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"DAW" 2003 Obituary


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DAWES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-02 published
FERGUSON, Angus Harold
died March 31, 2003, at Cambridge Memorial Hospital peacefully, and surrounded by his family. He leaves his wife Alice (BAILEY) of 61 years in April 2003, and five children - Ian (Connie), Waterloo; Sharon (Horst) WOHLGEMUT, Kingston; Hugh, Guelph Grant (Karen), Cambridge; and Janet BABCOCK, Toronto. He will be sincerely missed by 11 grandchildren. Angus was born in Killean, Puslinch Township, Ontario, on March 13, 1918, the eldest of three boys, to Marshall and Nellie (Amy) FERGUSON. He was predeceased by his parents and brother Donald (1975) and is survived by his brother, Ian (Millie) of London. He attended Killean Public School, Galt Collegiate Institute, and farmed until 1942 when, for health reasons, he and his wife moved to Toronto. In 1949 he returned to Galt and shortly thereafter became operator then owner of the Credit Bureau of Galt, later Cambridge, where he along with his wife continued in business until the '80's when the business was sold to his son Hugh. During those years he served as Director of the Associated Credit Bureau of Ontario, then Canada, and U.S.A. Associations and later as President of Ontario and Canada. He served on several committees of the City of Galt and Cambridge over the years. He was a member of the Galt Lions Club since 1952, as President and Director as well as bulletin editor for over 20 years. His main interest in the Lions Club was eye-sight conservation for which he received the Helen Keller award, and was the first in the Galt Club to be honoured with the Melvin Jones Award. He was also, involved in Heart and Stroke from its' beginning in the Galt unit and was its' first Treasurer. Angus was a member of Knox's Galt Presbyterian Church for over 50 years, and served on the Board of Managers as secretary for 17 years, was a longtime elder, and worked on many committees - special among them to him was as a member of the Scout and Group committee where he served for many years. Above all else, Angus was an ardent fisherman and hunter, and always enjoyed being able to say he had ''dipped his line in most areas of Canada from Coast to Coast''. His other main interest was the Clans and Scottish Societies of Canada and North America and most particularly - the Ferguson Clan - serving 25 years as Regional Director of Ontario and as President of Clan Ferguson of Canada and North America. He had been a Clan member in Scotland since 1948. He was a participant in the Multicultural movement for Cambridge from the inception and was able to get the first grant for it through his association with a member of a Toronto member of Clan Ferguson Society of Canada. Ill health followed him through his lifetime. He was a very early recipient of open heart surgery in 1959. He held a deep interest in the progress made in his area and felt it a great honor to be asked to be a part of the Heart and Stroke Foundation when it first started a chapter in his area. Friends will be received at Coutts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 96 St. Andrews, Street, Cambridge (www.funeralscanada.com) on Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. and Friday at the church from 1: 30 p.m. until the service time of 2: 30 p.m. Funeral Services will then be conducted at Knox's Galt Presbyterian Church, Queen's Square, Cambridge on Friday, April 4, 2003, at 2: 30 p.m. with Rev. Wayne DAWES officiating. Interment Killean Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Knox's Galt Presbyterian Church (Major Repair Fund) or the Regional Heart and Stroke Foundation would be gratefully received.

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DAWES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
BROWN, Kenneth, M.D., C.M., (F.R.C.S.C)
Born 1924 in Montreal, Québec, died November 18, 2003, North Bay, Ontario. Lovingly remembered by his wife, Toni and his children, Susan (Don) PRIEBE of North Bay, Pam (Tom) DAWES of Thunder Bay, Ken (Rose) BROWN of Port Perry, Heather ROBERTSON of Calgary, Alison (Bruce) MILLAR of Canmore, Toni BROWN (Dick AVERNS) of Vancouver, and Meredith BROWN (Ronnie DREVER) of Montreal. Especially loved by his grandchildren, Sarah, Nik, Heidi, Kim, Lisa, Eric, Graeme, Laura, Evan, Geoff, Cam, Aidan, Riley, Nelson, Brooke, and Lily. Also survived by his brother, James (Jean) BROWN of South Carolina. Friends may call at the Martyn Funeral Home, 464 Wyld Street, North Bay, on Thursday, November 20, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday November 21, 2003, at Christ Church Anglican, Vimy Street, North Bay. If desired, donations to the Parkinson Society Canada would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.
