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"CRO" 2003 Obituary


CROFT  CROLL  CROMBIE  CROMPTON  CRONIN  CRONK  CRONYN  CROSBY  CROSS  CROSSMAN  CROTTY  CROWE 

CROFT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-12 published
Died This Day -- 13 school canoeists, 1978
Thursday, June 12, 2003 - Page R9
Adventure outing by Saint John's School, Claremont, Ontario, struck by high winds on Lake Temiskaming, single capsize caused panic and the upset of other canoes, led to deaths of teacher Mark DEANNY and boys
Todd MICHELL,
Barry NELSON,
Jody O'GORMAN,
Timothy PRYCE,
David GREANEY,
Andy HERMAN,
Simon CROFT,
Tim HOPKINS,
Tom KENNY,
Scott BINDON,
Kevin BLACK,
Fraser BOURCHIER
Autopsies showed all drowned but that some had been in water 12 hours before death occurred.

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CROLL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-11 published
Died This Day -- David CROLL, 1991
Wednesday, June 11, 2003 - Page R5
Lawyer and politician born in Moscow on March 12, 1900; 1905, emigrated with family to Canada; raised in Windsor, Ontario in 1925, opened law practice; spent seven years as mayor of Windsor 1934, elected to Ontario legislature; served in Hepburn cabinet resigned over labour dispute ("My place is marching with the workers rather than riding with General Motors"); 1945, elected to Parliament; in 1955, named to Senate.

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CROMBIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
Elizabeth Miriam Rose DASHWOOD
The DASHWOOD and SOUTHGATE families. Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - Page A20
Wife, mother, returning officer, organizer. Born January 12, 1929, in Toronto. Died April 6 in Toronto, of heart failure, aged 74.
Betty was a conservative person. Except about the date of her birth -- about that she was progressive, insisting it was 1930, when it was really 1929. There it conservatively remained; no one argued with Betty.
Betty SOUTHGATE spent her early years on Edgewood Crescent in Rosedale, but left Canada when her stockbroker father decided to return to England to try his fortune. Her finest times were spent at her mother's family farm, a place that, 60 years later, still seemed idyllic to her.
The war brought the SOUTHGATEs back to Canada on one of the last passenger ships to cross the Atlantic. Betty survived burning factories, bombers and submarines and shared sandwiches with bloodied soldiers rescued from Dunkirk to return to Rosedale. She was schooled at Branksome Hall and Trinity College, University of Toronto. She left Trinity with an honours B.A. and an engagement to John DASHWOOD. After Trinity came a job at the Canadian Cancer Society, a wedding in 1957 and then children, Geoffrey and Monica.
The swinging sixties came. Betty did not notice the changing times. But not to worry: church and schools still stood. Betty intended to make sure they continued.
After a brief sojourn in Scarborough, Ontario, Betty returned to Edgewood Crescent. There she remained the rest of her life. The house became an epicentre for a broad range of people and organizations. Edgewood housed potential immigrants, relatives and Friends, refugees from house fires and renovations, cats, dogs, and canoes. Betty put up with model-soldier exhibitions, a boa constrictor, drunken teenage parties, punk-rock bands, and, ultimately, rambunctious grandchildren.
The life of the house was often hectic, particularly politically. The DASHWOODs were divided: John was New Democratic Party; Betty worked tirelessly for the Tories. Every election, opposing campaign signs went up. The one thing on which they agreed was their strong dislike of Pierre TRUDEAU. Her staunch support paid off when David CROMBIE became a member of parliament and then a cabinet minister. Her political work led to her becoming returning officer for the diverse Rosedale riding. Betty relished, and excelled at, running an effective election. Several of her elections were hotly contested, but Betty survived with her dignity and integrity intact.
Compassion went with Betty's conservatism. She was involved with (to name several) St. Simon's Church, the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario and St. Peter's food bank. For her beloved Trinity, she was a major organizer of the annual book sale, which has raised millions of dollars for the library. Trinity was so important to her that Betty put off medical treatment in her last year to organize the 50th reunion of her class.
Betty had a gift for Friendship. Twenty summers in Port Hope extended her already-broad circle. She had Branksome Friends, Trinity Friends, church Friends, tennis Friends, English Friends and Edgewood Friends. Her correspondence was huge. She sent and received a massive number of Christmas cards.
Her heart was large. Our own hearts ache when we consider her stoic insistence on her way of doing things. Betty drank, refused to stop smoking when she should have, and drove badly: That should be said, too. She held us all together, until she no longer could. She died in her sleep, her heart failed, her body beset by a cancer she defied until the end. She took food to a sick friend, in a snow storm, the day before she died.
Her church was full for her funeral. The church bell tolled her knell. Traditional. Just like Betty.

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CROMPTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-15 published
CROMPTON, Peter Gordon
Peter died tragically early Sunday July 13, 2003 in his 28th year. Survived by his parents Judy and Ken, older brother Jeff and grandmother Lillian YOUNG all of Collingwood, Uncles and Aunts Gordon and Joan CROMPTON, Peter and Sophie YOUNG and their families of Thunder Bay, Ontario. Born in Toronto, Peter moved to Collingwood to attend the National Ski Academy. He was a former member of the Ontario Ski Team competing nationally and internationally in the Nor-Am Race Series, the U.S.A. Junior Championships and the World University Games. Peter graduated from the University of Guelph Ontario with a Degree in Economics. He was employed in Toronto with CB. Richard Ellis as a Sales Representative Investment Properties. Peter was a member of The Osler Bluff Ski Club and the Blue Mountain Golf and Country Club where he was an accomplished golfer. Peter had a passion for windsurfing and surfing taking him to Australia, Hawaii, Oregon and Cape Hatteras. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home ''Collingwood Chapel'', 82 Pine Street from 6: 00-9:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 16, 2003. The funeral service will be held at the Trinity United Church, 140 Maple Street, Collingwood, July 17, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. Interment to follow at Trinity United Cemetery, Poplar Sideroad, Collingwood. If desired, donations may be made to the Smart Risk Snow Smart Program, 790 Bay Street, Suite 401, Toronto, Ontario M5E 1N8 or a Charity of Choice.

