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"FIS" 2003 Obituary


FISCHER  FISHER 

FISCHER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
Mary Elizabeth McHARG " Bette"
In loving memory of Mary Elizabeth McHARG " Bette" who passed away peacefully at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Little Current on November 11, 2003 at the age of 80 years.
Bette was the assistant clerk for the town of Little Current, and the Justice of the Peace for many years. Born on September 12, 1923 to Thomas and Elizabeth (HOWE) TRIMBELE. Predeceased by husband Raymond. Loving mother of John. Cherished by grand_son Matthew. Will be missed by sister Peggy FISCHER (husband Homer predeceased,) brother Thomas (predeceased) and wife Jenette TRIMBELE. Remembered by cousins Thomas and wife Sandi FISCHER, Madelene CAVE, Judy MILLER and Jane FISCHER. Memorial service was held on Friday, November 14, 2003 at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Little Current. Cremation.

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FISCHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
KUHN, Tillo E., Professor Emeritus of Economics, York University, B.Sc. L.S.E., PhD. McGill
Born November 1, 1919 in Munich, Bavaria, Germany, died July 18, 2003 in hospital in Gatineau, Quebec after a series of strokes. He leaves to mourn him his wife Naomi, sons Roland, Oliver and Christopher, daughter Nicola, daughters-in-law Susan and Tulimah, son-in-law Neil, and his grandchildren Alexander and Thomas KUHN, Sophia and William KUHN, and Holly and Josh JANNA. Tillo will be missed also by his niece Dagmar FORGET and nephew Hatto FISCHER, brothers-in-law David and John KIRKWOOD, and cousins in Germany and England, as well as many Friends, former colleagues and students. He was predeceased by his beloved sister Brigitte FISCHER and cousin ''like my brother'' Hatto KUHN. From 1949 to 1954 Tillo lived in England, where he was the first student from post-war Germany to enter the London School of Economics. In 1954 he emigrated to Canada to begin work in transportation economics in Montreal and then Ottawa. The summer of 1955 found him in a cottage ''up the Gatineau'' at Gleneagle, where he began a lifelong love affair with that area as well as with a cottage neighbour, Naomi, whom he married in 1956. After receiving Canadian citizenship in 1959, Tillo accepted an invitation to join the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley. Four years in Berkeley were the beginning of his twin careers of university teaching and international development assignments for the World Bank and other international agencies. In 1966 he became a member of the new Faculty of Administrative Studies at York University in Toronto, his employer until retirement in 1989. Tillo was proud to have worked in 13 different countries. Some of the longer and most exciting projects were in Honduras 1962, Dahomey (now Benin) 1967, Paraguay 1968, and Kenya 1970-72, where he was director of a Canadian International Development Agency team working with the Kenyan Ministry of Finance and Planning, coupled with a training program for Kenyans at York. His favourite country after Canada to live and work was Greece, where he spent 1964-65 in a research centre, 1980-82 working in the finance ministry under both a conservative and a Papandreou-led government, and 1985-87 teaching in the business school of the University of Athens. In 1989 Tillo retired to his house Tirconna at Gleneagle on the Gatineau River, the same site where Tillo and Naomi met in 1955. Cremation has taken place. Memorial service, burial of ashes and reception to celebrate Tillo's interesting life will follow in September in Wakefield, Quebec. Date to be announced later. Funeral arrangements c/o Hulse Playfair and McGarry, Wakefield.

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FISHER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-12 published
Glenn Vernon PELTIER
Glenn Vernon PELTIER of Wasaga Beach, formerly of Wikwemikong passed away at Wasaga Beach on Thursday, November 6th, 2003 in his 47th year.
Beloved son of Eugene PELTIER and Stella PELTIER née RECOLLET predeceased.) Beloved step-son of Honorine (CORBIERE) PELTIER. Loving brother of Ron (Beatrice), Brian (Catherine), Linda (Byron), Arlene (Dale), Warren (Jackie), Wayne (Christi). Survived by uncles Robert PELTIER, Tommy PELTIER, Norman RECOLLET, Isadore RECOLLET and aunt Bella PITAWANAKWAT.
