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"DRA" 2003 Obituary


DRABINSKY  DRAGE  DRAIN  DRAINIE  DRAKE  DRAPEAU  DRAPER  DRAYTON 

DRABINSKY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-27 published
His calling was behind the scenes
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, June 27, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- Jimmy FULLER's first job in the theatre was playing Julius Caesar at the Royal Alex in Toronto. Odd for a teenage boy with no acting experience. But he played the post-Ides of March Julius Caesar, lying dead in a coffin on the stage, a part no actor wanted to perform.
His father was a business agent for the stage union the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, and he wangled the job for the boy. Jimmy FULLER went into his father's trade. He was a member of International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees for 54 years and was president of Local 58 for 36 years, until just before his death on May 22 at the age of 82.
Jimmy FULLER worked as an electrician at Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the opening performance of Camelot in 1960. He stayed there for more than 30 years, as chief electrician for the theatre, which in time changed its name to the Hummingbird Centre.
A union leader, he was also an entrepreneur. In 1976, he started his own company, Canadian Staging Projects, which rented stage equipment. It was successful, and he continued as president until the 1990s. During that time, he also worked in many productions and negotiated contracts with the likes of theatre owner Ed MIRVISH and impresario Garth DRABINSKY.
The 350 members of Local 58 work behind the scenes in live theatre in Toronto. They are the stagehands and electricians for everything from the Royal Alex to the Canadian National Exhibition. Jimmy FULLER was so enthusiastic about live theatre he would sometimes invest in the shows themselves. Some were small productions, but his most successful flutter was in the musical Cats.
James Charles FULLER was born in Toronto on October 31, 1920. He went to Runnymede Public School and then followed the family trade, qualifying as an electrician after studying at Western Tech high school. One of his first jobs, apart from playing the dead Julius Caesar, was at a movie theatre, the Runnymede Odeon, starting as an usher.
In 1941, he joined the army and when they discovered his stage talent he was put to work as part of the crew for the Army Show.
He was involved with staging productions, and the one he remembered in particular was with the Canadian comedy team, Wayne and Shuster
Just before the end of the war he was sent to British Columbia for more serious wartime work: wiring minesweepers, which were essentially wooden ships that used electrical signals to detect mines. He was back in Toronto just before the end of the war, working in his old trade as an electrician at the Odeon.
In 1950, he started J. Fuller Lighting Ltd., a freelance theatrical lighting business. It was around that time that he became a business agent for the Toronto Local 58 of International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees. At the end of that decade he became the head electrician for the O'Keefe Centre and stayed on there until But it wasn't as if that were his only job. Along with running his own company, he was running the union, negotiating contracts with local theatre owners, in particular the Mirvishes.
"Jimmy was labour and I was management. We fought one another tooth and nail for 30 years. We should have been the bitterest of enemies," Mr. MIRVISH said in a statement issued on Mr. FULLER's death. "We actually became the best of Friends."
He travelled with many shows, working with the Charlottetown Festival and the military Tattoo. He also worked closely with the Canadian Opera Company and was himself a fan of the opera.
Jimmy FULLER led a quiet home life and his family said that once he was home he never talked business. He leaves his wife, Eleanor, to whom he had been married for 58 years, and his daughter Susan.

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DRAGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
THOMAS, Jean Gertrude
Born in Guelph, Ontario, 1904. She died peacefully in her sleep Thursday, February 20, 2003 in Belmont House after a full life of over 98 years. She is survived by her youngest sister Margaret (1 of 4 siblings) and her daughter Beverley THOMAS. She is predeceased by her husband Lincoln THOMAS and daughter Barbara JABLONSKI. She was a loving grandma to her 7 grandchildren, Kim CORCORAN, Tom CHUTE, Elizabeth DRAGE, James JABLONSKI, Jennifer SLUYS, Nick JABLONSKI and Matt JABLONSKI. She was 'G.G.' (great grandma) to Christian, Jordan, Caitlin, Erinn, Alexis, Allison, Nathaniel, Jake, Nicole and Ethan, with a new one arriving any day. She will be sadly missed by her many in laws, nieces and nephews, cousins and all honored and valued Friends. If so desired donations may be made to the Belmont Foundation, 55 Belmont Street, Toronto, Ontario M5R 1R1 (416) 964-9231 in remembrance of Jean THOMAS. Jean wanted no funeral, or mourners but suggested a 'picnic' with family and Friends. This event will be held in Belmont House Sunday, February 23, 2003, from 2-4 p.m. Special thanks goes to the staff and volunteers at Belmont House who made life there full of happiness and comfort.

