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"DEN" 2003 Obituary


DENNING  DENNIS  DENT  DENTON  DENURE 

DENNING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-17 published
McCLEARY, John Raymond Walker
Passed away peacefully at Ottawa General Hospital on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 in his 41st. year. Beloved husband and best friend of Lisa, and Super Dad to Matthew and Kelsey. John was involved in an experimental stem cell program for the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis. He died from complications after the successful transplant procedure. John is survived by his parents David and Nancy McCLEARY of Orangeville, his sister Cathy and her husband Ross STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, his mother and father-in-law Clarence and Eva MURPHY of Orillia, and by his sister-in-law Sherry and her husband Dan TEETER, brother-in-law Bill MURPHY and his wife Sherry. Uncle John was always very proud of, Sarah and Jake STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Morgan and Ryan TEETER, Sarah, Megan and Lori MURPHY and will be sadly missed. John was very special to his most cherished friend and ''brother'' Dave DENNING, and his wife Lisa and their children Alex, Larissa and Brent.
''John, We Will Cherish Our Memories Forever, And We Will Always Admire Your Courage.''
''We Love You As Big As The Universe.''
Friends may call at the Dods and McNair Funeral Home and Chapel, 21 First St. Orangeville on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be from St. Timothy Catholic Church, 42 Dawson Road, Orangeville on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Forest Lawn Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy donations to the Ontario M.S. Society or Hospice Dufferin would be appreciated. A tree will be planted in memory of John in the Dods and McNair Memorial Forest at the Island Lake Conservation Area, Orangeville. A dedication service will be held on Sunday September 7, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m.

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DENNIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
DENNIS, Reuben
On Sunday, March 2, 2003 at Mount Sinai Hospital. Reuben beloved husband of the late Helene. Loving father and father-in-law of David and Suzanne, Sheila and Bob. Devoted grandfather of Jeffrey and Lori, Tony and Sari, Leslie and David, Mitchell and Sheryl, Randy and Risa, Cindy, Russell and Michele, and Jennifer. Devoted great grandfather of Matthew, Allie, Sydney, Adam, Rachel, Madeline, Isabelle, Mark, Michelle, Lily, Jacqueline, Gillis, Eric, Jacob, Brett, Rachel, and Ben. Services at Beth Tzedec Synagogue, 1700 Bathurst Street, Monday, March 3 at 1: 00 p.m. Internment at Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Mount Sinai Hospital Foundation at 416-586-8290.

