All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"FER" 2003 Obituary


FERGUSON  FERNANDES  FERRETTI  FERRIER 

FERGUSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-05 published
Frances Marie BATMAN
Frances and Ralph owned and operated BATMAN's Tent and Trailer Park in Sheguiandah for years. Peacefully at Manitoulin Lodge in Gore Bay on Thursday, January 30, 2003 age 72 years. Cherished wife of Ralph BATMAN. Loving mother of Dennis of Sudbury, Paul and wife Jackie of Sheguiandah, William and wife Cheryl of Sault Sainte Marie. Special grandmother of Rebekkah, Matthew, Phillip, Kyle (April) and Cory (Stacey) and great grand_son Andrew. Will be remembered by brother Doug FERGUSON and sisters Patricia and husband Harold CLARKE, Ruth DUNLOP, and Wilhelmine BATMAN.
Visitation was 2-4 and 7-9 pm, Friday at Island Funeral Home. Funeral Service 2: 00 pm Saturday, February 1, 2003 at Little Current United Church. Burial Elm View Cemetery in the spring.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERGUSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-21 published
Flora FERGUSON
In Loving Memory of Flora FERGUSON. Peacefully at Manitoulin Centennial Manor on Sunday May 18, 2003, age 94 years.
Beloved wife of John FERGUSON. Dear sister of Reta (husband William) BRAY of Hemet, California. Predeceased by siblings Wilbert (Olive) MOORE, Carmen MOORE, Violet McLENNAN (husband Bill,) Alvin MOORE, Myrtle MEREDITH, Charles MOORE. Remembered by sister-in-law Hilda MOORE. Predeceased by all her in-laws: Maine (husband William) MARSHALL, Rueben (wife Nell) FERGUSON, Floyd (wife Pearl) FERGUSON, William (wife Cecile) FERGUSON, Lena (husband Walter) MARSHALL. Loved by many nieces and nephews. Visitation 2-4 and 7-9 pm Tuesday, May 20 at Island Funeral Home. Funeral Service 2: 00 pm Wednesday, May 21, 2003. Burial Cold Springs Cemetery.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERGUSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Sidney William COX
In loving memory of Sidney William COX, on Saturday, September 6, 2003 at the Mindemoya Hospital at the age of 90.
Born in England in 1913. Beloved husband of the late Hollis (Nee MARSHALL) 1986. Loving father of Bill and friend Marilyn, Jack and wife Ruth Anne, Charlie and friend Norma, Anne and husband Frank HANER, Mary and husband Vance McGAULEY. Fondly remembered by 10 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren. Survived by one sister Frances BREATHAT. Predeceased by brother Arthur and sister Kathleen FERGUSON. Brother-in-law Charlie FERGUSON. Sister-in-law Mazie AELICK and Leona MARSHALL. Sadly missed by friend Mildred. Visitation was held on Monday, September 8, 2003. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, September 9, 2003 at Saint Francis of Assisi Anglican Church, Mindemoya, Ontario. Burial in Mindemoya Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERGUSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-24 published
Charles Sidney FERGUSON
In loving memory of Charles Sidney FERGUSON on Saturday, September 20, 2003 at Mindemoya Hospital at the age of 76 years.
Born to William and Kathleen (née COX) FERGUSON on May 20, 1927. Beloved husband of the late Audis (née MARSHALL) 1991. Loving father of Sharleen and husband Ian VANHORN, Lori McLENNAN, all of Mindemoya. Special Poppa of Darryl VANHORN and friend Skye, Shannon and husband Marc DROUIN, Jessica McLENNAN. Cherished by great granddaughters Jamey and Taylor VANHORN. Fondly remembered by Susan LANKTREE- VANHORN. Will be missed by sisters, Monica and husband Jim CORRIGAN, Barbara and husband Caryl MOGGY, all of Mindemoya, brother William FERGUSON of M'Chigeeng and sisters-in-law Mazie AELICK and Leona MARSHALL. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, September 23, 2003 at St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church, Mindemoya.
Cremation with burial in Mindemoya Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERGUSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
John Benjamen FERGUSON
In loving memory of John Benjamen FERGUSON who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Centennial Manor on Sunday, November 16, 2003 at the age of 97 years.
Predeceased by his beloved wife Flora (née MOORE) on May 18, 2003. Predeceased by all his brothers and sisters, Maime (husband William) MARSHALL, Reuben (wife Nell,) Floyd (wife Pearl,) William (wife Cecil,) Lena (husband Walter) MARSHALL. Brother-in-law to Reta (predeceased) and husband William BRAY, Charles MOORE (predeceased) and wife Hilda, William and wife Olive MOORE, Carmen MOORE, Violet and Bill McLENNAN, Alvin MOORE, Myrtle MEREDITH. Loved by many nieces and nephews.
Visitation was held on Tuesday, November 18, 2003. Funeral Service at 2: 00 p.m. Wednesday,
November 19, 2003 at Little Current United Church. Burial in Cold Springs Cemetery.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERGUSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
Gordon Kenneth FLEMING/FLEMMING
By Jack FORTIN Thursday, February 13, 2003, Page A30
Musician, husband, father. Born August 3, 1931, in Winnipeg. Died August 31, 2002, in Scarborough, Ontario, following a stroke, aged 71.
