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"DON" 2003 Obituary


DONALD  DONALDSON  DONISON  DONOGHUE  DONOHUE  DONOVAN 

DONALD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
YOUNG, Ira
Of West Vancouver, British Columbia and Malibu Beach, California died January 29th 2003 at his home in Malibu with family at his side.
Ira spent his life in pursuit of many passions. He was deeply loved and will be greatly missed by the many people he touched.
Born in 1926 in Edmonton, Alberta, Ira earned his B.Sc. at the University of Alberta and an M.A. in Clinical Psychology. He was an instructor in Psychology at Hobart and William Smith in Geneva, New York before starting a career in real estate. Ira founded the Western Realty Management group of companies in Edmonton in 1953 and embarked on a journey to create some of the most notable and ground breaking land development projects in Canada. He earned a reputation as one of Canada's leading private developers and builders. His vision evolved from suburban subdivision projects to apartments, office buildings, industrial building projects and shopping centers, spanning from western to eastern Canada, Los Angeles and Hawaii. Most notable was his award winning Coquitlam Center outside of Vancouver, British Columbia. 1980 Merit Award winner of the International Council of Shopping Centers and Governor General's Award for Architecture, the first two-level center in western Canada, this project was recognized for innovations in energy efficiency and the dedicated spaces and design elements furnished by local artists. It also became the catalyst for the massive development of the immediate area and realized the Town Center scheme originally proposed to the local district by Ira YOUNG's company.
It was at this time that his love and support for the arts began to eclipse his prominence in the real estate business. Starting as an avid collector of Eskimo art, Ira and his wife Lori developed a collection of art including major works of legendary American Artists; the likes of Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein and perhaps the most important collection of Cy Twombly in North America. All the while they actively supported and befriended many emerging Canadian and American artists, displaying their works alongside the rest of their collection. Their collections have been shown in Vancouver, London, Montreal, Los Angeles and Halifax with over 90 pieces donated to the Vancouver Art Gallery. A member of The Vancouver Art Gallery's Board of Trustees since 1996, he was also active on the Gallery's Program, Acquisitions and Master Planning Committees, always arguing for world class standards through international and local perspectives.
In the 1980's Ira and Lori's interest in automotive racing led to the acquisition of Malibu Grand Prix in Canoga Park, California. A family entertainment company featuring 35 amusement parks across the United States showcasing ¾ scale Indy Type race cars, Ira threw his heart and soul into the venture eventually expanding into Canada, France, Portugal and Japan. True to form, he went all out and created a race team to compete in the International Motor Sports Association GTU class of racing in North America. Surprising to many, but not to him, his team won their first race out, their first season out, and earned Mazda the Manufacturers title. Ira backed this venture in more ways than one. He drove in both the Daytona 24 hour and Sebring 12 hour endurance races. Also true to form, he recognized promise and gave opportunities to then unknown drivers like Jack BALDWIN, Tommy KENDALL and crew chief Clayton CUNNINGHAM. His commitment to racing was rewarded with a team with four consecutive years as International Motor Sports Association GTU Champion and a car that now sits in an automotive museum as the most winning automobile in auto racing history.
Ira YOUNG, a real estate developer with a vision, an outspoken advocate of the arts, and a race car driver at heart, will be forever missed by wife Lori YOUNG, son Jason YOUNG of New York, son Clinton YOUNG and daughter-in-law Randi, daughters Jennifer and Susan YOUNG of Toronto, step-son Christopher WENSLEY and daughter-in-law Tatiana of West Vancouver, step-daughter Blair and son-in-law Paul DONALD of Edmonton and step-son Adam WENSLEY and daughter-in-law Laura of Upland, California and grand children Samantha, Jamie, Axel, Morgan, Miya, Dylan and Alejandro.
A celebration of his life with family and Friends will be held at the Capilano Golf and Country Club on Saturday, March 1st, 2003, 420 Southborough Drive, West Vancouver, British Columbia at 2: 00 pm.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made 'In memory of Ira YOUNG' to the Vancouver Art Gallery, 750 Hornby Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6Z 2H7 or to a charity of your choice.

