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"DIE" 2003 Obituary


DIEFENBAKER 

DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
He founded Readers' Club of Canada
Nationalist visionary struggled financially to publish Canadian writers
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page R7
In the early 1960s, when writers asked Peter and Carol MARTIN where to publish their manuscripts on Canada, the couple realized how few choices there were. Inspired, the Martins, both voracious readers, staunch nationalists and founders of the Readers' Club of Canada, decided to start their own press. In 1965, Peter Martin Associates came into being. Last month, Peter MARTIN died of lung cancer in Ottawa.
In an industry overshadowed by American companies, Peter MARTIN Associates was among the first in a wave of independent publishing houses to open during a time of rising Canadian nationalism.
Launched in a downtown Toronto basement on a shoestring budget, skeleton staff, idealism and enthusiasm, the company flew by the seat of its pants. Its employees were often young and new to the business. But many, including Peter CARVER, Michael SOLOMON and Valerie WYATT, went on to become Canadian mainstays.
"It really was a time of Canadian nationalism and those of us who believed in that cause could see what Peter and Carol were doing," said Ms. WYATT, a children's editor who spent four years with the company in the seventies.
During the 16 years before its sale in 1981, Peter Martin Associates published approximately 170 works, mainly non-fiction. Its presses put out I, Nuligak, the autobiography of an Inuit man; The Boyd Gang by Marjorie LAMB and Barry PEARSON; Trapping is My Life by John TETSO; and the Handbook of Canadian Film by Eleanor BEATTIE. Others who came through their doors included Hugh HOOD, Robert FULFORD, John Robert COLOMBO, Douglas FETHERLING and Mary Alice DOWNIE -- all to have their works published.
Started with small amounts of seed money from private investors and no government funding, Peter Martin Associates constantly struggled financially. At one point, for a bit of extra cash, the office became the designated nuclear-fallout shelter for the street. Pat DACEY, once the firm's book designer, lugged suitcases of books up the street to sell at Britnell's bookstore with summer employee Bronwyn DRAINIE.
Working at Peter Martin Associates was always fun, Ms. WYATT said. "You went in to work happy and you stayed happy all day."
Still, in a time when Canadian works received little recognition, she remembers finding it difficult to get media interviews for the author of Martin-published book.
Yet another title caused trouble with its subject. The company was putting out a collection of previously published sayings of former prime minister John DIEFENBAKER, called I Never Say Anything Provocative, edited by Margaret WENTE. Mr. DIEFENBAKER heard about the project, called Mr. MARTIN and threatened to sue. Mr. MARTIN stood firm.
"He handled it with such Úlan," said writer Tim WYNNE- JONES, then in the art department. "He was suitably dutiful, but not in awe. Mr. DIEFENBAKER was just over the top, as was his wont."
The book went to press and Mr. DIEFENBAKER did not go to court.
Once listed along with Peter GZOWSKI in a Maclean's magazine article on "Young Men to Watch," Mr. MARTIN was born on April 26, 1934 in Ottawa to a dentist father and a mother who drove an ambulance in the First World War. The younger of two sons, he attended Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario and the University of Toronto, where he earned a degree in philosophy.
During a year in Ottawa as the president of the National Federation of University Students, Mr. MARTIN met his first wife Carol. They married in 1956 and moved to Toronto. Three years later, they founded the Readers' Club in Featuring one Canadian book a month, it distributed works by Mordecai RICHLER, Irving LAYTON, Morley CALLAGHAN and Brian MOORE among others, and supplied its members with coupons. While continuing to run the Readers' Club (sold in 1978 to Saturday Night Magazine and closed in 1981), the MARTINs started Peter Martin Associates.
Throughout his career, Mr. MARTIN spoke out for Canadian publishing. Alarmed by the sale of Ryerson Press and Gage Educational Press in 1970 to American firms, he called a meeting of publishers to discuss problems in the industry. Named the Independent Publishers Association, the group started in 1971 with 16 members and with Mr. MARTIN as its first president. In 1976, it was renamed the Association of Canadian Publishers and continues today with 140 members. As a result of the group's efforts, Canadian publishing began to receive federal and provincial funding.
In the late 1970s, the MARTINs went their separate ways. Afterward, Mr. MARTIN published a small newspaper, The Downtowner, and owned a cookbook store with his second wife, Maggie NIEMI. In 1983, they moved near Sudbury, Ontario, where Mr. MARTIN did freelance book and theatre reviews, then moved to Ottawa in 1985 to work as president for Balmuir Books, publisher of the magazine International Perspectives and consulting editor for the University of Ottawa Press.
