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"DAY" 2003 Obituary


DAY 

DAY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-15 published
Maryann Catherine VERNER
In loving memory of Mary Ann Catherine VERNER, June 9, 1939 to January 6, 2003.
Maryann VERNER, a resident of R. R. #1, Evansville, passed away at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Mindemoya, on Monday, January 6, 2003 at the age of 63 years. She was born in Toronto, daughter of the late Wesley and Catherine DAY. Mary Ann was a graduate of the Royal Conservatory of Music, and through her talents as a musician, had a wide range of experience, having played for the Billy Graham Crusade, the People's Church in Toronto, organist at Centennial Rouge Church in Toronto for 10 years, and organist at Lyon's Memorial United Church in Gore Bay for about 12 years. Before her marriage to Harry on December 19, 1959, she had worked as an assistant at CBC, working with Norman JEWISON in Toronto and New York. She had also worked as a secretary for Eaton's and Capitol Records. She also enjoyed handcrafts, but her greatest enjoyment was her music and family. Dearly loved wife of Harry VERNER of Evansville loved mother of Catherine and husband Doug REIMER of Scarborough Gregory and wife Sherry of Sault Ste. Marie James and wife Terry of Burnt River and Amy, friend Paul MILLER of Hamilton. Proud grandmother of Stephen, Jacob, Kari, Justin, Silken, Nathan and Sarah and three great grandchildren.
The funeral service was conducted at the Burpee Mills Complex on Thursday, January 9, 2003 with Reverend Mary Jo Eckert Tracy and Mr. Erwin Thompson officiating. Spring interment in Mills Cemetery.
Culgin Funeral Home

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DAY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-15 published
Donald Alexander DAY
In loving memory of Donald Alexander DAY who passed away peacefully on Tuesday, October 7, 2003 at Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 86 years.
Born to William and Ethel (TRIMMER) DAY on July 18, 1917. Donald fought in WW2. He was a Gunner for the 10th Corp. of the Dragoons. Survived by brother Floyd in Hamilton, predeceased by Florence, Pauline, Harold, Kenneth, Mary. Visitation was held on Thursday, October 9, 2003 with Funeral Service following at Knox United Church, Manitowaning. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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DAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-20 published
MILLMAN, Doris A. (NEWMAN) (née ARNETT)
Always to be lovingly remembered by her large extended family, Doris Angelina (née ARNETT) (NEWMAN) MILLMAN died Sunday, March 9, 2003, at Lindenwood Manor, Winnipeg, at the age of 96. The second oldest of the four children of the late T.L. and Leila ARNETT (née GRANT,) Doris Angelina was born December 1, 1906 in Souris, Manitoba. In 1923 her father moved his appliance manufacturing business to Winnipeg. Doris attended Wesley College, then part of the University of Manitoba, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1927. She played competitive ice hockey for the university women's team, and was an avid tennis player. After university, Doris worked for the Royal Bank of Canada where she met Lincoln R. NEWMAN, also of Winnipeg. They married in 1934. During the Second World War, his career took them, and their two sons, to Calgary and Toronto, and, at the end of the war, to England where Linc ran Royal Bank of Canada's London office and Doris re-established the family. In 1950 they returned to Canada to live in Montreal. After her husband's death in 1955, Doris returned to Winnipeg with family. She became an active member of the University Women's Club. In 1963, Doris married H.T. (Ted) MILLMAN, a widower, engineer, and builder of Canada Safeway stores across Western Canada. After their marriage, his three children became an important part of her life. Doris maintained her home for nearly two decades after Ted's death in 1984. Just three months ago, she moved successfully to an apartment at Lindenwood Manor, where she was happy. While highly capable and independent, Doris always appreciated the care and support of her sister, Frances BOWLES, and her brother-in-law, the late Richard S. BOWLES, former Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba; and since Ted MILLMAN's death, the continued devotion of his youngest child, Alison KENNEDY, whom Doris raised as her own daughter. Doris is also survived by her sons, print journalist Roger NEWMAN (Janice,) Gimli, Manitoba journalist and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television broadcaster, Don NEWMAN, (Shannon DAY,) Ottawa, Ontario; stepsons, architect Hartley Vance MILLMAN (Claudia,) Ottawa, and retired school principal Bob MILLMAN (Linda CHERNENKOFF,) Winnipeg; sisters-in- law Joyce NEWMAN and Bernie ARNETT, Winnipeg; ten grandchildren; ten great-grandchildren and numerous also treasured nieces and nephews. Her memorial service was held in Winnipeg, Wednesday, March 19th, at Westminster United Church where Doris was a member for nearly 40 years. She died on her way to a church service. Doris was cremated and buried at Brookfield Cemetery between her beloved husbands. She was also predeceased by her cherished parents and brothers Tom and Sheldon ARNETT; brothers- and sisters-in-law; daughter-in-law Audrey-Ann NEWMAN and grand_son Lincoln Taylor NEWMAN. Doris Angelina Arnett Newman MILLMAN will be remembered by her family as a cheerful, positive, intelligent, independent and nurturing person. She was caring and compassionate no matter what the circumstances. In lieu of flowers, donations in Doris Millman's memory may be made to the Lincoln Taylor Newman Bursary Fund to assist promising students in need; cheques payable to Queen's University, and sent to the attention of the L.T. Newman Fund, Queen's Office of Advancement, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6.
''Love never ends.'' (1 Corinthians 13: 8)