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CROMPTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
Peter Gordon CROMPTON
Son, brother, friend, athlete, businessman. Born December 5, 1975, in Toronto. Died July 13 as a result of a boating accident, aged 27.
By Josh DOLAN, Bryce GIBSON, Blake HUTCHESON, Adam LAZIER, Rob MAGWOOD, Ian SULLIVAN
Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - Page A24
In the words of Pete's father Ken, "Pete did not live only 27 years. He lived 9,946 days and every one to the fullest!" Somehow this number is both more palatable and more appropriate when speaking of Pete's life.
Pete was born at Toronto General Hospital, weighing in at a larger-than-life 11 pounds, 10 ounces. From that day forward, "larger-than-life" was an apt description -- physically and otherwise. Pete grew up, along with brother Jeff, in a household that loved competition, outdoor activity, a good challenge, the odd healthy debate and, most of all, each other. The family went back and forth from Toronto to Collingwood, Ontario, to enjoy the best of both areas, depending on the season and the opportunity. His parents, Ken and Judy, loved watching their sons excel and gave them every opportunity to do so.
Pete was on skis at the age of 3 at Osler Bluff Ski Club, had a golf club in his hand by 5, and was windsurfing by 6. He took all three sports to incredible heights. He enjoyed and excelled at so much in life, yet did not seem to need or seek recognition. His low-key manner and his quiet confidence kept everyone at ease and drew people to him.
In skiing, Pete was a member of the Ontario Ski Team, competing nationally and internationally in the NorAm Race Series, the U.S.A. Junior Championships and the World University Games. He won several championships and had a natural gift on snow. He also became a scratch golfer and loved to take on Friends and family.
Perhaps his greatest passion, however, was windsurfing. He found every excuse he could to hit the surf on Georgian Bay, but his sense of adventure took him to beaches all over the world, including the southwest coast of Australia, Maui, the Colombian River Gorge in Oregon and Cape Hatteras in North Carolina. In the words of one of his lifelong Friends, "Pete loved life and life loved him right back!"
Pete was a generous, loyal and reliable friend who developed strong and lasting relationships at every phase of life: his youthful years of sports, competition and family; his fun and challenges at the National Ski Academy; his university years at Laurentian University and the University of Guelph (B.A. in Economics); his career launch at Nesbitt Burns; and his last several years at C.B. Richard Ellis where he was in commercial real-estate investment sales. At every turn he met with success with his long graceful stride and disarming smile.
It was going to be fun just to sit back and watch him perform in the decades ahead.
Looking through the family photo albums Pete had a mischievous smile and a sense of adventure in every picture. In virtually every snapshot either something spectacular had just happened, or it was about to happen. He was always surrounded by Friends and family as his easygoing style and sense of fun were infectious. His determination to improve and grow were never overt but always present. The results speak for themselves. As one good friend suggested: "Men wanted to be like Pete. Women wanted to be with him." More than 1,500 people attended his funeral.
Pete was quite simply a great human being who would have continued to win in his unpretentious manner and contribute on a kind-spirited and decent level to any situation. We are among his many Friends who have been brought together because of this fine person and who have had the good fortune of sharing a small piece of Pete's life -- all 9,946 days of it.
Josh, Bryce, Blake, Adam, Rob and Ian are Friends of Pete's.

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CRONIN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-03 published
Charles "Rodney" SALLOWS
In loving memory of Charles "Rodney" SALLOWS at his residence in Tehkummah on Thursday, August 14, 2003 at the age of 55 years.
Loving husband of Dianne SALLOWS. Cherished son of Rene and Charlie (predeceased) SALLOWS. Will be missed by siblings, Sharon (Carl) WOODS, Karen (Ollie) RIPLEY, Jamie (Shirley) SALLOWS, Heather (Robert) MARION, Holly SALLOWS, Cindy SALLOWS, Shane SALLOWS. Remembered by many nieces and nephews. Will be missed also by cousins of the CRONIN Family in Sudbury. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home

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CRONIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
ORR, Rosemary Margaret (STINSON) 75 of Fonthill, Ontario died September 27, 2003 at West Lincoln Memorial Hospital, after a long battle with cancer. She is survived by her husband James Campbell ORR and by her children; Catherine E. ORR of Beamsville, James C. ORR and his wife Diane of Toronto, Susan Orr LYNCH of Salem, Massachusetts, Nancy J. THOMAS and her husband Philip of Fonthill. She was pre-deceased by her daughter Jane Orr CRONIN. She also leaves grandchildren; Carlton CRONIN, Katlyn PECK, Lesley ORR, Michael ORR, Elizabeth THOMAS, and Cameron LYNCH; and a sister Jane WHITE/WHYTE of Peterborough. Cremation has taken place. A burial service will be held at St. Andrews Anglican Churchyard in Grimsby at 11: 00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 1, 2003.

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CRONK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-03 published
Stanley Charles WIGGINS
By L. Bruce CRONK, Wednesday, December 3, 2003 - Page A26
Family man, band leader, insurer, civic supporter, athlete. Born August 9, 1925, in Belleville, Ontario Died August 3, in Kingston, Ontario, of cardiac arrest, aged 77.
Stanley WIGGINS was born in Belleville on the Bay of Quinte in southern Ontario and lived here all his life -- to the immeasurable benefit of the Quinte community. His mother, Beulah, was of United Empire Loyalist background. His father Fred's family was from County Tyrone, Ireland. Stan loved his parents, and cared for his mother to the end of her 93 years.
At age 12, Stan was introduced to the trumpet by bandmaster Jack GREEN of the Salvation Army Citadel Band, a remarkable teacher who initiated many young people into brass music. Three years later, at 15, Stan joined the Commodores Orchestra, famed in Eastern Ontario for its mellow "Big Band" style. He played with them for 60 years. I recall the dancing slowing almost to a halt when Stan's silver-toned trumpet would soar into one of the well-known solos of Bunny Berigan or Harry James, followed by loud applause.
After high school, Stan entered medicine at Queen's University, until illness forced him to abandon the dream of becoming a doctor. He studied at the Ontario Business College and then joined the London Life Insurance Company, first as an underwriter, then manager. In 1948 he married Margaret MILLER, a girl from his own Belleville Collegiate Institute. They and their children, Joanne, Jim and Carol, formed a close-knit family, camping, cottaging and skiing together.
Stan was always physically active: a skier, sailor, camper, golfer and avid swimmer. After he developed cardiac problems, I used to see him at the Harbour Club in the early morning, swimming laps. I still look -- but he's no longer there.
Stan had the capacity to listen with complete interest whenever anyone addressed him. He was, indeed, "Mr. Belleville." His community-caring spirit was manifested in his service on the board of education and of the Children's Aid Society, his presidency of the Belleville Club and the Sales Ad Association.
Stan also gave his musical talents to the Concert Brass and 8 Wing Concert Band, and his own group, the River City Jazz Band. His daughter told me that as a young man he'd stayed with a relative in New Jersey, commuting to New York for special trumpet lessons, and had been offered jobs with several popular bands -- but decided that the constant on-the-road life of a jazz musician was not for him. He was more interested in family life, work, and civic activities. In 1997, Stan received the Quinte Arts Council Recognition Award "in recognition of outstanding contribution to the arts in Quinte."
On Saturday, August 2, he led the Commodores for three hours at the Wellington Waterfront Festival. A close friend and fellow member of the Commodores, trumpeter Bruce PARSONS, later said: "Stan was bound and determined to play that horn up to the day he died, and by God, he did."
On Sunday morning, he and Margaret received Holy Communion, and then, in the afternoon, went with Friends on a Thousand Islands cruise followed by a massed bands tattoo at Fort Henry in Kingston. While the bands played Stan's own arrangement of the New Maple Leaf Forever, a vicious electrical storm broke. Stan hurried off to the bus to get umbrellas for the ladies. Then he collapsed.
At Stan's packed funeral service, Reverend Peter JOYCE gave thanks for Stan's life, and then quoted the song The Commodores always play at the evening's close -- "We'll meet again, /Don't know where, /Don't know when, /But I know we'll meet again/Some sunny day." Amen to that.
L. Bruce CRONK has been a friend of Stan's since their boyhood.