Husband * Father * Grandpa * Friend * Surgeon
We'll miss you

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DAWKINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-21 published
The soul of Canadian basketball
The coach who led national teams to Olympics, world championships, was a well-loved motivator on and off the court
By James CHRISTIE Monday, April 21, 2003 - Page R5
Jack DONOHUE knew how to win. His underdog Canadian basketball teams won games against National Basketball Association-bound superstars -- and Mr. DONOHUE won every heart he touched.
The former national basketball coach and famed motivator was arguably the most beloved figure in Canadian amateur and Olympic sport. Mr. DONOHUE died Wednesday in Ottawa after a battle with cancer. He was 71.
With his trademark New York Irish accent and gift for telling inspirational and humorous stories, Mr. DONOHUE was the soul of basketball in Canada for almost two decades and led the national team to three Olympic Games and three world championship tournaments.
His great players included a high schooler in New York named Lew ALCINDOR (later Kareem ABDUL- JABBAR;) Canadian centres Bill WENNINGTON and Mike SMREK, who went on to get National Basketball Association championship rings with Chicago and Los Angeles respectively Leo RAUTINS, a first-round draft pick of Philadelphia 76ers in 1983; guards Eli PASQUALE and Jay TRIANO, who is now assistant coach with the Toronto Raptors.
"For all he's done for basketball in this country -- not just with the national team, but with clinics and all his public speaking he should get the Order of Canada," Mr. TRIANO said.
Under Mr. DONOHUE, Canadian teams stayed among the top six in the world for 18 years. Canada finished fourth at the 1976 Montreal and 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and claimed gold at the 1983 World University Games in Edmonton. In the process they beat a team of U.S. college talents that included future National Basketball Association stars Charles BARKLEY, Karl MALONE, Kevin WILLIS, Ed PINCKNEY and Johnny DAWKINS. The monumental win over the United States came in the semi-final. The gold medal match was just as much a stunner, as Canada beat a Yugoslavian team built with members of the world championship squad.
Globe and Mail columnist Trent FRAYNE recorded how the loquacious Mr. DONOHUE had steered the Canucks to the improbable triumph, making them believe in themselves:
"You've got to appreciate how much talent you have," Jack would say, hunkering down beside a centre or a guard or, every now and then, an unwary newshound (Jack is ready for anybody). "You are unique. Think about that: there's nobody else in the world like you. If you want to be happy, try to make other people happy. Hey, if you want to be loved, you must love others. The way to improve is to do something you have never done. Don't be afraid of your emotions. Let 'em all hang out. Emotions are your generator. The intellect is the governor...."
And now, in the seventh month of July, it has all come about just as Jack promised. On Saturday night in Edmonton, his players, Jack's Guys, hoisted him upon their shoulders, and, for once, Jack's jaw was still. Blue eyes blinking rapidly behind silver-rimmed spectacles, white hair tousled, Jack put the scissors to that final strand and held the net aloft.
Coaching was a passion, not so much for the trophies, but for the human victories, personal challenges and little triumphs.
"I remember my father coming home tired and dirty every night. That's not for me. I love what I'm doing, so it doesn't seem like work and never will," he said.
Since retiring as national coach in 1988, Mr. DONOHUE has been the darling of the motivational speakers' circuit. In that regard, Mr. DONOHUE never quit being The Coach. He urged captains of industry to get the most out of themselves and build teamwork among employees as he did his players.
Often, Mr. DONOHUE told them to find opportunity even in the midst of problems: "It's all a matter of attitude. A guy leaves the house wearing his new, expensive suit for the first time, trips and falls in a puddle. He can get up and curse; or he can get up and check his pockets to see if he caught any fish, " he said in an interview with The Globe and Mail before the Los Angeles Olympics.