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DRAIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-03 published
Valetta May ROSE
By Jim PATTERSON Thursday, April 3, 2003 - Page A22
Valetta May ROSE
Domestic worker, farmer and comic writer's muse. Born in Warsaw, Ontario, January 9, 1912. Died January 16, in Toronto, of a stroke, aged 91.
On January 16, 2003, Valetta ROSE, 91, spoke with her brother, Ken DRAIN, and her niece, Dora BARR, by phone from her home in Norwood, Ontario Then she got into a limousine to go to a large family party in Toronto, to celebrate her nephew David PATTERSON's birthday. On the way, she sat with her great-nephew Paul, his partner Cathy and their six-week-old daughter, Kira, and was delighted to have the baby beside her for the trip.
There were more than 100 people at the party, but Valetta held court, greeting family members. Then, at 7 p.m., she suffered a stroke, and died instantly in her daughter Beattie's arms.
Born on January 9, 1912, Valetta was the second child of David DRAIN and Christina EDWARDS, who farmed near Warsaw, Ontario The DRAIN household was full of fiddle, piano and song; people arrived by horse and sled for music in the parlour, food in the kitchen and children everywhere. When Valetta's mother went into labour to deliver her sister Cora, Valetta's older brother Ivan was told to take his 20-month-old sister to grandma's house. Ivan was 3 and the house was two kilometres away -- but those were different times. Off the pair toddled, perfectly capable and perfectly safe.
As teenagers, Valetta and Cora set off for Toronto to work as domestics, eventually earning a respectable $25 per month plus room and board.
In 1943, Valetta married the love of her life, Ted ROSE. They farmed together outside Warsaw for 32 years. One night just after they were married, they went to Peterborough to see a movie. Afterward, walking up George Street, Valetta mused aloud about how lovely it would be to own a bedroom suite like the one in a store's display window. The next day, Ted came home with the furniture. Valetta never did discover how he'd afforded it.
In 1975, Ted and Valetta sold the farm and retired to Norwood. Ted died in 1987.
Last year, Valetta set off for Scotland with her daughters Beattie and Judy, their husbands, Bob BECHTEL and David GORDON, and Judy and David's two sons, Ian and Paul. Valetta announced, "On this trip, I just want to enjoy being all together." For three weeks, they drove around staying at bed and breakfasts and exploring the islands off the north coast. She was planning another trip this year -- to Judy's home in Vancouver.
For 40 years, Valetta followed the advice of one Dr. JARVIS, whose book Folk Medicine taught the benefits of lecithin, and she followed his prescription for a daily teaspoon of apple cider vinegar mixed with honey in a half glass of water to keep herself free from the worst of arthritis and other afflictions. Valetta knew that the secret of caring for others was simply to enjoy their company and, as the family "Information Central," loved to share stories of their successes.
She had her own place in Canadian cultural history. Filmmaker Norman JEWISON, a cousin, mentioned Valetta to writer Don HARRON, who immediately claimed her for use as the wife of his fictional character Charlie FARQUHARSON. Soon Valetta was credited with writing down Charlie's Hist'ry of Canada on those days when it was "too wet to plough." A highlight of Valetta's 90th birthday party was a card and framed photo from her "second husband."
Valetta made the best of every minute. She spent her last night on the bed that Ted had bought for her so many years before. Her spirit will delight family and Friends for years to come.
Jim PATTERSON is Valetta's sister Cora's youngest son. He was helped by Beattie, Ken, Cora HENDREN and Stephen PATTERSON.

