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"COT" 2003 Obituary


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COTE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Margaret Velma ROWE
In loving memory of Margaret Velma ROWE at Manitoulin Health Centre in Little Current on Sunday, January 5, 2003 at the age of 85 years.
Predeceased by husband Frank ROWE (WW2 Oct 27, 1944.)
Loving mother of Kenneth and Dorothy ROWE, Joan and Matt COTE. Cherished grandmother of Michael and Angela, Kim HARRIS, Lori Robert, Tim and Carol, Dave Brenda. Special great grandmother of Dylan, twins Brianna and Kierra, Brianna, Alanna, Stephen and Devin. Will be missed by sisters Mildred VAREY and Ivy COWAN and brother Cliff VAREY, predeceased by Milf and Manely. Aunt of many nieces and nephews.
Visitation was on Tuesday, January 7, 2003. Funeral Service is at 2: 00 p.m. Wednesday January 8, 2003 both at Island Funeral Home.

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CÔTÉ o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-17 published
Nancy Louise (WEMIGWANS) SHAWANA
In loving memory of Nancy SHAWANA, March 7, 1936 to September 10, 2003.
Nancy SHAWANA, a resident of Wikwemikong, passed away at the Wikwemikong Nursing Home, on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 at the age of 67 years. She was born in Wikwemikong, daughter of Esther ANNIMIKWAAN and the late Adolphus WEMIGWANS (predeceased January 1946). She was a member of the Catholic Church and the Homemaker's. Nancy had many hobbies and interests including quilting, putting puzzles together and Bingo. She was an avid outdoorswoman, who enjoyed playing with the grandchildren, and visiting with family and Friends. Nancy has left happy memories that will be cherished by family, Friends and staff and residents at the nursing home where she lived and worked. Beloved wife of the late Joe Alex SHAWANA (September 1999.) Loving mother of Gordon WEMIGWANS (wife Julia,) Clement SHAWANA (friend Irene) of Wikwemikong, Howard (friend Sheila,) James SHAWANA (wife Marcella) of Niagara Falls. Her son Justin predeceased her. Dear grandmother of 13 grandchildren and 23 great grandchildren. Predeceased by 2 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild. Loving sister of Lawrence (wife Agatha) WEMIGWANS, Beatrice BONDY (husband David predeceased,) Rozina BRASS, Ronnie (wife Gail) ANNIMIKWAAN, Patsy CÔTÉ (friend Arnold,) sister-in-law Leona WEMIGWANS and Margaret SHAWANA (husband Lloyd predeceased.) Predeceased by Francis WEMIGWANS and Marcella LAPINSON. Also survived by many nieces and nephews.
Friends called the St.Ignatius Church, Buzwah on Thursday, September 11, 2003. Funeral service was held on Saturday, September 13, 2003 from Holy Cross Mission, Wikwemikong. Father Doug McCarthy officiated. Interment in Wikwemikong Cemetery.

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COTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-22 published
She danced on tabletops of Ottawa
Former reporter with capital connections hosted parties for the powerful and waged a spirited campaign to save railway cabooses
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, January 22, 2003, Page R5
Most who knew her have a story to tell about Starr SOLOMON, a journalist and public-relations practitioner who for years hosted glamorous parties in Ottawa that attracted a who's who of cabinet ministers, bureaucrats and media people.
Ms. SOLOMON, the widow of Hy SOLOMON, former Ottawa bureau chief for The Financial Post, has died in Toronto. She was 64.
Long-time friend and colleague Walter GRAY/GREY remembers the time Ms. SOLOMON convinced former Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY and Liberal Member of Parliament Sheila COPPS -- for years Mr. MULRONEY's nemesis -- to sing together at the National Press Club in Ottawa in the mid-1980s, following the annual Parliamentary Press Gallery dinner.
"They sang a duet. The song was You Made Me Love You," says Mr. GRAY/GREY, a former Globe and Mail bureau chief in Ottawa, who played the piano while the two politicians crooned in tandem. Ms. COPPS is now Canada's heritage minister.
