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"FLA" 2003 Obituary


FLAHERTY  FLANAGAN  FLANNERY  FLAVELLE 

FLAHERTY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Donald Arthur CASSIDY
In loving memory of Donald Arthur CASSIDY " Hop" at Manitoulin Health Centre in Little Current on Monday January 6, 2003 in his 75th year.
Beloved husband of Lillian (née FLAHERTY.) Predeceased by parents Ernest and Helen CASSIDY. Brother of Eunice SCOBIE of Dundas and Beatrice WHITE/WHYTE of Columbia, South Carolina. Predeceased by brother Leonard and sister Madeline. Cherished father of Janice BOOKER of Ridgeway, William (Bill) of Port Colborne, Ruth WILSON (Bruce) of Little Current, Beverly CASSIDY (Scott MURRAY) of Welland and Roger of Little Current.
Beloved grandfather of Derek, Tammy, Scott, Gregory, Joshua, Sarah, Valerie, Brett, and Brian. Great grandfather of three. Uncle of many nieces and nephews. Visitation from 2: 00 until Memorial service at 3: 30 p.m. Wednesday January 8, 2003 at Grace Bible Church.

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FLAHERTY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
N. Peter SMITH
August 5, 1946 to October 19, 2003.
Pete went to join he heavenly Father on Sunday morning with his wife and best friend, Esther at his bedside in the Mindemoya Hospital. Pete had courageously fought a lengthy battle with prostate cancer. Pete was born in Toronto and grew up in London. He returned to Toronto to work, and begin his family, but often dreamed of leaving for a more rural lifestyle. During the years of living in the city, he spent his weekends and vacations with his Friends and family, building a cottage on the Pickerel River-Le Grou lake near Arnstein. He was eventually able to realize his dream of farming and he moved his family to Powassan. He later enjoyed living and working in Parry Sound. He was able to realize another dream of entrepreneurship when he opened his gift shop "The Pickle Jar" in Port Loring. Pete chose Manitoulin Island as his final earthly home, and felt he had almost found paradise at his home in Gore Bay overlooking the North Channel.
Pete loved the outdoors and always believed in being a good steward of the land, attempting to leave the environment in a better condition. His hobbies included golfing, hunting, fishing, all terrain vehicles, sledding, boating, and walking, as well as woodworking, collecting antiques and many more interests. He loved to socialize and enjoyed spending time in conversation with people.
Pete was the younger son of Allan and Margaret SMITH (predeceased) of Toronto. He will be missed by his brother David (Sylvia) of Oakville, his children, Brian of Huntsville, Scott (wife Valerie) of Oshawa, and Wendy (Chris) of Parry Sound. Step son Jamie (Cheryl) and granddaughter Rebecca TAILOR/TAYLOR of Guelph. Mother and father-in-law, Fred and Beulah RUSSELL of Tehkummah, sisters and brothers-in-law, Evelyn RUSSELL BAEHR of Kitchener, Barbara and Keith FLAHERTY of Southampton. Nieces and nephews, a great niece and great nephew, and many Friends.
Pete was active in the Mindemoya Missionary Church and will be missed by his church family.