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CRONYN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-21 published
A character in life and work
Toronto-born actor played supporting roles in hundreds of films and television shows, including the cult-hit sitcom Mary Hartman
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, May 21, 2003 - Page R5
As a genial, six-foot, balding performer who wore a trademark mustache and glasses, Graham JARVIS was not the leading-man type. The Toronto-born actor from a privileged background, who died last month in California at 72, courted but never achieved stardom and instead gained a kind of small-roles fame by appearing in hundreds of supporting parts in film and television productions.
Mr. JARVIS took character parts in films as diverse as Alice's Restaurant, Cold Turkey, Middle Age Crazy, Silkwood and Misery, and a similar assortment of television shows including Star Trek, ER, Murder She Wrote, Gunsmoke, The X-Files and Six Feet Under.
His first role was as an understudy in a mid-1950s Broadway production of Tennessee Williams's Orpheus Descending, and his last was as the grandfather in an episode of the television series Seventh Heaven, which aired four days after his death in April.
He is perhaps best known for his portrayal of Charlie Haggers, the devoted husband of a country singer in the 1970s television sitcom Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman. "Nobody outside the business knows my name, but it doesn't bother me," he told an interviewer in 1982. "Fans still know me as Charlie, years after we went off the air. Fans went nuts over that character for some reason and I love the guy myself."
A scion of the historic Toronto family for whom JARVIS Street is named, Graham Powely JARVIS was also the grand_son of John LABATT Jr., who built up the famous Labatt brewery. A strain of theatrical talent obviously runs in the Labatt blood: His cousins include two legendary theatre personalities -- nonagenarian actor Hume CRONYN and Broadway producer Robert WHITEHEAD, who died last year.
It was Mr. WHITEHEAD who helped Mr. JARVIS attain the gig in Orpheus Descending and an audition at the Barter Theatre in Abbingdon, Va., where he trained for three seasons. Mr. CRONYN also helped him land a Broadway role, Mr. JARVIS said in 1982, adding that he rarely liked to mention the celebrated theatrical connections within his own family.
"This is the first time I've let this information out because I've tried not to trade on it," he said. "But I guess I've been around long enough now not to worry about it."
His father, an investment banker who was instrumental in founding what is today known as Scotia McLeod and was later president of Labatt, moved the family to New York when Graham was 5. He was sent to Bishop Ridley College, a prep school in St. Catharines, Ontario, and later to Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. A confused dropout at 23, he found work on the midnight shift in a penny arcade on 42nd Street in Manhattan. Then a friend invited him to watch an off-Broadway troupe in rehearsal and a light went on in his head. "I can do that!" he told himself, and he never looked back.
"Graham was such a great character actor because he could just go into character," said his niece, Sandra JARVIS of Toronto. "He was just brilliant that way. You'd be having a conversation with him and he'd just don a role, and it would take you a second to realize that Graham was now acting. Anyone who knew him well could just see this glow in his eyes -- this glint that told you he knew he was having fun with you."
"He loved acting," said his friend, actor Wil ALBERT. " When he was acting he was like a little boy going to the candy store."
Mr. JARVIS was a graduate of the American Theatre Wing acting school as well as of the Barter Theatre. He was an original member of the Lincoln Center Repertory Theater and a veteran of many Broadway and off-Broadway productions.
His first film role (in Bye Bye Braverman, 1968) enticed him to move to Hollywood, and he soon landed the part of the narrator in the stage production of The Rocky Horror Show at the Roxy Theatre on Sunset Boulevard.
Television producer Norman LEAR spotted him there and eventually recommended him for Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman. Mr. JARVIS also appeared in the show's sequel, Forever Fernwood. Another memorable role was of John Erlichman in Blind Ambition, a well-received 1979 television miniseries about the Watergate political scandal.
Relishing the idea of free airfare to Toronto where he had family and Friends, Mr. JARVIS took occasional work from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer Ross McLEAN once told of auditioning him as a talk-show host, but felt his bald dome would need to be covered. Mr. JARVIS owned a hairpiece but had left it in California.
"Makeup pulled 20-odd rugs out of storage," Mr. McLEAN wrote. "Everything he tried on looked absurdly out of place." Ultimately, Mr. JARVIS arranged for his L.A. agent to go to his house, find the hairpiece and rush it to Toronto.
"The rug made it on time," Mr. McLEAN noted, adding that "I have rarely seen a less convincing thatch of regrouped Hong Kong hair." In short, Graham JARVIS looked best -- and did the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation audition -- as himself.
In a 1980s television series called Making the Grade, Mr. JARVIS played a buck-passing inner-city high-school principal who didn't care that a student couldn't read. In real life, however, he worked as a volunteer to teach literacy skills to young offenders.
"It was really fascinating to hear him talk about it," said his wife, JoAnna. "He felt they couldn't read because they couldn't speak -- they were speaking a street patois. He went back to college to get his teaching certificate so he could do this on a regular basis." Active in civic politics, he pushed for handgun control and helped voters get to the polls on election day. He also sang in his church choir and worked in its Sunday school.
"I think the consensus among almost everyone who knew Graham is that he was a very warm, enjoyable man," said actor Jerry HARDIN, a friend for almost 50 years.
"You came away feeling he was a good human being if you had any contact with him. He was very empathetic. He had compassion for people's difficulties and problems, and he would help them if he could."
Friends and family also recall his storytelling skills and his joy at giving visitors detailed historic tours of New York and later Hollywood. By all accounts, he was a humble man.
"He didn't think he was nearly as successful as he was," said Barbara WARREN, a niece. "He was always extremely surprised and delighted when people would stop him on the street and ask him for his autograph.
"He loved to deliver the lines and get the shock on your face," Ms. WARREN said. "You never saw him poise himself, he just walked right in as if he was that person."
Mr. JARVIS died at his home in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles on April 16. Besides his wife, JoAnna, he leaves sons Matthew and Alex in California and sister Kitty Blair in Toronto.