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DENNIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
Jack McCLURE
By Carol BERNEY Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page A22
Painter, tennis player, friend, Perth County Conspirator. Born July 26, 1936, in Troy, New York Died February 13 in Stratford, Ontario, of heart failure, aged 66.
Jack McCLURE never made much money. He lived a simple life, say his Friends, who describe him as a "secular monk." After serving in the U.S. Coast Guard in Miami in the early 60s, Jack attended the University of Miami, played tennis, and hung out at The Flick coffee house, where he met actor/musician Cedric SMITH. In the late sixties Jack accompanied Cedric to Canada, and ended up working in the kitchen of the Black Swan coffee house in Stratford and living at "Puddlewalk, " the communal farm home of the Perth County Conspiracy, a swirling, ever-changing family of draft dodgers, artists, actors, musicians, and local hippies.
Jack was a passionate scholar and creative thinker. Obsessed with Marshall McLUHAN, Jack thought he saw a flaw in McLUHAN's theory, and actually went to Toronto to meet McLUHAN. Unfortunately, McLUHAN brushed him off and Jack came home crushed. For a short while, Jack lived at the (in)famous Rochdale College in Toronto. Jack said he lived on the 14th floor, and would look down and see cop cars converging on the building, but the residents had rigged the elevators to run so slowly that there was always plenty of time to clean up before the police arrived, and people rarely got busted. The other people on his floor were very nice, serious artists and intellectuals, but there were some wilder characters on some of the lower floors, and riding the elevator could be quite an adventure.
Back in Stratford, Jack lived in a caboose on a friend's farm for awhile, and then moved into town to share an apartment with another friend, Harry FINLAY. Jack then worked at the Gentle Rain natural foods store for, essentially, the rest of his life. He also sold paintings to his Friends, and gave tennis lessons. Among his patrons and students was musician Loreena McKENNITT, who said Jack was a very good teacher. His paintings were mostly in a realistically impressionist style, with tiny touches of absurdity and/or social protest. He would add a discarded Coke can to an otherwise idyllic river scene, or paint a nuclear-waste hazard sign on the side of a railroad car or at the back of a cave. One of his paintings was a portrait of Albert Einstein, while another, titled Church of the Muses, depicted Einstein playing the violin, with James Joyce playing piano and Bertrand Russell reciting.
In the last few years, Jack became close Friends with Michelle DENNIS, a co-worker at the Gentle Rain. On the back of a painting Jack gave to Michelle's family he called her two young daughters his "surrogate grandchildren."
This past summer, Jack was diagnosed with lung cancer. He underwent chemotherapy and radiation therapy and was in remission when he suffered a fatal heart attack during a badminton game. Jack left instructions to be cremated, with no service. However, as his long-term friend and employer Eric EBERHART remarked, that didn't mean we couldn't have a party. So the Sunday after Jack's death, many of his Friends and co-workers gathered at his house. We brought food, drink, photographs, and his paintings, and we had an impromptu showing of Jack's work to pay homage to his life and his spirit. His paintings are being archived, and in the spring there may be a showing at one of the Stratford galleries.
In Jack's room, on his work bench, was a quotation from Einstein: "The years of anxious searching in the dark, the intense longing, the alternations of confidence and exhaustion and then -- the final emergence into the light -- only someone who has so struggled and endured could understand." This describes the Jack we knew and loved.
Carol BERNEY is a friend of Jack McCLURE.

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DENT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-21 published
Catherine Lisa DENT
Friday, February 21, 2003 - Page A18
Daughter, sister, partner, aunt, scientist, adventurer, athlete, friend. Born May 11, 1964, in Toronto. Died July 11, 2002, of cancer, aged 38.
I loved it when anyone asked me what my older sister Lisa was up to, as this particular topic was always rich in conversational potential. "Oh, Lisa's teaching my dad to windsurf... Lisa's up at a research station in Algonquin... Lisa's playing Ultimate Frisbee in Pittsburgh and her team is going to the national championships... Lisa's canoeing through the Okefenokee Swamp... Lisa's taking guitar lessons... Lisa's working at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for the summer... Lisa's living in a trailer in the middle of nowhere to study birds... well, that would be Dr. Lisa DENT, now... Lisa's taken up yoga..."
She was the adventurer in our family; she was an independent thinker who followed her own course and persevered until she reached her destination. We often laughed about how, virtually anything we got involved in, Lisa did first.
As a child, she was inquisitive and inventive. She loved the natural setting at the family cottage and one day set about to tame a chipmunk. At home she created board games out of her favourite television shows, such as Hogan's Heroes. She and I would try to find a way for Hogan or Carter to escape, while avoiding Colonel Klink and the Gulag card. We loved watching The Monkees television show together, singing along to the songs. But one day, she said this time, she just wanted to listen carefully to the music. What a wonderful surprise when she gave me my birthday present: a tape of my favourite Monkees songs, secretly recorded from the Television.
Lisa was gifted academically, attending University of Toronto Schools, and winning scholarships to the University of Waterloo, where she studied mathematics, and to Carnegie Mellon University, where she began a PhD, specializing in artificial intelligence. It was representative of her quest for meaningful exploration that, halfway through this program, she decided that ecology was more important to her than teaching machines to think. So she returned to undergraduate studies and then earned a PhD in aquatic ecology at Arizona State University.
At Arizona State University she balanced her academic life with social and athletic activities. With her partner, Russ, and her dog, Shadow, she took advantage of the wonderful physical environment in Arizona through many hours of camping, hiking, rock climbing, and Ultimate Frisbee.
It was during her post-doc at the University of Wisconsin at Madison that Lisa learned she had cancer. The devastating news quickly worsened as later tests showed it was inoperable and had spread to her brain and other organs. She despaired, but resolved not to let despair overcome her. She set out to learn all she could about the disease and how she could fight it by whatever means available. She pushed herself to keep climbing and hiking through the chemotherapy and radiation. When conventional treatments proved ineffective she signed up for experimental trials. Several doctors tried to persuade her it was time to stop treatment, but she was approaching her illness the same way she approached other aspects of her life -- with perseverance, knowledge and understanding. She read widely about death and disease, uncertainty and loss. I believe this understanding allowed her to reach an acceptance of her illness, even as she fought it so hard.
More than anything I wish I could be answering that question: "What's Lisa up to these days?" Especially if my daughters Anglin and Eliza were asking. She would be the strong, smart, brave, amazing aunt who travelled to faraway places, who showed there is more than one path to take, and who, regardless of the circumstances, always kept exploring.
John DENT John is Lisa's brother.