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FLANAGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-29 published
Nick McCOMBIE
By Kathleen FLANAGAN Friday, August 29, 2003 - Page A20
Workers' advocate, friend, family man. Born December 18, 1949, in Winchester, England. Died July 31 in Toronto, of cancer, aged If you have a friend on whom you think you can rely, you are a lucky man./ If you have a reason to live on and not to die, you are a lucky man.
Nick McCOMBIE was a lucky man. Many times in the last four years, he described himself that way, in a reference to the song, O Lucky Man, written in 1972 by Alan Price. This might seem an odd way for a man with terminal cancer to describe himself. But it made perfect sense: Nick was proud of his accomplishments, he was happy with his family: wife and soul-mate, Kathy BRADFORD, and sons Peter and Liam (aged 23 and 14). He enjoyed playing and coaching hockey. He knew he was loved by his many Friends. Despite a cancer diagnosis in 1999, Nick was mindful of all of life's blessings.
Healthy and vibrant during most of his four-year struggle with cancer, Nick was known for his sense of humour and his love of life. Nick had accepted that he was dying, but, at age 53, he did not go willingly. He would have liked a few more years to see his sons mature, to rail against the troublesome global situation, to listen to Bonnie Raitt, and to play guitar from the deck of his cottage in Boutilier's Point, Nova Scotia.
An advocate for injured workers since the late 1970s, Nick felt very fortunate with his life's work. His formal education had been cut short in 1966, when he was expelled from high school after Grade 10 for having long hair. By today's standards, this was a shocking abuse of power, effectively impeding his access to a post-secondary education. As he matured, he learned the value of strategic compromise, but he never regretted taking a position.
Before becoming active in workers' rights, Nick had made his living through a variety of physical labour jobs, such as taxi-driving, and warehouse and factory work. And he played guitar with The Churls, a scrappy rock 'n' roll band that played in Yorkville Village in the late 60s.
There were many things that set Nick apart from others, during those early days. He read Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, and Voltaire. He was strongly opposed to recreational drugs. And, despite his long hair, he had no counter-culture affectations. Nick was decidedly uncool. In fact, it was a point of pride with him. Another point of pride was that he took political ideas seriously.
Nick became active in his union which eventually led him to injured workers' issues. In 1985, he became a member of the Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal. In 1987, he co-authored a legal textbook, Workers Compensation in Ontario. In 1991, he was appointed vice-chair of the Appeals Tribunal, a position he served until his death. Passionate about the rights of working people, Nick found the area of workers' compensation intellectually challenging and personally rewarding, extraordinarily so for someone who had never completed high school. Two months before he died, the Ontario Bar Association honoured Nick with the Ron Ellis Award for Excellence in Workers' Compensation Law -- the first time the award had been given to a non-lawyer. This recognition pleased Nick.
Born the only child of a Scottish mother and a Canadian father, Nick was a consummate Canadian nationalist, whose values were perfectly aligned with the Canadian ideals of fairness, respect, and reason. Nick understood that to change the present, it is necessary to understand the past, concurring with Karl Marx that "Men make their own history, but they do so under conditions not of their own choosing." Nick believed that if history is studied, if the rule of law is respected, and if tyranny is opposed at every turn, a better world will be created with bread and roses for all.
Kathleen is a friend of Nick McCOMBIE.

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FLANAGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-13 published
FLANAGAN, Gerald Joseph
Born March 15, 1925 in Montreal. Died November 11, 2003. Graduated Loyola High School, Loyola College B.Sc., McGill University Civil Engineering, Member of Professional Engineers Society. Beloved son of James B. FLANAGAN and Rachel FLANAGAN (née McMILLAN.) Brother of Bernard and Catherine all deceased. A fine man with a generous heart. A great dad and attentive grandfather who will be sadly missed by the little ones. Well regarded in his professional career in construction and engineering, working for Johns Manville, St. Lawrence Systems and C.A.A. In his later years he devoted his time and energy to his parish and many worthy causes including Foster Parents Plan, the St. Vincent de Paul Society and the Weston Food Bank. He is survived by his children Jim, Margot, Kevin and Bruce and his many grandchildren Michael, Marie-Claire, Matthew, Malcolm, Maeve, Duncan, Isabel, Jacqueline, Madeleine, Kate, James and Joseph. Peace be with you Dad. Family and Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Road, 416-241-4618 (north of Lawrence Ave.) Weston on Thursday, November 13 from 7-9 p.m. and on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass on Saturday, November 15, 2003 at 11: 30 a.m. at Saint John the Evangelist Church, 49 George Street in Weston (416-241-0133). Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers please feel free to donate to the above mentioned charitable organizations.

