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"CRE" 2003 Obituary


CREAN  CREERY  CREME  CRERAR  CRESINO  CRESS  CRESSY  CRETNEY 

CREAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
Fight master set standards for stage combat
Canadian Press, Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - Page R9
Stratford, Ontario -- Patrick (Paddy) CREAN, a longtime fight director at the Stratford Festival who set international standards on staging combat in theatre, died Monday after an illness. He was 93.
Mr. CREAN, who was a competitive fencer, began choreographing fights in 1932 when he was working in his native England as an actor in The Legends of Don Juan. From then on he was frequently hired to stage fight scenes in theatre and movies such as The Master of Ballantree and The Sword of Sherwood Forest. He worked with actors including Paul SCOFIELD, Laurence OLIVIER, Trevor HOWARD, Alec GUINNESS, Douglas FAIRBANKS Jr. and Errol FLYNN, often acting as FLYNN's stunt double in movies.
Mr. CREAN first came to the Stratford Festival in 1962 to be fight arranger for a staging of Macbeth and ended up by making Stratford his home. He remained as festival fight director until 1983, arranging combat scenes for such demanding productions as The Three Musketeers. He continued to work as an actor, sometimes taking small roles in shows for which he had done fight arranging and also performing a one-man show, The Sun Never Sets. A funeral will be held Saturday in Stratford.

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CREERY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-01 published
Journalist, teacher, a 'fountain of information'
Columnist reputed to have been the only person in the Ottawa Press Gallery who understood the Canada Pension Plan when it was introduced by the Pearson government in 1966
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, October 1, 2003 - Page R7
Journalist Don McGILLIVRAY surrounded himself with thousands of books. Every nook and cranny of his Ottawa home was filled with the 15,000 volumes he had collected over his lifetime.
As a national newspaper columnist and journalism professor who used words for a living, he knew each one of his books intimately. He could pull one off the shelf and immediately find the exact reference he was looking for whether it was a few lines of a T. S. Eliot poem, the history of a word or an obscure piece of Canadian political history.
A voracious reader all his life, Mr. McGILLIVRAY, who died in a Victoria hospital on June 24 at the age of 76, proudly claimed that he had read all the books in the Moose Jaw Public Library by age 12. He later became a serious book collector, a mass that grew over the years until, in the late 1990s, he donated it to the University of Northern British Columbia. When the time came to ship the collection, it took 465 boxes to hold the approximately 15,000 books, many of which were devoted to language and etymology. To his colleagues, Mr. McGILLIVRAY was a walking resource library.
Mr. McGILLIVRAY, who joined the Southam News Ottawa bureau in 1962 as a parliamentary correspondent, was reputed to have been the only person in the Ottawa Press Gallery who understood the Canada Pension Plan when it was introduced by the Pearson government in 1966, and was constantly in demand from other reporters needing help understanding a new budget.
"He was a great fountain of information," said his friend and colleague Tim CREERY. "He just loved talking about politics and policies."
Having started his journalism career at The Regina Leader-Post in 1951 as a reporter and then a city-desk editor, Mr. McGILLIVRAY went on to become a national economics and political columnist for Southam News. Readers of Southam papers across the country turned to Mr. McGILLIVRAY's columns to find complex economic and political policies explained in clear and simple language.
Mr. McGILLIVRAY approached his columns with skepticism and was always suspicious of authority. "He spent a lot of time examining things from an opposite point of view," his son, Murray McGILLIVRAY said.
That didn't always make him a favourite in Ottawa. But that only delighted Mr. McGILLIVRAY, who felt it his duty as a journalist to expose the flim-flam. He believed journalism's highest duty was "the revelation of things that politicians would rather keep hidden," Murray McGILLIVRAY added.
"He was a very independent minded person," Mr. CREERY said. "He sort of questioned everything."