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DRAINIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
He founded Readers' Club of Canada
Nationalist visionary struggled financially to publish Canadian writers
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page R7
In the early 1960s, when writers asked Peter and Carol MARTIN where to publish their manuscripts on Canada, the couple realized how few choices there were. Inspired, the Martins, both voracious readers, staunch nationalists and founders of the Readers' Club of Canada, decided to start their own press. In 1965, Peter Martin Associates came into being. Last month, Peter MARTIN died of lung cancer in Ottawa.
In an industry overshadowed by American companies, Peter MARTIN Associates was among the first in a wave of independent publishing houses to open during a time of rising Canadian nationalism.
Launched in a downtown Toronto basement on a shoestring budget, skeleton staff, idealism and enthusiasm, the company flew by the seat of its pants. Its employees were often young and new to the business. But many, including Peter CARVER, Michael SOLOMON and Valerie WYATT, went on to become Canadian mainstays.
"It really was a time of Canadian nationalism and those of us who believed in that cause could see what Peter and Carol were doing," said Ms. WYATT, a children's editor who spent four years with the company in the seventies.
During the 16 years before its sale in 1981, Peter Martin Associates published approximately 170 works, mainly non-fiction. Its presses put out I, Nuligak, the autobiography of an Inuit man; The Boyd Gang by Marjorie LAMB and Barry PEARSON; Trapping is My Life by John TETSO; and the Handbook of Canadian Film by Eleanor BEATTIE. Others who came through their doors included Hugh HOOD, Robert FULFORD, John Robert COLOMBO, Douglas FETHERLING and Mary Alice DOWNIE -- all to have their works published.
Started with small amounts of seed money from private investors and no government funding, Peter Martin Associates constantly struggled financially. At one point, for a bit of extra cash, the office became the designated nuclear-fallout shelter for the street. Pat DACEY, once the firm's book designer, lugged suitcases of books up the street to sell at Britnell's bookstore with summer employee Bronwyn DRAINIE.
Working at Peter Martin Associates was always fun, Ms. WYATT said. "You went in to work happy and you stayed happy all day."
Still, in a time when Canadian works received little recognition, she remembers finding it difficult to get media interviews for the author of Martin-published book.
Yet another title caused trouble with its subject. The company was putting out a collection of previously published sayings of former prime minister John DIEFENBAKER, called I Never Say Anything Provocative, edited by Margaret WENTE. Mr. DIEFENBAKER heard about the project, called Mr. MARTIN and threatened to sue. Mr. MARTIN stood firm.
"He handled it with such élan," said writer Tim WYNNE- JONES, then in the art department. "He was suitably dutiful, but not in awe. Mr. DIEFENBAKER was just over the top, as was his wont."
The book went to press and Mr. DIEFENBAKER did not go to court.
Once listed along with Peter GZOWSKI in a Maclean's magazine article on "Young Men to Watch," Mr. MARTIN was born on April 26, 1934 in Ottawa to a dentist father and a mother who drove an ambulance in the First World War. The younger of two sons, he attended Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario and the University of Toronto, where he earned a degree in philosophy.
During a year in Ottawa as the president of the National Federation of University Students, Mr. MARTIN met his first wife Carol. They married in 1956 and moved to Toronto. Three years later, they founded the Readers' Club in Featuring one Canadian book a month, it distributed works by Mordecai RICHLER, Irving LAYTON, Morley CALLAGHAN and Brian MOORE among others, and supplied its members with coupons. While continuing to run the Readers' Club (sold in 1978 to Saturday Night Magazine and closed in 1981), the MARTINs started Peter Martin Associates.
Throughout his career, Mr. MARTIN spoke out for Canadian publishing. Alarmed by the sale of Ryerson Press and Gage Educational Press in 1970 to American firms, he called a meeting of publishers to discuss problems in the industry. Named the Independent Publishers Association, the group started in 1971 with 16 members and with Mr. MARTIN as its first president. In 1976, it was renamed the Association of Canadian Publishers and continues today with 140 members. As a result of the group's efforts, Canadian publishing began to receive federal and provincial funding.
In the late 1970s, the MARTINs went their separate ways. Afterward, Mr. MARTIN published a small newspaper, The Downtowner, and owned a cookbook store with his second wife, Maggie NIEMI. In 1983, they moved near Sudbury, Ontario, where Mr. MARTIN did freelance book and theatre reviews, then moved to Ottawa in 1985 to work as president for Balmuir Books, publisher of the magazine International Perspectives and consulting editor for the University of Ottawa Press.
After a spinal-cord injury in 1997, Mr. MARTIN was left a quadriplegic, except for limited use of his left arm. Even so, he remained active, maintained a heavy e-mail correspondence and spent time in the park reading while seated in a bright-yellow wheelchair.
Mr. MARTIN leaves his children Pamela, Christopher and Jeremy and his wife Maggie NIEMI. He died on March 15.