Edna HAMPTON, one of Ms. SOLOMON's closest Friends, said acquaintances, colleagues and politicians always looked forward to dinner parties at the SOLOMON home in Ottawa's trendy Glebe neighbourhood. Trouble was, you never knew when the meal would be served.
"I always used to eat first because the parties would zip along and she would let dinner go. You might eat at 8, you might eat at 11 . . . but you always knew the food would be good," said Ms. HAMPTON, a retired journalist.
Ms. SOLOMON was born in Ottawa and moved to North Bay, Ontario, as a child, where she attended elementary and high school. In the late 1950s, she landed a reporting job with The North Bay Nugget, where Ms. HAMPTON was a senior reporter at the time. Later, The Ottawa Citizen hired her as a reporter and she wrote under the byline Starr COTE, the surname of her first husband.
"She was always full of energy and fond of fun assignments," recalls Ms. HAMPTON. " She would cover anything from a royal tour to a St. Patrick's Day event up the Ottawa Valley."
Among her plum assignments was the visit to Ottawa by U.S. president John F. KENNEDY and his wife, Jacqueline. She also wrote restaurant reviews for The Citizen, where she developed a reputation as a lively writer who was quick-witted, entertaining and personal. Ms. SOLOMON often fought it out for the big local stories with Joyce FAIRBAIRN, a reporter with the now-defunct Ottawa Journal. Ms. FAIRBAIRN later became a Senator.
Ms. SOLOMON left The Citizen in the mid-1960s and moved to Toronto, where she worked with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a writer/producer. She married Mr. SOLOMON on January 23, 1966. The couple lived in Toronto until Mr. SOLOMON was transferred to Washington to open a bureau for The Financial Post.
When the SOLOMONs returned to Ottawa, Ms. SOLOMON and a partner formed a public-relations firm. She quickly became a fixture in the city's media and political circles, a move Mr. GRAY/GREY calls "networking at its best. She had a wide range of Friends and she used these connections to her greatest advantage. I wish I had her Rolodex."
For about 10 years in the 1980s, Ms. SOLOMON and Mr. GRAY/GREY worked at the same public-relations firm, where they teamed up on a variety of projects.
"There was the day the African chief Butelezi arrived in Ottawa as a front for a group of Canadian businesses trying to develop business relations with South Africa. I was assigned to shepherd the chief around town," says Mr. GRAY/GREY. " Starr was to accompany his lady, the lovely Princess Irene, whose sole interest was to shop -- especially at Zellers. As they made their departure laden down with Zellers bags. I think the princess gave Starr a tip for her services."
The pair also worked together on an unsuccessful campaign to stop the Canadian National Railway from eliminating railway cabooses. "The cabooses disappeared, but to this day, the Save the Caboose sweatshirt has been the most comfortable sweatshirt in our respective wardrobes," says Mr. GRAY/GREY.
Over the years Ms. SOLOMON volunteered her public-relations skills for many campaigns. She was a founding member of the Legal Education and Action Fund, which was established to advance women's equality rights, and served on the board of directors of the Ottawa Civic Hospital.
As a couple, the SOLOMONs were known in Ottawa for throwing glamorous parties, some planned, some spontaneous, that attracted the leading cabinet ministers, writers and journalists of the day. Ms. SOLOMON entertained and amused guests with her wit and political insights, while her husband was an engaging conversationalist whose business and political insights held the attention of politicians and bureaucrats.
Those who attended their soirees remember Ms. SOLOMON as a welcoming hostess and terrific cook, whose specialty was Greek and Mediterranean dishes. When guests arrived, she was always beautifully dressed and "the records were on the turntable," recalls Mr. GRAY/GREY. " Patsy Cline was her favourite. But also lots of jazz -- her friend Brian Browne, Oscar Peterson, Oliver Jones." Often guests would sing and dance around the SOLOMONs' dining-room table.