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CRONYN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-08 published
BOSWELL, Patrick Arthur
Died peacefully in Victoria, British Columbia, after a long illness, on July 7, 2003. son of the late W. H. and Nan BOSWELL (née CRONYN.) He is survived by his wife Stephanie BOSWELL (née HAAS,) his sister Ann and her husband Henry BENATTAR, and his nephews Peter BOSWELL, Tony and Patrick BENATTAR, and his nieces Edie and Sue (VIBERT) and Samantha BENATTAR. He was predeceased by his brother Bill BOSWELL. Born in Toronto in 1924, he attended Ridley College School and served overseas in the Royal Canadian Air Force After 25 years, Pat left his position at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto and moved to Banff, Alberta where he managed the Alpine Club of Canada. Skiing and mountain climbing were his great loves. He and Stephanie became owners, editors and managers of the Banff Crag and Canyon. They retired in 1988, moving to Sidney, British Columbia and finally to Victoria. He will be sadly missed for his humour, kindness, generosity and affinity with words. No funeral services by request. Private cremation. Flowers are gratefully declined.

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CRONYN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-31 published
CRONYN, Jean
Of London, England. Died unexpectedly on 23rd October aged 84. Much loved wife of the late Hugh CRONYN, G.M., artist, born Vancouver, died London, England in 1996 aged 91. Treasured mother of Anna and Janey, and adored grandmother of Ed and Will. She will be much missed by her many Friends and family. Funeral service at St. Nicholas Church, Chiswick Mall, London W4, England, at 11: 30 a.m. on Tuesday 4th November.

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CROSBY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
Singer was hit on Hit Parade
Canadian-born performer played violin with Jack Benny and posed as wife of Sid Caesar
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, September 13, 2003 - Page F11
She was called "Canada's First Lady of Song." In the late 1940s, singer Gisele MacKENZIE was so popular on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio that she was known just by her first name.
When she was 23, she headed off to Hollywood, where she became one of the main singers on Your Hit Parade, a popular American network television show in the 1950s. By the time television started in Canada in 1952, she was already a star in the United States, appearing on programs with Jack Benny and later with Sid Caesar, the hottest comedian of his day.
Gisele MacKENZIE, who has died at the age of 76, was not always known by that name. On the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, she was known simply as Gisele, though a 1950 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation press release did call her by her proper name -- Gisele LAFLECHE. As soon as she moved to CBS in 1951, she adopted the stage name Gisele MacKENZIE. The reason, she told a New York reporter in 1955, was that the name Gisele LAFLECHE "sounded too much like a striptease artist's." The real explanation was an American audience would have trouble with so French a name. It was the television network that ordered the name change.
Marie Marguerite Louise Gisele LAFLECHE was born on January 10, 1927, in Winnipeg. The name MacKENZIE was from her paternal grandmother. Her father, Georges, was a doctor, who played the violin, and her mother, Marietta MANSEAU, was a concert pianist and singer as a young woman. Ms. MacKENZIE started playing the violin seriously when she was 7. She made her first public performance at the Royal Alexandra Hotel in Winnipeg at the age of 12.
When she was 14, her family sent her to the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. She studied the violin and the piano, and planned on being a concert violinist. Later in life, a story circulated that she never took voice lessons, but Jim GUTHRO, who was at the conservatory at the same time, remembered a voice teacher who took an interest in her. He also remembered that she attended at the same time as Robert GOULET and they would sing together.
When she first came to Toronto, she stayed at Rosary Hall, a residence for Catholic girls on Bloor Street at the top of Jarvis Street. Tess MALLOY, who was there at the same time, remembered her. "She lived right across the hall from me. She and her girlfriend used to drive us nuts practising the violin."
Ms. MALLOY didn't remember her singing at the residence, but somewhere along the way someone discovered Ms. MacKENZIE could sing. It was close to the end of the war and she started to perform for groups of servicemen. It was then that she was discovered by musician Bob SHUTTLEWORTH, a lieutenant who led a band for the Royal Canadian Navy.
Right after the war, she started singing with Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH's band at the Glenmount Hotel on the Lake of Bays, north of Toronto. Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH, who later became her manager and her husband, took her to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, which then broadcast live popular music over the radio.
"Bob SHUTTLEWORTH called me at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and said, 'Get a studio, a piano and a vocal mike. I have someone I want you to hear,' recalled Jackie RAE, then a music producer at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, later leader of his own band (and, incidentally, the uncle of former Ontario premier Bob RAE.) "I remember her wonderful voice and how fresh she was. We hired her straight away to do three programs a week."
The program was Meet Gisele, and it ran for 15 minutes on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The program started on October 8, 1946, and lasted for four years. She was so popular the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation used her in other programs with names such as The Girl Next Door or The Song Pluggers.
In 1951, Ms. MacKENZIE was spotted by Bing CROSBY's son, and went to work in the United States for Bob CROSBY's Club 15, bumping the Andrews Sisters from their regular slot. The pay was $20,000 (U.S.) a year, worth $150,000 in today's money. She was 23.
The money was something Canada could never match. Mr. GUTHRO, later head of Variety at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, guesses she was making $200 a week for her radio programs.
"Gisele Leaves for Hollywood. Canada's Loss," read a headline in one Toronto paper. The article guessed at the pay package, and it was right.
Ms. MacKENZIE was about to have her best decade ever in show business. After a short stint on Club 15, she worked on the Mario Lanza Show, before landing her full-time job at Your Hit Parade. The idea behind the NBC program was to take the top seven songs on the hit parade that week and have them done by the regular singers in the Your Hit Parade troupe. The half-hour program was a huge success in the United States and in late 1953 the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation picked it up for a while.
Ms. MacKENZIE was the only regular singer on the program to have her own hit record, Hard to Get, in 1955.
Though none of her family shared her success, all were musical. There were her parents, both of whom were serious amateur musicians two of her sisters sang and played, and a brother played the cello. Along with Gisele, two of them had what is called perfect pitch.
"It's rare and she had it," Mr. RAE said. "You would play four notes on the piano and she could match them. Perfect pitch isn't always a great thing, but in her case it was."
Ms. MacKENZIE's training as a classical violinist came in handy on the Jack Benny program, on which she first appeared in 1955. The droll comedian always made a thing of how he couldn't play the violin. One vaudeville-type act they would do on his show involved her patiently showing him what to do with a violin after he made some awful screeching noise with his bow.
She was Jack Benny's protégé, and he helped land her own television program in 1958. Called the Gisele MacKENZIE Show, it lasted only six months.
But she remained famous. At one stage, she was the subject of This is Your Life, which involved linking up with old Friends and relatives. She was a regular on game shows that featured minor celebrities, such as Hollywood Squares.
In 1963, she was cast as Sid Caesar's television wife and made regular trips to New York City, where the program was done. Like other television programs of that era, it was live, since videotape was only just being introduced.
Ms. MacKENZIE also acted and sang in live musicals in the United States, things such as Annie Get Your Gun and South Pacific. Over the years, she also worked in Las Vegas, performing in night clubs there. She returned to Canada for the occasional concert and television special, including one on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in late 1960. It was about "her story book career" and included the yarn, always told by her publicists, of how she decided to take up singing after she lost her $3,000 violin.
By the end of the 1960s, the big work started to dry up and Canadian newspapers were running the occasional "Where Are They Now" articles. She was in a sprawling ranch house in suburban Encino, Calif. She also owned property in Palmdale and Marin County, Calif., as well as a house on Lake Manitoba back home.
All that detail came up in a nasty divorce from Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH in 1968. Because he was also her manager, he kept 10 per cent of her gross income for the next three years. She later married a banker, Robert KLEIN, but that also ended in divorce.
During the rest of her career, Ms. MacKENZIE kept working in regional theatre and made guest appearances on television series, including MacGyver and Murder, She Wrote, as well as singing stints on programs such as the Dean Martin Show. She also did television commercials in the United States and Canada.
Ms. MacKENZIE had some odd hobbies. She collected and mixed exotic perfumes and in the 1950s she took up target shooting, becoming an expert shot. She and her first husband had a large collection of pistols, rifles and shotguns. In her later years, like many Hollywood stars, she was involved with Scientology.
Ms. MacKENZIE, who died in Burbank, Calif., on September 5, had two children with Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH, a son Mac and a daughter Gigi (short for Gisele) DOWNS.