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DONALD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-26 published
CLOSE, Mary Mills Donald
Died peacefully, in her 95th year, in Markham, Ontario, on Sunday, March 23rd, 2003, the beloved wife of the late Edward Robinson CLOSE. She is greatly missed by her son Allan and his wife Sandra, her son Donald and his wife Clare, and daughter Johanna and her husband Bert SPENCER. She is survived and missed by her adoring grandchildren Erin and Grant SPENCER, Alexandrina CLOSE and her husband Ravo LAINEVOOL, Andrew CLOSE and his companion Kristina SMITH, Sarah WRIGHT, Nathalie GLEESON, Paula HUDSON; and her sister Alexandrina (Mrs. P. B. F. SMITH) of Halifax. Mary was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Alexander DONALD of Hamilton and Burlington, sister of the late Mrs. W. E. BOAKE (Ivadell,) the late Mrs. Paul FARREN (Jane,) and the late George E. DONALD. A family service will be conducted at the graveside, Woodland Cemetery, Hamilton, Ontario on March 28th, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m. As an expression of sympathy, donations to the Canadian charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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DONALD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-09 published
BERMINGHAM, Mary Louise (Lou) (née DONALD) -- Died peacefully at her home on Monday, December 8, 2003, in her 75th year, after a lengthy illness, surrounded by her family and assured of their love for her. Predeceased by Bill, her loving husband of 50 years. Reunited with her parents George and Beatrice DONALD. Survived by her children Tim and his wife Candace, Susan (JASPER) and her husband Terry, Patrick and his wife Amy, and Anne, all of whom will so deeply miss her smiles, her warmth and her unfailing cheerfulness. Also survived by her adoring grandchildren Sarah, Christopher, Katie, Hudson, Cabot, Will, Georgia, Carmichael and Alistair. They will always hold her in their hearts as the perfect Granny to them all. Lou will also be greatly missed by her sisters, Joan SINCLAIR and Allison GILBERT, and by her brother, Alex DONALD. Lou embodied the spirit of Christmas all the year and gave her many Friends strength and comfort in their lives. Her gardens and her home were always beautiful and welcoming. The family welcomes all who would like to share their memories of Lou to Otterburn on Thursday, December 11, 2003, from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. A memorial service will be held at Saint John's Church in Ancaster at 11 o'clock a.m. on Friday, December 12, 2003 (Halson & Wilson Streets). In lieu of flowers, donations to Saint John's Anglican Church or to a charity of your choice would be gratefully received.

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DONALDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-13 published
JUNOD, Donaldson Isabel Elizabeth,
87, a Toronto native, died Monday, March 10, in Rhode Island. Mrs. JUNOD was born March 7, 1916, in Toronto to the late E. Victor and Isabel DONALDSON. She and her family moved to New York in 1930. She was married on October 28, 1939, to Charles F. JUNOD Jr., who died in 1975. Mrs. JUNOD is survived by three sons, Charles of Cranston, Rhode Island; Joseph of Arlington, Viginia; and John of Seabrook, New Hampshire; eight grandchildren eight great-grandchildren, and several cousins in Toronto. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., March 22, at Saint Thomas' Episcopal Church, Greenville, Rhode Island. Arrangements are by Tucker and Quinn Funeral Home, Greenville, Rhode Island. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Mrs. Junod's memory to Habitat for Humanity, 121 Habitat Street, Americus, Georgia 31709.

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DONALDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-06 published
MacLEAN, James Hector
Born in Cochrane, Ontario, February 12, 1917 to James and Rose Ellen. Husband of Margaret DONALDSON. Died September 3rd, 2003, suddenly at home. Father of James Duart MacLEAN and Heather Margaret HARRIS. Brother to Mabel Kathleen MacLEAN. Grandfather to Erin, Mark, Nicholas and Andrew. Loved all, loved by all. Cremation has taken place in concordance with Hec's wishes. In his memory, charitable donations may be made to the Friends of Algonquin Park by visiting www.algonquinpark.on.ca

