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"FEL" 2003 Obituary


FELDBRILL  FELDMAN  FELICIANT  FELICIDADE  FELLOWES  FELLOWS 

FELDBRILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-23 published
Mary Elizabeth STARR
By Elizabeth STARR, Michael STARR and Laurie STARR Tuesday, December 23, 2003 - Page A22
Musician, teacher, mother, mother-in-law, sister, granny. Born March 4, 1920, in Toronto. Died August 3 in Toronto, of a brain hemorrhage, aged 83.
Mary STARR lived a full life teaching the cello to generations of students and enjoying a close relationship with her family.
Growing up in Toronto, Mary received her licentiate in cello in 1947 from the then-Toronto Conservatory of Music (now the Royal Conservatory) -- the highest possible diploma, and a rather uncommon achievement at the time for cellists. As a member of the Conservatory orchestra, she remembered seeing "a young kid" who played a piano concerto with the orchestra. The "young kid" was Glenn GOULD. Through the 1940s and 1950s she travelled extensively throughout Ontario playing chamber music with various Canadian musicians who were to become well known: Victor FELDBRILL, Eugene KASH, Stuart HAMILTON, Steven STARYK, and John COVEART among them.
After her future husband Frank (a singer) went to England, he managed to entice Mary over in 1951 by sending her programs of the concerts that were happening in London. There Mary worked, practised, played, went to concerts, and got married in 1952.
After returning to Canada (and two children later), Mary's teaching career was well under way. Through her career she taught with the Metropolitan Toronto School Board as an itinerant cello teacher, privately with the Royal Conservatory of Music, and in the Seneca College Suzuki program. She taught three-year-olds, school-aged children, high-school students, university students and even a few of the parents of her students. After years of doing four to six schools per day walking up three flights of stairs (it always seemed to be three flights of stairs) with a cello and music, she left to concentrate on private teaching. Although a number of her students went on to become professional cellists, Mary remained a tireless advocate of the fundamental value of musical education to developing and informing the enjoyment of the art of music throughout one's life; this was more important to her than becoming a professional musician.
Whether at music camp where she was a faculty member for many years, or her regular Monday night quartet sessions where we will always appreciate the warm vibrations and wonderful harmonies that crept through our house, the opportunity to play chamber music, just for fun, was one of the great pleasures for Mary throughout her life.
With the death of Frank in 1969, Mary had to work hard to support the family to cover all the "needs" and most of the "wants." She did this admirably.
The last six years of Mary's life, after moving into an apartment in her son and daughter-in-law's house, were surely among her best. There she had security with independence, community with privacy, and a granddaughter who lived just downstairs. She would sit ensconced in her big green chair, content to let life swirl around her as she read, needle-pointed, embroidered, or knitted.
Nothing thrilled Mary more than when 11-year-old Laurie and a few of her Friends took up cello last year. So began private teaching all over again -- not something she expected at the age of 82, but this was much more fun!.
Mary was Mary right to the end. After making an impressive recovery from a broken hip and arm suffered through an encounter with a revolving door, she was soon to be discharged from the rehabilitation hospital. She was in good spirits, had her sense of humour, and craved her "big green chair." She worked hard for that goal that unfortunately was not to be.
Elizabeth and Michael are Mary's children; Laurie is Mary's granddaughter.

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FELDMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-14 published
HEATHCOTE, Eric Thomas Blake
Died peacefully, after a short illness, at North York General Hospital, on March 12, 2003. The loving husband of Barbara, father of Isobel and Blake, grandfather of Elspeth, Zoe, Elizabeth, Edward and Maggie, and brother of Joan GRIGNON of Ajax. He was predeceased by his father, Major E.T. HEATHCOTE, Military Medal, Canadian Efficiency Decoration, and his mother, Winnifred (WALLIS) HEATHCOTE. Blake was born in Toronto in 1925, attended Lawrence Park Collegiate, and graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in engineering after serving with the Canadian Signal Corps (1944-1946). His career took him from work under the Eisenhower administration in radio technologies, and back to Canada in engineering consultancy work until 1964. He then spent 23 years with the firm of McGregor and Associates, retiring as senior partner to work with the firm of Proctor and Redfern as senior Vice President until his retirement. He continued working as an independent engineering consultant until December 2002, when he completed his last assignment for St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. Blake was a member of the Don Mills Civitan Club and helped found their hockey league; of the Professional Engineers of Ontario, the Canadian Healthcare Engineering Society, the Royal Canadian Legion, the Royal Canadian Military Institute, and a range of other professional associations. In 1998, he was presented with an award for 25 years' service from the Canadian Standards Association, for whom he had done extensive work in the medical gas sector, serving on many inquiries and boards as an expert analyst. He was an active member of the Church of Our Saviour in Don Mills, and also took great pleasure from such activities as woodworking, winemaking, fixing pretty much everything that got broken, and travel with his family. He also took great satisfaction in maintaining a colourful correspondence with a wide range of corporate and political thorns in his side. His family would like to extend warmest thanks to Dr. Sid FELDMAN, Dr. Simon YU, the nursing staff of North York General Hospital (particularly the pastoral support people), as well as the many Friends who showed such compassion and support as his rapidly-moving illness emerged and took hold. There will be a visitation at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home (159 Eglinton Avenue West, 2 lights west of Yonge) Sunday, March 16th from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. The funeral will take place at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home on Monday, March 17th at 11 a.m., with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Church of Our Saviour in Don Mills (1 Laurentide Drive, Don Mills, M3A 3C6), the North York General Hospital 4001 Leslie Street, Toronto, M2K 1E1), or the charity of your choice.