Gordie FLEMING/FLEMMING was a remarkable music talent, known internationally as a master of the accordion, especially in the jazz idiom. He was a life member of Local 149 of the Toronto Musicians' Association.
In show-business vernacular, Gordie was "born in a trunk." He began playing accordion when his older brother gave him lessons. His musical ability was such that he began performing publicly at the age of five. His schoolteachers often saw him being whisked away in a taxi to perform at theatres and radio stations in Winnipeg. By the age of 10, he was a working member of various bands in that city.
In 1949, Gordie lost his accordion in a fire at a Winnipeg hotel. With the insurance money, he headed for the bright lights of Montreal where he soon became an important part of that city's musical life. His accordion ability was complemented by the fact that he was also a gifted arranger and composer.
He had a marvellous ability to improvise and could string out complex bebop lines, leaving his listeners in awe. He often slipped a jazz phrase into ballads or commercial tunes, confirming that jazz was indeed his first love.
One of Montreal's busiest musicians, he wrote for local orchestras, shows, radio and television. He had perfect pitch and often wrote without reference to a keyboard. He was at home in every type of music from classics to jazz. For several years, he worked at the National Film Board as a composer and musician.
In Montreal, Gordie performed with many show business headliners: there was a wealth of home-grown talent in Montreal, such as Oscar PETERSON and Maynard FERGUSON, as well as other jazz musicians who were beginning to be noticed.
Gordie had said that when when he first heard bebop it was like entering another world. As his career indicates, he had no trouble in that world. He worked with many personalities including: Charlie PARKER, Mel TORMÉ, Hank SNOW, Lena HORNE, Englebert HUMPERDINCK, Dennis DAY, Gordon MacRAE, Cab CALLOWAY, Nat King COLE, Cat STEVENS, Rich LITTLE, Billy ECKSTEIN, Pee Wee HUNT, Arthur GODFREY and Buddy DEFRANCO.
He also performed with Tommy AMBROSE, Allan MILLS, Wally KOSTER, Tommy HUNTER, Bert NIOSI, Wayne and Shuster, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation jazz shows with Al BACULIS, and many other Canadian jazz musicians.
On Montreal's French music scene, Gordie performed on radio and television with Emile GENEST, Ti-Jean CARIGNAN, André GAGNON and Ginette RENO. He was a featured soloist with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on several occasions.
Internationally, Gordie toured France in 1952 and performed with Edith PIAF and Tino ROSSI. He had the honour to perform for former prime minister Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU at a Commonwealth Conference.
He participated with other top Canadian musicians in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation tour to entertain Canadian and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Europe in 1952 and 1968.
For me, a memorable experience was playing in a group with Gordie for several winters in Florida. A popular member of the Panama City Beach family of musicians, Gordie looked forward to his winter trek south. Many of the American musicians will miss him, as will the many snowbirds who looked forward to hearing him each year.
His extensive repertoire allowed Gordie to author a book called Music of the World, in which he wrote the music to 280 songs from more than 30 countries.
Gordie leaves his wife of 47 years, Joanne, and seven children.
Jack FORTIN is Gordie's friend.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERGUSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-18 published
His voice resonated on airwaves
Veteran read news, hosted shows on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio and television for four decades
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - Page R7
Harry MANNIS, a popular Canadian Broadcasting Corporation announcer and host whose warm, deep voice graced the country's airwaves for four decades, died last month in Toronto. He was 82.
Mr. MANNIS started his career with the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. in Halifax at the end of the Second World War. He was known across the country, not only for reading the radio news, but hosting a number of programs including Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio's Themes and Variations and Anthology. His voice was also often heard on the Project, Stage and Fourth Estate.
"He had that great resonance that I envied, " said his long-time friend and former radio personality Max FERGUSON. "As an announcer I have always considered him the best."
Mr. MANNIS preferred radio but also ventured into television, reading the Toronto metro news and hosting What's New?, a news magazine geared toward youth, which was launched in 1972.
In radio, he said, you had the option of sitting at the microphone in an old T-shirt (although Mr. MANNIS himself was most often smartly dressed in a turtleneck sweater and dress coat). He also found it less stressful than television. "It's easier on the nerves. Only one thing can be a problem -- reading, " he said in an interview in 1975.
A modest, unassuming man, who stood at just over six-feet tall, Mr. MANNIS admitted to still having a bout of nerves after almost three decades in the business.
"Even after 29 years I haven't been able to conquer this feeling, " he said in 1975.
"When I was doing the Toronto metro television news, I had a recurring nightmare that when I'd go on the air, all the pages of the news would be mixed up. It's never happened, but you never know, " he said.
It was that same fear that prompted him to meticulously check his work before sitting down in front of the microphone. If he didn't know a word, or its proper pronunciation, instead of guessing and taking the risk of being wrong on-air he would head right to the public broadcaster's man in charge of language and make sure he got it right.