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FLANNERY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-15 published
Laszlo (Leslie) POKOLY
By James W. FLANNERY Thursday, May 15, 2003 - Page A26
Husband, father, minister. Born April 29, 1908, in Kolozsvar, Transylvania, Hungary. Died November 4, 2002, in Toronto, of natural causes, aged 94.
For many years, Laszlo POKOLY was a well-loved leader of the Hungarian community of Toronto, particularly for his heroic service to the thousands of refugees who came to Canada after the 1956 Hungarian Revolution. A minister of the United Church of Canada, he was also instrumental in creating the Metropolitan Toronto Interfaith Immigration Committee, an organization known for its work in building bridges among the various ethnic peoples who transformed the character of the city during this period. In recognition of his tireless devotion to helping others, Leslie POKOLY was made a member of the Order of Saint John.
The life of "Lacibaci," as his relatives called him, mirrored in many ways the tumultuous and tragic events of the 20th century. After he graduated from Debrecen University, one of the premier Protestant academic institutions in Central Europe, he began his professional career by serving as legal counsel for the Royal Postal System of Hungary. With the outbreak of the Second World War, Leslie POKOLY was conscripted as an officer in the Hungarian Army. A man who combined tremendous foresight with practical ingenuity, in the closing days of the war he led his company of soldiers and their families westward to surrender to the American rather than the Russian Army. He and his family then followed the precarious existence of refugees in Germany, but in 1948 his life took a cruel turn when his 34-year-old wife died suddenly of an aneurysm, leaving two young daughters in his care.
In 1950, the POKOLYs emigrated to Canada to begin a new life. Scarcely knowing a word of English, Lacibaci at first found work shovelling snow and as a house painter in Hamilton. Within six months, however, he was enrolled as a minister in training at United College, Winnipeg. Ordained to the ministry in 1954 he served several Hungarian communities in Manitoba and Saskatchewan until, just prior to the '56 Revolution, he was called to Toronto.
As the pastor of the Hungarian congregation at the Church of all Nations, his enlightened spirit reached out to embrace people of all religious faiths.
Liberal as he was in the exercise of his beliefs, Lacibaci was a man who lived according to a strict code of honour. By Hungarian law he was required to bring up his daughters in the Catholic faith of their mother. In Canada, even after he had become a United Church minister, he continued to oversee the Catholic instruction of his daughters. When Enik was about to be married in the Catholic Church, Lacibaci became greatly annoyed because the parish priest refused to allow him to play an official role in the service. "If that is the case," said Lacibaci, "then my daughter will be married by the Cardinal!" And so she was.
Laszlo POKOLY was a man of the cloth with his feet firmly planted in the realities of the world. Clear in his principles, his strategies and his allegiance to the many causes he espoused, his wry sense of humour made him a delightful companion and eased the pressure of many difficult situations.
For the last 10 years of his life, Lacibaci lived in a nursing home, primarily because he wished to be close to his second wife, Margit, who died of Alzheimer's Disease in 1998. Although he suffered from a variety of afflictions, no one heard a word of complaint. "All things considered, it could be worse," was his mantra.
Devoted to his native Hungary, his adopted country Canada, his church, his city and his family, now all of us are the worse for his loss, but strengthened by the example of his dedicated life.
James is son-in-law to Laszlo POKOLY.