He succeeded in getting himself banned from the Parliamentary Press Gallery's annual dinner by reporting, and inciting other journalists to report on, the sometimes bad behaviour and humorous speeches given there by political leaders and other invited politicians. While his generation of reporters carried the stereotype of hard drinkers, Mr. McGILLIVRAY, a teetotalling Prairie Baptist, didn't take part in the debauchery and he succeeded in getting the once off-the-record dinner on the record.
Donald Gerald McGILLIVRAY was born June 21, 1927, in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan., the fourth of five children to Malcolm and Mary McGILLIVRAY. For the first years of his life he lived on the family's "barren, quarter-section" farm in Archive, Saskatchewan.
Mr. McGILLIVRAY left the farm to study economics at the University of Saskatchewan, before starting his journalistic career in 1951 at The Regina Leader-Post.
In September of the previous year (1950) he had married Julietta KEPNER, whom he met while working for the summer at a hardware store in Moose Jaw. The couple had four children. Julietta died from cancer in 1979.
From Regina, Mr. McGILLIVRAY and his family moved to Winnipeg in 1955 where he worked as a reporter and columnist for The Winnipeg Tribune.
In 1962, the family headed east to Ottawa where Mr. McGILLIVRAY took a job as parliamentary correspondent for Southam News. From there he was posted to Washington and then London, where he covered the Vietnam War protests and the 1967 Six-Day War.
In 1970, he returned to Canada to become associate editor of The Edmonton Journal, but soon returned east in 1972 as editor of The Financial Times of Canada. He returned to the Southam News Ottawa bureau in 1975 and remained there as a national political and economic columnist until the mid-1990s.
Aside from writing, Mr. McGILLIVRAY also mentored a generation of journalists at Montreal's Concordia University and later at Ottawa's Carleton University.
When Mr. McGILLIVRAY officially retired from Southam in 1992, he continued to write his weekly political and business columns, but in 1995 he started showing symptoms of a Parkinson's-like disease that left him unable to read.
He leaves his children Murray, Peigi Ann, Neil and Fionna, his sister Marion and brother Allan. He was predeceased by wife Julietta and brother Archie.
A celebration of Mr. McGILLIVRAY's life is planned for October 19 in Ottawa.

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CREME o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-29 published
Kenneth Fawcett COLLINS
By Alan RAYBURN Thursday, May 29, 2003 - Page A26
Husband, father, grandfather, veteran, volunteer, family historian. Born November 23, 1916, in Haverhill, Massachusetts. Died February 19, in Ottawa, of cancer, aged 86.
Ken COLLINS was born close to the New Hampshire border, into a family with very deep New England roots. His father Bernard (Bern) traced his roots back to the 1600s in that area, while his mother, Eleanor (Elly) McPHERSON, came from Grand Valley in Dufferin County, Ontario Elly's mother, Elizabeth Adaline FAWCETT, was the source of Ken's second name. Bern and Elly emigrated from the United States to Montreal in 1926, and then, in 1930, moved to North Bay, Ontario
In 1941, Ken graduated from Queen's University in Kingston with a degree in chemical engineering and worked in the Welland Chemical Works in Niagara Falls for two years. He then joined the Canadian army's Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, and rose to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. Ken's pride as a commandant of "Reemee" was revealed in his car licence plate: CREME.
Ken served overseas from 1943 to 1946, and was a Normandy veteran. After the war, he held various staff and regimental appointments, mostly in Ottawa. Upon retiring from the army in 1967, Ken was engaged by Carleton University to administer the department of planning and construction until 1982.
During his Queen's graduation week, Ken married Evalyn ROBLIN, who had been raised west of Kingston in Adolphustown Township, Lennox and Addington County. After he discovered that local historians had been mistaken about which of two ancestral Roblin roots were Evalyn's, he vigorously launched into a search of his own family roots. Over a period of some 60 years he accumulated 24 thick binders on family connections. He was able to trace back 18 generations, with King Edward 4th among his ancestors in the 1400s.