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FELDMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
FOGELL, David 1923-2003
Born December 22, 1923 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died October 27, 2003 at home with his family in Vancouver, British Columbia. He was predeceased by his parents Melach and Surka, brother, Ben and sisters Dora and Netty. Dave is mourned by his wife, Estelle, children, Melanie and her husband Ken GOLDSTEIN, Wayne and Mark. He will be greatly missed by his grandchildren Carie and her husband Stuart, Daniel, Sarah, Kylie; Sammy, Benji and their mother Dorothy ULLMAN as well as great-grand_son, Kade. He will never be forgotten by his many relatives and Friends. Dave was an incredibly charismatic and an intensely joyful human being. He felt deeply and loved unquestioningly. Those who were fortunate enough to be part of his life will be forever enriched by having known him. Dave approached everything in his life with meticulous attention. He had very humble beginnings yet he always remembered those who helped him throughout his life. He had a rare passion for living extending to everything and everyone. His seemingly endless energy led to numerous accomplishments and successes. He will be remembered most for his ability to make those around him feel loved. The funeral is Wednesday, October 29, 2003 at the Beth Israel Cemetary, 1721 Willingdon, Burnaby, at 12 noon. The pallbearers are Sammy and Benji FOGELL, Daniel GOLDSTEIN, Lanny GOULD, Howard DINER and Joel ALTMAN. Honourary pallbearers are Zivey FELDMAN and Harry GELFANT. The family would like to thank caregivers Denyse TREPANIER and Bryan WALKER as well as Dr. Larry COLLINS and Dr. Victoria BERNSTEIN. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Fund or the Jewish Family Service Agency.

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FELICIANT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-10 published
FELICIANT, Peggy Penelope (formerly PERRY, née KNOWLES) 1926 Died early Monday morning, June 9, 2003, in Toronto, peacefully with her family. Beloved wife of the late David FELICIANT, she will be lovingly remembered by her sons Douglas PERRY (Lesley) and Stephen PERRY, her stepson David FELICIANT, her sisters Patricia ATKINSON (Ted) and Barbara GABRIEL (Fred,) her nephews Gary ATKINSON (Susan,) Gregory ATKINSON (Sharon,) Tim ATKINSON (Linda) and Andrew GABRIEL (Holly,) and her niece Carol GABRIEL. Peggy was a graduate in nursing of McGill University, and for many years was a public health nurse with the Borough of Etobicoke. Visitation will be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto (2 stoplights west of Yonge Street), from 7 - 9 p.m. on Tuesday. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Wednesday, June 11, at 11 a.m. Reception to follow. Private interment will take place at Cataraqui Cemetery, in Kingston, on Thursday. For those who wish, donations may be made in Peggy's memory to the Alzheimer's Society of Toronto.

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FELICIDADE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
SANTOS, Felicidade
Peacefully at home on Saturday, March 1, 2003 in her 80th year. Beloved wife of the late Joao. Loving mother of Joao LUIS, Jose MANUEL, Fernando, Maria FELICIDADE, Maria GORETE and Tony. Dear grandmother of sixteen and great-grandmother of one. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter 'Peel' Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga, (Hwy. 10 north of Q.E.W.), from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. on Tuesday. Parish Prayers at 7: 30 p.m. Tuesday. Funeral Mass at S. Salvador do Mundo Church, 1225 Melton Dr., Mississauga on Wednesday March 5 at 10 a.m. Interment Saint Mary's Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to the Trillium Health Centre-Mississauga (Oncology).