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DONISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-26 published
He was the voice of the land
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation broadcaster oversaw radio programming that connected the country's isolated agricultural and fishing communities
By Carol COOPER, Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, December 26, 2003 - Page R15
It wasn't a great beginning. Racked with nerves during his first on-air stint for a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Winnipeg radio agricultural show in 1944, Bob KNOWLES gabbled the market reports in a record three minutes, instead of the scheduled 10, with the result that his boss had to spend the next seven minutes rereading them.
"I don't suppose anyone made any sense out of anything I'd read," Mr. KNOWLES told the Regina Leader Post in 1981.
Many voice and elocution lessons later, Mr. KNOWLES became an accomplished and well-loved farm broadcaster, who won the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation farm department's Cowhide Trophy for proficiency in broadcasting in 1951 and then rose through the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ranks to become the national supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts.
Mr. KNOWLES, who in that capacity, oversaw programs such as Country Calendar, Country Magazine, Summer Fallow and the daily agricultural noon-hour shows, died in his sleep recently. He was 83.
Farm shows on radio and television offer up-to-date market information, advice on growing crops and raising animals, and news on the latest agricultural research from the universities to their busy and isolated rural audience. In days gone by, when many more Canadians made their living from the land without modern communication methods, radio farm shows were particularly important.
As national supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts, and chair of National Farm Radio Forum's executive committee for a number of years, Mr. KNOWLES contributed to one ground-breaking Canadian show. Launched in the early forties as an adult-education program for farmers, Farm Radio Forum brought farmers, their wives and often their children together in an early version of interactive radio. Gathering weekly throughout the winter in living rooms, kitchens and community halls across the country, they listened to the show's broadcasts.
After hearing a panel discussion, the group discussed questions presented in study guides. A secretary recorded answers, which were sent back to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, some to be aired the following week. Their responses helped shape agricultural policy across the country and initiated several projects, said Rodger Schwass, a former national secretary of Farm Radio Forum and professor emeritus from York University.
As its chair during the late fifties and early sixties, Mr. KNOWLES helped choose show topics and panelists and became involved in one of its projects, Radios for India.
Forums across Canada raised money to help start a radio forum in India, one of several countries, including Jamaica, Belize, Ghana and Nigeria that adopted the Canadian idea. When the head of Indian radio came to Canada for three months to study radio forums, Mr. KNOWLES shepherded him around the country. In turn, Mr. KNOWLES participated in a training program in India. Radio forums became the chief means of disseminating information during India's Green Revolution, which ended up doubling the country's food production.
Robert Gordon KNOWLES was born on February 5, 1920 to Gordon and Catherine Finn KNOWLES on the family's homestead in Rutland, Saskatchewan. The family had settled there from Ontario in 1907, in the town that no longer exists, roughly 160 kilometres west of Saskatoon. Affected by mild cerebral palsy resulting from a difficult birth, Mr. KNOWLES walked with a mild limp and was unable to use his right hand.
Although Mr. KNOWLES wanted nothing more than to become a farmer, his father feared his son's disability would make that difficult. Instead, he encouraged Mr. KNOWLES to continue his education. Upon completing his B.Sc. in agriculture at the University of Saskatchewan in 1942, and with a low service rating because of his disability, Mr. KNOWLES did not enlist during the Second World War. Instead, he completed his master's degree in agriculture at the university in 1944, where he had met Pat APTED, an honours graduate in arts and biology, whom he married in 1943.
With so many men overseas, Mr. KNOWLES had three job offers upon graduation: as a district agriculturalist in Alberta, as a land inspector for the Canadian Pacific Railway, or as a western farm commentator with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. He chose the people's network. "At that time, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation was only eight-years-old and it seemed like a very glamorous position," Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon Daily News in After his first position in Winnipeg, he transferred to Edmonton for a similar job, staying nine months, before returning to Winnipeg as regional farm-broadcast commentator in 1950.
Of his early days in broadcasting, Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon paper, "I made my work pass the following test: Is it of interest and value to the farmer to know about this and why? I think I did all right because I've been criticized equally by all farm organizations at one time or another."
In 1954, Mr. KNOWLES and his family packed up and moved to Toronto, where he became the assistant supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts and 19 months later, the supervisor.
Not only did he manage the section's budget, set its policy and advise regional announcers across the country, but at least once provided the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation with a breaking story.
In 1963, Mr. KNOWLES and most of the network's farm department were on a flight that crashed during landing at Toronto International Airport.
Uninjured, Mr. KNOWLES left the plane to be put into a holding room with fellow passengers. Once there, he demanded to call home to reassure his wife and young family. Granted the privilege, he immediately called the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's newsroom.
In 1967, with a major network restructuring under way, Mr. KNOWLES took a three-year leave of absence to work for the Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome on the development of farm broadcasts.
Upon returning to Canada, he found his job had disappeared. Mr. KNOWLES took the only Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Radio farm commentator's job available, where he reported, wrote and delivered approximately 6,000 broadcasts for Radio Noon in Regina, until his retirement in 1980.
Said Bonnie DONISON, producer of Radio Noon. "Because he was so friendly and warm, people really liked to talk to him and And he held some interesting interviews, once with a trouserless federal minister of agriculture, Otto LANG. Mr. LANG had ripped his pants getting out of a taxi, so he removed them, sent them aside for mending and carried on, recalled Gerry WADE, a fellow farm-broadcaster who worked with Mr. KNOWLES in Regina.
Of his broadcasting career, Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon Daily News, "I can honestly say that during all of my time as a journalist, there never was a day I didn't want to go into work."
Mr. KNOWLES also helped create the Canadian Farm Writers Federation and was inducted into the Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame in 1990.
He died on November 5 in Ottawa. His first wife Pat, predeceased him in 1997. He leaves his second wife Marney, children Tony, Laura, Alan and Janet, seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

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DONOGHUE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-25 published
DONOGHUE, Lynn, R.C.A.
Born April 20, 1953, Red Lake, Ontario. Died November 22, 2003, St. Joseph's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. Lynn leaves to cherish her memory her parents Marjorie (Marni) DONOGHUE, Meaford, Ontario and H. Graham DONOGHUE and his wife Jacqueline, Calgary, Alberta, her beloved son, Luca LANGIANO and his father, Domenico LANGIANO, Toronto, her sister Barbara VAVALIDIS, husband, Stefanos and sons, Alexander and Philip, London, England, her extended family and many Friends.
Lynn was a respected and critically acclaimed artist and portraitist whose strong vibrantly luminous works can be found in galleries and museums across Canada and in private collections internationally. She was elected a member of the Royal Academy of Art in 1991. Lynn was also recognized as an active advocate for many civic and humanitarian causes. She received the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal for outstanding service to the community in 2002.
Cremation has taken place. A celebratory service will be held at Saint Mary Magdeline Anglican Church in January. Date to be announced. Those wishing to remember Lynn may do so by supporting those causes of special interest to her.