"We did have serious discussions on serious subjects, from time to time," adds Mr. GRAY/GREY.
Former Ottawa Citizen food editor and restaurant reviewer Kathleen WALKER remembers Ms. SOLOMON as "literally . . . the kind of person who danced on tabletops. She was just wonderful and wild. We had a ball together. Great sense of humour. A terrific lady."
She will also be remembered as a great friend "who was there in thick and thin if you had a problem," says Mr. GRAY/GREY.
After her husband died in 1991, Ms. SOLOMON moved back to Toronto, where she did volunteer consulting and public relations work for various organizations, including Legal Education and Action Fund and a Greek nursing home. She was also a trustee of the Hyman SOLOMON Award for Excellence in Public Policy Journalism, established to honour her husband's legacy.
Ms. SOLOMON leaves her two sons, Adam and Ben, two grandchildren and two brothers. A celebration of her life is to be held at the National Press Club in Ottawa on January 29 at 5: 30 p.m.
Starr SOLOMON, journalist, public-relations specialist; born Ottawa, February 27, 1938; died Toronto, January 3, 2003.

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CÔTÉ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
Hockey News co-founder had winning formula
By James CHRISTIE Friday, April 11, 2003 - Page S10
Toronto -- No one was going to get rich from The Hockey News, Ken McKENZIE freely admitted. The wealth he shared was in the information it contained for fans and those in the hockey industry.
McKENZIE who died Wednesday at Trillium Hospital in Mississauga, was co-founder 1947 -- along with Will CÔTÉ -- of the publication that came to be known as hockey's Bible. He was 79.
His son, John McKENZIE, said Ken died suddenly when he went into septic shock following surgery for colon cancer.
Ken McKENZIE and CÔTÉ birthed a magazine that was a landmark in the Canadian periodicals industry -- a sport publication that survived when so many failed and folded. It evolved from a house organ for the National Hockey League -- McKENZIE was originally an National Hockey League publicist -- into an encyclopedic, authoritative publication. The content matured from reprints of stories by hockey beat writers in six National Hockey League towns to exclusive columns by The Hockey News's own editors and writers such as Steve DRYDEN and Bob McKENZIE (no relation,) who could challenge the National Hockey League and international hockey establishment. Ken McKENZIE was presented with the Elmer Ferguson Award for his pioneering role on the magazine's 50th anniversary in 1997 and inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.
"He loved hockey and sports of all kinds," said John McKENZIE, a correspondent with American Broadcasting Company News in New York. "He had this idea when he was in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He got up on a table in the mess hall and called his buddies around and said 'If I started a hockey paper, would you guys buy it?'
"They all cheered. He started with only $383 and The Hockey News was born."
Ken McKENZIE cited the figure as precisely $383.81 in a 50th anniversary story in The Globe and Mail. He was famed for keeping a close eye on finances down to the penny.
Along with editing associate Charlie HALPIN, McKENZIE operated the paper on a shoestring with a handful of employees. Newspaper beat writers in each team's city were paid only a few dollars.
"When I paid those guys, it was 10 bucks, later on 50 bucks, whatever, it was the going rate," McKENZIE said. "It was always cheap. You weren't going to get rich in this business.... I'd say to a guy, 'You may be big in Calgary or Edmonton or Vancouver, but if you write for this paper, they'll know you all across Canada.' A lot of guys liked that."
As the National Hockey League's publicity director from the 1940s into the late 1960s, McKENZIE developed press and radio guides and had access to teams' statistics and mailing lists. He and CÔTÉ used those to convince almost 4,000 fans to send in $2 each ($3 in the United States) as advance subscription payments to finance the first issue. The circulation was 20,000 by the end of its first year.
The Hockey News under McKENZIE maintained its comfortable relationship with the National Hockey League. McKENZIE bought out COTE's interest in the mid-1960s, then eventually sold 80 per cent of the magazine to New York's WCC Publishing in 1973 for a reported $4-million and the balance in the 1980s. The headquarters moved from Montreal to Toronto and McKENZIE stayed as publisher intil 1981.