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DENTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-17 published
Hit by bus, bicycling student killed
Police attempting to reconstruct events that led to tragedy in front of high school
By Ken KILPATRICK Wednesday, September 17, 2003 - Page A18
Burlington -- An 18-year-old student was struck by a school bus and killed while riding her bike outside her high school yesterday morning.
Jesica Marie GREEN, a Grade 12 student, was riding her bicycle across a driveway just 30 metres from the front door of Lord Elgin High School when she was struck by a school bus that had just delivered its students and was exiting on to the street.
She was pronounced dead at the scene.
The area in front of the school was busy with students and motorists when the accident occurred just after 8 a.m.
"We all freaked out," said a student who was part of a group standing in front of the school at the time.
"Someone said a person had been hit. She was kind of sprawled out under the bus. A passing car driver ran over and told us to call the police. We all stayed back... no one wanted to go any closer to see what was really going on."
He said it didn't look as if the victim had been wearing a bicycle helmet.
Three hours later, a truck safety officer and staff from the Ontario Ministry of Transportation repeatedly drove the bus from a parking spot in front of Lord Elgin to the New Street entrance. At one point, a woman stood behind the driver and videotaped the view through the windshield.
Dan MARADIN, general manager for Laidlaw Transit Ltd., said he and the company "are deeply saddened by the incident and our thoughts go out to the victim's family and Friends."
The woman driving the bus -- who has not been identified -- was traumatized by the accident, he said, and the company is offering her counselling. "She was a good driver and had been with us for 1½ years."
Mr. MARADIN said the driver had been trained by Laidlaw. Training to operate a school bus comprises 40 hours of classroom and behind-the-wheel lessons.
The Halton District School Board immediately sent its Tragic Event Response Team into the school to offer counselling to those who witnessed the accident.
Students who needed help immediately were called to the school's conference room where the response team waited with cookies and drinks.
One student, in Lord Elgin as the event unfolded outside, said they were told to stay in their classrooms and away from the front of the school.
"The mood inside the school was very sad and there were some tears," she said.
Marnie DENTON, communication officer with the school board, said the response team "is there to help students who witnessed the accident and those who were Friends of Ms. GREEN. They will be at the school for as long as they are needed. They have specialized training and help our students deal with the shock associated with tragedy."