Ken and Evalyn had three children, Marianne, Bruce (a fireman who was killed in a fire in 1972), and Elizabeth; also, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Family was very important to Ken; he was very proud of his offspring.
For almost a quarter of a century, Ken was a Friday evening volunteer at the Family History Centre of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on Ottawa's Prince of Wales Drive. There he guided both experienced and novice family historians to find their ancestral records.
Recognizing the value of working with others involved in genealogy (right up there in North American hobby popularity, right after stamp collecting), Ken joined the Ontario Genealogical Society and its Ottawa Branch in 1972. After serving as the chair of the branch in the mid-1970s, he rose through the ranks to become the president of the Ontario Genealogical Society from 1977 to Ken was a prime mover of recording gravestone inscriptions in Ontario's cemeteries. As the Ontario Genealogical Society cemetery inscription coordinator from 1974 to 1992, he saw the number of recorded cemeteries rise from 1,800 to more than 5,000. A spinoff from the cemetery recordings is the much-used Ontario Cemetery Finding Aid on the Internet, which publishes the indexes of the cemetery recordings.
Ken was a member of Rideau Park United Church in the Alta Vista area of Ottawa, and had worked there for 36 years with the Boy Scouts. When his grand_son, John BAIRD (now an Ontario cabinet minister) became a teenager, he guided him to become a Queen's Scout.
Ken COLLINS was a great mentor, friend and gentleman: his contributions to family history studies, cemetery recordings and Scouting will long serve many Ottawa and Ontario generations to come.
Alan RAYBURN is a friend of Ken COLLINS; Edward KIPP contributed to the article.

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CRERAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
Politician, chef, farmer cooked for presidents
He first came to Canada after the Second World War at the invitation of the Dutch ambassador
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, March 5, 2003 - Page R9
Ottawa -- Anton WYTENBURG was a proficient chef who had little time to prepare meals for his wife and 10 children because he was often too busy cooking for others, including presidents and other dignitaries.
"He was never a chef at home, because he was always working in a hotel somewhere or at the bakery, " says his son Rudy of Ottawa, who says his father's specialties were Dutch pastries and cakes.
At one point, Mr. WYTENBURG was a cook at the venerable Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York, where he helped prepare meals for U.S. presidents Dwight EISENHOWER and Harry TRUMAN, and president-to-be John F. KENNEDY. In 1945, he worked as a chef for General Henry CRERAR at a Canadian Officers' Club in Holland.
Mr. WYTENBURG, a native of Delft, the Netherlands, died in Ottawa on January 30. He was 83.
The son of a Dutch tailor, Mr. WYTENBURG completed Grade 8 in Delft and landed a job at a bakery. Later, he moved to Scheveningen to work as a sous chef in an oceanside hotel.
While working there, he learned to speak German, French and English and, during the Second World War, used his language skills as part of the Dutch resistance in its fight against the invading Germans.
Later, while working for Gen. CRERAR, Mr. WYTENBURG was asked by Dr. Jan VAN ROYEN, the Dutch ambassador to Canada, to come to work for him as a chef at the Dutch embassy in Ottawa.
"Anton gladly accepted the opportunity. The Dutch were and are forever grateful for the support of the Canadians during the war, " said Rudy. In 1947, he came to Canada to work at the embassy in Ottawa.
In 1950, when the Dutch ambassador was transferred to Washington, Mr. WYTENBURG worked as a chef at the French embassy in Ottawa before buying a bakery in Ottawa that became the first Dutch pastry shop in the city. The business, renamed Anton's Select Pastries, later expanded to include five outlets.
In 1952, he married Catharina VAN VUGT, also a native of the Netherlands, whom he met when she was a nanny for the secretary to the Dutch ambassador. That year, Dutch Queen Juliana paid a visit to one of Anton's bakeries.
While running their bakeries, the WYTENBURGs made many Friends, including some who farmed outside Ottawa and spoke highly of life in the country. This led them to buy a small farm west of Ottawa in 1962 and in 1964 would see the family give up its bakeries in favour of full-time agriculture on larger Ottawa Valley spreads, first in Richmond and later in Renfrew, where dairy farming would become the family's bread and butter.