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CROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
'Nobody beats Arthur'
Victoria native left mark on Ottawa's business scene, while setting swimming records when he was over 70
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, November 5, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- When Arthur INGLIS moved to Ottawa from Victoria in the late 1960s, his goal was to leave his mark on the nation's capital. By all accounts, he succeeded, both in the world of business and in the swimming pool.
"When he arrived he thought he could make a difference," said his partner of 20 years Kimberly CROSS. " The place was a wasteland back then, but he did manage to leave an imprint."
Mr. INGLIS, who as recently as May set a world swimming record, died on September 1. He as 71.
After moving to Ottawa, Mr. INGLIS, who was born in Victoria on March 28, 1932, worked as director of store design for Hudson's Bay Co. and redesigned a handful of department stores purchased from their local owner by the Bay.
In 1976, he started two Vanilla Boutique clothing stores and later operated the Ecco Restaurant in downtown Ottawa. He founded the Mags and Fags newsstand that same year after he realized Ottawa didn't have an outlet with the variety of magazines and newspapers available in New York or London. The business also included Immigration and Naturalization Service News Service, which distributes newspapers and magazines to Ottawa's business and government sectors.
With a reputation as an innovative member of Ottawa's business community, Mr. INGLIS and a partner built Mags and Fags into one of the biggest newsstands in Canada, said Mr. CROSS, who added that local media individuals often visited the Elgin Street shop.
During the early 1980s, Mr. INGLIS and a business partner designed a bar named Shannon's in honour of Shannon TWEED, Miss Ottawa Valley of 1977 and Playboy Magazine's 1982 Playmate of the Year. TWEED, partner of Gene SIMMONS, bassist for rock band KISS, named her dog Vanilla after Mr. INGLIS's women's fashion shops.
His boutiques carried innovative lines of clothing from France and Italy that couldn't be found elsewhere in Ottawa. His Ecco restaurant and club was a downtown hotspot known for its elegant yet homey setting.
"It was hot, hot, hot with a library and outdoor terrace on the second floor, like something you'd find on 3rd Avenue in New York," Mr. CROSS said. "It was the place where all of the city's movers and shakers went, real estate people, fashion people -- you name it."
Mr. INGLIS and a partner also designed and introduced several Ottawa shopping centres to the sales kiosks that are now commonplace in most malls.
In 2000, when Mr. INGLIS was 68 and still operating the newsstand, his life took a dramatic turn because of cholesterol and blood-pressure problems. His doctors placed him on medication but instead of relying on pills, he quit drinking, adopted a healthier diet and started swimming and weight-training.
In 2002, he sold his share in Mags and Fags to concentrate on travel and competitive swimming, which he had excelled at as youngster and into his teens.
Mr. INGLIS's athletic prowess in his younger days also included skating with the Ice Capades, touring North America with his sister May in the 1950s.
To pursue his interest in swimming and to improve his fitness, Mr. INGLIS joined the Technosport masters swim and triathlon team in Ottawa and was soon setting Canadian and world swimming records in the 70-and-over age group. As his health problems eased, he challenged the best in the world in masters swimming in various locales, including New Zealand and Hawaii.
When he died, he held 17 Canadian or Ontario records in backstroke, breaststroke, freestyle and individual medley, including all Canadian backstroke records in all distances in the 70 to 74 age group, said teammate Pat NIBLETT, who keeps track of records set by members of the Technosport team. Mr. INGLIS was also a member of an Ontario swim relay team that set a world record in New Zealand in 2002.
Ms. NIBLETT, who often travelled to swim meets with Mr. INGLIS, remembers her teammate as a "tall slim man with the twinkling eyes and wonderful sense of humour. I only had the privilege of knowing Arthur for three short years. I felt as if I had known him for a lifetime. There is a saying in our house that 'nobody beats Arthur.' This is true of everything that Arthur did."
At the Canadian National Masters Swim Championships in Montreal in May, Mr. INGLIS broke his own 200-metre backstroke record and set Canadian records in the 100 and 200 individual medley events.
Technosport coach Duane JONES, who was among those shocked by the incredibly fit Mr. INGLIS's death, said the swimmer worked out about five times a week.
"When we first met, he was 30 pounds overweight, he was not a healthy eater and he was lethargic. But soon after, he was setting records; when he was 71-years-old he had the body of a 35-year-old. He paid attention to detail and did his workouts, swimming, biking and weight-training consistently.
"The first time he dove into the water I could not believe how beautiful his strokes cut the water. I've coached more than 6,000 athletes during the past 35 years and have never seen a guy like Arthur INGLIS."
Ramona FIEBIG, manager of Mags and Fags for more than 14 years, said Mr. INGLIS was a dedicated businessman who did his best to ensure the newsstand had the best selection of titles in the city. He often showed up for work on weekends as early as 3 a.m.
"There are thousands of titles in the store. It was no small chore to keep on top of what was new, to find new magazines and locate suppliers."
To the day he died, Mr. INGLIS was an innovator, Mr. CROSS said, adding that as his health deteriorated, he wanted to try a novel drug treatment to prolong his life.
"After his stroke, the options were paralysis on his left side or trying a new drug," Mr. CROSS said, adding that the side effect was a 16-per-cent chance he would suffer massive bleeding in his brain. "His feeling was that if he didn't survive, the next person who came down the shoot might have a better chance."