Mr. DONOHUE, who was born June 4, 1931, received a bachelor's degree in economics at New York's Fordham University and a master of arts in health education before serving with the U.S. Army in the Korean War. He began teaching in American high schools in 1954 and eventually wound up at New York's Power Memorial Academy, where he coached Mr. ABDUL- JABBAR and amassed a 163-30 record.
He later moved up to Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts., before taking the reins of the Canadian program -- at first coaching both the men's and women's teams. Mr. DONOHUE was inducted into the Canadian Basketball Hall of Fame in 1992. He is also in the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame, and was awarded a Canada 125 medal by the Governor-General.
When the National Basketball Association expanded north into Canada in 1995, Mr. DONOHUE became director of international public relations and director of Canadian player development for the Vancouver Grizzlies.
One of Mr. DONOHUE's proudest times in basketball came when Mr. TRIANO followed in his path as a national coach. At the 2000 Olympics, Canada -- with Steve NASH and Todd MacCULLOCH -- finished with a 5-2 record, defeating mighty Yugoslavia once again, as it had in 1983.
"We talked about everything from how to guard guys on the perimeter to dying. I think he's at peace with it," Mr. TRIANO said of his mentor at a recent Raptor practice.
"He taught with humour," Mr. TRIANO said of Mr. DONOHUE's coaching style. "We learned a lot because we were laughing all the time."
A colourful broadcaster, naming names -- at least pronouncing them correctly -- wasn't one of Mr. DONOHUE's many strengths. He didn't earn the nickname "Jack Dontknowho" for no reason, Mr. TRIANO said. "It was always, 'that guy,' or 'you over there,'" he said. "I've seen him struggle to introduce his kids because he couldn't remember their names. He always told me he liked doing colour for the European teams, because no one knew if he wasn't saying their names right."
He travelled the world, but the dearest sight for Mr. DONOHUE was always his own front door, in Kanata, Ontario, where he spent his last days. Behind that door were wife Mary Jane, his six kids and his grandchildren.
"We're asking you to hug your families, extra special, and we're asking you to enjoy life, because we sure did and we still are," Mary Jane DONOHUE said this week.
Somewhere, the busy coach found time for all he needed to do. He used to keep a block on his desk reminding him that there are 86,400 seconds in a day, time enough if he organized himself. Family was a priority. At least five minutes of Mr. DONOHUE's day had to be reserved for hugging his kids. He was a believer in family and in human contact. In his coaching years, when he returned from a road journey, there would be a lineup awaiting him at home, the kids taking their turns to make up for the lost minutes of hugging during his absence.
"I met him at a dance he didn't go to," Mary Jane DONOHUE said in the pre-Los Angeles Games article. "My girlfriend and I went and he had several Friends who were very up on it. But Jack said he'd rather go to a movie and would meet them later. He came through the door as my girlfriend and I were walking out.
"He asked why we were leaving so soon, and said there were two gentlemen he wanted us to meet. He introduced my friend to one of his, then I asked who the other gentleman was supposed to be. Guess who?"
Mary Jane DONOHUE felt trust instantly. "I could have gone across the country with him that night and felt safe. If he's for you, he's for you all the way."

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DAWSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Nelda May MONTGOMERY
In loving memory of Nelda May MONTGOMERY, September 13, 1913 - January 5, 2003.
Nelda MONTGOMERY, a resident of Spring Bay, passed away peacefully at her residence on Sunday, January 5, 2003, at the age of 89 years. She was born at Grimesthorpe, daughter of the late Neil and Pearl (LEWIS) McALLISTER. Nelda had operated Dawson's Resort from 1935 until 1982. Her hobbies included quilting, driving, picking raspberries, and most of all, going to yard sales.
Nelda was predeceased by her first husband Robert DAWSON in June of 1957. She later married Colin MONTGOMERY who predeceased November 1982. Dearly loved mother of James and daughter-in-law Myrtle DAWSON of Spring Bay. Proud grandmother of Marilyn, Sylvia (Doug ORFORD,) Paul, Murray (Dawn) all of Spring Bay and David of London and great grandchildren Bruce, Rodney and Sarah ORFORD and Rebecca and Alexander DAWSON. Dear sister of Dorothy DOBRANSKI of Little Current, Calvin (Winnifred) McALLISTER of Azilda and Marie (Richard) LAVOIE of Sudbury. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by brothers Gordon and Elgin and brother-in-law Michael DOBRANSKI.
