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"COU" 2003 Obituary


COULTER  COULTIS  COURTRIGHT  COURVILLE  COUSINS  COUSLAND 

COULTER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
Robert Thomas COULTER
In loving memory of Robert Thomas COULTER who passed away Sunday Morning, June 29th ,2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital - Memorial Site at the age of 59 years.
Beloved husband of Lenna (CASEY) COULTER predeceased 1999. Cherished son of Lloyd and Elsie COULTER predeceased. Loving brother of Ernest (wife Marilyn) COULTER of Parry Sound, Mary FRASER (husband Don predeceased) of Falconbridge. Dear brother-in-law of Joan LAFAIVRE (husband Len) of Haileybury. Sadly missed by loving nieces and nephews and their families. Funeral Service in the R. J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury, Wednesday, July 2nd, 2003 at 1 pm. Friends may call after 12 noon on Wednesday. Cremation at the Parklawn Crematorium.
also linked as linked as LEFEBVRE

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COULTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-06 published
SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, Edward Cavell
Group Captain, Royal Canadian Air Force (retired), Distinguished Flying Cross, Canadian Forces Decoration, died peacefully on November 29, 2003 in Tsawwassen, British Columbia. He was 87. Ed SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER was born in Preston (now Cambridge,) Ontario on March 9th, 1916, and joined the Royal Canadian Air Force on November 5, 1940, as an Airman 2nd Class and had risen to the rank of Group Captain by the time he retired in 1968, after 28 years of service. He served in two tours of operations and was Executive Assistant to two Air Vice Marshals, at Eastern Air Command and Air Force Headquarters in Ottawa. He saw active duty as a Navigation Officer in 5 and 11 Squadrons during the Second World War, on successful anti-submarine patrols in Canso PBYs over the North Atlantic; he later served in 412 Squadron. He married Bernice May COULTER of Pugwash, Nova Scotia on October 30, 1941 and had three children, Gregory, Peter and Virginia. After teaching Military History at Royal Military College during the early 50s he attended the Officer's Staff College at Bracknell, England in 1955, returning to Canada as Commanding Officer of Mont Apica Radar Station in Quebec. In 1960 he was posted to Madison, Wisconsin as Canadian Liaison Officer with North American Aerospace Defense Command. After a final tour of duty at Air Force Headquarters in Ottawa he retired, first to Florida, then to Kelowna, British Columbia. He became a stockbroker, then managed a specialty steel company and finally became a realtor before retiring in 1982 in Tsawwassen, where he had lived since 1971. He was an avid birder, traveler and sailor and had circumnavigated Vancouver Island in his Bayfield 29 with his brother Elmer. He is survived by Bea, his loving wife of 62 years, and his three children in Vancouver, Toronto and Penticton, their spouses and his five grandchildren, Morgan, Lauren, Miles, Chelsea and Weston. By his request, there will be no funeral. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. Per Ardua Ad Astra

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COULTIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-19 published
COULTIS
-In loving memory of a dear father and grandfather Wilfred Dell who passed away February 18, 1998.
In a little country graveyard
Where gentle breezes blow,
Lies one we loved so dearly,
Calm and peaceful, he is sleeping
Sweetest rest that follows pain.
We, who loved him, sadly miss him,
But trust in God, we'll meet again.
--Always remembered by daughter Corrine GILL, son Don COULTIS, his wife Marlene and grandchildren.

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COULTIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
R. J. Leland COULTIS
In loving memory of R. J. Leland COULTIS who passed away Saturday morning, May 3rd, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital-Memorial Site at the age of 66 years.
Beloved husband of Gladys (WALLI) COULTIS of Sudbury. Loving father of Richard and Philip both of Copper Cliff and Norma BELANGER of Sudbury. Cherished grandfather of Kaitlyn and Justin. Dear son of Phillip and Jessie COULTIS predeceased. Dear brother of Laureen BAILEY (husband Arden predeceased) of Sudbury, Loretta PYETTE (husband Eugene) of Tehkummah, Georgina MacKENZIE (husband Jim) of Little Current and George predeceased. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews.
At Leland's request there will be no visitation or service.
Cremation with interment of the cremains in the family plot at Waters Cemetery.
Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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COULTIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-15 published
COULTIS
-In loving memory of Ruby Mae, who passed away one year ago on October 22, 2002.
This is for you,
For the mother, wife and grandma we love,
For the one who helped us
Through all our childhood tears and failures.
For the lady who was a wonderful example of
what more women should be.
For the mother, wife and grandma whose
love and devotion to her family was marked by strength and guidance.
We respected and admired you so.
-Much love and sadly missed by daughter Corrine GILL, son Don COULTIS and wife Marlene, good Friends John and Pat NOVACK and families.