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CROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-11 published
An old-fashioned newsman
Distinguished journalist began humbly as a copy boy at the Hamilton Spectator and soared to the top of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
By James McCREADY, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 11, 2003 - Page R11
During the October Crisis of 1970, there were a lot of editors who buckled under. They followed the orders of the police and the Quebec and federal governments about not printing or broadcasting some details about the kidnapping of British Trade Commissioner James CROSS and the kidnapping and murder of Quebec cabinet minister Pierre LAPORTE.
Many editors and broadcast executives took to self-censorship, anticipating what the authorities wanted and keeping newscasts and newspapers clean. Denis HARVEY, who has died at age of 74, was not one of them.
Then editor of The Gazette of Montreal, the man he faced down was Jerome CHOQUETTE, Quebec's justice minister and the public face of authority during much of the crisis. CHOQUETTE did not want newspapers to publish the full manifesto of the Front de libération du Québec. Denis HARVEY ignored the request and published it.
The paper also broke the news that police had a photograph of James CROSS sitting on what looked like a box of dynamite. The justice minister warned The Gazette editor he could be arrested under the terms of the War Measures Act, but Mr. HARVEY called his bluff.
During the crisis, Mr. HARVEY didn't change his habits. When the paper was put to bed, he would walk to the Montreal Men's Press Club in the Mount Royal Hotel carrying the bulldog or first edition of the paper and sit at the bar and argue statistics with the sports editor, Brodie SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER.
There would also be political discussions, some of them heated, since the man who wrote the stamp column at the paper had been called up from the reserves in the military and took himself, and the War Measures Act, quite seriously.
Mr. HARVEY was an old-fashioned newsman, a high-school dropout who rose to edit newspapers and who went on to run the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television news service and then the entire Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television network.
Denis Martin HARVEY was born on August 15, 1929, in Hamilton, where his father was a customs inspector. He left school halfway through Grade 13 and landed a job as a copy boy at The Hamilton Spectator. This was not uncommon and was the traditional route for a young person coming into the newspaper business. Journalism schools were all but unknown and university-educated reporters and editors were rare.
He went from copy boy, ripping the wire copy off the machines, to listening in for police tips on radio scanners. He became a sports writer and in 1952 quit the paper and went to travel in Europe for six months. He came back to the Spectator as a general reporter the next year.
He did everything, from labour columnist to business writer. At 26, he was city editor of the Spectator and then news editor. In 1961, he was executive editor and held that job for five years.
In 1966, he moved to The Canadian Magazine, a joint venture with the Toronto Star. It meant leaving Hamilton after 21 years, but it was the first step to the most important job in his career editor of The Gazette, which he took over in 1969, the year he turned 40.
Mr. HARVEY was tough. He scared people with a gruff demeanour, which at times seemed like something out of The Front Page. When he arrived at The Gazette, it was losing the newspaper war with rival Montreal Star. Many editors had cozy sinecures. Almost right away, Mr. HARVEY fired the head of every department but one. When one editor came into his office and said he had found another job and was giving two weeks' notice. HARVEY shot back: "Two hours' notice." The man was gone in less.
However, he inspired loyalty in his staff of reporters and editors.
"He could be tough but he stood up for his staff. And he was completely honest and honourable. A stand-up guy," said Brian STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, who covered city hall at The Gazette and was later hired by Mr. HARVEY at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. "You always wanted to impress him."
One night at Martin's, a bar next door to The Gazette, there were complaints about a sports picture in the paper. The photographer said to Mr. HARVEY: " I'd like to see you do better."
Next night he was at the Forum for a Canadiens game. Along with two regular photographers, he took pictures which, unsigned, went back to the office for selection. His picture made the paper.
It was a combination of hot news stories and the ability to turn around a failing newspaper that made his reputation at The Gazette. The police strike in 1969, the October Crisis, riots and labour battles made the period one of the most exciting in the paper's history.
Having secured his reputation as an editor, Mr. HARVEY was lured away to television in 1973 to become chief news editor at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television News in Toronto. His colleagues told him he was crazy.
"My newspaper Friends said: 'How can you make the transition?' Mr. HARVEY said years later. "But I'm surprised more people don't. I believe in changing jobs."
Although he didn't know anything about television, he told people: "I do know pictures." He went to CBS in New York for a crash course in television news.
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television News was as much of a mess as The Gazette had been. There had been a series of editors who hadn't managed to get a handle on the place. Mr. HARVEY took quick action and made it more professional, spending less time on bureaucracy and more time on the main newscast.
One night, an old-time producer was called into his office and the new chief news editor asked him why he hadn't gone with a fresh lead story. The producer replied he couldn't order anyone to do that -- that was the lineup editor's job. Mr. HARVEY disagreed and said: "Put on your coat and go home." The man kept his job, but worked on the desk and not as a producer.
During his short reign at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation News, he brought in fresh faces and got television reporters to think about breaking stories instead of following newspaper headlines. Audience levels rose and so did Mr. HARVEY, moving up the ladder at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. But the promise of a big paycheque lured him to a three-year stint at The Toronto Star starting in 1978.
There, he was first in charge of the editorial page and then became editor in chief and vice-president. He left the Star in 1981 and was replaced by George RADWANSKI, the future federal privacy commissioner, who had worked for him at The Gazette. Mr. HARVEY returned to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, taking over sports for the English network. By 1983, he was vice-president of the entire English network of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
He held that job for seven years. He used to say his favourite part of the job was the power to do programming. He changed the face of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and it has stayed that way. Mr. HARVEY took the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation all Canadian -- it took several years but he stopped running American program in prime time.
"We have handed over this most powerful medium to a foreign country," he told a broadcasting conference in 1990. "Nowhere else in the world had one country imported the total television of another country."
Along with Canadian content, one of his lasting creations was the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's news and current-affairs specialty channel Newsworld. He left the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1991 and worked off and on as a broadcast consultant. He spent a lot of time travelling and took up some rather un-tough-guy hobbies, such as bird-watching and going to the ballet.
Mr. HARVEY, who died after a brief struggle with cancer, leaves his wife Louise LORE, and Lynn and Brian, his two children from an earlier marriage.