He wanted to continue writing and working, rather than retire, and after leaving the hockey paper, he and HALPIN bought into Ontario Golf News. McKENZIE was still associated with the golf paper at his death, said Ontario Golf advertising executive Ted VANCE.
"I know it was first viewed as a house organ, but go through his stuff in the early years and it wasn't strictly milquetoast, said DRYDEN, The Hockey News editor from 1991 to 2002. "He may have had favourites and protected some people. As National Hockey League publicist, he could not be a vociferous critic. But long before the sale of The Hockey News, it was getting an edge to it. In the end, it was a helluva idea."
Added Bob McKENZIE: " Whatever anyone says, it's a good legacy to have started The Hockey News and to see where it's at today." Parent corporation Tanscontinental Publishing said The Hockey News has a paid circulation of more than 100,000.
Ken McKENZIE is survived by his wife Lorraine of Mississauga, four children -- John McKENZIE and Jane Mckenzie KOPEC of New York, Kim McKENZIE in Oakville, Ontario, and Nancy Mckenzie PONTURO in Redding, Connecticut., -- and five grandchildren. His funeral will be 11 a.m., Monday April 14, at St. Luke's Anglican Church on Dixie Road, Mississauga.

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COTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
Hockey News co-founder had winning formula
By James CHRISTIE Friday, April 11, 2003 - Page S10
Toronto -- No one was going to get rich from The Hockey News, Ken McKENZIE freely admitted. The wealth he shared was in the information it contained for fans and those in the hockey industry.
McKENZIE who died Wednesday at Trillium Hospital in Mississauga, was co-founder 1947 -- along with Will CÔTÉ -- of the publication that came to be known as hockey's Bible. He was 79.
His son, John McKENZIE, said Ken died suddenly when he went into septic shock following surgery for colon cancer.
Ken McKENZIE and CÔTÉ birthed a magazine that was a landmark in the Canadian periodicals industry -- a sport publication that survived when so many failed and folded. It evolved from a house organ for the National Hockey League -- McKENZIE was originally an National Hockey League publicist -- into an encyclopedic, authoritative publication. The content matured from reprints of stories by hockey beat writers in six National Hockey League towns to exclusive columns by The Hockey News's own editors and writers such as Steve DRYDEN and Bob McKENZIE (no relation,) who could challenge the National Hockey League and international hockey establishment. Ken McKENZIE was presented with the Elmer Ferguson Award for his pioneering role on the magazine's 50th anniversary in 1997 and inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.
"He loved hockey and sports of all kinds," said John McKENZIE, a correspondent with American Broadcasting Company News in New York. "He had this idea when he was in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He got up on a table in the mess hall and called his buddies around and said 'If I started a hockey paper, would you guys buy it?'
"They all cheered. He started with only $383 and The Hockey News was born."
Ken McKENZIE cited the figure as precisely $383.81 in a 50th anniversary story in The Globe and Mail. He was famed for keeping a close eye on finances down to the penny.
Along with editing associate Charlie HALPIN, McKENZIE operated the paper on a shoestring with a handful of employees. Newspaper beat writers in each team's city were paid only a few dollars.
"When I paid those guys, it was 10 bucks, later on 50 bucks, whatever, it was the going rate," McKENZIE said. "It was always cheap. You weren't going to get rich in this business.... I'd say to a guy, 'You may be big in Calgary or Edmonton or Vancouver, but if you write for this paper, they'll know you all across Canada.' A lot of guys liked that."
As the National Hockey League's publicity director from the 1940s into the late 1960s, McKENZIE developed press and radio guides and had access to teams' statistics and mailing lists. He and CÔTÉ used those to convince almost 4,000 fans to send in $2 each ($3 in the United States) as advance subscription payments to finance the first issue. The circulation was 20,000 by the end of its first year.