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COURTRIGHT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
COURTRIGHT, James Milton
Died Friday, February 21, 2003 in Kingston, Ontario, age 88. Predeceased by his loving wife Mary Roche COURTRIGHT. Survived by his sister Celina Mary COURTRIGHT, Ottawa, and his 8 children Joseph (Nancy), Ottawa, James (Mildred), Calgary, Tricia (Mike), Calgary, Stephen, Kingston, John (Dali), Calgary, Mary Ellen (Alan), Lochiel, Tony (Martha), Toronto and Frank, Kingston, and 14 grandchildren. Born in North Bay, Ontario and raised in Ottawa. Graduate of the University of Ottawa and Queen's University. Professional Engineer, member of Canadian Olympic Team Berlin 1936, Gold Medal javelin thrower in the British Empire Games Sydney 1938. Career employee of Shell Canada. Retired Vice Principal of Queen's University. The family will receive Friends at the Robert J. Reid and Sons Funeral Home, 309 Johnson Street (at Barrie Street), Kingston, on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial at Saint Mary's Cathedral, 279 Johnson Street, on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 at 10: 30 a.m. Cremation. Friends are invited to a reception at the Robert J. Reid Funeral Home following the funeral mass. A private interment will take place at a later date at Saint Mary's Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer Society would be greatly appreciated. Online Guest Book ReidFuneralHome.com (613) 548-7973.

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COURTRIGHT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
He struck gold at the old Empire games
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page R7
Jim COURTRIGHT, who has died, aged 88, was one of Canada's top track-and-field athletes, winning a gold medal in the javelin throw at the 1938 British Empire Games in Sydney.
Just getting to the meet was a marathon for Mr. COURTRIGHT, an engineering student at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario The price of a train ticket to Vancouver beyond his means, he found work as a prisoner escort, travelling cross-country in a converted box car while handcuffed to a man facing deportation.
In any event, he found his fare and went on to join the Canadian team which arrived in Australia on January 15, 1938.
In the javelin throw, Mr. COURTRIGHT faced formidable competition in Stanley LAY of New Zealand and Jack METCALFE of Australia. LAY, a sign writer by trade, had been a capable cricketer who put his arm to great success. METCALFE was a superb athlete whose specialty was the triple jump, in which he won a bronze at the Berlin Olympics in 1936 and gold at the Empire Games in 1938. In the end, it was the Canadian who prevailed, followed by LAY and METCALFE.
Despite his gold medal, Mr. COURTRIGHT was overshadowed by Eric COY of Winnipeg, who had won two medals and so was awarded the Norton H. Crowe Trophy as Canada's outstanding amateur athlete that year. Mr. COURTRIGHT also trailed Mr. COY and sculler Bob PEARCE in voting for the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada's top male athlete, a prize open to amateurs and professionals. Mr. PEARCE won the trophy.
Later in 1938, Mr. COURTRIGHT unleashed a throw of 62.74 metres, an intercollegiate record at the time that still ranks as the third longest in Queen's University history. He broke his leg in an accident at a gold mine in Northern Ontario in the summer of 1939, yet recovered to play guard for the school's basketball team the following winter.
James Milton COURTRIGHT was born in 1914 to a civil engineer and the daughter of the town sheriff in North Bay, Ontario The family moved to Ottawa and the boy participated in football and field events at Glebe Collegiate.
Mr. COURTRIGHT placed third nationally in the javelin in 1934 while still a student at the University of Ottawa. He finished second the following year behind Mr. COY.
In 1936, the Ottawa student was the best in the land and attended the Berlin Olympics that summer. One of 28 competitors in the javelin, Mr. COURTRIGHT's best throw of 60.54 metres was too short to qualify for the final round. He finished 14th in an event won by Gerhard STOECK of Germany, whose winning toss of 71.84 metres was inspired by chanting crowds at the Olympic stadium, among them Adolf Hitler.
The disappointment of his Berlin performance spurred Mr. COURTRIGHT to greater success in throwing events. In 1937, he was Canada's intercollegiate champion in javelin and the shot put.
In July, he travelled to Dallas to compete at a 200-athlete meet organized as part of the city's Greater Texas and Pan-American Exposition. Mr. COURTRIGHT won the gold medal in javelin at the Cotton Bowl. The success of the meet inspired the organizing of the first official Pan-American Games fourteen years later.
Mr. COURTRIGHT attended postgraduate classes in engineering at Queen's, where he did double-duty as star athlete and track coach. He was also president of the student body in his final year.
After graduation, Mr. COURTRIGHT joined Shell Canada as a refinery engineer in Montreal in 1941. As he was promoted he accepted back-and-forth postings from Montreal to Toronto to Vancouver to Toronto to Montreal to Toronto, including a stint as a public-relations co-ordinator.
He became a vice-principal at Queen's in 1970, a job he held until retirement nine years later.
Mr. COURTRIGHT died on February 21, just days after the 65th anniversary of his triumph in Sydney. He leaves eight children and sister Celina COURTRIGHT of Ottawa. He was predeceased by his wife, Mary (née Roche), and three brothers.
In 1958, a moving van loaded with the family's possessions caught fire and burned, destroying many of Mr. COURTRIGHT's medals and trophies. A prize rescued from the ashes was the gold medal from the British Empire Games. It is now in the hands of a grand_son.