Friends called at the Culgin Funeral Home on Tuesday, January 7, 2003. The funeral service will be conducted in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel on Wednesday, January 8, 2003 with Reverend Frank HANER officiating. Spring interment in Grimesthorpe Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Culgin Funeral Home.

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DAWSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-26 published
Mary-Ann Elizabeth DAWSON
In loving memory of Mary-Ann Elizabeth DAWSON. A graduate of Ontario Ladies College, B. A. in Sociology, University of Toronto, Director of Social Assistance, Community Services and Housing Department, York Region. Peacefully with her family by her side on Friday, February 21, 2003 at the age of 52. Mary-Ann, beloved wife of Patrick. Loving mother of Tracy ATKINS and loving step-mother of Tammy BOUCHARD and her husband Michael, Julie and Matthew. Proud grandmother of Shelby. Loving daughter of Alma McDOUGALL and the late Lauchlan McDOUGALL of Gore Bay. Dear sister of Ross McDOUGALL and his wife Deone and Connie TURNER. Dear sister-in-law of Michael and Elizabeth DAWSON. Loving aunt of Kyle, Neil, Nicole, Cole, Peter and Katie. Mary-Ann will be deeply missed by many Friends and family. A funeral service takes place on Wednesday, February 26 at the Aurora United Church. Arrangements entrusted to the Thompson Funeral Home, Aurora. 905-727-5421. A memorial service will be held in the spring in Gore Bay followed by an interment at the Gordon Cemetery, Manitoulin Island.

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DAWSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
FRANCIS, Elizabeth DAWSON
Betty passed away peacefully at home on February 17, 2003 in her 85th year. Cherished wife of the late Al FRANCIS and much-loved mother of Bob and wife Barb, John and wife Cathy, and Jane and husband Dave. Devoted grandmother to Shaun, Kyle, Nicole, Diane and Bill, and loving sister and aunt to twin Barbara GILMOUR, husband Doug and all their family. Betty's love of family is a rich legacy that she has left to us all. Her zest for life and keen caring for others greatly touched all who knew her. We wish to thank the wonderful staff at 4 Teddington Park, your care was exceptional. A private family memorial will be held to celebrate Betty's life. Donations to Alzheimer Society Toronto, 2323 Yonge Street, Suite 500, Toronto, Ontario M4P 2C9 would be appreciated.

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DAWSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
DAWSON, Mary-Ann Elizabeth
Graduate of Ontario Ladies College, B.A. in Sociology University of Toronto, Director of Social Assistance, Community Services and Housing Department York Region. Peacefully with her family by her side on Friday, February 21, 2003 at the age of 52. Mary-Ann, beloved wife of Patrick. Loving mother of Tracy ATKINS and loving step-mother of Tammy BOUCHARD and her husband Michael, Julie and Matthew. Proud grandmother of Shelby. Loving daughter of Alma McDOUGALL and the late Lauchlan McDOUGALL of Gore Bay. Dear sister of Ross McDOUGALL and his wife Deone and Connie TURNER. Dear sister-in-law of Michael and Elizabeth DAWSON. Loving aunt of Kyle, Neil, Nicole, Cole, Peter and Katie. Mary-Ann will be deeply missed by many Friends and family. Visitation will be held on Tuesday from 2-3 and 7-9 p.m. at the Thompson Funeral Home, 29 Victoria Street, Aurora, 905-727-5421. A Funeral Service will be held on Wednesday at 1 p.m. at the Aurora United Church, 15186 Yonge Street, Aurora. A Memorial Service will be held in the spring in Gore Bay followed by an interment a the Gordon Cemetery, Manitoulin Island. Memorial donations may be made to the York Region Breast Cancer Society or Sunnybrook Cancer Clinic.