"Harry never mispronounced a word, Mr. FERGUSON said.
But like any new radio broadcaster, Mr. MANNIS, who didn't lack a wry humour, had a couple of small announcing mishaps in the early years. One day in Halifax, the city experienced a power failure. The show still having to go on, Mr. MANNIS was forced to read the news from the master control room with someone holding a flashlight over his shoulder.
Another time, when his microphone was switched on for a station call he happened to be looking at a drama producer whose last name was Appleby. Before he knew it, the words coming out of his mouth were: "This is CBH, Applefax."
"Relax for a minute and it's fatal, Mr. MANNIS said in the 1975 interview. "The minute a mike is turned on, I visualize a million pairs of ears glued to their radios or television sets, all eagerly awaiting to pounce on my slightest mispronunciation. Is it any wonder the tongue cleaves to the palate, the eyes become glazed, the hand holding the script trembles like a leaf in a gale?"
Harry MANNIS was born in Toronto on April 11, 1920. He was the youngest of three children born to Jessie and Benjamin MANNIS, who owned a furrier shop. Harry attended Oakwood Collegiate Institute and met his wife Elizabeth when she moved in two doors down. The couple married in 1942 and later had a daughter.
"He was like any nice young man, Elizabeth MANNIS said. "He was private. He wasn't flamboyant."
After high school, Mr. MANNIS briefly attended the University of Toronto before leaving to join the Royal Canadian Air Force. Stationed in England during the war, he returned home to Canada in 1946. Uncertain about what to do next, he decided to enroll in a radio-announcing course at Toronto's Ryerson Institute of Technology (now Ryerson University).
"We all liked the way he read things at home, " said Elizabeth MANNIS, who was one of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's first female announcers.
Impressed with his voice quality and enunciation (which was untrained), they told him not to bother with school and sent him to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for an audition. He was hired the next day for an announcing job in Halifax. Within two weeks of his audition, he was reading the radio news on the East Coast.
"I just happened to be in the right place at the right time, Mr. MANNIS said of his quick entry into the radio world.
He had had a brush with the airwaves before the war. After learning to play the piano, violin and clarinet by ear as a child, he decided to try his hand at singing, fancying himself a pop star one day.
When he was 17, he appeared on an amateur radio hour show singing a pop song. He thought he had found the key to his success until, as he put it, "the pianist refused to play slowly, and I refused to sing fast, and the result was pandemonium."
"Music came naturally to him, " Elizabeth said. "The same with announcing, he didn't have to struggle with it."
Mr. MANNIS remained with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation until his retirement in the mid-1980s. He was widely liked and respected by his colleagues, who called him a "class act." Judy MADDREN, host of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's World Report, wrote in a condolence note to his family that Mr. MANNIS was a "true gentleman" who always treated her with respect and without condescension.
An animal lover, Mr. MANNIS and his wife took in stray animals and supported a local organization called the Toronto Wildlife Centre, which helps rehabilitate injured wildlife.
Mr. MANNIS died of cancer on January 2 in a Toronto hospital. Besides his wife, he leaves daughter Kate and two grandchildren.
Harry MANNIS, born in Toronto on April 11, 1920; died in Toronto on January 2, 2003.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERGUSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-02 published
FERGUSON, Angus Harold
died March 31, 2003, at Cambridge Memorial Hospital peacefully, and surrounded by his family. He leaves his wife Alice (BAILEY) of 61 years in April 2003, and five children - Ian (Connie), Waterloo; Sharon (Horst) WOHLGEMUT, Kingston; Hugh, Guelph Grant (Karen), Cambridge; and Janet BABCOCK, Toronto. He will be sincerely missed by 11 grandchildren. Angus was born in Killean, Puslinch Township, Ontario, on March 13, 1918, the eldest of three boys, to Marshall and Nellie (Amy) FERGUSON. He was predeceased by his parents and brother Donald (1975) and is survived by his brother, Ian (Millie) of London. He attended Killean Public School, Galt Collegiate Institute, and farmed until 1942 when, for health reasons, he and his wife moved to Toronto. In 1949 he returned to Galt and shortly thereafter became operator then owner of the Credit Bureau of Galt, later Cambridge, where he along with his wife continued in business until the '80's when the business was sold to his son Hugh. During those years he served as Director of the Associated Credit Bureau of Ontario, then Canada, and U.S.A. Associations and later as President of Ontario and Canada. He served on several committees of the City of Galt and Cambridge over the years. He was a member of the Galt Lions Club since 1952, as President and Director as well as bulletin editor for over 20 years. His main interest in the Lions Club was eye-sight conservation for which he received the Helen Keller award, and was the first in the Galt Club to be honoured with the Melvin Jones Award. He was also, involved in Heart and Stroke from its' beginning in the Galt unit and was its' first Treasurer. Angus was a member of Knox's Galt Presbyterian Church for over 50 years, and served on the Board of Managers as secretary for 17 years, was a longtime elder, and worked on many committees - special among them to him was as a member of the Scout and Group committee where he served for many years. Above all else, Angus was an ardent fisherman and