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DONOGHUE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-04 published
A painter of real people
Toronto artist sought to get beneath a subject's veneer to achieve a 'luminous presence'
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 4, 2003 - Page R11
'She'll paint you the way she wants," David MIRVISH, patron and art collector, once said of the Canadian portrait painter Lynn DONOGHUE.
"She's sensitive to mood," Mr. MIRVISH, who sat for Ms. DONOGHUE on several occasions, told The Financial Post Magazine in 1984. "She may catch you at a different angle, and not every subject feels that's the way they want to be seen. The important thing is whether it's a successful picture or not. You shouldn't expect to like a portrait."
But what you could expect if you were having your portrait painted by Ms. DONOGHUE is that you would at the very least enjoy the process. Sitting for the Toronto-based painter was like having tea with a lively, old friend.
"You were always chatting about this and that with Lynn," said Father Daniel DONOVAN, an art collector and professor of theology at St. Michael's College in the University of Toronto, who also sat for Ms. DONOGHUE. " She was always vibrant and alive."
Always seeking to get beyond a person's veneer, Ms. DONOGHUE enjoyed the process of trying to draw out her subjects. "She wanted people to [be] open and communicate with her," Father DONOVAN said.
Mr. DONOGHUE, considered one of the pre-eminent portrait painters in Canada, died last month in Toronto. She was 50.
"She made a huge impact [in the Canadian art world] and did so at a very young age," said Christian Cardell CORBET, founder of the Canadian Portrait Academy.
"She was at a stage... where she was just about to take off," Mr. CORBET said. "What she could have contributed was just cut short."
Ms. DONOGHUE started showing her work in 1973. Her early work caused a stir when some galleries refused to show her giant portraits of naked males. Since then she has had countless group shows and solo exhibitions. Her work can be found in the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Ontario Legislature, the National Museum of Botswana, the Vancouver Art Gallery, and several other private and public collections.
Ms. DONOGHUE, who was elected a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in 1991, did both commissioned and non-commissioned portraits. One of her notable commissions was of John STOKES, the former speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.
Last year, Ms. DONOGHUE completed a portrait of Margaret ATWOOD that came was at once celebrated. After approaching the Canadian literary icon to paint her portrait, Ms. DONOGHUE set about to capture Ms. ATWOOD using bright oil colours. In the portrait, Ms. ATWOOD, sits with her legs crossed and looks out at the viewer wearing a vibrant, green shirt.
"She was not afraid of colour," Mr. CORBET said. "She would take it [paint] right from the tube."
Three years ago, Terrence HEATH, the former director of the Winnipeg Art Gallery, wrote in BorderCrossings following an exhibition of Ms. DONOGHUE's work at a Toronto gallery: "Each painting... is a statement in colour. The figures are set in colour fields that tell you as much about the figure as the likeness and body position do. Most remarkable about these paintings is their sheer luminous presence."
"She created honest portraits" and "didn't follow much of a systematic approach to portraiture," Mr. CORBET said. "She allowed her spontaneity and intuition to come through."
Ms. DONOGHUE once said that her historic mentors, such as Frans Hals, conveyed in their portraits the feeling of people who are very alive. "Why do people know, when they look at a painting of mine, that it is a real person?" she told The Financial Post Magazine in 1984. It was one of her perpetual queries into the nature of portrait painting.
Lynn DONOGHUE was born on April 20, 1953, in the small community of Red Lake in northern Ontario, more than 500 kilometres from Thunder Bay. Her father Graham DONOGHUE was a mining engineer who moved his family about, including a spell in Newfoundland. Ms. DONOGHUE finished high school at H.B. Beal Secondary School in London, Ontario She graduated in 1972 with a special art diploma.
Having lived in England and New York as an artist, Toronto was home to Ms. DONOGHUE. She lived with her 14-year-old son Luca in a loft in a converted industrial building in the city's west end. Her loft doubled as her studio. In the cluttered space, some of her paintings hung on the walls and canvases were stacked next to the essentials required for daily living. Living off the sale of her paintings, Ms. DONOGHUE financially scrapped by month to month, her Friends said.
Described as vivacious and gregarious, she was "the life of the party." An active member of the arts community, she could regularly be seen at gallery openings and art shows around Toronto. Outside the art world, she was an active community member. Most recently she helped to organize events for Toronto's new mayor David MILLER during the municipal election. She also attended the Anglican Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, where a painting she had done of her son's baptism hung on the wall.
An exhibit of Ms. DONOGHUE's most recent major work is scheduled to open at the MacLaren Art Centre in Barrie, Ontario, in March. Called the The Last Supper, the large group piece, which Ms. DONOGHUE started in 2001, consists of 13 portraits encircling a central table piece, which is itself a triptych. The installation requires a total wall space of about 5 metres by 10 metres (16 feet by 34 feet).
Father DONOVAN well remembers how he first learned of the project. One day, he received a call from Ms. DONOGHUE asking if he would have lunch with her. She had an idea she wanted to talk to him about. The idea turned out to be the The Last Supper and Ms. DONOGHUE said she needed his help. After their lunch, she invited Father DONOVAN, along with several others, to dinner. While they were eating and drinking, she photographed them, capturing their mannerisms and expressions. From the photographs, she made a series of sketches which she then used to develop the large group piece.
"She loved what she was doing," Mr. CORBET said. "There was this inner drive that said 'go on.' "
Ms. DONOGHUE, an insulin-dependent diabetic, died on November 22 in a Toronto hospital, after suffering from an insulin reaction that led to a coma.
She leaves her parents Marjorie and Graham DONOGHUE, her son Luca LANGIANO and his father, Domenico LANGIANO and sister Barbara VAVALIDIS.