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DAWSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
HOWARD, Barbara Lynn (DAWSON)
Known as Gram since the first of her 10 beloved grandchildren were born 25 years ago - died secure in the love of her family on Thursday, April 17, 2003.
Barbara will always be the much-loved wife and a fantastic ''first mate'' for William A. E. (Ted) HOWARD, her husband of 54 years. The two led shipwatching expeditions for their grandchildren from ''Terraho'', a home they built themselves on the Thousand Islands Parkway in Mallorytown Landing after sailing the high seas together in the ''Barbaelia''.
Barbara was also the wonderful and proud mother of Alexander, Peter, Stephen, Darrell, Christine and Timothy, who died in 1990 and welcomes her now. Born into the musical and artistic DAWSON family of Toronto Barbara will be missed every day by her surviving siblings, brother Donald DAWSON of Sherwood Park, Alberta., and sister Darrell (DAWSON) HOWARD of Nanaimo, British Columbia, as well as by all the members of the DAWSON and HOWARD families, and her many Friends.
Instead of flowers, Barbara's family suggests a contribution to St. Peter's Anglican Church Choir, or to a charity of special meaning to you and your family. They also ask you to bring your best singing voices to a service to celebrate her life on Saturday, April 26th at 2 p.m., to be held in St. Peter's Anglican Church in Brockville.

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DAWSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-24 published
HOWARD, Barbara Lynn (DAWSON)
Known as Gram since the first of her 10 beloved grandchildren were born 25 years ago - died secure in the love of her family on Thursday, April 17, 2003.
Barbara will always be the much-loved wife and a fantastic ''first mate'' for William A. E. (Ted) HOWARD, her husband of 54 years. The two led shipwatching expeditions for their grandchildren from ''Terraho'', a home they built themselves on the Thousand Islands Parkway in Mallorytown Landing after sailing the high seas together in the ''Barbaelia''.
Barbara was also the wonderful and proud mother of Alexander, Peter, Stephen, Darrell, Christine and Timothy, who died in 1979 and welcomes her now. Born into the musical and artistic DAWSON family of Toronto Barbara will be missed every day by her surviving siblings, brother Donald DAWSON of Sherwood Park, Alberta., and sister Darrell (DAWSON) HOWARD of Nanaimo, British Columbia, as well as by all the members of the DAWSON and HOWARD families, and her many Friends.
Instead of flowers, Barbara's family suggests a contribution to St. Peter's Anglican Church Choir, or to a charity of special meaning to you and your family. They also ask you to bring your best singing voices to a service to celebrate her life on Saturday, April 26th at 2 p.m., to be held in St. Peter's Anglican Church in Brockville.

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DAWSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-04 published
News editor was expert adventurer
Globe journalist was known for attention to detail, knife-sharp instincts and wit
By Luma MUHTADIE Monday, August 4, 2003 - Page R5
In The Globe and Mail newsroom, he was known as "Snapper."
Some say it was because Alan DAWSON could get to the heart of a story or make a headline decision in a snap. Others say it was because he demanded instant action from those around him. And a few refer to his getting a little "snappish" around deadline.
Whatever the take on his nickname, Mr. DAWSON was seen by all as a small and quirky, yet assertive newsman, with knife-sharp instincts, a keen attention to detail and a biting wit.
Mr. DAWSON died in his sleep last Sunday -- at the age of 86 two days after checking into Nanaimo General Hospital with undetected bronchial cancer.
During his 34-year tenure at The Globe, Mr. DAWSON worked his way up the chain of command from senior slot man, reigning over the editing process, to news editor and then assistant managing editor. During his last few years at The Globe he helped choose and implement the computer system that made The Globe the first Canadian newspaper to enter the technological age.
Mr. DAWSON is best remembered for his gifts as a news editor on the front lines.
"He had incredible instincts," said Clark DAVEY, who worked with Mr. DAWSON for 27 years at The Globe and Mail. "You could put a pile of stories in front of him and he'd pick out the four or five most important ones -- and he was right 99 per cent of the time," Mr. DAVEY said.