Predeceased by aunts, Yvonne McRAE, Rosemary FISHER, Margaret RIVERS and uncles, Wilfred PELTIER, Eli RECOLLET, Philip RECOLLET and Sam RECOLLET. Will be sadly missed by nephews and nieces, Yvette, Joe, Jennifer, Binaysi, Ying, Cheyene, Jade, Steven, Anais, Nicholas and Jeana. Special aunts and uncles, Thomas (predeceased), Boniface and Mary Ann, Glen and Joanne, Doreen and Clement, Theresa and Leonard, Shirley, Carroll, Danny, Timmy (predeceased) and Cecilia.
Friends called at St. Ignatius Roman Catholic Church, Buzwah from 4: 00 p.m. on Saturday, November 8th until the Funeral Mass on Monday, November 10th at 11: 00 a.m. also at St. Ignatius Roman Catholic Church, Buzwah with Father McCARTHY officiating. Interment in the Wikwemikong Cemetery. Bourcier Funeral Home Espanola.

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FISHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-10 published
LUCAS, Professor Emeritus Alec
Died, after a lengthy illness, at Island Lodge in Ottawa, on May 6th, 2003. He was born in Toronto June 20, 1913, the youngest child of Bert and Emma LUCAS, and grew up on a farm near Cobourg. It was here his love of nature and books was nurtured. Schooling began at Cook's School, a two-roomed school near Cobourg, where he later taught while studying for a B.A. and M.A. from Queen's. He obtained a Ph.D. in English from Harvard in 1951. Wishing to return to Canada, he accepted an offer from University of New Brunswick and taught English there until 1957 before going to McGill where he taught for and wrote for the next 30 years. After retirement he was made an Emeritus Professor in 1984, and worked part-time, which included a visiting lectureship in Iqaluit. He continued to write until he suffered a stroke in December 1995. Alec was an early advocate for the importance of teaching of Canadian literature and was the founding coordinator of the Canadian Studies Program, the forerunner of The McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. He wrote extensively on Canadian literature, including articles for The Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature, and the Literary History of Canada. He published books on writers such as Hugh MacLennan, Farley Mowat and Peter MacArthur and edited several anthologies of short stories including the best selling Great Canadian Short Stories. His passion for literature and teaching was matched by his concern for and interest in nature he was an active conservationist and bequeathed most of his woodland property at Plaisance, Quebec to the Quebec Society of the Protection of Birds as a nature reserve. He is predeceased by his parents, and siblings Eva FISHER, Vera FORSYTH, and Leonard LUCAS. He leaves his wife, Sharon; former wives Margaret and Coula; children George (Charlotte) of White Rock, Suzanne (Allan) LANGSFORD of Kingston, and Edward of Halifax, five grandchildren, several nieces and nephews including Sylvia (Tom) MIDDLEBRO'of Ottawa and Joan (Dick) MEYER of Barrie and grandnieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held at the Mackay United Church, 39 Dufferin Road, Ottawa, May 16 at 3 p.m. Ashes will be interned in Cobourg at a later date. If desired, a donation can be made in his memory to Island Lodge, 1 Porter's Island Ottawa K1N 5M2 or a charity of choice.

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FISHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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FISHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-26 published
Eileen KRIEGER
By Lesley KRIEGER, Karen McDONALD and Bob SILVERMAN Monday, May 26, 2003 - Page A14
Daughter, granddaughter, niece, sister, dancer, student leader. Born January 5, 1981, in Ridgeway, Ontario Died January 20, near Belleville, Ontario, in a car accident, aged 21.
Eileen grew up in a small town where she spent most of her time either dancing at her mother's dance studio or running wild on her grandmother's farm. "Eileen the Bunny Queen" was an early nickname that reflected her love of rabbits. But she spent time with more that just rabbits -- there were also all of those raccoons, squirrels, chickens, turkeys and, of course, horses. Later, she even managed to integrate cats, dogs and rabbits into her university life.
She grew into a beautiful young woman with a dazzling smile and what seemed to be boundless energy. She once told her housemate that she found sleep boring. As she matured she became immersed in myriad activities but family remained at the centre of her life. She was a loving daughter to her father Charlie, and a mentor to her younger brother Karl and sister Meaghan.