The Hockey News under McKENZIE maintained its comfortable relationship with the National Hockey League. McKENZIE bought out COTE's interest in the mid-1960s, then eventually sold 80 per cent of the magazine to New York's WCC Publishing in 1973 for a reported $4-million and the balance in the 1980s. The headquarters moved from Montreal to Toronto and McKENZIE stayed as publisher intil 1981.
He wanted to continue writing and working, rather than retire, and after leaving the hockey paper, he and HALPIN bought into Ontario Golf News. McKENZIE was still associated with the golf paper at his death, said Ontario Golf advertising executive Ted VANCE.
"I know it was first viewed as a house organ, but go through his stuff in the early years and it wasn't strictly milquetoast, said DRYDEN, The Hockey News editor from 1991 to 2002. "He may have had favourites and protected some people. As National Hockey League publicist, he could not be a vociferous critic. But long before the sale of The Hockey News, it was getting an edge to it. In the end, it was a helluva idea."
Added Bob McKENZIE: " Whatever anyone says, it's a good legacy to have started The Hockey News and to see where it's at today." Parent corporation Tanscontinental Publishing said The Hockey News has a paid circulation of more than 100,000.
Ken McKENZIE is survived by his wife Lorraine of Mississauga, four children -- John McKENZIE and Jane Mckenzie KOPEC of New York, Kim McKENZIE in Oakville, Ontario, and Nancy Mckenzie PONTURO in Redding, Connecticut., -- and five grandchildren. His funeral will be 11 a.m., Monday April 14, at St. Luke's Anglican Church on Dixie Road, Mississauga.

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CÔTÉ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-18 published
Nova Scotia's marathon man
Cape Breton boy was Boston's most surprising victor
By Kevin COX Wednesday, June 18, 2003 - Page R5
Halifax -- Johnny MILES was first the determined champion, then the gentle grandfather of Canadian distance running.
His first major running prize was a sack of flour in North Sydney, Nova Scotia, in 1922 -- he finished third in the three-mile race but was first to sprint by the store. After four years of training including sprints behind his grocery cart, the humble, unknown 20-year-old Cape Breton delivery boy and Sunday-school teacher stunned the running world by defeating its best athletes to win the prestigious Boston Marathon.
It was a win that Mr. MILES and his father had calmly predicted to a policeman and a race official the day before. But even Johnny MILES had his doubts on that chilly April Monday as he pounded along the 26.2-mile course on his 95-cent shoes from the Co-op store in his hometown.
At the 22-mile mark, Mr. MILES was running stride for stride with leader and Finnish running legend Albin STENROOS when he looked over and saw a blank and exhausted expression on his rival's face.
"I knew right there that I had him and I had to make a move," he recalled with the gleam of a fierce competitor in his eye in an interview 54 years later. "He was rubbing his side and he had a stitch, so I didn't look back. I speeded up and I think that took the heart out of him."
He is still widely hailed among running raconteurs as the most surprising victor in the 107-year history of the event. Mr. MILES's time -- then a world marathon record -- was so unbelievable that race officials measured the Boston course -- and found it 176 yards short of the classic 26-mile, 385-yard distance.
"I don't know what all the fuss is about," he said in an interview in 1995. "I had a God-given gift and I used it."
Mr. MILES, his father and his mother arrived in Boston by train a few days before the marathon. The day before the race, father and son walked the course, got lost and ended up asking a burly Irish policeman for directions and received some advice that was not exactly a vote of confidence.
"My son needs to know the route because he's entered in tomorrow's race." The friendly officer smiled and said, "Tell your son to just follow the crowd."
On race day, Mr. MILES wore a red, homemade maple leaf on a white undershirt. His performance shattered the 1924 record held by the other race favourite, Clarence DEMAR, the four-time winner of the event.
"That boy ran the best marathon since that Indian [Canadian Tom LONGBOAT] in 1907," a stunned Mr. DEMAR was reported to have said.