As deadline approached one evening in the 1960s, Mr. DAWSON picked up a review, written by the paper's drama critic Herbert WHITTAKER, of a production of Oklahoma! at the Royal Alexandra Theatre. Mr. WHITTAKER's first line was an admission that the musical had been revived so many times that there was nothing left to say. So Mr. DAWSON cut only the first sentence off and ran it to print.
When Mr. WHITTAKER saw his one-line review the following morning, he was livid.
But the phones started ringing and letters poured in, congratulating Mr. WHITTAKER for his witty criticism of the playhouse for overloading its bill with revivals.
Mr. DAWSON was also an adventurer outside the newsroom, with a passion for fishing and game hunting. As a news editor his pages often featured obscure articles on these hobbies, and he wrote a weekly hunting column for The Globe.
In a detailed, first-person account of an expedition in the Northwest Territories, published on September 25, 1959, Mr. DAWSON proudly described travelling "nearly 6,000 miles in one week by car, train, airliner, truck, bush plane, outboard skiff, musking buggy and on foot" to become "the first successful wild buffalo hunter of the 20th century."
Prior to that trip (and since 1893), the government had banned buffalo hunting because Canadian herds had dwindled almost to extinction. But a spill of thousands of animals from Wood Buffalo National Park into Fort Smith prompted authorities to sanction a hunting expedition for the first 10 people to apply.
"The opportunity came across the news desk, but he made sure he sent his own entry in before he ran the story in the paper," recalled his wife, Marilyn DAWSON, with a laugh.
One of Mr. DAWSON's prized possessions was a rifle crafted by his closest friend, Harry HICKEY, who owned Holman and Hickey Custom Gunsmith, a shop in Toronto, for 30 years.
"He knew guns inside out," his wife said, "And if someone misidentified a gun in a story, he would go ballistic."
Many readers derided him for describing his hunting techniques and successes. In a letter to the editor, one reader referred to Mr. DAWSON as "nothing more than a pasty-faced, beady-eyed killer."
Mr. DAWSON took the critique with a grain of salt and a smile. During a Halloween costume party for the newsroom that followed, he showed up in his hunting garb, toting a shotgun with a toy tiger dangling by its tail from the end of the barrel. He'd applied a pasty flour mixture to his face and sequins around his eyes.
"DAWSON's face was a sight to behold... the ultimate pasty-faced, beady-eyed killer had been created," recalled Wilfred SLATER, who worked alongside Mr. DAWSON on The Globe's copy desk for 25 years.
Alan DAWSON was born in Toronto on December 24, 1917, to S.B. and Anne Beatrice DAWSON. His father was publisher of The Stratford Beacon in Stratford, Ontario, before becoming badly injured in a vehicle accident. The family moved around a lot before returning to Toronto, where Mr. DAWSON graduated from Jarvis Collegiate.
Given the scarce employment opportunities in the Depression era, Mr. DAWSON hitched a ride on a series of freight trains heading to Northern Ontario, working in lumber camps during the day and sleeping in local jails to stay sheltered from the cold.
He returned to Toronto in 1936 and worked six days a week as a copy boy at The Toronto Daily Star, earning a dollar a day.
He remained at the Star until 1948, but it was a period broken by three years as a flight engineer with the Royal Canadian Air Force -- he carried out 31 raids over Germany with a crew that returned alive.
Mr. DAWSON came to The Globe in 1948, because they offered a dollar more per week and he needed the money to support his first wife and his son, Alan David DAWSON.
As an editor in 1963, he hired a young reporter in the women's department named Marilyn COOPER, who later became features editor. They married in 1970.
The two enjoyed many hobbies together. They bought an old farmhouse on a 10-acre plot north of Pickering, Ontario, and renovated it themselves; they took their dogs on long walks, and made regular trips to an old-fashioned fishing camp called Marathon in the Florida Keys. They also bought a recreational vehicle and drove around the continent from Newfoundland to Manitoba, Alaska to Colorado, each time following a different route.
"He was a type-A personality -- go, go, go," recalled his wife. "And when he retired he wanted to do something as well."