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DAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-04 published
Kassie (Katharine) TEMPLE
By Colin LEYS Friday, April 4, 2003 - Page A18
A Canadian who served God and defended the poor of New York. Born June 8, 1944, in Port Hope, Ontario Died November 22, 2002, in New York City, from cancer, aged 58.
No one who talked with Kassie TEMPLE for more than 10 minutes could fail to realize that she was one of the more remarkable people they were ever likely to meet.
Kassie was an Anglican who worked in a Catholic organization and wrote regularly for its newspaper. She was a radical social critic, but opposed to all political parties. A passionate seeker after religious truth, she spent long hours studying the Bible in Hebrew. She was a gifted teacher and powerful debater (woe betide anyone who rashly assumed this religious social worker would be easy to outsmart); above all a fearless, tireless worker with the homeless, sick and abandoned people of her quarter of Manhattan.
She was born in Port Hope, Ontario, where her father was bursar of Trinity College School. After high school, Kassie studied religion at McMaster University. From there she went in the mid-1960s to work for the Canadian International Development Agency in Ottawa and then headed off for two years to Sierra Leone in West Africa, looking after Canadian teachers with the Canadian University Students Overseas. She retained several close Friends from the Canadian University Students Overseas contingent.
She returned to Canada, and McMaster, in 1970 to work with the eminent Canadian philosopher George GRANT, writing a doctoral thesis on the French theologian and sociologist Jacques Ellul. In 1975, she began teaching at the University of Manitoba at Brandon.
One day in 1977 she travelled to New York to see Dorothy DAY, who with Peter MAURIN had founded the Catholic Worker, a group dedicated to nonviolence and solidarity with the poor and other victims of capitalist society. Kassie had been introduced to them some years earlier through a friend at McMaster, but this visit proved a turning point.
From New York she called a friend in Brandon and asked her to get rid of all her belongings, and from then until her death she lived in Mary House, one of two Catholic Worker homes in Manhattan's Lower East Side (she remained an Anglican, however one with a lifelong interest in developing closer understanding between beliefs, including between Christians and Jews). She took to wearing cast-off clothes donated by well-wishers, making her famous soups and stews, caring and fighting for anyone and everyone who was underprivileged, poor, sick, or neglected: prisoners in jail, patients in hospital, elderly people trapped in dingy nursing homes. She took time out only to look after her father in Port Hope for his last three years, saying "it's too bad if you can't look after your own father."
Kassie's religious faith was intense, but she had no trace of religiosity. Last year a visitor asked her why she was wearing a Yankees hat back to front. Oh, she explained, it was just a hat that had been donated, "and we're all Mets fans here."
She could have been a professor, a civil servant, or a diplomat. Instead she identified herself with the poor. However unhappy, sick or difficult they might be, they were never people she worked for or did good to; they were family and Friends.
Kassie was diagnosed with cancer early in 2002. After bearing intense pain very bravely she died peacefully at Mary House, surrounded by her Friends. During the three years she had devoted to looking after her father in Port Hope she made the same sort of impact on that small community as she did in New York. A huge congregation attended her funeral service in Port Hope.
She leaves a painful gap but also an inspiring example, for Canadians as well as her much-loved New Yorkers.
Colin LEYS is Kassie TEMPLE's cousin.