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COURVILLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-15 published
Radio pioneer built network
He founded Ontario's first French-language radio station in 1951 when his local station denied francophones airtime.
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, June 16, 2003 - Page R7
He started in business as a butcher, and later was a soldier and a hotelier, but Conrad LAVIGNE's first love was show business. Whether he was operating the television stations in Northern Ontario that became the largest privately owned television broadcast system in the world, appearing at the staid proceedings of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, or at conventions, Mr. LAVIGNE often delighted those within earshot with jokes, stories, witty comments -- even singing.
Like the time he sang grace during the annual meeting of the Association for French Language Broadcasters in the 1970s.
"Members of the head table, including myself and Premier Bill DAVIS, walked into the room and stood behind our chairs," recalls Pierre JUNEAU, chairman of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission from 1968 to 1975.
"Mr. LAVIGNE, who was chairman of the French-language broadcasters group, began singing grace in French, and with his very strong voice. People felt sort of strange with this."
When he was done, Mr. LAVIGNE looked at Premier DAVIS and quipped: "Well, Mr. Premier, this is to show you that when you are chairman, you can do whatever you like."
J. Lyman POTTS, former vice-president of Standard Broadcasting, remembers the time in the early 1960s when Mr. LAVIGNE appeared before the Board of Broadcast Governors -- predecessor of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission -- in support of a radio or television station licensing application.
At the beginning of his presentation, Mr. LAVIGNE expressed his regrets that Board of Broadcast Governors member Bernard GOULET had died at few days earlier. Then, without skipping a beat, he looked toward the ceiling and said: "If Bernie were here today, I think he would vote for my application."
"It broke up the room," says Mr. POTTS. "If ever a meeting got dull he'd liven things up. It was a joy to find him at meetings. He was a unique personality."
Mr. LAVIGNE, who was born in the small town of Chénéville, Quebec, on November 2, 1916, and raised in Cochrane, Ontario, died in Timmins, Ontario on April 16 following a lengthy battle with emphysema. He was 86.
Friends, family and business associates say Mr. LAVIGNE had show business in his blood in his late teens. On many evenings, the young man who moved to Timmins from Cochrane at age 18 to open a small grocery store and butcher shop with his uncle would act in plays in the hall of a local church. But he didn't get into the entertainment business in a big way until after he helped Canada's war effort, got married and started his life as an entrepreneur in the hotel business.
In 1942, he sold his butcher shop and enlisted in the Canadian infantry. He became a commando training officer while stationed at Vernon, British Columbia, and in 1944 headed overseas. While on a furlough from Vernon he returned to Timmins and married Jeanne CANIE. The couple raised seven children.
Mr. LAVIGNE returned to Canada in 1946 and bought the Prince George Hotel in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, which at the time was a booming gold-mining town. He sold the business in 1950.
He entered the world of media and entertainment by founding CFCL, the first French-language radio station in Ontario in 1951, in what, essentially, was his way of ensuring the area's large French-speaking population had a voice in the North.
Michelle DE COURVILLE NICOL of Ottawa said her father launched the station after a group of francophones that he was part of in Kirkland Lake was told by the manager of an English-language radio station that they would no longer be given regular air time to discuss issues of interest to French people.
"He was very proud of being a francophone," says Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL. " When he was told that his compatriots would no longer be welcome on the local station he said, 'Oh, ya!' and got the idea of starting a French-language radio station. He moved to Timmins, applied for a licence and got it."
CFCL soon attracted a faithful audience, especially in Northwestern Quebec, where it could be heard more clearly than French stations in Montreal.
In a 1988 interview with Northern Ontario Business, Mr. LAVIGNE remembered the time he hired a relative unknown named Stompin' Tom CONNORS to perform live on CFCL. The radio station was located above a jewellery store and the pounding from Mr. CONNORS's size-11 boots caused china to fall off the shelves in the store below.