Eileen's interests and those of her mother meshed to a greater extent than they do for many mothers and daughters. One of those passions was dance. Her final performances were in Casa Del Sol, Spain. An extraordinary bonding took place among the dance Friends as they travelled and worked together.
Eileen's high school years left their mark on her teachers. One teacher, Ken GIBBONS, found working closely with her at the student leadership camp to be "a joy and learning experience for me. She was a natural teacher who knew the material and showed a genuine concern for those she was leading. The greatest thrill for a teacher is to know even one person like Eileen." Hugh O'BRIAN, founder of Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership, recalls Eileen's qualities at the World Leadership Congress, calling her "a true achiever and a great representative of Canada."
This straight-A student somehow managed to spend a year as president of her high-school student council, stay involved in sports, and receive the 1999 Award for Excellence and the Principal's Leadership Award before entering Queen's University in 2000 where she majored in Development Studies and Sociology.
While at Queen's she took a job as a waitress at Summerhill (the principal's official residence, which is used for entertaining). There, her poise, self-confidence and engaging personality resulted in her meeting and getting to know many people, including members of Queen's Board of Trustees, honorary-degree recipients, and Members of Parliament.
From her first year on campus Eileen became involved in the Canadian Student Leadership Conference (now known as Withinsight) which is a Queen's student-run initiative. This annual conference takes place in Ottawa and attracts students from across the country who come to hear government, business and other community leaders speak or lead workshops. It was at that conference one year, that Eileen met Richard, who became her true love.
Eileen became the national director of the 2003 conference, but she did not get to see the results of her hard work; the accident that took her life occurred three days before the conference was to begin. Her executive team members were devastated by her loss but came together to run a very successful conference in her honour. In future conferences, there will be an annual award offered in her name.
Upon hearing of her death, Al FISHER, a professor of music at Queen's, wrote: "I found her (to be) a vital, intelligent and accomplished young person. The cruelty of a sudden, violent death for such a treasure is profoundly numbing."
Lesley KRIEGER is Eileen's mother, Karen McDONALD her aunt; Bob SILVERMAN, Dean of Arts and Science at Queen's, a friend.

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FISHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-29 published
CHRISTMAS, Patricia
Died peacefully, at Sandringham Hospital, Victoria, British Columbia, on Sunday, May 18, 2003. She is survived by her son Robin and her life partner, Art FISHER. Born Patricia Ethel POITIER in London, United Kingdom July 13, 1920, she came to Canada in 1948 with her husband actor Eric CHRISTMAS and two sons, Robin and Stephen. She enjoyed a life-long love of the theatre and successfully toured as part of a two- woman show in the fifties. She held court at 15 Beech Avenue in Toronto for many years, serving as a beacon for a generation of artists and young people. Her sharp wit and joie de vivre will be sorely missed.

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FISHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
Lacrosse champ endured racism
Legendary player was subjected to slurs, but he didn't respond. 'It's because you were beating them they were saying it'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, June 28, 2003 - Page F9
Before every Brantford Warriors lacrosse game in 1971, Ross POWLESS, the team's former player and coach, a member of the Canadian, and later, the Ontario lacrosse halls of fame, crossed the floor to speak with coach Morley KELLS.
As they chatted, Mr. POWLESS wagged his finger at Mr. KELLS, now an Ontario Member of Provincial Parliament. To the spectators above, it looked as if he were advising the coach on the upcoming game.
"I kind of laughed, because I knew what was taking place," Mr. KELLS said. "You could always see them up in the stands nodding, thinking, 'Ross has things straightened out.' I didn't mind a bit."
Known for his sense of humour as well as his playing and coaching, Mr. POWLESS died recently at the age of 76.
From 1945 to 1961, he played intermediate and senior level lacrosse in British Columbia, New York State and Southern Ontario, scoring 294 goals and 338 assists during his Senior A career. He contributed to three Mann Cup wins, lacrosse's national championship, for the Peterborough Timbermen from 1951 to 1953.
During the 1953 Cup finals, Mr. POWLESS won the Mike Kelly Award as the most valuable player of the series. Also, he was twice given the Tom Longboat Award as the top Indian athlete in Canada.