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FELLOWES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-06 published
From fashion to furniture
Photographer gave up the fast life in Manhattan to open a shop in the Ontario countryside
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, September 6, 2003 - Page F11
Malcolm BATTY was a top fashion photographer, taking pictures of the likes of Christie Brinkley and Andie MacDowell for big Manhattan department stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue. But for the past 15 years, he ran an art and furniture shop in the hamlet of Mono Centre, living in a farmhouse in the countryside nearby.
At the peak of his photography career in the early 1980s, Mr. BATTY, who has died at the age of 57, moved in a rarefied world of high fashion and show business in New York City. Not bad for a kid who had started his working life as a waiter in a coffee shop in Toronto's Yorkville district in the early 1960s.
A man as handsome as his models were beautiful, he was always cool, in an understated way. Even when he was in the furniture business, he had a low-key style, bringing his finished pieces into town in an old red Toyota Land Cruiser.
Mr. BATTY dropped out of photography, and the fast life in New York City, in part because he came to find the world of fashion so shallow. He moved back to Canada with his new wife, Jane FELLOWES, and started making furniture. The first pieces they sold were birdhouses made from things such as orange crates.
They sold their high-end birdhouses at the Pack Rat, which at the time was the only furniture shop along the strip of Yonge Street in Rosedale, an area now jammed with fashionable stores.
"We decided our birdhouses were not going to be the common hardware-store style," Mr. BATTY told an interviewer in 1994. "They would have themes: Muskoka lodges, Santa Fe roadhouses, Indian dhows, grain elevators. Very odd stuff. We took them down to Pack Rat and, lo and behold, they started to sell for $220 to $250 a piece."
Malcolm David BATTY was born of British parents in India, on November 29, 1945. His birthplace was Nasik, just outside Bombay near where his mother was a military nurse. His father was a riding instructor for the British army who left the family soon after Malcolm's birth.
When the British left India in 1947, Malcolm and his mother returned to England. He was brought up in Wales with his mother and grandparents. He went to an experimental school, but was never a brilliant student. He did learn one skill that came in handy in later life: building dry stone walls. His grandfather taught him how and he built a series of stone walls on his farm in Mono Township, using rocks from the foundation of an old barn.
Mr. BATTY decided to come to Canada when he was about 16. He had relatives in Brockville, Ontario, but soon made his way to Toronto. While working in the Peddler coffee shop, he started to paint. He had a studio above a sail-making shop on Front Street and just about made a living selling his paintings. He was talented enough, but he needed formal training. He received a grant to study in Paris.
While there, a friend gave him a 35-mm camera and he stopped painting, for a while anyway, and started taking pictures. He came back to Toronto, was successful and then moved to New York City. The full page ads in The New York Times were his specialty superstar models and spreads for the big Manhattan stores.
"It was the painting that made him a great photographer," said Alan VENABLES, a friend and the owner of the Pack Rat. "He was a photographer with a painter's eye. Not too many of those."
Like someone trying to quit smoking, Mr. BATTY tried to kick the Manhattan habit more than once. His favourite escape was in a camper van, travelling across the United States and ending up in Mexico, usually the Baja Peninsula.
When he came back to Canada in the mid-1980s, it was with Jane FELLOWES, a Canadian. They spent some time in Cyprus, where Mr. BATTY's mother had retired. While there, they kept busy training horses. Because his father had been a riding instructor, Mr. BATTY wanted to see if he had the same talents. It turned out that he had a natural touch with horses.
After their furniture business took off, Mr. BATTY and Ms. FELLOWES wanted to find a shop where they could work and sell some of the things they made. They found it in Mono Centre, almost an hour north of the Toronto international airport. They opened a shop called Tequila Cove, across the driveway from a restaurant and pub, the Mono Cliffs Inn.
By this time, they made more than birdhouses and had expanded to tables with hammered tin tops, stripped cedar furniture and seagulls carved from old white fencing. What they didn't sell in the shop was put in the back of the Land Cruiser and went to Toronto.
Mr. BATTY took up photography again, working for a quarterly magazine called In The Hills. A few years ago, he landed a big assignment as the still photographer for a film Called Spirit of Havana, a National Film Board Production. It was one of many trips to Cuba and he always took his cameras.
This started a collection of photography that is to be published this fall. The book is called Cuba, Grace Under Pressure, with the text by Toronto writer Rosemary SULLIVAN. There are 102 pictures, with the theme being Cuban culture, the aging musicians, poets and dancers of the revolutionary era. It talks about how ordinary Cubans survive day to day.
Mr. BATTY had also started to paint again in the past few years. And he loved music, in particular the blues. He owned a vintage electric guitar, a 1967 Fender Telecaster. He leaves his wife, Ms. FELLOWES, and his mother.

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FELLOWS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-08 published
RAPSEY, Margaret Louisa (FELLOWS) 1914-2003
Margaret died May 4, 2003. She was predeceased by her husband Jim and by her brothers George and Bill. She is survived by her brother John and by her sons John (Irene), David (Glenda) and Brian (Linda), grandchildren Jay, Kammi, Jesse, Crispin, Brian John (Fiona), Dylan and great-grandchildren Zac and Sunday. Her family and Friends will remember her grace, kindness and indomitable spirit. Cremation has occurred and a memorial will be held later. Condolences and donations received at www.maccoubrey.com

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