Major Tim LOURIE, public-relations director of the exercise, said Mr. FLYNN travelled to Pembroke on Monday to observe a reserve exercise in which the Toronto Scottish Regiment (the Queen Mother's Own,) of which Mr. FLYNN was the honorary lieutenant-colonel, was participating.
"Unfortunately, he didn't even get out to see us here," Major LOURIE said. The regiment received the call that he had collapsed in the hotel just before a group of honorary colonels was heading out to observe the exercise.
Mr. FLYNN, was born in County Cork, Ireland, in 1923. When he was two years old he migrated with his family to the Kensington section of Toronto, long a melting pot for immigrants.
In 1938, at age 15, he joined the Toronto Scottish and volunteered for active service at the outbreak of the Second World War. In 1942, he joined the joint Canadian-American unit that came to be known as the Devil's Brigade, and in 1943, he transferred to the 1st Canadian Parachute Regiment.
He jumped into Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944, where he was wounded by German fire. After recovery, he rejoined the regiment, jumped into Germany on March 24, 1945, in Operation Varsity, the crossing of the Rhine River, and was wounded again when part of his leg was shattered by machine-gun fire as he escorted two German prisoners across the Rhine.
As a result of the wound, Mr. FLYNN walked with a cane for the rest of his life. "One of his most self-deprecating comments, when talking to young soldiers, was that he had made only three jumps. One was for practice, one was on D-Day, and the third and last was across the Rhine," commented Lieutenant-Colonel Mike TRAYNER, commanding officer of the Toronto Scottish.
After the war, he joined the City of Toronto's clerk's department, and rose to be protocol officer. He failed in his first run for mayor of Etobicoke in 1969, but upset the incumbent, Doug LACEY, in 1972.
In 1984, he was elected chairman of Metropolitan Toronto, replacing Paul GODFREY, now president of the Toronto Blue Jays, who was then leaving Toronto politics to become publisher of the Toronto Sun. His career as Metro chairman ended in 1988, when he lost to Alan TONKS, now a member of parliament.

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FLYNN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
LAMONT, Jean Annette (ROBINS)
Jean died peacefully, on Tuesday, October 14, 2003 in Toronto, with her children Doug and Anne at her side; in her 84th year. Predeceased by her loving husband and friend of 53 years, Bruce Maitland LAMONT, a former senior international executive with Royal Bank of Canada. Survived by son, James Douglas and his wife Kathy, stepchildren Melissa and August and step-great granddaughter, Elizabeth; and daughter Anne and husband Christopher JAMES and their daughter, Kathleen. Cherished sister of Joan BAILEY and her children, Robin (Marie,) Joanne (Ken HOLT,) John (Clare) and Janet (Heino CLAESSENS) and their families. Remembered by sisters-in-law Pauline FLYNN (Hank) and Meribeth LAMONT and their families and the extended LAMONT clan. Special thanks to cousin Joanne HOLT for all her support and help over the last few years. Thank you to the staff and Mom's new Friends at the Kingsway Retirement Residence, Etobicoke for their Friendship and support in making the Kingsway her home away from home. A graduate of MacDonald Hall, Guelph University (1940) and Toronto Western Hospital School of Nursing (1943) she was always proud of her accomplishment as one of Canada's first female nursing flight attendants with Trans Canada Airways. Mom was an avid bridge player and golfer, a social dynamo who cherished her wide circle of Friends. A celebration of her life will be held on Saturday, October 18, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 89 Dunn Street (at Lakeshore Road), Oakville. If desired, in lieu of flowers, donations in Jean's memory to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.
Mom, a Grand Slam and a hole-in-one to you. Love always.

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FLYNN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
Fight master set standards for stage combat
Canadian Press, Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - Page R9
Stratford, Ontario -- Patrick (Paddy) CREAN, a longtime fight director at the Stratford Festival who set international standards on staging combat in theatre, died Monday after an illness. He was 93.
Mr. CREAN, who was a competitive fencer, began choreographing fights in 1932 when he was working in his native England as an actor in The Legends of Don Juan. From then on he was frequently hired to stage fight scenes in theatre and movies such as The Master of Ballantree and The Sword of Sherwood Forest. He worked with actors including Paul SCOFIELD, Laurence OLIVIER, Trevor HOWARD, Alec GUINNESS, Douglas FAIRBANKS Jr. and Errol FLYNN, often acting as FLYNN's stunt double in movies.
Mr. CREAN first came to the Stratford Festival in 1962 to be fight arranger for a staging of Macbeth and ended up by making Stratford his home. He remained as festival fight director until 1983, arranging combat scenes for such demanding productions as The Three Musketeers. He continued to work as an actor, sometimes taking small roles in shows for which he had done fight arranging and also performing a one-man show, The Sun Never Sets. A funeral will be held Saturday in Stratford.

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