hunter, and always enjoyed being able to say he had ''dipped his line in most areas of Canada from Coast to Coast''. His other main interest was the Clans and Scottish Societies of Canada and North America and most particularly - the Ferguson Clan - serving 25 years as Regional Director of Ontario and as President of Clan Ferguson of Canada and North America. He had been a Clan member in Scotland since 1948. He was a participant in the Multicultural movement for Cambridge from the inception and was able to get the first grant for it through his association with a member of a Toronto member of Clan Ferguson Society of Canada. Ill health followed him through his lifetime. He was a very early recipient of open heart surgery in 1959. He held a deep interest in the progress made in his area and felt it a great honor to be asked to be a part of the Heart and Stroke Foundation when it first started a chapter in his area. Friends will be received at Coutts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 96 St. Andrews, Street, Cambridge (www.funeralscanada.com) on Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. and Friday at the church from 1: 30 p.m. until the service time of 2: 30 p.m. Funeral Services will then be conducted at Knox's Galt Presbyterian Church, Queen's Square, Cambridge on Friday, April 4, 2003, at 2: 30 p.m. with Rev. Wayne DAWES officiating. Interment Killean Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Knox's Galt Presbyterian Church (Major Repair Fund) or the Regional Heart and Stroke Foundation would be gratefully received.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERGUSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-15 published
Maker of men: 'The Chief' ran Kilkoo Camp for Boys
For 25 years, Ontario educator ran a wilderness camp for boys and then helped launch Toronto's Greenwood College
By Allison LAWLOR Thursday, May 15, 2003 - Page R9
John LATIMER's idea of a perfect evening was visiting with young campers in their cabins at Kilcoo Camp, telling stories and listening to tales of their day's adventures.
"You haven't seen the Pied Piper in action until you saw John in action," said his long-time friend David HADDEN, the head of Lakefield College School, a private school in Lakefield, Ontario "The kids just loved him."
Mr. LATIMER's life-long love of Kilcoo Camp, the Ontario boy's camp he directed for more than 25 years, began in 1938. At the age of 8, Mr. LATIMER arrived at Kilcoo, located on the shores of Haliburton's Gull Lake, about two hours' drive northeast of Toronto, as a young camper.
He loved the outdoors and became an accomplished canoeist. After several years as a camper, Mr. LATIMER moved on to become a leader-in-training, counsellor and program director at the camp. Then in the fall of 1955, he bought the camp and became its director.
Mr. LATIMER, along with his wife Peggy, directed Kilcoo until 1981. It was as director of Kilcoo that he became known as "Chief" a name that stuck with him throughout his life. After retiring from Kilcoo, he had a cottage built beside the camp and remained active in camp life and as a well-known face to the young campers. Not long after stepping down as the camp's director, Mr. LATIMER's eldest son, David LATIMER, took over and continues to direct the camp.
Mr. LATIMER later wrote a book called Maker of Men: The Kilcoo Story, about the place he loved so much. He also co-authored a camp-counsellor's handbook. With his wide smile and keen interest in people, Mr. LATIMER captured people with his enthusiasm.
"He just had this special gift," said Mr. HADDEN, who considers Mr. LATIMER his mentor and the reason he pursued a career working with young people. "No one I know has had a greater capacity to love so many people."
Mr. HADDEN added: "He had the ability to touch people's souls, really I believe that."
John Robert LATIMER was born on October 13, 1930, in Toronto. After graduating from Lawrence Park Collegiate Institute in north Toronto, he went on to radio school. He completed his training and went to work as an announcer at private radio stations in Guelph, Ontario, and Stratford, Ontario, before joining the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto. At the public broadcasting corporation, he worked in the film department but continued to spend his summers at Kilcoo Camp.
"I think he worked to go to Kilcoo," said his long-time friend John KENNEDY.
At a party of camp Friends, he met his future wife Peggy MacDONALD. The couple married on April 29, 1961, and later had three sons, who grew up around the camp.
Not long after retiring as director of Kilcoo in 1981, Mr. LATIMER went to work in the Ontario government's Office of Protocol.
"He never had any intention of retiring," his wife Peggy LATIMER said. "He always said he didn't like golfing."
As acting chief of protocol, Mr. LATIMER was responsible for making sure visits to the province by the Royal Family and heads of state ran smoothly.
In his role, Mr. LATIMER and his wife had occasion to meet the Queen, Prince Philip, the late Queen Mother and several other members of the Royal Family. The Duchess of York, Sarah FERGUSON, spent time at Kilcoo Camp learning how to paddle a canoe.
From the Ontario government, Mr. LATIMER went to Royal St. George's College, a private boys' school in Toronto, where he was headmaster from 1988 to 1996. About three years ago, Mr. LATIMER and his son David sat down with Richard WERNHAM, a lawyer and entrepreneur who made millions selling his mutual-fund company Global Strategy, to talk about their dream of starting up a private school in Toronto.
Together they, along with Mr. WERNHAM's wife Julia WEST, founded Greenwood College School (the school was named in honour of Mr. LATIMER's mother, Zetta GREENWOOD.) The school, which emphasizes not only academic achievement but the student's emotional, social and physical development, opened last September.