The couple eventually settled on Vancouver Island in 1994, and Mr. DAWSON went on his final fishing trip three years ago. Mr. DAWSON didn't want an elaborate funeral. He told his family he did not want to be buried because he was claustrophobic, opting for a private cremation with his ashes scattered along the water insisting the water be warm rather than cold.
His wife has decided to go on with the couple's yearly August roast-beef barbecue that the two had already planned for their Friends before Mr. DAWSON died. She says she'll do everything precisely the way he liked it -- with a special request to the butcher that the beef be hung for four to five weeks ahead of time so it's extra juicy and turned slowly on a rotisserie over charcoal on the special day.

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DAWSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-31 published
The dean of Canadian sociology
The first chair of a new University of Toronto department trained a generation of scholars
By Carol COOPER, Special to the Globe and Mail Friday, October 31, 2003 - Page R13
In 1938, with a doctorate in political science and anxious to achieve his dream of becoming a professor, Samuel Delbert CLARK reluctantly took the only position available to him at the University of Toronto, as its first full-time lecturer in sociology.
In doing so, S.D. CLARK became one of the country's early anglophone sociologists. During his career, his immense intellect, painstaking scholarship and prolific writing brought credibility and respect to the fledgling discipline. At a time when Canadian universities had few sociology departments, Prof. CLARK trained a generation of sociologists who spread out across the country, establishing sociology departments in other centres. And as an administrator at U of T, Prof. CLARK brought leading sociologists to the school.
The first sociologist born, raised and trained here, Prof. S. D. CLARK has died at the age of 93.
Incorporating the staples theory of his mentor, leading Canadian political economist Harold INNIS, the work of American historian F. J. TURNER, and sociologists Carl DAWSON and E. C. HUGHES of McGill University, among others, Prof. CLARK developed his own approach.
He studied social change on Canada's economic frontiers such as the fur trade, Western wheat farming, and the lumber and mining industries. He traced the development of those communities as the residents there, far from the cultural and financial institutions that controlled their lives and contending with distance and poverty, took their communities through a period of simultaneous disorganization and reorganization. From the struggle emerged new organizations and religious sects, such as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Social Credit Party.
Reflecting his university training in history, sociology and political science, Prof. CLARK brought a multifaceted approach to his research.
"He looked at things that were happening in Canada almost uniquely and tried to understand them and not to reduce it to some simplistic international generalization," said William MICHELSON, the S. D. Clark professor of sociology at the University of Toronto. "He really wanted to look into a multiplicity of factors."
Not everyone liked Prof. CLARK's approach to sociology, but nor did Prof. CLARK favour the Chicago School approach then taught at McGill University. Although he later altered his research methods, Prof. CLARK at first viewed the American approach dimly, seeing it as one of doorbell-ringing in order to ask stupid questions, one that scientifically quantified what happened in the present without exploring the past. Instead, he pored over archival material, studying the development of Canadian society from a historical perspective.
Books by Prof. CLARK, such as The Social Development of Canada, drew fire from historians, who challenged his theory and said sociology and history were incompatible. But the publications brought attention to the new discipline.
Born to a farming family on February 24, 1910, in Lloydminster, Alberta., Samuel Delbert CLARK was the second of five children. The family of Northern Irish descent had been established in Ontario since 1840 until it moved West in 1905.
Showing an early aptitude for school and a strong interest in history, Prof. CLARK graduated from the University of Saskatchewan with an honours B.A. in history and political science and an M.A. in history. Brushing aside suggestions that he become a high-school teacher and politician, Prof. CLARK aimed instead for a university position.
He entered University of Toronto in 1931 to do a doctorate in political science and economic history. While the studies proved dry and disappointing, it was there that he first met Harold INNIS, read the works of Marx, Engels and North American left-wingers, and attended meetings of the radical League for Social Reconstruction. Disillusioned with his studies and short of funds, Prof. CLARK accepted a Saskatchewan Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire scholarship and headed for the London School of Economics in 1932. At the school, he received his first exposure to sociology, including the works of Prof. DAWSON at McGill.