Born a Mohawk on the Six Nations Reserve of the Grand River Territory in Southwestern Ontario, Mr. POWLESS came from a family of talented players. One of his grandfathers, his father and several uncles played on Six Nations teams or with the travelling Mohawk Stars, according to lacrosse historian Stan SHILLINGTON.
And Mr. POWLESS was patriarch to another. Four of his sons played Senior A lacrosse. One of them, Gaylord, joined him in the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 1990, making them the only father and son pair in the hall.
Ross POWLESS played what his people call "the game the Creator gave us" with skill and ease.
"He was a great, great player," said close friend and former teammate Roger SMITH, also a member of the Canadian and Ontario lacrosse halls of fame. "He could do it all. He could play defence, offence. He scored a lot of goals, he was a great team player, a great checker, a good corner player, a good loose-ball man. He was one of the best."
A large man, standing above six feet and weighing more than 200 pounds, Mr. POWLESS played an especially strong defensive game. "He wasn't fast, but he knew where to cut you off at the pass," said Mr. KELLS, who played against him.
"Ross's attitude was that sooner or later you had to show up heading for the net, so he would be there waiting for you. If anyone had a natural understanding of how the flow of the game should be and how to control it, it was him."
Mr. POWLESS played with handmade hickory sticks, disdaining the later mass-produced plastic sticks as "Tupperware."
A gifted coach who got the best out of his players, he led many teams to divisional and national championships. One of his prouder moments came when he coached six of his sons, including Gaylord, on the 1974 Ontario First Nations Team. The team won the All-Indian Nations Lacrosse Tournament in B.C.
Born on September 29, 1926, in the log cabin his carpenter father built in Ohsweken, Ontario, Alex Ross POWLESS was one of eight children. Although the family lived without running water or hydro, he later told his children that he never felt poor because there was always food on the table.
After his mother died in 1932, Mr. POWLESS attended residential school in nearby Brantford until Grade 8 and then high school for one year. In 1945, at the age of 18, he headed to Vancouver to play on Andy PAULL's Senior North Shore Indians team.
For the next five years, Mr. POWLESS played for intermediate teams in Buffalo, Brantford and Huntsville, Ontario, taking seasonal jobs to support himself. In 1951, he joined the Senior A Peterborough Timbermen.
By 1954, Mr. POWLESS and his wife Wilma, whom he married in 1948, had moved their growing family, which would eventually number 14, back to the family homestead in Ohsweken. There, they lived without electricity until 1957 and without running water until a new house was built in 1970.
Mr. POWLESS continued playing Senior A lacrosse for Hamilton and St. Catharines, and as a pickup player for the Timbermen in the 1956 Mann Cup finals, then moved to Senior B and intermediate teams until he retired from playing in 1961.
Lacrosse was important to a lot of people, but it was extra important to him, Mr. POWLESS told Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in January.
Richard POWLESS, another son from the 1974 team, said: "It opened up the world to him. Back in those days, there weren't many Indians playing in the wider world. It got him off the reserve, and he had the talent to go places, and it was recognized."
Often the wider world greeted Mr. POWLESS with racial slurs. The crowd and members of opposing teams called him blanket-ass and wagon-burner and squirted drinks on him.
"You'd get used it, it wouldn't bother you. They wouldn't be saying that if they were beating you. It's because you were beating them they were saying it," Mr. POWLESS told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Richard POWLESS said, "He didn't react to it, he didn't respond to it, it was just part of the burden he had to carry."
Still, Ross POWLESS credited lacrosse with helping him make white Friends across the country. Some of them stood up for him. Once during tryouts for the Timbermen, he entered a bar in Peterborough with some members of the team. Because he did not have a blue card indicating that he had given up his Indian status, he could not drink legally and was refused service.
The Timbermen left the bar saying, "If he's not good enough, we're not good enough neither," author Donald M. FISHER quotes Mr. POWLESS's recollection in Lacrosse: A History of the Game.
Mr. POWLESS was proud of his heritage and maintained its traditions.
However, he did not teach the Mohawk language to his children. Scarred by his experience in residential school, where he was punished for speaking his mother tongue, he and his wife decided not to pass it on. Instead, he told his children that it was a white man's world, and to live in it successfully, they needed to excel in English.