As a farmer, Mr. WYTENBURG took a keen interest in agricultural organizations and committees. "He had a way with people, he could diffuse tense situations and always find a solution, " says Rudy.
Over the years, Mr. WYTENBURG's sons took on more of the farming responsibilities, leaving their father with more time for the many organizations he worked with, including the Ottawa-Carleton Safety Council and the Richmond Agricultural Society. In the late 1970s, Friends and neighbours urged him to consider politics.
In 1978, he won a councillor's seat in the rural ward of Goulbourn in 1980, he ran for mayor but lost; he tried again in 1982 and was successful, sitting as Mayor of Goulbourn Township from 1982 through to 1991. He was also on the council of the former Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton.
Moving a large family around the community and the farm was difficult, until Mr. WYTENBURG bought a used, fully stretched Cadillac limousine.
"It sure raised a few eyebrows when we were being chauffeured to the hay fields in a black limo, " recalls Rudy. "It often made for a bit of fun when the boys would ask an unsuspecting gal out on a date."
Mr. WYTENBURG left politics and farming in 1991 at age 72. After retiring, he continued to volunteer his time to help out on committees and task forces and as a strong supporter of the church. At the age of 75, he was the oldest participant in a walkathon for a local charity.
Mr. WYTENBURG leaves 10 children who live in California, Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, Renfrew, Ottawa and in England. Two of them continue to operate the family's 440-hectare farm near Renfrew.

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CRERAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-14 published
Thomas MacDONALD
By Joan ROBINSON Friday, March 14, 2003 - Page A24
Father, husband, caterer. Born November 12, 1915, in Liverpool, England. Died January 25, in Ottawa, of a stroke, aged 87.
Tom MacDONALD was the third of nine children born to William and Mary Ellen MacDONALD. The family emigrated from England to Canada in 1924 and settled in Kingston, Ontario With the outbreak of the Second World War, Tom and his four brothers joined the Armed Forces. Tom enlisted in the Canadian Army on January 25, 1940. He was assigned as batman/driver to Lieutenant-General H. D. R. CRERAR. In 1944, the Kingston Whig Standard featured a photo of "Cpl. T. McDONALD" sewing an extra pip on CRERAR's uniform, marking his promotion to full General; CRERAR was then Commander of the First Canadian Army. During those war years, Tom served with the general in Italy, Sicily, the Netherlands, Belgium, North Africa, France and Germany. One of his duties was to prepare the general's meals; he became proficient at obtaining and preparing reasonable meals with scant resources. It was during this time that he developed a keen interest in food preparation.
After the war, Tom remained in the army. Although he had no professional training, his natural flair for food preparation and presentation led to his employment in Ottawa by National Defence Headquarters as organizer and caterer of official banquets and what was known as "the cocktail party circuit." On a private basis, the United States Embassy also employed him in this capacity.
Among his effects are letters of appreciation from Ambassador Livingston MERCHANT of the U.S. Embassy and one from then-president Dwight EISENHOWER, thanking Tom for his efforts during the Second World War, as well as his contributions during two presidential trips to Ottawa. It concludes: "With best wishes to a former comrade-in-arms."
During this time he also accompanied General CRERAR on official business trips, wherein his role was to assist in the personal needs of the CRERAR family. Many of these trips were to major Canadian cities but in 1947, Tom accompanied General CRERAR on a trade development mission to Hawaii, Hong Kong, Tokyo and Manila. His last international trip took place in the 1960s when, in a similar role, he travelled to Cyprus with a delegation headed by Minister of Defence Paul HELLYER.
In 1965, he was honourably released from the army. He then assumed the position of steward at 24 Sussex Drive. He served with Prime Minister Lester PEARSON from 1965 to 1968 and with Prime Minister Pierre TRUDEAU from 1968 to 1975. He was again responsible for the organization of formal banquets and other entertainment. On one such occasion, a photo much prized by Tom's English mother shows him in formal dress, standing ready to serve the Queen Mother.