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DONOGHUE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-04 published
Recollections of an artist whose absence is palpable
By OLIVER Girling, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 4, 2003 - Page R11
Lynn DONOGHUE loved to paint pictures, and her favourite subject was the human form.
A spiritual child of the influential David Mirvish Gallery of the seventies, her work was championed by the gallery's owner as well as its director, Alkis KLONARIDIS, when he later opened on his own. This was noteworthy because the Mirvish Gallery's domain had been modernist, abstract painting and sculpture, to the exclusion of almost everything else.
But Lynn's paintings were a kind of hybrid, marrying the flatness and luminous colour of abstract painting to whimsical representations of the figure and face. For painting in Toronto, this was an important step, a bridge between card-carrying abstractionists like Ric Evans and Jan Poldaas and unabashed figurative artists then just starting, like the ChromaZone and Republic collectives and Joanne Tod. Still, historicism doesn't explain or do justice to the brand new species she invented and practised with lifelong consistency.
The subjects of her pictures seem sort of animated, the result of asymmetries that could only be achieved with a live sitter. Not for her the "95-per-cent Kodak, 5-per-cent art" method (Godard's ironic deflation of cinema's pretensions); unlike other figurative painting contemporaries, her use of photographs as aids was minimal.
The result was people in their gawky particularity who look like they're in the middle of living, rather than idealized, Platonic masks. (Look at her portrait of the company Dancemakers when you're in the lobby of the Premiere Dance Theatre in Toronto).
Lucian FREUD needed four sittings from the Queen for his 6-by-10-inch portrait; Lynn needed at least 20 for her 5-by-6-foot works. I know, because I sat for her twice. The first time, in New York in the eighties, she gave me turquoise pants and punked-out hair in the buttoned-down nineties, I'm more Jimmy Olson, cub reporter. Both were exaggerations; she relished using clothing as a sensual and imagist extension of personality.
The experience was energizing and relaxing. Talking non-stop as she painted, and constantly requiring a response, there was no danger of my going slack-jawed (this may be another part of the animation you see in her paintings).
Erudite about art history, she talked about artists and shows, "the biz," she called it; gossiped big-time; interspersed advice recipes; homilies. I felt honoured to be invited into such an intimate situation, to be present at the creation of a work. The final portraits feel to me like the residue of our conversations, souvenirs of 20 or so encounters at two junctures in our lives.
A prolific artist (http: //www.lynndonoghue.com), there is still new work to look forward to. Rumours also exist of a body of watercolour, male nudes that she was working on which, if true, would bring her back to her origins, when she painted lumpen, youthful abstract painters in their full-bodied glory.
In the art community, we're mourning a much-loved friend and colleague. I don't anticipate meeting her ghost at Dundas and Roncesvalles, our common Toronto neighbourhood; on the contrary, it's her absence that's palpable -- her voice especially. It will be felt by her Friends in various communities, at the Gato Nero on College Street where she had morning coffee for 20 years, at a particular pub on Bloor Street, at the high-Anglican church where she prayed.
Absence has always been one of the clearest motifs in Lynn DONOGHUE's work. When abstraction and representation meet, colours, forms and lines that converge provisionally as a face remember a person not present.
A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday at the Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, 477 Manning Ave., Toronto.

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DONOHUE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-19 published
Basketball coach led national team
Saturday, April 19, 2003 - Page F10
Ottawa -- Jack DONOHUE, head coach of the Canadian men's basketball team for 17 years, died Wednesday of cancer. He was 70.
Mr. DONOHUE coached Kareem ABDUL- JABBAR, then known as Lew ALCINDOR, at Power Memorial Academy in New York and had a record of 163-30 from 1959 to 1965. He was the head coach at Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts., from 1965 to 1972 and had a record of 106-66.
Mr. DONOHUE led the Canadian national team to the Olympics four times and won the gold medal at the 1983 World University Games in Edmonton.
He was inducted into the Olympic Hall of Fame and retired from coaching in 1988.
Associated Press