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DENURE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-25 published
DENURE, Frederick Calvin
Died July 22, 2003, age 70, in Lindsay, Ontario, his home since Fred DENURE was a remarkable, generous friend to many and a devoted husband of forty-six years to his one and only Dorothy Ann. His drive, energy and sense of humour will be greatly missed by all who knew him, especially his children Raymond, Steven and Susan. His nine grandchildren have lost a bright spark in their lives
a grandfather whose support and inspiring curiosity showed them that the world is what you make of it.
Fred, founder of DeNure Tours and numerous other business ventures, was an intrepid, inquisitive traveler who always had his eye open for an opportunity or an interesting conversation. Travel was a vocation, but his greatest pleasure was trips taken with his family and good Friends.
The family would like to thank Doctors READY, PERRY, MOULTON and DAVY and the staff at Sunnybrook and St. Michael's Hospital. A very special thanks to the second floor medical south nurses at the Ross Memorial Hospital who ensured that Fred was well looked after in his final days.
A service in celebration of Fred's life will be held at 2 p.m. at Cambridge Street United Church on July 29, 2003 in Lindsay.
Donations in Fred's honour can be made to the Palliative Care Unit at Ross Memorial Hospital in Lindsay.
Arrangements entrusted to Mackey Funeral Home, Lindsay 705-328-2721.

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DENURE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Howard HOAG
By Steven DENURE, Julia WOODS, Michael HOMER, Marty SILVERSTONE Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page A28
Friend, husband, father, rugby player. Born September 17, 1952, in Ottawa. Died June 15, in Toronto, of cancer, aged 50.
Friends experienced a quintessential Howard HOAG moment a few years ago on the dock at a friend's cottage at a remote spot in Georgian Bay. They had an old recurve bow and a quiver full of new arrows, and were taking turns shooting at -- and missing a floating target anchored far out in the bay. As was his lifelong habit, Howard arrived much later than anticipated. He stepped out of the boat with a nautical flourish, and, after being roundly berated for being late and bringing what looked to be only six (warm) beer, he picked up the bow and tested its pull. Then he turned and fired an arrow and hit the previously unthreatened target the first time, with a satisfying thunk, like an exclamation mark at the end of a sentence. In the moment of stunned silence that followed, he gave a withering Hoagian look. "That's how it's done," he said, and picked up his six-pack and his knapsack, which turned out to be full of wine, and headed up the hill, leaving the merry band on the dock properly put in its place.
His Friends spent so much time waiting for him that they dubbed it "Howard time." The wait was always worth it. At every party there was "before Howie" and "after Howie." With his arrival, the conversation always sparkled a little more, the wine tasted better, the room seemed to grow bigger -- plus there was his unique ability to infuriate and/or entertain everybody in the room.
Howard grew up in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, the youngest of four children born to a production manager at the mighty CIP paper mill. As a child he was a Boy Scout, soloist in the church choir and an avid canoeist. He would later tell stories about paddling around the islands in the St. Lawrence River and watching the foam from the mill make the paddles disappear.
His voice eventually changed and, when he got to Montreal's McGill University, so did the songs. Howard studied environmental biology, but his true passion was the game of rugby. In recent years, Howard was best known as the heart and soul of the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club, as well as a key organizer of its annual Robbie Burns night. In Montreal, however, he's a legend: it was his monumental gaffe (he loudly lambasted a group of football coaches while the men in question sat in the next room listening to every word) that led to the creation of the Howie Hoag Award. Since its inception in 1971, "the Hoag" has been given out weekly during the MacDonald College football season to the player who performs the most remarkable misdeed of the week.
We are comforted to know that the last several years of Howard's too-short life were the absolute best. At 48, the classic lad and confirmed bachelor met the love of his life, the incomparable Louise RICH, and her daughter, Odette HUTCHINGS. This perfect trio -- whose adopted nickname was H.R.H. -- did not have anything like the number of years they deserved together, but what they did have was packed with enough love and laughter to fill many longer lifetimes.
Tragically, last Christmas Eve, Howard, who'd battled cancer as a child, learned that the radiation treatment that had saved his life 42 years earlier had probably led to the growth of an inoperable tumour in one of his bile ducts. In early June, Howard was given only a few days to live, but survived long enough to marry Louise and spend another week with his family and the Friends he loved. He also lived long enough to die on the day and at the hour of what used to be his absolutely favourite kind of night: just after midnight on a midsummer's eve with a full moon, which Howard used to say was "God's flashlight."
Steve, Julia, Mike and Marty are Friends of Howard HOAG.

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