"He fully believed in leadership and building leaders," said David LATIMER, who is the school's director of community life. "He always believed that through leadership, all kids could be helped."
An active member of the school, John LATIMER served on the school's board of directors and took part in interviewing hundreds of prospective students for the school's first year.
Having founded the school, which fulfilled a long-time dream, Mr. LATIMER pursued another goal. He got tickets for his first rock concert. Sitting in the 11th row of the Rolling Stones concert in Toronto last year was a spry man in his 70s, said his son David.
Known as a prankster, Mr. LATIMER's jokes ran from sending dead flowers on a birthday, to filling a room full of balloons, to placing a strange object in a bed.
Mr. KENNEDY can remember finding a plastic rose in his lush rose garden at his home in British Columbia and opening up his suitcase after a trip with Mr. LATIMER to find hundreds of packages of matches tucked away in shirt pockets, socks and underwear.
About three years ago, Mr. KENNEDY and his wife joined the LATIMERs on a trip to Disneyland in California. The two couples spent three days going on every ride, and exploring every exhibit.
"He revelled in it -- he loved it," Mr. KENNEDY said of the trip. "If there is such thing as an inner child, he had it."
Mr. LATIMER, who died in Toronto on April 22 after a short battle with cancer, leaves Peggy, his wife of 42 years, their three sons David, Jeffrey and Michael, and grandchildren Tori, Thomas, T. J. and Charlie.
"I do not regret leaving this Earth... because my life has been utterly fantastic," Mr. LATIMER said not long before he died.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERGUSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-19 published
John Bruce FERGUSON
By Anne MILLERD Thursday, June 19, 2003- page A18
Chartered accountant, husband, father and grandfather. Born March 10, 1922, in Edmonton. Died Feb.16, 2003, in North Vancouver, of cancer, aged 80.
John FERGUSON's father, a charming but hard-drinking Scot, left his wife and son when John was five, after which he and his mother shared a home with grandparents, aunt, uncle and cousins. A clever boy who was keen on sports, John was known in the grocery stores as the lad who knew the total of the bill before it was rung in. John's maternal grandfather, an inventor and machinist, became an important mentor to the boy. John never forgot his grandfather's kindness nor his father's desertion.
Following high school, John's apprenticeship to an accounting firm in Edmonton was interrupted by the onset of war. He served with the Air Force in Egypt, where he met red-headed Sandy (Flora Jean) REYNOLDS from liverpool. John and Sandy married at the end of the war, and John brought his bride home to Edmonton, where he resumed his apprenticeship. John spoke of the war years as the best years of his life.
John and Sandy had two children, Jean and Ian. John worked days and studied nights. Money was scarce, and Sandy's health suffered in the severe prairie winters. In 1950, when John qualified as a chartered accountant in Alberta, he moved his family to Vancouver, qualifying with the British Columbia Institute of Chartered Accountants in February, 1951.
John worked for Gulf of Georgia Towing from 1951 to 1977, and was an active member of the British Columbia Institute of Chartered Accountants, particularly in matters relating to professional ethics and discipline. In 1970, John was made a Fellow of the Institute, the highest honour it is able to confer on members.
John worked six days a week and most evenings. The family progressed from a motel in Burnaby, British Columbia, to a home in West Vancouver and a family membership to the Capilano Winter Club. While his children learned to skate, he served on the board and helped build sets for winter carnivals. Typically a stern and uncompromising father, John loved to take his children by surprise on Christmas Eve, coming home with extravagant gifts for everyone.
In 1977, Gulf of Georgia Towing was bought out and John retired. He built rock walls, travelled with Sandy, golfed and kept up his committee work at the Institute. John and Sandy enjoyed their two young granddaughters. Sandy's health failed, and when she died of cancer in 1984, John said, "There are people who just say they're sorry, and there are people who leave muffins on your doorstep or ask you to lunch. I found out who my Friends were."
In 1985, John married Babs MILLERD (née Dorothea STEWARD/STEWART/STUART,) also widowed. Attached to a large and comparatively chaotic clan, John made himself useful. He administered an educational trust fund for the 21 MILLERD grandchildren, and dispatched advice on financial matters. He took particular interest in a business started by Babs's youngest son and his wife, teaching them bookkeeping and coaching them in proper business practice, advising "Always remember the receiver general is a partner in your business."
In the last years of his life, John gave up curling, but continued to golf. He devoted himself to the care of Babs, as she became less able to care for herself. John became ill in the last few months of his life, but remained lucid, loquacious, and fond of maxims to the end. "Always do your best," he would say, as well as, "Nothing else is good enough."
John FERGUSON is survived and missed by his wife Babs, son Ian FERGUSON, daughter Jean ELLIS, grandchildren Ursula, Jessica and Julian, great-grandchildren Sam and Tyler, and by all the MILLERD clan.