Although officially retired in 1975, he maintained his interest in cooking both in his private catering business and at home. He was a lively, fun-loving man and with his wife, Verena, hosted many memorable parties wherein his love of people and sense of humour had full rein.
Tom was proud of his country, his city and his war service. He could be moved to tears by memories of his war years and every year that he was physically able he marched in the Veteran's Day parade wearing his war medals.
In his declining years, he was comforted by the care and companionship of his family and Friends. At Uncle Tom's funeral they volunteered their special memories of him. There was much laughter and few tears as befitted the man. The music of his favourite song We'll Meet Again concluded the ceremony -- sung, of course, by Vera LYNN. He will be missed by many, including nieces, nephews, Friends and surviving comrades-in-arms.
Joan is Tom MacDONALD's niece.

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CRERAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-23 published
Susan Elizabeth CRERAR
By Lauren LINTON and Kelly KIRKLAND, Wednesday, July 23, 2003 - Page A18
Daughter, sister, wife, mother, aunt, grandmother. Born March 30, 1939, in Port Arthur, Ontario Died March 11, 2003, in Delray Beach, Florida, of ovarian cancer, aged 63.
The youngest of two girls, Sue was born to Robert and Laura PRETTIE, a high-profile couple who had moved to Port Arthur, Ontario, to start Northern Wood Preservers Ltd. Sue's strong will and innate sense of fairness were rewarded with her many Friends. Sue would cause trouble if she thought the system was not fair for all. She carried this attitude to boarding school in Toronto where she let it be known that she disagreed with the many rules imposed by the strict girls' school.
After graduating from Havergal College, Sue headed to Vancouver to attend the University of British Columbia. On her second day on campus, Sue met Bill CRERAR at a "registration mixer." Bill said he was quick to "latch onto her and take her off the dating circuit." There they began the love affair that would last more than 44 years.
The children came soon after with Kelly, Lauren, and Steve all born within four years. Sue's philosophy was that if you were home with one child you might as well be home with a few (this seemed reasonable until we had our own kids). The family moved to Berkeley, Calif., where Bill completed his M.B.A. and Sue stayed home with the three young children and became involved in various local charities. After graduation, the family moved to White Plains, New York A fourth child, Andrew, was born in One of Sue's many gifts was her ability to create a home in any environment. We have memories of living in dust and plastic during the many home-renovation projects and eating unidentifiable meals prepared in the microwave aboard a travelling motor home. Mom made it all seem like a great adventure.
Another move brought the family to Toronto in 1967 where Sue could be closer to her sister, Audrey. She volunteered with various non-profit organizations and also served on a number of boards, including the Shaw Festival. In 1975, Sue persuaded a good friend, Diane, that they should open an art gallery, and Hollander York Gallery was founded. She showed us the importance of balancing work and family.
Sue had a great appreciation for the written word. She relished her moments of solitude with a book or newspaper and also had a great talent for expressing herself on paper. When fax machines were invented, Sue saw this new technology as an opportunity soon all family members (including grandparents) were given fax machines and the Family Fax Network was born. And when Sue taught herself how to operate a Macintosh computer, all her faxes arrived neatly typed. When e-mail was the new rage, Sue took it up with passion and couldn't understand why everyone (including her husband!) did not have an e-mail address.
It was as a mother that Sue had the most profound impact. Communication with her two daughters and two sons was daily by phone, fax or e-mail. She was always happy to hear from us and was so wise about so many things, from relationship woes to disciplinary issues with children.
One can never forget Sue's loud, infectious laugh. She laughed at herself when she would tell the story of how her printer broke down and she purchased a new printer only to discover that she had forgotten to plug in the original computer. Human foibles, especially her own, delighted her and she was so quick to see the humour in any situation.