After a spinal-cord injury in 1997, Mr. MARTIN was left a quadriplegic, except for limited use of his left arm. Even so, he remained active, maintained a heavy e-mail correspondence and spent time in the park reading while seated in a bright-yellow wheelchair.
Mr. MARTIN leaves his children Pamela, Christopher and Jeremy and his wife Maggie NIEMI. He died on March 15.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-04 published
Died This Day -- Gordon CHURCHILL, 1985
Monday, August 4, 2003 - Page R5
Lawyer, politician, was born in Coldwater, Ontario, on November 8, 1898; veteran of both world wars; 1951, elected to Parliament developed close working relationship with John DIEFENBAKER; 1957, managed his leadership bid; served as minister of trade and commerce, veterans affairs and national defence; died in Vancouver.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Professor played a role in defeat of SSAINTURENT government
By M.J. STONE Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page R5
Nearly four decades after Louis SSAINTURENT had been Prime Minister of Canada, McGill professor James MALLORY was surprised to discover how influential he had been in the defeat of Mr. SSAINTURENT's Liberals in 1957. The revelation occurred in 1992 when the cabinet papers of the SSAINTURENT government, which had been sealed for 35 years, were made available to the public.
Unknown to Professor MALLORY, a radio interview he gave in the wake of the 1957 election had caught the Prime Minister's ear. The Liberals had been reduced to 105 seats in the House, seven fewer than the Conservatives. But the Grits were still in a position to form a minority government with the aid of the 25 elected members of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, later to become the New Democratic Party.
Mr. SSAINTURENT found himself at a crossroads. While his party was clearly in decline, the Conservatives were on the rise and many questioned whether the Liberals still had a legal mandate to govern. When Mr. SSAINTURENT arrived in cabinet that morning, Prof. MALLORY's radio interview was still ringing in his ears.
Prof. MALLORY, who died in Montreal on June 24, said in the interview that if the Liberals continued to govern it would result in a constitutional crisis. He believed it was the responsibility of John DIEFENBAKER and the Conservatives to form a government. The cabinet papers clearly reflect Prof. MALLORY's influence over the Prime Minister that morning. Mr. SSAINTURENT demanded a copy of the MALLORY interview and after carefully studying the radio transcripts, he handed the rule of government over to the Tories.
Highly regarded as the foremost expert in Canadian legal and federal structures, Prof. MALLORY was often called on to advise governments about constitutional procedures. McGill professor Charles TAILOR/TAYLOR said another good example occurred in 1979.
"Joe CLARK's Conservatives had just lost a parliamentary vote," Prof. TAILOR/TAYLOR recalled. "The governor-general, Ed SCHREYER, telephoned McGill's political science department, looking for Jim. It caused something of a stir when he couldn't be found immediately. SCHREYER was frantic for MALLORY's advice. The governor-general was unsure how to proceed.
"Jim was eventually found and consulted. His advice was that the Conservatives should call an election -- exactly what Joe CLARK did."
The son of a county sheriff, James Russell MALLORY was born on February 5, 1916. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of New Brunswick in 1937 and later studied law at Edinburgh and Dalhousie universities.
He met his American-born wife, Frances KELLER, in Scotland, and the couple married in 1940. They had two sons: James and Charles. Prof. MALLORY joined the faculty of the University of Saskatchewan in 1941. Later, he taught at the University of Toronto and Brandon College before moving to McGill in 1946.
A respected scholar and lawyer, Prof. MALLORY was an "old-school" professor who taught at McGill for 45 years. His reputation as a constitutional expert was solidified in 1954 when he published Social Credit and the Federal Power in Canada. The quintessential text mapped out the constitutional parameters of federal/provincial relations.
"James MALLORY was a discreet and modest man," McGill professor Sam NOUMOFF recalled. "He had a profound understanding of morality and he was incapable of self-promotion. He worked on university committee after committee while holding many teaching responsibilities.
"Jim wasn't the sort of man who sought public approval, he just did things because they were the right thing to do."
His son James, who lives in Britain, summed up his father's idealism: "He had a bloody-minded stubbornness. It would manifest sometimes in allowing discussions to go on and on. Then he would do exactly what he intended to do in the first place. Somehow it never impaired his reputation as a genuine democrat."