Anne MILLERD is a step-daughter-in-law of the late John FERGUSON.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERGUSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
FERGUSON, Cecil George
With a deep sense of loss, we announce the death of Cecil FERGUSON who died peacefully in the presence of his family on Monday, June 23, 2003 in his 87th year. Remembered with gratitude by Maureen Olivia FERGUSON, cherished father of Moira and beloved ''Papa'' to Elizabeth. Predeceased by his parents Elizabeth Maude ALLIN and John Howard FERGUSON, brothers James and Donald FERGUSON. Survived by his sister Laura FERGUSON of Metcalfe, Ontario and brother Harold FERGUSON of Osgoode, Ontario and many nieces and nephews. Family and Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (2 stoplights west of Yonge Street), on Friday, July 4 from 7-9 p.m. A Service of Thanksgiving for Cec's life will be held at Blythwood Road Baptist Church, 80 Blythwood Road, Toronto, on Saturday, July 5, 2003 at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to Big Brothers of Metro Toronto or Save the Children Canada would be greatly appreciated.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERGUSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
Ben WISE
By Jeremy FERGUSON Thursday, July 10, 2003 - Page A20
Actor, director, lawyer, innkeeper, artist, husband, father. Born May 13, 1929, in Toronto. Died January 21, of cancer, aged Ben WISE spent the first six years of his life in a household of Polish Jewish immigrants. The language was Yiddish. Enrolled in public school at 6, Ben didn't speak a word of English. He was held back a year. He joked he was the guy who failed Grade Others knew him as the perfectionist, hands-on proprietor of the Inn at Manitou.
His daughter Jennifer, associate professor of theatre history at the University of Victoria, recalls that by the time he came to fatherhood at age 30, he was already accomplished. He'd been a floor director during the "golden age" of television drama at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. It was Ben's index finger that cued the first live-to-air transmission of the new national broadcast network in 1952.
He graduated as a lawyer, from Osgoode Hall in 1957, but the courtroom was not for him. It was more his nature to be the seasoned traveller, journeying to Israel in 1949, studying life from cafés on the Champs Élysées and, in a Hemingway turn, reeling in giant sail-fish off Jamaica.
Enter Sheila, his wife, partner, and best friend, always at his side, supporting and making possible everything he did, everything he was. Their greatest co-production was their children: Cindy, Jennifer, Jordanna and Jonathan -- and five grandchildren.
In 1959, Ben and Sheila launched Mani tou-wabing, a fine arts camp near Parry Sound, Ontario The Toronto press called him "The Sol Hurok of Camping." The fledgling impresario signed on prima ballerinas from Belgrade, musical-theatre directors from New York's 42nd Street, designers from Derbyshire, Shakespeareans from Stratford. He assembled a fine arts faculty unheard-of in the world of camping. He nurtured the talents of thousands of young painters, dancers, musicians and filmmakers.
This was mere rehearsal for Ben's baby, the Inn at Manitou, born in 1974. The Inn is a unique fusion of tennis club, five-star hotel, wilderness spa and French restaurant, and a long-standing member of Paris-based Relais and Chateau. The summer of 2003 marks its 30th season, its standards unflagging -- as Ben would have insisted.
He was a foodie before the word came along, bringing over several French chefs, including Jean-Pierre CHALLET of Toronto's Bouchon and Jean-Charles DUPOIRE of Epic in the Royal York Hotel.
"Ben understood the enormous difference between being good and very good," remembers Mr. CHALLET. "He guided chefs. He opened our minds. He and Sheila were always ahead of their time. Even today, there is nobody in Toronto with their standards of perfection."
Renaissance men don't sleep: Ben found time to be a developer, building spectacular country houses on the shores of Lake Manitou-wabing. He took up paint brushes and turned out hundreds of landscapes and portraits. His paintings sold. In his 70s, he was planning a return to acting. The man had many lives to live.
Fatherhood? "He wanted us to see, feel, experience, know everything all the beauty in the world, all the noble ideas, all the gorgeous music, all the best of every type of thing that is," says Jennifer WISE. " From blinis in Moscow to falafel in Jeru salem; from New Year's in Paris to the Old Vic in London; from Rumplemeyer's on the East Side to Beethoven on the West, he... treated us to a three-decades-long guided tour of his world."
The last words are Jennifer's: "Above all, Ben loved to feel the sun on his face -- he'd close his eyes, tilt his head back to catch all its rays, and command us to do the same. He never tired of the sight of the coloured leaves in autumn, or the blazing glow of a sunset at day's end."
Jeremy FERGUSON is Ben's friend.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERGUSON - All Categories in OGSPI

FERNANDES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
BARR, The Honourable Mr. Justice John Roderick (Rod), Q.C., L.L.D.
Born in Toronto on September 9, 1921, died in St. Catharines, Ontario May 30, 2003. Devoted and loving husband to the late Rhoda Marshall BARR. Predeceased by infant daughter Jane. Dearly loved by his son Peter, daughter Elizabeth and their spouses, Sharon BRODERICK and Stephen PERRY. Adoring grandfather to John BARR and Nicholas, James and Christopher PERRY. Brother and great friend of his sisters, Margaret RHAMEY and the late Isabelle MARSH. As dear as a brother to sisters-in-law, Helen CAUGHEY and Nellie MARSHALL.