At times, Mr. POWLESS acted politically. In 1959, a group of Mohawks, including him, tried to reinstate the traditional native government. "He was a firm believer in our own system and our own way of doing things," Richard POWLESS said. "When he believed in something, it wasn't just talk and that's the way he raised us."
Mr. POWLESS had settled into carpentry after his return to Ohsweken in 1954, a trade he practised for the next 30 years.
Earning a reputation as a hard worker, he soon became a foreman and, among other projects, worked on the Burlington Skyway Bridge.
Always an avid hunter, fisherman and pool player, Mr. POWLESS worked as a building inspector on the Six Nations Reserve until his retirement in 1991, served as a band councillor for eight years and helped to start Six Nations minor lacrosse and hockey leagues. In 1997, the Ontario Municipal Recreation Association gave him a volunteer service award.
Like many players, Mr. POWLESS was buried with lacrosse sticks. He had told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation of his intention, saying, "I want to play with my dad, my sons, my uncles and my nephews."
Mr. POWLESS died on May 26 in Paris, Ontario, of cancer. Sons Victor, Gaylord and Gregory predeceased him. He leaves Wilma, his wife of 55 years, 11 children, 27 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

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FISHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-13 published
'What else could it have been but a miracle?'
Rene CAISSE died 25 years ago without gaining the recognition some cancer survivors believe she deserved. Without Essiac, her mysterious remedy, they wouldn't be alive today, they tell Roy MacGREGOR
By Roy MacGREGOR, Saturday, December 13, 2003 - Page F8
Bracebridge, Ontario -- These days, when she looks back at her remarkable, and largely unexpected, long life, Iona HALE will often permit herself a small, soft giggle.
She is 85 now, a vibrant, spunky woman with enough excess energy to power the small off-highway nursing home she now lives in at the north end of the Muskoka tourist region that gave the world Norman BETHUNE and, Iona HALE will die believing, possibly something far more profound.
A possible cure for cancer.
Twenty-seven years ago, Mrs. HALE sat in Toronto's Princess Margaret Hospital and heard that terrifying word applied to her own pitiful condition. She was 58, and had already dropped to 75 pounds when her big, truck-driver husband, Ted, finally got her in to see the specialists who were supposed to know why she had stopped eating and was in such terrible pain.
Mrs. HALE remembers awakening in the recovery room after unsuccessful surgery and being told by a brusque nurse, "You're not going to live long, you know, dear."
"That's what you think!" she snapped back.
Ted HALE had often heard stories of a secret "Indian" medicine that an area nurse had supposedly used to cure cancer patients, but he had no idea where it could be found. He had asked a physician, only to be told, "That damned Essiac -- there's nothing to it."
When they returned to their home near Huntsville, Ontario -- with instructions to come back in three weeks, if Mrs. HALE was still around -- Mr. HALE set out to find the mysterious medicine. With the help of a sympathetic doctor, he discovered Rene CAISSE, a Bracebridge nurse who claimed to have been given the native secret back in 1922. Pushing 90 and in ill health, she agreed to give him one small bottle of the tonic, telling him to hide it under his clothes as he left.
Mr. HALE fed his wife the medicine as tea, as instructed, and it was the first thing she was able to keep down. A few radiation treatments intended to ease the pain seemingly had no effect, but almost immediately after taking the Essiac, she felt relief. When the painkillers ran out and Mr. HALE said he would go pick up more, she told him, "Don't bother -- get more of this."
Twice more, he returned to get Essiac, the second time carrying a loaded pistol in case he had to force the medicine from the old nurse. He got it, and, according to Mrs. HALE, "the cancer just drained away." She returned to Toronto for one checkup -- "The doctor just looked at me like he was seeing a ghost" -- and never returned again.
"What else could it have been," Mrs. HALE asks today, "but a miracle?"
There is nothing special to mark the grave of Rene CAISSE.
It lies in the deepening snow at the very front row of St. Joseph's Cemetery on the narrow road running north out this small town in the heart of Ontario cottage country, a simple grave with a dark stone that reads: " McGAUGHNEY Rene M. (CAISSE) 1888-1978, Discoverer of 'Essiac,' Dearly Remembered."
On December 26, it will be 25 years since Rene -- pronounced "Reen" by locals -- CAISSE died. But in the minds of many people with cancer, the great question of her life has continued on, unanswered, well beyond her death. Did she have a secret cure for the disease?