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DRAKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-30 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Aston Ignatius GREEN, late of the City of Toronto and Town of Flesherton, who died on or about the 19th day of February, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before September 15, 2003, after which the estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 25th day of July 2003.
Barbara E. GREEN
James MATHER
Wayne L. HOOEY
Estate Trustees with a Will
by: Hooey - Remus
Suite 400, Box 40
One University Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
M5J 2P1
Attention: W. Bruce DRAKE
Solicitors for the Estate Trustees
Page B8

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DRAKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Aston Ignatius GREEN, late of the City of Toronto and Town of Flesherton, who died on or about the 19th day of February, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before September 15, 2003, after which the estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 25th day of July 2003.
Barbara E. GREEN
James MATHER
Wayne L. HOOEY
Estate Trustees with a Will
by: Hooey - Remus
Suite 400, Box 40
One University Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
M5J 2P1
Attention: W. Bruce DRAKE
Solicitors for the Estate Trustees
Page B12

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DRAKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-13 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Aston Ignatius GREEN, late of the City of Toronto and Town of Flesherton, who died on or about the 19th day of February, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before September 15, 2003, after which the estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 25th day of July 2003.
Barbara E. GREEN
James MATHER
Wayne L. HOOEY
Estate Trustees with a Will
by: Hooey - Remus
Suite 400, Box 40
One University Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
M5J 2P1
Attention: W. Bruce DRAKE
Solicitors for the Estate Trustees
Page B7

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DRAPEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-16 published
His vision for Canada went sky-high
Aircraft engineer worked at Canadian Vickers during the Second World War and helped in development of Canadair
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - Page R9
Perhaps more than anyone else, Peter GOOCH gave Canada its wings. An aeronautical engineer, he helped to build the company that went on to become Canadair, the aerospace division of Bombardier and the foundation for Canada's success as an aircraft manufacturer.
Like many young men of his generation, the Second World War had thrust him into the job of his dreams: chief engineer of a vast aircraft plant building flying boats for submarine patrols and converting military transports into commercial aircraft.
Mr. GOOCH, who died in February at the age of 88, joined Canadian Vickers at the outbreak of the war. The company was building ships in the east end of Montreal but expanded to build sea planes, including those that landed on floats and skis as well as amphibians, so-called flying boats, which could take off from water or land.
Canadian Vickers moved its aeronautical arm to Cartierville airport, then a three-kilometre streetcar ride from the edge of Montreal.
In May 1942, the federal government got involved by helping to build a 150,000-square-metre plant. Within three months, Mr. GOOCH and his team turned out the first PBY, or Canso, an advanced flying boat which saw extensive service in the war. The technology behind the Canso's ability to take off and land using the fuselage as a hull is still used in Canadair's water bombers.
The assembly line produced 340 Cansos. Then a young man who was not yet 30, Mr. GOOCH supervised a complex engineering project with dozens of engineers and thousands of workers under him. As the war came to an end, the factory expanded to convert military C47s into civilian DC3s.
At one point, Mr. GOOCH was also sent to England to work on the development of the legendary de Havilland Mosquito, an all-wood fighter-bomber that was later made in Canada and used by the Royal Canadian Air Force.
Mr. GOOCH was not only a clever engineer but a man of quiet charm and an accomplished linguist. Both these traits smoothed the path for his winning the contract for Vickers to build Montreal's first subway cars. Because he was fluent in French, he was able to deal with the mayor of Montreal, Jean DRAPEAU, something few English-only speaking businessmen of his day could manage.
By 1964, Mr. GOOCH was vice-president of engineering at Canadian Vickers. He convinced the mayor that his firm, located in a working class, French-Canadian district, could do the job of building the subway cars. Shortly after winning the contract, Mr. GOOCH was promoted to president of Canadian Vickers.
Peter William GOOCH was born on February 18, 1915, in Toronto. His father was a successful businessman who owned and ran a window-manufacturing company.
He attended Upper Canada College and the University of Toronto, graduating with a degree in civil engineering in 1936. A year later, he earned a masters degree in aeronautical engineering. His first job in aviation was with de Havilland and he transferred to the company's home base in England. He worked at its plants until the outbreak of the war when he started at Canadair, which was then owned by Canadian Vickers. After the war, the government wanted to encourage the development of an aviation industry using Canadair as a base. After one postwar re-organization, Canadair was bought by an American firm with the odd name of The Electric Boat Company. It formed the basis of General Dynamics, the defence giant.
Mr. GOOCH opted to stay with Canadian Vickers and moved to its operation on the St. Lawrence River. He left the firm in 1967 and moved to Toronto as president and part owner of the firm that became FluiDynamic Devices Inc., a company that turned exotic inventions developed at the National Research Council in Ottawa into commercial products.
A man of immense curiosity, he would get caught up in many projects, including a windtunnel. Called Airflow, it helped measure industrial emissions as part of an environmental initiative put together long before most people had heard of the word. The firm sold its first wind tunnel to Volvo, in Sweden, to test the aerodynamics of its cars.
In his spare time, Mr. GOOCH read in many languages and in addition to French, he spoke Russian, Spanish, German and Italian. When visiting businessmen arrived from Europe, he was always called upon to entertain them. At the age of 60, he decided to learn Japanese since his firm, FluiDynamics, had picked up a Japanese client.
A devoted family man, he spent his free time at the cottage he built at Lac Oureau, north of Montreal. A patient fisherman, his son remembers him catching just one trout on the fished-out lake in the southern Laurentians. The family would head further north on fishing trips every summer.
His hobbies included carpentry and a whole range of sports from skiing to golf. He was fit even in his later years and last summer was the first time he used a cart instead of walking the course.
Mr. GOOCH died in Toronto on February 27. He leaves his wife Evelyn and his four children.