Rod was grateful for a full and happy life. He grew up in Hamilton, Ontario and enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force at the outset of World War 2. Rod first served as a Flight Instructor in Trenton, Ontario, where he met his future wife Nursing Sister Rhoda MARSHALL. Obtaining the rank of Flight Lieutenant, he served in 426 Squadron as a pilot with Bomber Command at Linton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire.
At the end of the war, Rod studied law at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto and was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1948. At that time, he and Rhoda established their home in St. Catharines where he enjoyed many years practicing civil litigation and where as a trial lawyer he earned the respect of his colleagues. Rod served as a Bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada and was a member of the American College of Trial Lawyers and the Advocates Society. He was appointed to the Supreme Court of Ontario, Trial Division in 1983.
Rod received an Honourary Doctorate of Laws from Brock University. He was an active member of the St. Catharines Flying Club and proud member of the St. Catharines Rowing Club. He took up sculling at the age of 52 and participated in Masters Rowing in Canada and the United States.
He supported a large range of charities. No one less fortunate was ever turned away. Rod's insight and kindness was matched only by his wonderful, inimitable sense of humour. Above all, he loved and was loved by his family.
The family is deeply grateful to Dr. R. MacKETT, Dr. F. MacKAY, Dr. J. WRIGHT, Dr. FERNANDES and Dr. W. GOLDBERG, and to gentle caregivers Virgie PEREZ, Marylou and Risa.
''Pray for me, and I will for thee,
that we may merrily meet in heaven.''
The family will receive Friends at the Hulse and English Funeral Home, 75 Church Street, St. Catharines, on Sunday, June 1, from 7-9 p.m. and Monday, June 2, from 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held at Knox Presbyterian Church, 51 Church Street, St. Catharines, on Tuesday, June 3, 2003 at 11 a.m. A service will also be held in St. Paul's Presbyterian Church, Amherst Island, on Wednesday, June 4, 2003, at 3 p.m. Interment to follow.
Donations may be made in Rod's memory to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Knox Presbyterian Church.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERNANDES - All Categories in OGSPI

FERRETTI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-09 published
Activist established blue box program
Radical became known for putting pressure on government, corporations
By Martin MITTELSTAEDT Wednesday, July 9, 2003 - Page R7
Toronto -- One of Canada's most influential environmental activists, Gary GALLON, died Thursday in Montreal after a long battle with cancer.
Although Mr. GALLON may not have been a household name, Canadians almost everywhere will recognize one of his major achievements, the setting up of the country's first blue box recycling program in Ontario during the late 1980s.
He also had a hand during the 1970s in establishing Greenpeace, and maintained a lifelong passion for environmental causes evident in his series of twice-monthly newsletters, called the GALLON Environmental Letter.
"I've always been bothered by excess consumption and wanton destruction of habitat. Human ethics must allow space for other creatures," he said recently.
Born in the United States in 1945, Mr. GALLON moved to Canada in the late 1960s to avoid the draft during the Vietnam war. He settled in Vancouver and began working by writing newsletters promoting mining stocks listed on the Vancouver Stock Exchange.
After work, he turned to his true passion, the environment, joining the nighttime meetings of the Society for the Promotion of Environmental Conservation, a group that at the time opposed the use of the British Columbia coast for supertanker routes.
"He became concerned that what he was doing [by selling stocks] was causing environmental damage," said David OVED, a Toronto environmental consultant who worked with him in the Ontario government.
Mr. GALLON's biggest impact on the country's conservation movement occurred when he was senior policy adviser for Jim BRADLEY, Ontario's Liberal environment minister from 1985-90, one of Mr. BRADLEY's surprise hires.
It was a risky move for the new Liberal government to employ one of Canada's leading environmental radicals for such a post.
Mr. GALLON instantly became known as one of " BRADLEY's brats," the moniker given the group of dedicated environmentalists assembled by Mr. BRADLEY within the Ontario government who helped originate such programs as the blue box and the province's acid rain reduction program.
In the mid-1980s, municipal recycling had been an experimental effort in a few communities.
Mr. GALLON worked to establish the blue box across the province. Mr. OVED said Mr. GALLON could often influence opponents within the government through his use of the inventive turn of phase or image.
In one particularly bitter debate, cabinet was discussing preservation of Ontario's Temagami forest region, an area containing some of Canada's last remaining stands of towering old growth red and white pines.
Mr. OVED said some politicians were questioning why environmentalists in Toronto and elsewhere in Southern Ontario were arguing to preserve a forest in the north that they might never see.
Mr. GALLON said forest preservation was part of the ideal that Canadians held of the society they would like to be part of.
"Gary's comment was 'People here may never see those forests, but they value green spaces in their minds,' Mr. OVED said.
Mr. OVED said the turn of phase impressed then-premier David PETERSON, who began to affectionately call Mr. GALLON and Mr. BRADLEY's other environmental activists "space cadets."