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CROSSMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
PLUM, Gerald E., Ph.D.
Dr. Gerald PLUM, psychologist, died in the early hours of Boxing Day, 2003. His daughter Terra and partner Penny LOUBE were with him. Gerry was born in Detroit in 1934 and raised in Farmington, Michigan. He was a man of many gifts, both intellectual and physical. He was the quarterback of his high school football team and a running back at Wayne State University. He was also a pitcher of considerable ability, scouted in his teens by the New York Giants. A scholar, he completed his doctoral studies at the University of Chicago, where he studied with D.O. Hebb, Carl Rogers and Bruno Bettelheim. In 1965, he moved with his young family to British Columbia and taught psychology for a number of years at the University of British Columbia. Later, he taught at King's College in London until his retirement seven years ago. At King's, he served as head of the Social Work Program and Chairman of the psychology department. He also conducted a private practice for many years, and was a consultant to Search, a community mental health project in Strathroy. Gerry was a member of the College of Psychologists of Ontario and British Columbia. He was a member of the Michigan Bioenergetics Society and studied at The Gestalt Institute of Toronto. Following his retirement, Gerry pursued in earnest his life-long interest in drama. He acted in several plays in London, including Shakespeare and musical comedies. For his performance in his final role, he was presented with an adjudicator's special award. In his spare time, Gerry renovated a farmhouse near Mt. Brydges, canoed the Nahanni River, and bicycled from Vancouver to Michigan for his 30th high school reunion. In addition to Penny and Terra, Gerry is survived by his sons Dan and Judd, his brother Tom, his father Irving, and nieces and nephews. His mother Opal died earlier this year, and he lost his beloved son Randy in 1985. Gerry will be sorely missed by many close Friends, associates, and those he served over his long, productive career. Visitation was held Monday, December 29 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at Denning Brothers Fuenral Home, 32 Metcalfe Street West, Strathroy. Funeral service at that location on December 30 at 11 a.m., Reverend Clarence CROSSMAN officiating.

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CROTTY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-04 published
ROGAN, Patricia L. (née CROTTY)
Born August 20, 1930 in New York City. Died March 1, 2003 in Toronto. Predeceased by her husband, Edward ROGAN. Survived by her seven children, Edward, Owen, Daniel, Neal, Patricia, Joseph and Mary. Also survived by her grandchildren, Patrick, Haven, Edward, Kathleen and Michael. Patricia will be buried next to her husband in a private ceremony in Ireland. She will be remembered.

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CROWE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-18 published
William Turner CROWE
By Danielle BOCHOVE Wednesday, June 18, 2003 - Page A24
Father, grandfather, husband and friend. Born September 16, 1911, in Toronto. Died May 24, 2003, in Toronto of pneumonia, aged If life were fair, its length would be a function of how well it was lived. For William Turner CROWE, 91 years was not nearly long enough. He embodied the claim that age is a state of mind. Family often joked that he was "just a big kid," but it was true. Throughout his life, he somehow managed to hold on to the very best qualities of childhood. A clear-eyed enthusiasm for the world, the expectation that each day would hold something to enjoy, the drive to learn anything: astronomy, history, Formula One trivia, mechanics, archeology, snooker.
I remember him commenting, as an old man, on the colour of a stone: how smooth it was, and flat, before skipping it across the water with a fluid vigour. Tobogganing one perfect Christmas Day - he was in his 80s -- he took on a giant. When the toboggan finally flipped, three-quarters of the way down, he was briefly airborne before landing in a heap of laughter and powder. Later, while the younger riders moaned over their aches, he crowed that he hadn't had so much fun in such a long time.
His life seemed to have a disproportionate amount of fun -- and yet it wasn't easy. The Depression and the Second World War were among its defining events. His mother, accepting the threat of disinheritance, had severed all ties with England by marrying a pub owner and moving to Canada. Money was tight. My grandfather remembered spending days staring through a shop window as a boy at a model train he could never afford. Perhaps that's why, as an adult, he sought out chances to fill the needs of children. Money was given to all of us for university, college and first houses.
My grandmother told me another story recently about a lunch with my grandfather just a few years ago. At a nearby table some young men were laughing and joking and he watched them with pleasure, commenting that they seemed like "such nice boys." When it came time to leave, he quietly paid for their meal and left the restaurant before they could find out. A small gesture, but typical of hundreds delivered over 91 years with a generosity of spirit unmatched by anyone except his wife.
His marriage to Edith Dorothy MARK was the most important event of his life. He would pick her up for dates on a motorcycle, much to the shock of the neighbours, but was always a gentleman. He proposed on a ski hill one frosty evening; she says she couldn't wait to get inside to see the ring. In 63 years of marriage, no one ever saw them treat each other with anything but tenderness and respect; each always put the other first.
He was born in Toronto and lived there his entire life. His elder brother Clifford married my grandmother's sister Jo and the four of them were inseparable, traveling together often after their children were grown. A "methods man," he was forced into early retirement -- a blow his family feared would kill him -- but rallied back, focusing his skills on rearranging my grandmother's kitchen for optimum efficiency, along with most of the other systems in the house. At the age of 72 he underwent a triple bypass and amazed the doctors with his determination to recover. I still remember trotting beside him on his daily walk; he could do five kilometres in under an hour. The surgery bought him almost 20 more precious years.
I can say unequivocally that he is the most extraordinary man I've ever known. To have lived 91 years, fully. Participating, giving, with an enthusiasm and crackling curiosity that defied even Alzheimer's until the end. When memory failed, he still commented on his great-granddaughter's blue eyes. In the end, William was extraordinary in the example he set of how an ordinary man can live.
Danielle BOCHOVE is William CROWE's granddaughter.