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DRAPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-01 published
Died This Day -- William Henry DRAPER, 1877
Saturday, November 1, 2003 - Page F12
Politician and judge born in London, England, on March 11, 1801 1836, as young lawyer, entered politics to turn the old Family Compact that ran Upper Canada into a political party; served as attorney-general for Sir Charles METCALFE and Lord CATHCART 1847, forced out of power by right wing of his own party and appointed to judiciary; ideas adopted by Disciple John A. MacDONALD credited with founding Conservative Party.

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DRAYTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-18 published
Nova Scotia's marathon man
Cape Breton boy was Boston's most surprising victor
By Kevin COX Wednesday, June 18, 2003 - Page R5
Halifax -- Johnny MILES was first the determined champion, then the gentle grandfather of Canadian distance running.
His first major running prize was a sack of flour in North Sydney, Nova Scotia, in 1922 -- he finished third in the three-mile race but was first to sprint by the store. After four years of training including sprints behind his grocery cart, the humble, unknown 20-year-old Cape Breton delivery boy and Sunday-school teacher stunned the running world by defeating its best athletes to win the prestigious Boston Marathon.
It was a win that Mr. MILES and his father had calmly predicted to a policeman and a race official the day before. But even Johnny MILES had his doubts on that chilly April Monday as he pounded along the 26.2-mile course on his 95-cent shoes from the Co-op store in his hometown.
At the 22-mile mark, Mr. MILES was running stride for stride with leader and Finnish running legend Albin STENROOS when he looked over and saw a blank and exhausted expression on his rival's face.
"I knew right there that I had him and I had to make a move," he recalled with the gleam of a fierce competitor in his eye in an interview 54 years later. "He was rubbing his side and he had a stitch, so I didn't look back. I speeded up and I think that took the heart out of him."
He is still widely hailed among running raconteurs as the most surprising victor in the 107-year history of the event. Mr. MILES's time -- then a world marathon record -- was so unbelievable that race officials measured the Boston course -- and found it 176 yards short of the classic 26-mile, 385-yard distance.
"I don't know what all the fuss is about," he said in an interview in 1995. "I had a God-given gift and I used it."
Mr. MILES, his father and his mother arrived in Boston by train a few days before the marathon. The day before the race, father and son walked the course, got lost and ended up asking a burly Irish policeman for directions and received some advice that was not exactly a vote of confidence.
"My son needs to know the route because he's entered in tomorrow's race." The friendly officer smiled and said, "Tell your son to just follow the crowd."
On race day, Mr. MILES wore a red, homemade maple leaf on a white undershirt. His performance shattered the 1924 record held by the other race favourite, Clarence DEMAR, the four-time winner of the event.
"That boy ran the best marathon since that Indian [Canadian Tom LONGBOAT] in 1907," a stunned Mr. DEMAR was reported to have said.
A year later, he again challenged the gruelling course but suffered an embarrassing setback when he had to withdraw from the race with serious burns to his feet. His dad had taken a pair of his 95-cent sneakers and shaved down the soles with a straight razor so they wouldn't be so heavy. His feet -- tops and bottoms -- had bled.
It was a rare retreat. Mr. MILES, who trained on rural Cape Breton roads, dominated Canadian distance running through the late 1920s and early 1930s. He captured the Boston crown again in 1929 and won a bronze medal at the British Empire Games in 1931 and also ran the marathon in the Olympic Games in 1928 and 1932.
Born in Halifax, England, on October 30, 1905, Mr. MILES moved with his family to Cape Breton the following year. He worked as a grocery delivery boy at the time of his big win. But his first job as a young teen was in the Cape Breton coal mines. He went to work there to help support his family when his father went off to fight in the First World War.
Mr. MILES left the mines a few years later and entered his first contest -- a three-mile race in Sydney, Nova Scotia -- with the hopes of winning some fishing supplies.