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DAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-02 published
O'GRADY, Dr. Walter
Walter died at home of prostate cancer on April 30th, 2003. His love and humour will be sadly missed by wife Jean, daughters Elizabeth, Jennifer and Carrie, sons-in-law Jonathan KEAN and Steven PROBST, grand_son Zachary, sister Patricia DAY and husband Harry, brother Paul and wife Frances, mother-in-law Floss REILLY and all his loving extended family. Born in Hamilton in 1933 and educated at St. Michael's College, Walter held a variety of jobs in Hamilton and Southern Ontario before returning to graduate school in Toronto. Thereafter he was a professor of English at the University of Toronto, serving as assistant chair of the English department for nine years, and becoming known both for his stimulating lectures and for his aplomb in managing a large and turbulent department. The family extends thanks to the palliative care team, nurses, and personal support workers who helped to ease his difficult last months. As Walter is donating his body to medical science there will be no funeral, but Friends may call at 487 Briar Hill Avenue, Toronto, on Sunday May 4th from 3 to 5 p.m. The Department of English will arrange a gathering later. Donations in Walter's name to a charity of your choice would be appreciated in lieu of flowers.

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DAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Katherine (Kae) PLAUNT
Died peacefully at York Extendicare, Sudbury, on May 9, 2003 in her 90th year, with her children at her side. Cherished daughter of the late Mildred and W.B. PLAUNT. Predeceased by her loving husband, Dr. R. MacKay THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON in 1981. Dearly remembered by her children: Andy (Mandy TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Toronto, Kathie THOMAS (Richard,) Judy MAKI (Tom) and Robin (Mary Lou McKINLEY) of Sudbury. Adored Nana to Allen DAY (Erin CAMERON), Andy DAY (Carla GIUSTO), Kathy, Jodi, Alex, Nikki, Fraser, Michael, Jamie, Scott and great-grandmother to Alexander. Beloved sister of Marian MAHAFFY (Guy, predeceased,) Bill PLAUNT, predeceased (Agnes,) Helen VOLLANS (Maurice, predeceased,) Donald PLAUNT, predeceased, Royal Canadian Air Force, World War 2 and Jean BENNESS, predeceased (Barry, predeceased.) Loving sister-in-law to George WRIGHT of Hanover, Ruth LAWS of Almonte, Murray THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Ottawa and Muriel VALENTIN of Stuttgart, Germany. Auntie Kae will be fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews and their families in the PLAUNT and THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON clans.
Born in Renfrew on April 29, 1914, she moved to Sudbury in 1924 where her father established his lumber business. She attended Central Public and Sudbury High School, Branksome Hall and graduated from the School of Nursing, University of Toronto, in 1937. After working in Toronto in public health, she returned to Sudbury the following year where she met and married Mac.
Kae loved to golf and curl, and took an avid interest in her family's history. She was very talented in the traditional arts, enjoying knitting, quilting and cooking. As an active community volunteer, she belonged to the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire where she was Regent and to the Salvation Army as an organizer for the annual fund raising drive and board member. She loved to travel with her husband and Friends, but her favourite place in the world was Lake Pogamasing where her parents established a family camp in 1941 and where she spent every summer with her family. She loved to entertain her Friends and her children's Friends, especially at Pog. We were blessed to have a mother and grandmother who stressed the importance of family, community and responsibility. She loved to bring people together and do things for them, to share her interests and her talents, she was kind and considerate to all she met, and along with Dad taught us how to dance and have fun.
Special thanks from the family to Dr. Reg KUSNIERCZYK and his staff, the Walford staff and Dr. ROCH and staff on the fifth floor of York Extendicare for their devoted and caring attention to Mother.
In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to Young Men's Christian Association Sudbury.
Memorial service in the R.J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury, Tuesday, May 13th, 2003 at 11: 30 a.m. Cremation followed by interment at Lake Pogamasing. Friends may call 6-9 p.m. Monday, or gather in the chapel after 11 a.m. Tuesday.