Ms. CAISSE never claimed to have a "cure" for cancer, but she did claim to have a secret native formula that, at the very least, alleviated pain and, in some cases, seemed to work what desperate cancer sufferers were claiming were miracles.
She had discovered the formula while caring for an elderly Englishwoman who had once been diagnosed with breast cancer and, unable to afford surgery, turned instead to a Northern Ontario Ojibwa medicine man who had given her a recipe for a helpful tonic.
The materials were all found locally, free in the forest: burdock root, sheep sorrel, slippery elm bark, wild rhubarb root and water.
The woman had taken the native brew regularly and been cancer-free ever since.
Ms. CAISSE had carefully written down the formula as dictated, thinking she might herself turn to this forest concoction if she ever developed the dreaded disease. She never did, dying eventually from complications after breaking a hip, but she remembered the recipe when an aunt was diagnosed with cancer of the stomach and given six months to live. The aunt agreed to try the tonic, recovered and went on to live 21 more years.
The aunt's doctor, R.D. FISHER, was intrigued enough that he encouraged Ms. CAISSE to offer her remedy -- which she now called "Essiac," a reverse spelling of her name -- to others, and by 1926 Dr. FISHER and eight other physicians were petitioning the Department of Health and Welfare to conduct tests on this strange brew.
"We, the undersigned," the letter from the nine doctors read, "believe that the 'Treatment for Cancer' given by nurse R.M. CAISSE can do no harm and that it relieves pain, will reduce the enlargement and will prolong life in hopeless cases."
Instead of opening doors, however, the petition caused them to slam. Health and Welfare responded that a nurse had no right to treat patients and even went so far as to prepare the papers necessary to begin prosecution proceedings.
But when officials were dispatched to see her, she talked them out of taking action, and for years after, officials turned a blind eye as she continued to disperse the tonic. She made no claim that it was medication; she refused to see anyone who had not first been referred by their regular physician; and she turned down all payment apart from small "donations" to keep the clinic running.
Her work attracted the attention of Dr. Frederick BANTING, the discoverer of insulin, but an arrangement to work together foundered when he insisted they test the tonic first on mice, and Ms. CAISSE argued that humans had more immediate needs.
Her problems with authority were only beginning. A 55,000-signature petition persuaded the Ontario government to establish a royal commission to look into her work, but the panel of physicians would agree to hear only from 49 of the 387 witnesses: who turned up on her behalf -- and dismissed all but four on the grounds that they had no diagnostic proof. The commission refused to endorse Essiac, and a private member's bill that would have let her continue treating patients at her clinic fell three votes short in the legislature.
She quit when the stress drove her to the verge of collapse, moved north with her new husband, Charles McGAUGHNEY, and dropped out of the public eye. But not out of the public interest.
"You need proof?" laughs Iona HALE. " Just look at me -- I'm still here!"
Not everyone in the medical establishment dismissed Essiac. Ms. CAISSE had permitted the Brusch Medical Center near Boston to conduct experiments after Dr. Charles BRUSCH, one-time physician to John Kennedy, inquired about the mysterious cure. Tests on the formula did show some promise on mice, and the centre eventually reported: "The doctors do not say that Essiac is a cure, but they do say it is of benefit." Dr. BRUSCH even claimed that Essiac helped in his own later battle with cancer.
Other tests, though, were less encouraging. In the early 1970s, Ms. CAISSE sent some of her herbs to the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in Rye, New York but when early tests proved negative, she claimed Sloan-Kettering had completely fouled up the preparation and refused further assistance.
Through it all, she refused to disclose her recipe -- until a rush of publicity after a 1977 article in Homemaker's magazine persuaded her to hand over the formula to the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario for safekeeping and to give a copy to the Resperin Corporation of Toronto in the hopes that, eventually, scientific proof would be found.
She died without gaining the recognition some cancer survivors believe she deserved, and in 1982, the federal government declared Resperin's testing procedures flawed and shut down further studies.
The story of Ms. CAISSE's medicine carried on, however, with more and more people turning to the man who would have been her member of Parliament to see if he could help.