Prof. MALLORY was the founder of both the Canadian Studies program at McGill and the Canadian Association of University Professors. After retiring in 1982 he was appointed professor emeritus and continued to teach for another 10 years. In 1964, he was elected to the Royal Society of Canada and was later awarded the Queen's Silver Jubilee Medal in 1977.
In 1995, McGill founded the James R. Mallory lecture series, a one-day event that features a special guest who lectures about Canadian issues. Past guests have included Bob RAE, Peter WHITE/WHYTE and Phyllis LAMBERT. The organizers of the event say that this year's lecture will focus on Prof. MALLORY's legacy.
Prof. MALLORY died 11 weeks after the death of his wife on what would have been their 63rd anniversary.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-04 published
Died This Day -- John Cameron PALLETT, 1985
Saturday, October 4, 2003 - Page F10
Lawyer and politician born in Dixie, Ontario in 1921; attended University of Toronto; during Second World War, served with Governor-General's Horse Guards in Italian campaign; 1954, Member of Parliament for Peel; chairman of Canadian delegation to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization; 1960, named parliamentary secretary to prime minister John DIEFENBAKER; 1977 to 1979, bencher of Law Society of Upper Canada.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
Marion CHAMBERS
By Rosemary, Colin and Maralee CHAMBERS, Wednesday, November 19, 2003 - Page A22
Mother, grandmother, wife and partner, teacher, friend, community activist. Born July 23, 1928, in Massey, Ontario Died June 22 in Guelph, Ontario, aged 74.
It seemed fitting that Marion CHAMBERS won the 1994 Ontario New Democratic Party's Agnes MacPhail award for pioneering women. Like MacPHAIL, Marion's roots were in Ontario's Grey County. And like MacPHAIL, she lived life with a strong commitment to social justice, equality and activism.
Born in Massey, Ontario, in 1928, Marion McKESSOCK grew up on a farm in the Depression era. As a child she was a strong student with a flair for reading, creative writing and drama. Marion aspired to be a journalist but as there were few women in the profession at that time, her guidance counsellor (later known to Canadians as Olive DIEFENBAKER) steered her toward teaching. It was a good match. As a teacher, parent and friend, Marion had never-ending patience, an enthusiasm for knowledge, a keen analytical mind and an ability to bring out the best in people.
Marion taught in Inglewood, Guelph and Forest Hill while completing her B.A. at Queen's University during the summers. Her first love as a teacher was English literature and drama and she won awards for her student productions. Even after her formal teaching career ended, Marion continued to pursue English and drama on a volunteer basis. She taught English as a second language to two Vietnamese families who settled in the Erin area and wrote and directed an annual Christmas pageant for the children of Friends and neighbours.
Marion met Cecil, her husband of 46 years, when she taught his younger sister.
Along with their children, Rosemary, Colin and Maralee, they settled in Erin Township. Their busy lives were balanced by gorgeous fall colour, serene winter walks, spring carpets of trilliums and summers of gardening.
While at home caring for her young family, Marion became very involved in her community. She served on the boards of her local arts council, library, home and school association, parks and recreation association, United Church and on the Wellington Dufferin Health Council. Marion was elected to Erin Village Council in 1975 and her many contributions to the community were officially recognized when she was awarded Erin's Citizen of the Year Award.
A long-time member and supporter of the New Democratic Party, Marion became increasingly involved in the party in the late 1970s and early 1980s. She managed campaigns, twice sought election to the Ontario Legislature, served on the Ontario New Democratic Party Executive and was party president from 1982-1984.
Marion loved ideas and debate and was well known for putting her beliefs into action. She was often ahead of her time: recycling long before it was common, offering her own home as a "safe house" before such alternatives were available locally, expressing written dissent in 1988 when her United Church Board voted to deny the ordination of gays and lesbians. She encouraged her children in their studies and careers and enjoyed the lively discussions that ensued when five opinionated family members and frequent guests met around the dinner table.
Marion greeted everyone she met with a warm and engaging smile. Family and Friends looked to her for support.
Marion would have been humbled by the dedicated group of caregivers who were by her side as Alzheimer's disease took its toll. Her husband Cecil, her children and grandchildren, extended family and Friends provided exemplary care and support. As one friend noted in a letter to the family, "great love begets great love."
Rosemary, Colin and Maralee are Marion's children.

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