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DONOHUE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-21 published
The soul of Canadian basketball
The coach who led national teams to Olympics, world championships, was a well-loved motivator on and off the court
By James CHRISTIE Monday, April 21, 2003 - Page R5
Jack DONOHUE knew how to win. His underdog Canadian basketball teams won games against National Basketball Association-bound superstars -- and Mr. DONOHUE won every heart he touched.
The former national basketball coach and famed motivator was arguably the most beloved figure in Canadian amateur and Olympic sport. Mr. DONOHUE died Wednesday in Ottawa after a battle with cancer. He was 71.
With his trademark New York Irish accent and gift for telling inspirational and humorous stories, Mr. DONOHUE was the soul of basketball in Canada for almost two decades and led the national team to three Olympic Games and three world championship tournaments.
His great players included a high schooler in New York named Lew ALCINDOR (later Kareem ABDUL- JABBAR;) Canadian centres Bill WENNINGTON and Mike SMREK, who went on to get National Basketball Association championship rings with Chicago and Los Angeles respectively Leo RAUTINS, a first-round draft pick of Philadelphia 76ers in 1983; guards Eli PASQUALE and Jay TRIANO, who is now assistant coach with the Toronto Raptors.
"For all he's done for basketball in this country -- not just with the national team, but with clinics and all his public speaking he should get the Order of Canada," Mr. TRIANO said.
Under Mr. DONOHUE, Canadian teams stayed among the top six in the world for 18 years. Canada finished fourth at the 1976 Montreal and 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and claimed gold at the 1983 World University Games in Edmonton. In the process they beat a team of U.S. college talents that included future National Basketball Association stars Charles BARKLEY, Karl MALONE, Kevin WILLIS, Ed PINCKNEY and Johnny DAWKINS. The monumental win over the United States came in the semi-final. The gold medal match was just as much a stunner, as Canada beat a Yugoslavian team built with members of the world championship squad.
Globe and Mail columnist Trent FRAYNE recorded how the loquacious Mr. DONOHUE had steered the Canucks to the improbable triumph, making them believe in themselves:
"You've got to appreciate how much talent you have," Jack would say, hunkering down beside a centre or a guard or, every now and then, an unwary newshound (Jack is ready for anybody). "You are unique. Think about that: there's nobody else in the world like you. If you want to be happy, try to make other people happy. Hey, if you want to be loved, you must love others. The way to improve is to do something you have never done. Don't be afraid of your emotions. Let 'em all hang out. Emotions are your generator. The intellect is the governor...."
And now, in the seventh month of July, it has all come about just as Jack promised. On Saturday night in Edmonton, his players, Jack's Guys, hoisted him upon their shoulders, and, for once, Jack's jaw was still. Blue eyes blinking rapidly behind silver-rimmed spectacles, white hair tousled, Jack put the scissors to that final strand and held the net aloft.
Coaching was a passion, not so much for the trophies, but for the human victories, personal challenges and little triumphs.
"I remember my father coming home tired and dirty every night. That's not for me. I love what I'm doing, so it doesn't seem like work and never will," he said.
Since retiring as national coach in 1988, Mr. DONOHUE has been the darling of the motivational speakers' circuit. In that regard, Mr. DONOHUE never quit being The Coach. He urged captains of industry to get the most out of themselves and build teamwork among employees as he did his players.
Often, Mr. DONOHUE told them to find opportunity even in the midst of problems: "It's all a matter of attitude. A guy leaves the house wearing his new, expensive suit for the first time, trips and falls in a puddle. He can get up and curse; or he can get up and check his pockets to see if he caught any fish, " he said in an interview with The Globe and Mail before the Los Angeles Olympics.
Mr. DONOHUE, who was born June 4, 1931, received a bachelor's degree in economics at New York's Fordham University and a master of arts in health education before serving with the U.S. Army in the Korean War. He began teaching in American high schools in 1954 and eventually wound up at New York's Power Memorial Academy, where he coached Mr. ABDUL- JABBAR and amassed a 163-30 record.
He later moved up to Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts., before taking the reins of the Canadian program -- at first coaching both the men's and women's teams. Mr. DONOHUE was inducted into the Canadian Basketball Hall of Fame in 1992. He is also in the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame, and was awarded a Canada 125 medal by the Governor-General.
When the National Basketball Association expanded north into Canada in 1995, Mr. DONOHUE became director of international public relations and director of Canadian player development for the Vancouver Grizzlies.
One of Mr. DONOHUE's proudest times in basketball came when Mr. TRIANO followed in his path as a national coach. At the 2000 Olympics, Canada -- with Steve NASH and Todd MacCULLOCH -- finished with a 5-2 record, defeating mighty Yugoslavia once again, as it had in 1983.
"We talked about everything from how to guard guys on the perimeter to dying. I think he's at peace with it," Mr. TRIANO said of his mentor at a recent Raptor practice.
"He taught with humour," Mr. TRIANO said of Mr. DONOHUE's coaching style. "We learned a lot because we were laughing all the time."
A colourful broadcaster, naming names -- at least pronouncing them correctly -- wasn't one of Mr. DONOHUE's many strengths. He didn't earn the nickname "Jack Dontknowho" for no reason, Mr. TRIANO said. "It was always, 'that guy,' or 'you over there,'" he said. "I've seen him struggle to introduce his kids because he couldn't remember their names. He always told me he liked doing colour for the European teams, because no one knew if he wasn't saying their names right."
He travelled the world, but the dearest sight for Mr. DONOHUE was always his own front door, in Kanata, Ontario, where he spent his last days. Behind that door were wife Mary Jane, his six kids and his grandchildren.
"We're asking you to hug your families, extra special, and we're asking you to enjoy life, because we sure did and we still are," Mary Jane DONOHUE said this week.
Somewhere, the busy coach found time for all he needed to do. He used to keep a block on his desk reminding him that there are 86,400 seconds in a day, time enough if he organized himself. Family was a priority. At least five minutes of Mr. DONOHUE's day had to be reserved for hugging his kids. He was a believer in family and in human contact. In his coaching years, when he returned from a road journey, there would be a lineup awaiting him at home, the kids taking their turns to make up for the lost minutes of hugging during his absence.
"I met him at a dance he didn't go to," Mary Jane DONOHUE said in the pre-Los Angeles Games article. "My girlfriend and I went and he had several Friends who were very up on it. But Jack said he'd rather go to a movie and would meet them later. He came through the door as my girlfriend and I were walking out.
"He asked why we were leaving so soon, and said there were two gentlemen he wanted us to meet. He introduced my friend to one of his, then I asked who the other gentleman was supposed to be. Guess who?"
Mary Jane DONOHUE felt trust instantly. "I could have gone across the country with him that night and felt safe. If he's for you, he's for you all the way."