Some of the biggest run-ins that Mr. GALLON had during the 1980s were with Inco, one of Ontario's major emitter of chemicals that cause acid rain.
At one testy meeting, Mr. GALLON, dressed in a pink shirt, had exchanges with Inco's former chairman, Chuck BAIRD, who was later so annoyed at being pressed on the company's pollutants, that an Inco official called Mr. BRADLEY to complain.
"I got a call the next day asking who where those young radicals in pink polo shirts asking those impertinent questions," Mr. BRADLEY said.
Television broadcaster and Greenpeace founder Robert HUNTER said that Mr. GALLON related to him that the Inco chairman "had never run into such serious sass from mere political minions."
Of his experience in government, Mr. GALLON once said "you have less room to rail but more power to get things done."
Mr. GALLON suffered from colon cancer, which had spread to his lungs and liver.
Despite the pain of the disease and its treatments, he kept up his hobby of competitive swimming, winning in his age group in a Quebec swim meet last year, according to Mr. OVED.
Last month, the Royal Canadian Geographic Society's magazine gave Mr. GALLON its national environmental award for lifetime achievement.
Mr. GALLON was picked in 1977 to be executive director of the Nairobi-based Environment Liaison Centre International, where he met his wife-to-be, another prominent Canadian environmental activist, Janine FERRETTI.
Ms. FERRETTI was executive director of the North American Free Trade Agreement Commission for Environmental Cooperation and now holds a senior position with the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington. Mr. GALLON is survived by his two children, Kalifi and Jenika.

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERRETTI - All Categories in OGSPI

FERRIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-19 published
SCOTT, Lewis Clayton - August 16, 1909 - September 17, 2003
Died peacefully at Southlake Village Nursing Home, age 94, after a full and distinguished life as a sportsman. In an era when shooting, fishing, hunting and riding were the epitome of sportsmanship, Scott excelled at all.
Born on August 16, 1909 in Vermillion, South Dakota, Lew came to Toronto at an early age with his family. One of his first employers was the Toronto Carpet Company (where he met his future wife Alice PARKER.) He then moved on to the brokerage business with Barrett Sye and Co. as well as in the Toronto Grain Exchange. He established L.C. Scott Construction Company in the 1940's which operated in Canada, the United States and England. After World War 2, the company built a large number of schools and hospitals in Southern Ontario as well as some of the post war homes that were built in New Toronto and North York.
Lew had a lifelong passion for horses. During a family stint in California when he was a youngster, he first galloped racehorses at Hollywood Park and when he grew too big, switched to exercising polo ponies. After his business career was established, he acquired property in Markham - Wyndstone Farm - from which he bred and raised thoroughbred racehorses, steeplechasers and sport horses as well as bird dogs and prize- winning Shorthorn cattle.
Lew was an equestrian sportsman of international stature. He competed in steeplechasing and timber racing in Canada and the United States winning a number of prestigious trophies including the Prince of Wales trophy three times. He played polo in Canada, the United States, England and Barbados and competed at horse shows across Ontario. He was a keen foxhunter and served as the whipper-in for the Toronto and North York Hunt for 20 years prior to becoming a Master of Foxhounds in 1972, a position he held until 1990.
He raised bird dogs and competed with them all over North America in the 40's and the 50's. He was a top fly fisherman and enjoyed duck and pheasant hunting. Both he and his wife Alice were crack shots and long time members of the Toronto Gun Club. As a young man, he was a member of the Argonaut Rowing Club.
At one time, a member or director of the Toronto and North York Hunt, the Canadian Hunter Society, the Canadian Equestrian Team, the Canadian Thoroughbred Horse Society, the Toronto Polo Club and several U.S. polo clubs, the Cowdray Polo Club, United Kingdom Canadian director of the Master of Foxhounds Association of America, the Goodwood Club and the Argonaut Rowing Club. He was also an accomplished pilot who loved flying and had owned several planes.
In 1989, after 54 years of marriage, he lost his beloved wife Alice whose charm, hospitality and hard work was the foundation of the family and the basis which allowed Lew's energetic pursuit of his interests.
Predeceased also by his only son Lewis Christian (Skipper). Leaves daughters Alice FERRIER (Glen) and Susan Jane ANSTEY (Michael VAN EVERY,) granddaughters Jennifer ANSTEY, Elizabeth TRACEY, Janet Louise GAYFORD, Mary FRALEIGH and Margaret Ann SPROULE. Great grandchildren Owen TRACEY, Will FRALEIGH, Jamie FRALEIGH and Tom FRALEIGH.
He will be remembered for his enthusiasm, toughness, loyalty and keen interest in the people and things around him.
If desired, donations in his memory may be made to Think First Canada (for injury prevention in sports and recreation), Med-West Medical Centre, Suite 2-227, 750 Dundas St. West, Toronto, Ontario M6J 3S3 or to the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Endowment Fund.
A Private family service was held. Arrangements entrusted to the Thompson Funeral Home, 29 Victoria Street, Aurora (905-727-5421).

  F... Names     FE... Names     FER... Names     Welcome Home

FERRIER - All Categories in OGSPI