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FLAVELLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-30 published
Making the world a better place
Toronto textbook publisher was a tireless community activist, environmentalist and philanthropist
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, October 30, 2003 - Page R9
From the moment he arose in the morning until it was time to lie down at night, Gage LOVE's goal as a textbook publisher, community activist and philanthropist was to make the world a better place.
"He felt his job on this planet was to make bloody well sure that the Earth was better when he left than when he found it," says son David LOVE of King City, north of Toronto.
To that end, Mr. LOVE gave a piece of himself to so many causes that he was often chided by his wife and accountant for trying to do too much.
"He was a $100 donor to between 100 and 200 charities every year. It used to drive mom crazy," says David LOVE. " His accountant used to say, 'You're giving away too much.' To which dad would reply, 'It's no big deal.' Mr. LOVE, a successful businessman and a relentless and passionate philanthropist, with a broad scope of interests including health care, education and the environment, died at his home in King City on September 5. He was 85.
Born in Toronto on September 17, 1917, Mr. LOVE graduated from the University of Toronto in 1939 with a bachelor's degree in history. While a student he worked at W.J. Gage Publishing, a Toronto company operated since 1880 by his maternal grandfather, Sir William GAGE, and later run by his father Harry LOVE. The company published a variety of textbooks for schools and was also involved in the envelope and stationary business.
"He started out as a stock boy and did most jobs, all part of a plan put in place by his dad to teach his son the ropes," Mr. LOVE says.
In 1941, he married Clara Elizabeth (Betty) FLAVELLE, whom he'd first met when he was four years old and had begun dating in his teens. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy in 1942 and served on Canada's West Coast, ending the war as an officer on a mine sweeper.
After the Second World War he became president of W.J. Gage. When he took over the company, it was a small shop on Spadina Avenue in Toronto; during his presidency, the company in the late 1950s moved to larger and more modern quarters in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough. By the time Mr. LOVE had left, it had become one of Canada's foremost educational book publishers.
With Mr. LOVE at the helm, W.J. Gage, in the mid-1940s, acquired the rights to Dick and Jane, a popular American educational book designed to make reading fun for children, and began publishing it in Canada. But his greatest legacy by far, and one of his proudest achievements, says David LOVE, was A Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical Principles, which W.J. Gage published as its centennial project in 1967.
It was the first dictionary to publish distinct Canadian words such as "inspectioneer," a whaling word, "suicide squad," from the Canadian Football League, "cradle-hole," a cradle-shaped hole left in the ground when a large tree is overturned by a gale and "keg angel," a whisky trader.
"The introduction to the book made the case that Canadians have quite a vibrant language," said David LOVE, whose first summer job was proofreading the dictionary. "The book contained words from coast to coast that no one else knew about." Faced with stiff American competition, Mr. LOVE in 1971 made the controversial decision to sell 80 per cent of the publishing company's shares, a move that made him unhappy, says his son.
"He was offered government money, but a handout was out of the question because as an old-school businessman, he did not believe the taxpayers of Canada should be made to pay for his company. He felt it should rise or fall on it own merits as a successful business." Six years later, a Canadian company bought it back, much to Mr. LOVE's delight.
After leaving publishing, Mr. LOVE turned his attention to philanthropy, a path also taken by his grandfather, Sir William GAGE, who had endowed many hospitals and charities, and for this work was given a knighthood in 1918.
"Dad used the fruits of what he earned at the publishing company to give back to the community," says David LOVE. "He wanted to make Toronto a better place to live for everybody." Over the years, he served as chair of the Gage Research Institute, which researches tuberculosis, the Ina Grafton Gage Home, an old-age home, and West Park Healthcare Centre, all in Toronto, and was president of the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Toronto. In 1981, he co-founded the Toronto Metropolitan Community Foundation, now the Toronto Community Foundation, which connects potential philanthropists with community needs.
Among his largest donations was $250,000 in June, 2001, to the West Park Healthcare Centre, which was founded by Sir William GAGE in 1904. He was also a regular donor to Pollution Probe and the World Wildlife Fund.
"Seven months after founding Pollution Probe in 1969, we needed advice and help, so we went looking for it from people in the establishment," says Monte HUMMEL, one of the founders of Pollution Probe and now president of World Wildlife Fund. "Gage was one of those. He said, 'You [Pollution Probe] have got something to say and some of us in the business community need a kick in the pants.' He supported us with money, he sat on our board and he appealed to his peers to support Pollution Probe. In those days, that was a really courageous thing for him to do."
Mr. LOVE's sons are carrying on their father's philanthropy and his work in community and environmental affairs. David LOVE has been involved in the not-for-profit sector for 30 years, including 24 years with World Wildlife Fund; Geoff LOVE is a waste-recycling expert who played a significant role in developing Ontario's blue-box recycling program and Peter LOVE is a green-energy expert. A fourth son, Gage, is a teacher.
In addition to his wife and sons, Mr. LOVE leaves grandchildren Austin, Bryce, Melanie, Jennifer, Adrian, Charmian, Colin, Gage, Gaelan, Allie, Kate, Jesse, and great-grandchildren Ava, Makayla and Olivia.

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