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DAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-27 published
Haldane Ellis McCLARY
By Glenda DAY Tuesday, May 27, 2003 - Page A22
Veteran, wood carver, husband, father, stepfather, grandfather. Born April 18, 1924, in Tracey, New Brunswick Died March 27 in London, Ontario, of esophageal cancer, aged 79.
'I know where I am, and I know who you are. But, I prefer the quiet." These were the last words Hal uttered to me before falling into unconsciousness. While his body slowly collapsed under myriad stresses, his mind had remained lucid.
Born on a farm, Hal was the youngest of eight children. His father was a surveyor who travelled extensively and this left Hal, the only remaining male, responsible for the farm.
At 17, Hal lied about his age and enlisted in the Canadian army. He was a proud soldier and the recipient of four medals. Normally a spirited storyteller, Hal was reluctant to talk about the war, saying the horrors of war were too much to bear and that a civilian would neither understand, nor be able to cope with, hearing about such atrocities. Near the end of his life, however, Hal opened up slightly and told of a particularly brutal battle where he and two other privates were the only ones to survive. After the war, Hal visited some of the families of the lost soldiers.
Upon returning to civilian life, Hal relocated to London, Ontario, where he met Mae. They married in 1946 and had two daughters, Sharon and Lynn.
Hal was employed for 20 years at Eaton Automotive, and then at Proto Tools for 11 years. He took early leave, but finding retirement too quiescent, Hal became a security guard at Fanshawe College. A member of the Canadian Auto Workers for more than 30 years, Hal was a staunch union supporter and often visited the union hall to share stories over beer.
Following Mae's death, Hal met Vera in 1984. They married and purchased a house together, where Hal spent the balance of his years.
The fighting instinct that helped Hal survive the Second World War was the same force that carried him through life. Upon returning from holiday in Puerto Vallarta in 1985, he told of a monkey that had been trained to entertain tourists. It soon became apparent the monkey had also been trained to steal wallets; when it took Hal's wallet, Hal chased it along the beach. Grabbing its tail, Hal retrieved his wallet and dragged the monkey back down the beach where he apprehended the trainer and told him off in a most threatening manner. Hal went on to enjoy his holiday (with the exception of Montezuma's revenge!)
Hal was a voracious reader and a passionately opinionated man. His interests included Native peoples, and Canadian and American history. He was a self-professed war-trivia expert, and he loved hunting, fishing, and playing cards. His annual hunting and fishing expedition lasted a month, but Hal would spend the ensuing 11 months discussing the ones that got away. While family members knew of his adventures almost well enough to tell the stories themselves, Hal always found a receptive ear in his grandchildren. His most memorable vacation was the one that he and Vera spent driving through the mountain passes and pristine wilderness of Yukon and Alaska.
Hal was also an avid wood carver. Decked out in a plaid shirt, work pants, suspenders, and a baseball cap (his lifelong uniform), he whittled away in the garage on his latest creation. Everyone who knew him was the recipient of a birdhouse, wishing well, animal carving or garden cart, cut from fir or poplar.
He kept a fire going in the garage wood stove almost year-round, and this became Hal's haven from the rest of the world. I came to realize that, like the rest of us, Hal was searching for a personal world of peace as he travelled the journey of life.
Glenda DAY is Hal's stepdaughter.

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