After leaving London in 1933, Prof. CLARK arrived in Montreal, again strapped for cash. Hoping to collect a debt from a friend, who was then studying at McGill, Prof. CLARK stopped by his house. With the friend not home, Prof. CLARK then visited Prof. DAWSON, who offered him a research fellowship. After working on a project studying Canadian-American relations for two years and receiving an M.A. in sociology, Prof. CLARK returned to Toronto to continue his doctorate in political science.
In 1937 he accepted an appointment to teach political science and sociology at the University of Manitoba and stayed a year before returning once again to University of Toronto to complete his thesis and begin his career there.
As a proponent of a more British style of sociology, Prof. CLARK was favoured for the job over another Chicago-trained candidate, setting the academic direction for the school. Sociology was then run as a section under the department of anthropology, to be transferred a year later to the department of political economy. Except for occasional leaves, Prof. CLARK remained a fixture on campus, impeccably dressed in a woollen suit and sporting a pipe, until his retirement in 1976.
Shy and quiet, Prof. CLARK constantly cleared his throat and jingled the change in his pocket while lecturing.
"He never cracked a joke.... It was serious scholarship. You had to ask serious questions," recalled retired York University sociology professor Edward MANN, an early undergraduate student and later a doctoral student of Prof. CLARK. " Their [ INNIS and CLARK] religion was scholarship."
In that vein, Prof. CLARK never talked to the press about daily issues, saying it cheapened the discipline. And he practised rigorous scholarship.
"He had a tremendous amount of integrity," said Lorne TEPPERMAN, a University of Toronto sociology professor and former student of Prof. CLARK. " This was a guy who knew what he stood for, what he believed in. He was uncompromising. He had very high standards for himself and other people."
During the fifties, Prof. CLARK, an admirer of Lester PEARSON, exchanged his membership in the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation for that of the Liberal Party, the one endorsed by his wife, Rosemary. A graduate in economics from Columbia University, she edited all his works. By the sixties, Prof. CLARK had begun to study social change and urbanization, writing The Suburban Society and later, The New Urban Poor. Despite altering his research methods, dropping his historical research and adopting the American style of conducting questionnaires to collect data, he stopped short of tabulating them, arguing in The Suburban Society that "to lay claim to scientific precision... would be to falsify the competence of sociology."
And the man who studied social change became buffeted by it. While the sociology section had remained small during the forties and fifties, it ballooned during the sixties, becoming an independent department in 1963 with Prof. CLARK as its appointed head.
A capable administrator, Prof. CLARK brought feistiness to the job. "He was a very honest man," said Prof. TEPPERMAN. "He wasn't afraid on an argument, he wasn't afraid of a fight. If he liked you, he really liked you and if he didn't like you, he really didn't like you."
With the huge increase in sociology-department enrolment but small number of sociology graduates, Prof. CLARK looked outside the country to fill teaching positions. Most either came from the United States, or had been trained there.
While some scholars hailed Prof. CLARK for having eschewed American-style sociology and maintaining a Canadian approach, the young and sometimes radical newcomers with a markedly different approach regarded him as an oddball and an anachronism. And as an older, white, staunch Liberal Party-supporting male at the centre of an old-boy network, he represented everything they were fighting against. Accustomed to a more democratic academic culture at other schools, the new staff agitated for a greater say in the running of the department. When Prof. CLARK resisted, he was pushed out, and the chair became an elected position. He remained at the university until his retirement in 1976.
Outside of the university, throughout his career, Prof. CLARK served as an editor of The Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science, and as president of the Royal Society of Canada. In addition, he was appointed an Officer in the Order of Canada.
Despite the recognition he received, Prof. CLARK always felt that his older brother who took over the farm was the family success, according to his son, Edmund. And he enjoyed such simple pleasures as hockey. Once, while attending a dinner party at Claude BISSELL's house, then the president of U of T, Prof. CLARK asked where the television was and sat down to watch the hockey game. When questioned later, Prof. CLARK replied, "Anyone stupid enough to hold a party on a hockey night deserved to have the guests watch television in the den."
S.D. CLARK died on September 18. He leaves his wife, Rosemary, sons Edmund and Samuel, nine grandchildren and a sister, Grace. His daughter Ellen predeceased him.

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