He is revered in his home province of Nova Scotia even though he moved to Hamilton, Ontario, to train and take a job with International Harvester in 1927.
After his victories, some parents even named newborn children after the marathon hero. One of those babies, Johnny Miles WILLISTON, went on to become a driving force in establishing the Johnny Miles Marathon in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia.
The victories on the tracks and roads by a local boy who had worked as a child coal miner at the age of 11 injected some joy and hope into Cape Breton's coal-mining towns at a time when the industry was going through tough times and work underground was brutish and dangerous.
After he hung up his thin-soled racing shoes in 1932, Mr. MILES became an ambassador for fitness and clean living. He became a manager at International Harvester and worked in many parts of the world for the company after being told by a company executive that he could make something of himself if he put the same effort into his work that he exerted in running.
When running regained popularity in the 1970s, he was startled to become a celebrity among the new set of competitors who recognized his accomplishments. While Quebec runner Gérard CÔTÉ would dominate the Boston Marathon in the 1940s, winning it four times, Johnny MILES's time of 2: 25:40 stood as the Canadian record for the event until Jerome DRAYTON ran 2: 14:46 in 1977.
He was taken aback in 1967 at being named to the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
"That I should now be in the same illustrious company as the great stars of hockey, football, track and field, and other Canadian sports was a bit mind-boggling," he told author Floyd WILLISTON in the biography Johnny MILES: Nova Scotia's Marathon King in He was also caught off guard by being named to the Order of Canada in 1983.
"It's not going to change my life -- same hat size and shirt size," he told the New Glasgow Evening News.
Mr. MILES, who regularly attended races in the Hamilton area as a spectator in the 1980s, wondered how well he might have run with the technology offered to runners today.
"I think now I wouldn't eat steak before a race and I'd get these cushioned shoes and I'd know how to train," he said in an interview in New Glasgow at the marathon that was created and named after him in 1975 and still bears his name.
Mr. MILES and his wife Bess were fixtures at the Johnny Miles Marathon, which took place this past Sunday shortly after his death. Runners best remember him for his personal attention, anecdotes, quiet kindness and his enthusiasm for the sport.
Jerome BRUHM, a long-time Halifax runner and historian, remembered his first encounter with the running legend at the Johnny Miles Marathon in 1981.
"He was there and I'm nobody -- I'm just a runner. He came over and I said it was my first marathon and I was kind of nervous. He took me aside and talked to me and he said, 'Do you think you'll win the marathon'? Mr. BRUHM recalled this week. "I said, 'No, I'm a slow runner.' So, he said, 'Then go out there and do that -- finish the race and enjoy it.' He came over to me after the race and asked me how I did and how I felt. I thought that was fantastic that he would talk to me before the race and come over and check on me after the race."
He was a humble, personable man, Mr. BRUHM said.
"When he was inducted into the Canadian Running Hall of Fame, I went over to talk to him and he only wanted to talk about other people, not about what he had done."
Nova Scotia Premier John HAMM praised Mr. MILES for bringing international attention to his home province.
"We will always remember with pride his athletic accomplishments at the Boston Marathon and numerous other competitions as well as his success in business and accomplishments in life," the Premier said Monday.
In 2001, Boston Marathon officials celebrated the 75th anniversary of his startling 1926 win -- but at the age of 95, Mr. MILES said his health prevented him from attending the festivities. However, he promised to try to attend the 75th anniversary of his last Boston triumph.
Will CLONEY, long-time Boston Marathon official, had only praise for Mr. MILES. " There hasn't been a Johnny MILES in Boston since Johnny MILES."
Now there never will be.
Kevin COX is Atlantic correspondent of The Globe and Mail. He has completed 50 marathons -- including the Johhny Miles Marathon and the Boston Marathon.

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