Radio was his first love until the mid-1950s when, on a business trip to southern Ontario, he saw his first television broadcast, on WHAM from Rochester, New York He fell for the concept of television and he and an engineer friend drove to Rochester and learned everything they could about the magic medium of television.
Back in Timmins, Mr. LAVIGNE bought a hill in the north end of the town, named it Mont Sacré-Coeur, built a road to the foot of his hill, and began blasting rock and working in earnest to put a television station on the air. By 1956, CFCL-television was a reality.
"There was always the fear of failure because of the sparse population," Mr. LAVIGNE said at the time. "But we had an engineer with us named Roch DEMERS, who later became president of Telemedia, and together we started putting up rebroadcasting stations between 1957 and 1962."
Kapuskasing's rebroadcasting station was the first such facility in Canada, and it added another portion of the sparsely populated northeastern Ontario market to the growing station's network. Eventually, Mr. LAVIGNE built rebroadcasting stations in Chapleau and Moosonee, Ontario and Malartic, Quebec, and by the time expansion was completed, CFCL-television served 1.5 million people. Eventually, he built the station into the world's largest privately owned system.
For many years he appeared on a very popular CFCL program known as the President's Corner, during which he would sit on camera in a comfortable chair and read and respond to letters from viewers.
Between 1962 and 1970, Mr. LAVIGNE's television network entered the world of high technology with its own microwave network. Mr. LAVIGNE had the northeastern Ontario television market virtually all to himself for about 20 years until the Canadian Television Network (CTV) arrived on the scene. He reacted by building new stations in North Bay and Sudbury with a rebroadcasting station in Elliot Lake to serve Manitoulin Island. Expansion continued in 1976 with the purchase of a bankrupt television station in Pembroke, in the Ottawa Valley. Eventually, Mr. LAVIGNE's private network stretched from Moosonee to Ottawa, and from Hearst to Mattagami, Quebec
"When we first started we had the market all to ourselves," he told Northern Ontario Business. "We had 20 hours a week of local programming, and it was beautiful. We gave the North a unified voice. One time, during a forest fire near Chapleau, our messages arranged for accommodations for 1,000 people in Timmins."
Mr. LAVIGNE divested himself of his broadcasting holdings in 1980, primarily because he was refused permission to operate a cable television service in the North. He remained a director of Mid-Canada Television, the network that grew from his little Timmins station in 1956, and was chairman of the board of Northern Telephone Ltd. For a number of years, he served on the board of the National Bank of Canada, and for 10 years served on the board of ICG Utilities (formerly Inter City Gas.)
His life after broadcasting also included 20 years as a property developer in the Timmins area.
"He was always a physically active person," says Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL. "In the years he was setting up his television stations he would often go out with the engineers. He was not as happy sitting behind his desk."
Mr. LAVIGNE was elected to the Canadian Broadcasting Hall of Fame in 1990. His wife died in 1995. He leaves Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL and six other children, Marc, Andrée, Nicole, Jean-Luc, Pierre and Marie-France.

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COUSINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
ALLAN, Gavina Y. (née BROWN)
Survived by her husband William, brother Donald Grant BROWN (Katherine,) sister Olga Marion COUSINS (William,) nephews and nieces Ian BROWN (Wendy), Kevin BROWN (Katherine), Randolph COUSINS (Anne), Anne GOODCHILD (Wayne,) grand nephews and nieces Graham, Colin, Andrew and Shawn BROWN, Russell and Kerry COUSINS and Monica and Justine GOODCHILD. Private family arrangements have been made. In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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COUSLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-30 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Neil Alexander
Born in Morriston, Swansea, South Wales. Died at home on May 29, 2003 at age 77. Dear husband of Suzanne COUSLAND. Fondly remembered by family and Friends. The funeral service will be held in the Chapel of the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West on Monday, June 2 at 3: 00 p.m. with a reception to follow in the Park Room of the funeral home. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, the Alzheimer Society of Metro Toronto or the charity of your choice.

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