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"COV" 2003 Obituary


COVEART  COVEY  COVINGTON 

COVEART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-23 published
Mary Elizabeth STARR
By Elizabeth STARR, Michael STARR and Laurie STARR Tuesday, December 23, 2003 - Page A22
Musician, teacher, mother, mother-in-law, sister, granny. Born March 4, 1920, in Toronto. Died August 3 in Toronto, of a brain hemorrhage, aged 83.
Mary STARR lived a full life teaching the cello to generations of students and enjoying a close relationship with her family.
Growing up in Toronto, Mary received her licentiate in cello in 1947 from the then-Toronto Conservatory of Music (now the Royal Conservatory) -- the highest possible diploma, and a rather uncommon achievement at the time for cellists. As a member of the Conservatory orchestra, she remembered seeing "a young kid" who played a piano concerto with the orchestra. The "young kid" was Glenn GOULD. Through the 1940s and 1950s she travelled extensively throughout Ontario playing chamber music with various Canadian musicians who were to become well known: Victor FELDBRILL, Eugene KASH, Stuart HAMILTON, Steven STARYK, and John COVEART among them.
After her future husband Frank (a singer) went to England, he managed to entice Mary over in 1951 by sending her programs of the concerts that were happening in London. There Mary worked, practised, played, went to concerts, and got married in 1952.
After returning to Canada (and two children later), Mary's teaching career was well under way. Through her career she taught with the Metropolitan Toronto School Board as an itinerant cello teacher, privately with the Royal Conservatory of Music, and in the Seneca College Suzuki program. She taught three-year-olds, school-aged children, high-school students, university students and even a few of the parents of her students. After years of doing four to six schools per day walking up three flights of stairs (it always seemed to be three flights of stairs) with a cello and music, she left to concentrate on private teaching. Although a number of her students went on to become professional cellists, Mary remained a tireless advocate of the fundamental value of musical education to developing and informing the enjoyment of the art of music throughout one's life; this was more important to her than becoming a professional musician.
Whether at music camp where she was a faculty member for many years, or her regular Monday night quartet sessions where we will always appreciate the warm vibrations and wonderful harmonies that crept through our house, the opportunity to play chamber music, just for fun, was one of the great pleasures for Mary throughout her life.
With the death of Frank in 1969, Mary had to work hard to support the family to cover all the "needs" and most of the "wants." She did this admirably.
The last six years of Mary's life, after moving into an apartment in her son and daughter-in-law's house, were surely among her best. There she had security with independence, community with privacy, and a granddaughter who lived just downstairs. She would sit ensconced in her big green chair, content to let life swirl around her as she read, needle-pointed, embroidered, or knitted.
Nothing thrilled Mary more than when 11-year-old Laurie and a few of her Friends took up cello last year. So began private teaching all over again -- not something she expected at the age of 82, but this was much more fun!.
Mary was Mary right to the end. After making an impressive recovery from a broken hip and arm suffered through an encounter with a revolving door, she was soon to be discharged from the rehabilitation hospital. She was in good spirits, had her sense of humour, and craved her "big green chair." She worked hard for that goal that unfortunately was not to be.
Elizabeth and Michael are Mary's children; Laurie is Mary's granddaughter.

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COVEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-04 published
Died This Day -- 269 airline passengers, 1983
Thursday, September 4, 2003 - Page R9
All aboard Korean Air Lines flight 007 killed when plane shot down by Soviet fighter after straying into Soviet airspace; dead included nine Canadians: Mary Jane HENDRIE of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario; George PANAGOPOULOS, Marilou COVEY, Chun Lan YEH and San-Gi LIM, all of Toronto; François DE MASSY and François ROBERT of Montreal; Larry SAYERS of Stoney Creek, Ontario; and Rev. Jean-Paul GRÉGOIRE, a Tokyo resident.

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COVINGTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-14 published
SMITH, Ian Wilson (October 5, 1935 - June 8, 2003)
Ian died with great dignity, after a valiant struggle with cancer ending in the caring environment of Lisaard House, Cambridge, surrounded by loving Friends and family. Deepest thanks to the staff at Lisaard House and Hopesprings who provided a beacon of compassion during his struggle. Ian had an extensive career in marketing after graduating from McGill University. In later years, he had his own marketing consulting business. We will remember his great love of the outdoors with a deep affection for Caledon and the Grand River. His enthusiasm for the people and things he loved, his wonderful command of the English language combined with strong opinions and a dry sense of humour made him a colourful conversationalist. Ian was deeply moved by the caring Friendship of Beth SALHANY, Chaplin Ken BEAL, Joe and Getta DOYLE, Jim PUTT, Diane SIROIS, Desmay SMITH and many other special Friends who helped him on his journey. Ian, son of the late Sydney SMITH, will be greatly missed by his daughter Megan THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (daughter of Daphne SMITH) son-in-law Mike THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and granddaughters Kendra and Kristen. He is survived by his daughter Jennifer FOX, granddaughter Chaelene, mother Dorothy, sister Diane COVINGTON, niece and nephew Tara and Tom McMURTY. Donations can be sent to Lisaard House, Cambridge (519) 650-1121 in Ian's memory.

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COVINGTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
SMITH, Ian Wilson (October 5, 1935 - June 8, 2003)
Ian died with great dignity, after a valiant struggle with cancer ending in the caring environment of Lisaard House, Cambridge, surrounded by loving Friends and family. Deepest thanks to the staff at Lisaard House and Hopesprings who provided a beacon of compassion during his struggle. Ian had an extensive career in marketing after graduating from McGill University. In later years, he had his own marketing consulting business. We will remember his great love of the outdoors with a deep affection for Caledon and the Grand River. His enthusiasm for the people and things he loved, his wonderful command of the English language combined with strong opinions and a dry sense of humour made him a colourful conversationalist. Ian was deeply moved by the caring Friendship of Beth SALHANY, Chaplin Ken BEAL, Joe and Getta DOYLE, Jim PUTT, Diane SIROIS, Desmay SMITH and many other special Friends who helped him on his journey. Ian, son of the late Sydney SMITH, will be greatly missed by his daughter Megan THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (daughter of Daphne SMITH) son-in-law Mike THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and granddaughters Kendra and Kristen. He is survived by his daughter Jennifer FOX, granddaughter Chaelene, mother Dorothy, sister Diane COVINGTON, niece and nephew Tara and Tom McMURTRY. Donations can be sent to Lisaard House, Cambridge (519) 650-1121 in Ian's memory.

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