In July, 2001, Sue was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Sue never hesitated to say to curious Friends "I am more than just a cancer patient." She knew the end was near at Christmas 2002 and kept this awareness private between herself and her best friend, Bill.
Lauren and Kelly are Sue's daughters.

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CRESINO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-19 published
DRISCOLL, Father Joseph Vincent Philip Mary "Jakie"
The Jesuits of Winnipeg and the rest of Canada both mourn the loss and celebrate the life and Faith of Father Joseph Vincent Philip Mary (Jakie) DRISCOLL, S.J., who died suddenly at St. Ignatius Parish Rectory on Sunday, December 14th in his 71st year of religious life. The third son of William Francis DRISCOLL and Elizabeth (Lilly) Frances MORRISSEY, he was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A. in 1916, Father DRISCOLL first encountered the Jesuits at Boston College High School where he graduated in 1933. Experiencing and responding positively to a call to be a Jesuit priest himself he entered the novitiate in Guelph, Ontario immediately after completing his high school studies. As a young Jesuit he followed the long and thorough academic program at Guelph and Toronto, taught at Regiopolis college in Kingston, Ontario and was ordained a priest in 1946. He returned to work in Regiopolis in 1974 as well as served as the chaplain of the Royal Military College in Kingston. From 1954-58 he was a Director of the Jean Mance School of Nursing at the Hotel Dièu Hospital in Kingston which was followed by a brief period of Jesuit administration duties in Toronto. With the exception of summers spent in graduate studies at Catholic University in Washington, D.C., and three years in charge of a retreat house near Montreal (1963-66,) from 1959 on until his death Father DRISCOLL devoted his time, talent and spirit to the people of Manitoba. He served in a variety of capacities including university chaplain, fundraiser for St. Paul's High School and St. Paul's College, and a member of the Board of Directors of the St. Boniface Hospital School of Nursing. He was appointed pastor of Saint John Brebeuf Parish in Winnipeg in 1972, serving in that capacity until 1980, was Rector of both St. Paul's High School (1966-72) and of St. Paul's College (1981-84). He played an active role in organizing the 1984 papal visit to Manitoba and assisted the wider community as a member of the B'Nai Brith, Mayor Norrie Award Committee in 1985 and as the Honorary Vice-President of the Canadian Bible Society in 1986. Towards the end of his life he worked in the marriage tribunal of the Archdiocese of Winnipeg and as the Archivist of the Archdiocese. As well, he was actively involved in both the College and the High School, including assignments as alumni chaplain to both, and archivist to the High School.
In addition to the Jesuits of Winnipeg and the rest of Canada, Jakie will be missed by many others including Dr. Donald and Rosemary (niece) CHEW of Niagara Falls, Ontario and Charles CRESINO (cousin) of Ashburn, Virginia. Friends who will mourn the loss of Fr. DRISCOLL come from every generation and sector of life in Winnipeg and beyond. Active until the very end of his life, he brought to all those who knew him a personal integrity and commitment to the Catholic Church and to other faith communities that will be missed.
Prayer services and Funeral Mass were celebrated in Winnipeg. Those wishing to do so may make a donation in Fr. DRISCOLL's memory to the Father Driscoll Legacy Endowment Fund of St. Paul's College, 70 Dysart Rd., Winnipeg, R3T 2M6 or to the Fr. Driscoll Founders' Fund, St. Paul's High School, 2200 Grant Ave., Winnipeg, R3P 0P8.
'God Bless'

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CRESS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-25 published
CASE -
- In memory of our Dad Wilfred March 20th, 1999, our Mother Maizie May 20th, 2001, and our brother Jim June 28th, 1999.
Time will never heal the pain
Nor will it bring them back again
Precious memories we keep in our hearts
With those we'll never part
-Missed and loved always,
Larry and Roberta CRESS and family

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CRESS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-06 published
Hawley CRESS
In loving memory of Hawley CRESS who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Health Centre on Friday, August 1, 2003 at the age of 82 years.