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CROWE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
CROWE, Doris Mary (née SCANES)
Born in Winnipeg, July 12, 1921, daughter of Richard SCANES and Alice PAYNE, sister of Lenore and Jimmy, married Marshall CROWE, December 5, 1942. Graduate of United College, Winnipeg (B.A.: History and English) awarded highest standing in her class. Doris died on Friday, September 26, 2003, surrounded by family and Friends, after a long and spirited battle with cancer. Beloved wife, dear mother of Tom (Allison), Alison, Helen (David), Sheila (Brian), Abigail, Seumien (Nabo), Le (Ping) and Nick (Irene). Delighted and indefatigable grandmother of Jessica, Caleb, Innie, Susan, David, Adam, Cathy, Yuli, Jonathan, Ben, Rebecca and Ariana. Predeceased by her dear Friends Ann PHELPS and Starr SOLOMON. During World War 2, Doris worked as a reporter for the Vancouver Sun and taught high school. After the war, she accompanied Marshall on diplomatic postings, chiefly to New York and Moscow. During the 60's, she worked for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio and wrote and narrated a series of documentaries on life in the Soviet Union. She also worked tirelessly for the Toronto French School in its early years, helping to establish the first school library. Doris studied public relations in the early 70's, and did a variety of work in that field, including shepherding Harold CARDINAL through the Ottawa launching of ''The Unjust Society''. She also served as public relations director for the Canadian Nurses' Association. She was a member of the Committee for an Independent Canada and campaigned for the provincial and federal Liberal parties in many elections, beginning with Mitchell SHARP's campaign in the Toronto riding of Eglinton in 1963. In her 70's, Doris returned to university to study English history, Russian and Chinese. for the last 30 years of her life, Doris focused on the farm that she and Marshall ran near Portland. Among many enterprises, Doris was instrumental in introducing the Dexter cow into Canada. According to Doris' wishes, there will be no funeral. Arrangements by Scotland Funeral Home, Elgin. The family will receive Friends on Saturday, October 4, 12 to 8 p.m., at the farm, 4421 Old Kingston Road, Portland. In lieu of flowers, donations to the hospice, St. Vincent de Paul Hospital, Brockville (613) 342-4461, ext. 2271 would be most gratefully received. Their compassion, skill and generosity of spirit did much to ease Doris' last days when she could no longer be at her beloved farm. In memory of Doris: plant a garden, serve paella, learn a language, read a book to a child, be kind to an animal, support universal health care, live at peace with nature.

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CROWE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
Kathleen Innes Stewart Roland CROWE
By C.N.R. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Wednesday, November 5, 2003 - Page A26
Sister, friend, actor, social worker. Born April 9, 1908, in London, England. Died August 26, 2003 in New York City, aged Although born in England, Kitty -- or The Doy, as she was called en famille -- spent her early life in Cleveland, Ohio, where our father headed the H.K. Cushing Laboratory for Experimental Medicine at Western Reserve University. Her three brothers (I am the youngest) were born there. Our father, in 1922, moved our mother and the four children to Toronto where we were enrolled in those private schools that met his high standards. My sister went to Havergal College on Jarvis Street in Toronto and hated it. She stuck it out, though, and, on graduation, was accepted into the arts program at University College at the University of Toronto. After graduation, she and a girlfriend went to Europe where, among other adventures, they bicycled through Normandy and Brittany, an unusual escapade for two young women in the late 1920s. It was a life-enhancing experience as the journals she so meticulously kept attest.
Hers was indeed a privileged upbringing but throughout her long life she identified more with the downtrodden. After our father died in 1930, she returned to the family home in Toronto's Lawrence Park where, after our mother died in 1933, she, 10 years my elder, became my surrogate mother.
Next door to us was a family by the name of CROWE and, in 1935, she married the boy next door who went by the imposing moniker of James Fitz-Randolph. Both were aspiring actors and singers and moved to New York. Under their stage names, Kathleen and Norman ROLAND, for the next 30 years or so they appeared in theatres all over the eastern United States and Canada. In 1953, they appeared together at the first Stratford Festival in the famous tent. (Kitty understudied Irene WORTH who was playing Queen Margaret in Richard III. She told me she was terrified that one day Ms. WORTH would be unable to appear because she felt she could not play the part. Ms. WORTH was in robust good health and Kitty's fears were never tested.) Brendan Behan's The Hostage was another vehicle for their talents, as it ran for years off Broadway.
When without a part she augmented her income by writing cookbooks for a major American publisher. Shamelessly, she cribbed recipes from other cookbooks to supplement her own creations (she was a great cook). Proudly she retained her Canadian citizenship and worked for the National Film Board during the Second World War.
Sadly, married life became a hell for Kitty. Eventually, she sued successfully for divorce.
She followed her stage career until well into her 60s, appearing last in Toronto in 1975 in Noël Coward's Present Laughter, which starred Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.
As parts dried up she started another career as a social worker for New York City where her ability to speak Spanish (she also spoke French, German and a smattering of other languages), proved to be a valuable tool. For many years she was also active in the West Side Tenants Association. She hated grasping landlords with a passion and at one time she herself successfully sued her landlord for wrongful eviction. She was not all sugar candy.
During 2001 and 2002 she suffered a series of falls that resulted in fractured bones; she was forced to give up her independence. She moved into the Jewish Home and Hospital which is a fine place but a place to which she could not adapt. Finally, I think, she decided that life was no longer worth living. At 3 a.m. on August 26 last, she died, apparently peacefully.
C.N.R. (Jock) STEWARD/STEWART/STUART is Kathleen CROWE's kid brother.

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