Stan DARLING lives in the same nursing home as Iona HALE. Now 92, Mr. DARLING spent 21 years in Ottawa as the Progressive Conservative member for Muskoka-Parry Sound. He's remembered on Parliament Hill for his crusades against acid rain, but of all his political battles, Mr. DARLING says nothing compares to his fight to gain recognition for Rene CAISSE's mysterious medicine.
"So many people came to me with their stories," he said, "that I couldn't help but say, 'Okay, there must be something to this.'"
Mr. DARLING put together his own petition, 5,000 names, and went to the minister of health and argued that so many were now using Essiac it made sense to legalize it.
His bid failed, but he did persuade the medical bureaucrats to compromise: If Essiac were seen as a "tea" rather than a "drug," it could be viewed as a tonic, and so long as the presiding physician gave his approval, it could be added to a patient's care -- if only for psychological reasons. "On that basis," Mr. DARLING says, "I said, 'I don't give a damn what you call it, as long as you let the people get it.' "
The doubters are legion. "There's no evidence that it works," says Dr. Christina MILLS, senior adviser of cancer control policy for the Canadian Cancer Society. That being said, she says, "There is also little evidence of harmful side effects from it," but cautions anyone looking into the treatment to do so in consultation with their physician.
No scientific study of Essiac has ever appeared in an accepted, peer-reviewed medical journal. But those who believe say they have given up on seeing such proof.
Sue BEST of Rockland, Massachusetts., still vividly recalls that day 10 years ago when her 16-year-old son, Billy, sick with Hodgkin's disease, decided to run away from home rather than continue the chemotherapy treatments he said were killing him.
He was eventually found in Texas after a nationwide hunt and agreed to return home only if the treatments would cease and they would look into alternative treatments, including Essiac.
No one is certain what exactly cured Billy, but Ms. BEST was so convinced Essiac was a major factor she became a local distributor of the herbal medicine.
Rene CAISSE, she says, "spent a whole life trying to help people with a product she found out about totally by accident -- and being totally maligned all her life by the whole medical establishment in Canada."
In some ways, Ms. CAISSE has had an easier time in death than in life. Today, there is a street in Bracebridge named after her, a charming sculpture of her in a park near her old clinic, and Bracebridge Publishing has released a book, Bridge of Hope, about her experiences.
The recognition is largely the work of local historian Ken VEITCH, whose grandmother, Eliza, was one of the cancer-afflicted witnesses: who told the 1939 royal commission: "I owe my life to Miss CAISSE. I would have been dead and in my grave months ago." Instead, she lived 40 more years.
Don McVITTIE, a Huntsville businessman, is a grandnephew of Rene CAISSE and says she used her recipe to cure him of a duodenal ulcer when he was 19. Now 71 and in fine health, he still has his nightly brew of Essiac before bed.
"There's something mentally satisfying about having a glass of it," he says. "I think of it more as a blood cleanser. That's what Aunt Rene always said it was. I think she'd be disappointed it hasn't been more accepted."
"Look," Ken VEITCH says, "this all started back in the 1920s. And I've said a number of times that if there was nothing to it, it would be long gone.
"But there is something to it."
Roy MacGREGOR is a Globe and Mail columnist.
The secret revealed
Debate rages in Essiac circles about the correct recipe. The most accurate rendition likely comes from Mary McPHERSON, Rene CAISSE's long-time assistant. Ms. McPHERSON, currently frail and living in a Bracebridge nursing home, swore an affidavit in 1994 in which she recorded the recipe in front of witnesses. It is essentially the same preparation distributed today by Essiac Canada International, which operates out of Ottawa. The formula appears below:
61/2 cups of burdock root (cut)
1 lb. of sheep sorrelherb, powdered
1/4 lb. of slipper elm bark, powdered
1 oz. of Turkish rhubarb root, powdered
Mix ingredients thoroughly and store in glass jar in dark, dry cupboard. Use 1 oz. of herb mixture to 32 oz. of water, depending on the amount you want to make. I use 1 cup of mixture to 256 oz. of water.
Boil hard for 10 minutes (covered), then turn off heat but leave sitting on warm plate overnight (covered).
In the morning, heat steaming hot and let settle a few minutes, then strain through fine strainer into hot sterilized bottles and sit to cool. Store in dark, cool cupboard. Must be refrigerated when opened.

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