Predeceased by dear wife Elsie (née PEARSON.) Loving father of Larry and wife Roberta of Tehkummah, Jack and friend Julie of Mindemoya, Danny and wife Anita of Mindemoya, Beryl and husband Shane LAIDLEY of Little Current, Patsy and husband Mervin GILCHRIST of Mindemoya. Cherished grandfather of Brent and wife Pam, Jeff and wife Heather, Trevor and wife Lynn, Luke, Philippe, Michael, Melonie and friend James, Meghan, Matthew. Great grandfather of Zack, Jade, Paige, Haley, Jordan, Damion and Desaree. Remembered by brother Norman and wife Carrie and sisters-in-law Elva, Ann, Nelda and Jessie. Predeceased by brothers Harvey, Paul, William, Goldie, Cecil, Roy and sisters Nelda and Crystal. Graveside funeral service was held on Monday, August 4, 2003 in Hilly Grove Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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CRESSY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-03 published
CRESSY, Sybil (née WALKER)
In her 88th year, died peacefully at her retirement home, August 31, 2003. Sybil, predeceased by her loving husband Joe and her son Bill, is survived by her son Gordon, his wife Joanne; and her son, Jim. She was adored by her fantastic grandchildren Jennifer, Jillian, Joseph and Keith. Sybil was a woman of great courage, compassion and warmth; she was a giver throughout her extraordinary life. She was part of a group of dedicated women who volunteered with the Macaulay Child Development Centre for over 60 years. Sybil was the connector in 'The Bridge Club', a group of extraordinary women who nurtured each other and their families for some 70 years. Special thanks go to the truly amazing and kind staff of 4 Teddington Park. Visitation is on Friday September 5th, 2: 00 - 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton West (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.). Funeral Service will be held Saturday September 6th, 2: 00 p.m. at St. Leonard's Anglican Church, 25 Wanless Ave. (east of Yonge Street, 2 blocks north of Lawrence Ave.) Reception follows. Memorial donations to St. Leonard's Church would be appreciated.

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CRETNEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
WATSON, David Barr (M.B.E., Territorial Efficiency Medal, Canadian Forces Decoration, B.Com.)
Retired Partner, Woods Gordon and Co. (now Ernst and Young), Colonel, Royal Canadian Signals (Retd)
Died on Wednesday, April 9, 2003 at Ian Anderson House in Oakville in his 83rd year. He leaves his beloved wife Nancy (CRETNEY,) sons Nigel and Ian, daughters-in-law Natalie and Monica, and grandchildren Matthew, Thomas, Joy, Benjamin, Geoffrey, Christopher and Scott.
He was born in Swansea, Wales and was educated at Haileybury College and The London School of Economics. During World War 2 he was Commanding Officer, 1st British Airborne Corps Signals. He jumped into North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Normandy and Holland, and was awarded the Member of the British Empire and was twice mentioned in dispatches for gallantry. After emigrating to Canada in 1947 he joined the 8th Signal Regt. (Canadian Militia) and later was appointed Hon. Colonel, 709 (Toronto) Communication Regt.
He joined Woods, Gordon and Co., Management Consultants, in Toronto in 1949, and became a Partner in 1953. He established a worldwide reputation as a Management Information Systems specialist and developed many unique computer systems in Canada, U.S.A., United Kingdom, Australia, South Africa, Hong Kong and Iran. He retired in 1981.
He was a member of the Institute of Management Consultants of Ontario, Royal Canadian Military Institute, Oakville Probus Club, Signal Officers Club and Fort York Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion.
Friends may call at the Oakview Funeral Home, 56 Lakeshore Road West, Oakville (905) 842-2252 on Friday, April 11 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be at St. Jude's Church, 160 William Street, Oakville on Saturday, April 12, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to Ian Anderson House, Lions Foundation Dog Guides or the Salvation Army would be appreciated by the family.

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