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DONOHUE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-22 published
ARDIEL, Ruth Winnifred (née FRANCIS) 89 years.
Died peacefully at Windsor Regional Hospital-Western Campus on Tuesday, October 21, 2003. Dearest wife of the late J.R. ARDIEL (1973.) Beloved mother of Joan DUFF, Karen MEYERS and Susan and David RUCH. Dearest sister of June and Fred ROEMMELE. Loving grandmother of Melissa MEYERS and Jim DONOHUE, Jay MEYERS and Tina ROBBINS, Allison RUCH and Ryan SMITH, Dave RUCH and Anne Marie PETTINATO, Julie SANDO, and John PECARARO, Jackie and Frank HAMILTON, Michelle and Joe GRECO and Natalie DUFF. Great grandmother of Max and Miranda PECARARO, Scott and Mathew HAMILTON and Kaity and Nicholas GRECO. Dear Aunt to her special nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews. Remembered by several cousins in London and Toronto. Born on a homestead in Marengo, Saskatchewan to the late Anne and Alfred FRANCIS; pre-deceased by brothers Lloyd (1912), Bruce (Royal Canadian Air Force, 1943) and her sister Dorothy HENDERSON (1964.) Ruth was a long-standing member of Beach Grove Golf and Country Club, Windsor and Tamarac Golf and Country Club, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Visiting in the Walter D. Kelly Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1969 Wyandotte St. East, Windsor, Ontario on Thursday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. The complete funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday, October 24, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend William GALLAGHER officiating. Cremation with interment later in Greenlawn Memorial Cemetery. In kindness memorial tributes to the charity of you choice, Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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DONOVAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-15 published
Moira "Molly" BLEA
At North Bay General Hospital, Scollard Site, Saturday, January 12, 2003.
Moira DONOVAN beloved wife of James BLEA in her 76th year. Loving mother of Janet LABRECQUE (John) of Callander and David BLEA (Donna) of Keswick. Lovingly remembered by eight grandchildren, Jennifer CAMPEAU (Jean-Marc,) Joanne TAILOR/TAYLOR (Maxwell), Jeannie KENNEDY (Troy), Stephan, Sara, Adam, Issac, and Aaron BLEA and five great grandchildren, Jessica, Jenna, Molly, Meagan and Kyle. Dear sister of Richard DONOVAN (Marianne.) Dear aunt of Bridget MacKAY (David) and great aunt of Abigail, James and Darcy. Visitation at the McQuinty Funeral Home, Wednesday, January 15 from 1: 30 to 2:00 p.m. Funeral Service will be conducted in the McQuinty Funeral Home Chapel at 2: 00 p.m. Cremation to follow. McQuinty Funeral Home, 591 Cassells St. North Bay, Ont. P1B 3Z8. 705-472-8520.

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DONOVAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
KELLY, Thomas Patrick " Tim" (1922 - 2003)
Tim KELLY of Bromley Avenue, Moncton, died peacefully at the Moncton Hospital on Monday October 27, 2003. He was born in Toronto on October 18, 1922 and was the son of the late Emmett and Barbara (DOLLY) KELLY. Tim worked as a senior executive with Canadian Marconi Company, Montreal, Quebec and a business owner of the electronics distributor Keldon Electronics Limited, Pointe Claire, Quebec. In 1979 he established the Moncton, New Brunswick based consumer electronics retailer, Sounds Fantastic Atlantic Limited. As a business leader Tim had a gift for marketing and financial management. He built a strong business that grew and flourished well after his retirement in 1986, which is a legacy to his sound planning and leadership. He was one of the original believers in the United Way and was an active member of the Elks Lodge of Moncton since 1979. As well Tim served with the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1943-1945. Tim is survived by his wife of 54 years, Ivy Anita (née TRUMBLEY) and seven children: Brian (Lynne ARSENEAULT) of Peterborough, Steve of Dieppe, Jeff (Lila DONOVAN) of Moncton, Brad (Sandra THORBURN) of Edmonton, Scott (Jamie PENFOLD) of Moncton, Jan KOSHYLANYK (Terry) of Ancaster and Jill SMITH (Gary) of Riverview. He will be dearly missed by his 17 grandchildren: Kevin, Autumn, Christopher, Patrick, Jessica, Ryan, Alison, Kieran, Nicholas, Regan, Tyler, Wesley, Stephen, Kaileigh, Brandon, Morgan and Talia, as well his 2 great grand_sons Carter and William. He is also survived by his sisters Bernie KELLY of Beaconsfield and Barbara MURPHY (Ted) Uxbridge, and a brother Paul of Ottawa. He was predeceased by brothers Fred and Jim. Visiting hours will be held at Cadman's Funeral Home, 114 Alma Street, Moncton on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 with parish prayers to be held at the funeral home Thursday evening at 8: 30 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be held from St. Bernard's Catholic Church on Friday October 31 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Peter McKEE officiating. The interment will take place at Our Lady of Calvary Cemetery, Dieppe. Donations to the memorial of the donor's choice would be appreciated by the family. The family would like to thank the staff at both the Dr. George L. Dumont Hospital and the Moncton Hospital for the professional and loving care that they provided to Tim, as well to our family over the last few months. There are truly many angels at both our hospitals. www.cadmansfh.com

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DONOVAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-04 published
A painter of real people
Toronto artist sought to get beneath a subject's veneer to achieve a 'luminous presence'
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 4, 2003 - Page R11
'She'll paint you the way she wants," David MIRVISH, patron and art collector, once said of the Canadian portrait painter Lynn DONOGHUE.
"She's sensitive to mood," Mr. MIRVISH, who sat for Ms. DONOGHUE on several occasions, told The Financial Post Magazine in 1984. "She may catch you at a different angle, and not every subject feels that's the way they want to be seen. The important thing is whether it's a successful picture or not. You shouldn't expect to like a portrait."
But what you could expect if you were having your portrait painted by Ms. DONOGHUE is that you would at the very least enjoy the process. Sitting for the Toronto-based painter was like having tea with a lively, old friend.
"You were always chatting about this and that with Lynn," said Father Daniel DONOVAN, an art collector and professor of theology at St. Michael's College in the University of Toronto, who also sat for Ms. DONOGHUE. " She was always vibrant and alive."
Always seeking to get beyond a person's veneer, Ms. DONOGHUE enjoyed the process of trying to draw out her subjects. "She wanted people to [be] open and communicate with her," Father DONOVAN said.
Mr. DONOGHUE, considered one of the pre-eminent portrait painters in Canada, died last month in Toronto. She was 50.
"She made a huge impact [in the Canadian art world] and did so at a very young age," said Christian Cardell CORBET, founder of the Canadian Portrait Academy.
"She was at a stage... where she was just about to take off," Mr. CORBET said. "What she could have contributed was just cut short."
Ms. DONOGHUE started showing her work in 1973. Her early work caused a stir when some galleries refused to show her giant portraits of naked males. Since then she has had countless group shows and solo exhibitions. Her work can be found in the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Ontario Legislature, the National Museum of Botswana, the Vancouver Art Gallery, and several other private and public collections.
Ms. DONOGHUE, who was elected a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in 1991, did both commissioned and non-commissioned portraits. One of her notable commissions was of John STOKES, the former speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.
Last year, Ms. DONOGHUE completed a portrait of Margaret ATWOOD that came was at once celebrated. After approaching the Canadian literary icon to paint her portrait, Ms. DONOGHUE set about to capture Ms. ATWOOD using bright oil colours. In the portrait, Ms. ATWOOD, sits with her legs crossed and looks out at the viewer wearing a vibrant, green shirt.
"She was not afraid of colour," Mr. CORBET said. "She would take it [paint] right from the tube."
Three years ago, Terrence HEATH, the former director of the Winnipeg Art Gallery, wrote in BorderCrossings following an exhibition of Ms. DONOGHUE's work at a Toronto gallery: "Each painting... is a statement in colour. The figures are set in colour fields that tell you as much about the figure as the likeness and body position do. Most remarkable about these paintings is their sheer luminous presence."
"She created honest portraits" and "didn't follow much of a systematic approach to portraiture," Mr. CORBET said. "She allowed her spontaneity and intuition to come through."
Ms. DONOGHUE once said that her historic mentors, such as Frans Hals, conveyed in their portraits the feeling of people who are very alive. "Why do people know, when they look at a painting of mine, that it is a real person?" she told The Financial Post Magazine in 1984. It was one of her perpetual queries into the nature of portrait painting.
Lynn DONOGHUE was born on April 20, 1953, in the small community of Red Lake in northern Ontario, more than 500 kilometres from Thunder Bay. Her father Graham DONOGHUE was a mining engineer who moved his family about, including a spell in Newfoundland. Ms. DONOGHUE finished high school at H.B. Beal Secondary School in London, Ontario She graduated in 1972 with a special art diploma.
Having lived in England and New York as an artist, Toronto was home to Ms. DONOGHUE. She lived with her 14-year-old son Luca in a loft in a converted industrial building in the city's west end. Her loft doubled as her studio. In the cluttered space, some of her paintings hung on the walls and canvases were stacked next to the essentials required for daily living. Living off the sale of her paintings, Ms. DONOGHUE financially scrapped by month to month, her Friends said.
Described as vivacious and gregarious, she was "the life of the party." An active member of the arts community, she could regularly be seen at gallery openings and art shows around Toronto. Outside the art world, she was an active community member. Most recently she helped to organize events for Toronto's new mayor David MILLER during the municipal election. She also attended the Anglican Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, where a painting she had done of her son's baptism hung on the wall.
An exhibit of Ms. DONOGHUE's most recent major work is scheduled to open at the MacLaren Art Centre in Barrie, Ontario, in March. Called the The Last Supper, the large group piece, which Ms. DONOGHUE started in 2001, consists of 13 portraits encircling a central table piece, which is itself a triptych. The installation requires a total wall space of about 5 metres by 10 metres (16 feet by 34 feet).
Father DONOVAN well remembers how he first learned of the project. One day, he received a call from Ms. DONOGHUE asking if he would have lunch with her. She had an idea she wanted to talk to him about. The idea turned out to be the The Last Supper and Ms. DONOGHUE said she needed his help. After their lunch, she invited Father DONOVAN, along with several others, to dinner. While they were eating and drinking, she photographed them, capturing their mannerisms and expressions. From the photographs, she made a series of sketches which she then used to develop the large group piece.
"She loved what she was doing," Mr. CORBET said. "There was this inner drive that said 'go on.' "
Ms. DONOGHUE, an insulin-dependent diabetic, died on November 22 in a Toronto hospital, after suffering from an insulin reaction that led to a coma.
She leaves her parents Marjorie and Graham DONOGHUE, her son Luca LANGIANO and his father, Domenico LANGIANO and sister Barbara VAVALIDIS.

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