A year later, he again challenged the gruelling course but suffered an embarrassing setback when he had to withdraw from the race with serious burns to his feet. His dad had taken a pair of his 95-cent sneakers and shaved down the soles with a straight razor so they wouldn't be so heavy. His feet -- tops and bottoms -- had bled.
It was a rare retreat. Mr. MILES, who trained on rural Cape Breton roads, dominated Canadian distance running through the late 1920s and early 1930s. He captured the Boston crown again in 1929 and won a bronze medal at the British Empire Games in 1931 and also ran the marathon in the Olympic Games in 1928 and 1932.
Born in Halifax, England, on October 30, 1905, Mr. MILES moved with his family to Cape Breton the following year. He worked as a grocery delivery boy at the time of his big win. But his first job as a young teen was in the Cape Breton coal mines. He went to work there to help support his family when his father went off to fight in the First World War.
Mr. MILES left the mines a few years later and entered his first contest -- a three-mile race in Sydney, Nova Scotia -- with the hopes of winning some fishing supplies.
He is revered in his home province of Nova Scotia even though he moved to Hamilton, Ontario, to train and take a job with International Harvester in 1927.
After his victories, some parents even named newborn children after the marathon hero. One of those babies, Johnny Miles WILLISTON, went on to become a driving force in establishing the Johnny Miles Marathon in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia.
The victories on the tracks and roads by a local boy who had worked as a child coal miner at the age of 11 injected some joy and hope into Cape Breton's coal-mining towns at a time when the industry was going through tough times and work underground was brutish and dangerous.
After he hung up his thin-soled racing shoes in 1932, Mr. MILES became an ambassador for fitness and clean living. He became a manager at International Harvester and worked in many parts of the world for the company after being told by a company executive that he could make something of himself if he put the same effort into his work that he exerted in running.
When running regained popularity in the 1970s, he was startled to become a celebrity among the new set of competitors who recognized his accomplishments. While Quebec runner Gérard CÔTÉ would dominate the Boston Marathon in the 1940s, winning it four times, Johnny MILES's time of 2: 25:40 stood as the Canadian record for the event until Jerome DRAYTON ran 2: 14:46 in 1977.
He was taken aback in 1967 at being named to the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
"That I should now be in the same illustrious company as the great stars of hockey, football, track and field, and other Canadian sports was a bit mind-boggling," he told author Floyd WILLISTON in the biography Johnny MILES: Nova Scotia's Marathon King in He was also caught off guard by being named to the Order of Canada in 1983.
"It's not going to change my life -- same hat size and shirt size," he told the New Glasgow Evening News.
Mr. MILES, who regularly attended races in the Hamilton area as a spectator in the 1980s, wondered how well he might have run with the technology offered to runners today.
"I think now I wouldn't eat steak before a race and I'd get these cushioned shoes and I'd know how to train," he said in an interview in New Glasgow at the marathon that was created and named after him in 1975 and still bears his name.
Mr. MILES and his wife Bess were fixtures at the Johnny Miles Marathon, which took place this past Sunday shortly after his death. Runners best remember him for his personal attention, anecdotes, quiet kindness and his enthusiasm for the sport.
Jerome BRUHM, a long-time Halifax runner and historian, remembered his first encounter with the running legend at the Johnny Miles Marathon in 1981.
"He was there and I'm nobody -- I'm just a runner. He came over and I said it was my first marathon and I was kind of nervous. He took me aside and talked to me and he said, 'Do you think you'll win the marathon'? Mr. BRUHM recalled this week. "I said, 'No, I'm a slow runner.' So, he said, 'Then go out there and do that -- finish the race and enjoy it.' He came over to me after the race and asked me how I did and how I felt. I thought that was fantastic that he would talk to me before the race and come over and check on me after the race."
He was a humble, personable man, Mr. BRUHM said.
"When he was inducted into the Canadian Running Hall of Fame, I went over to talk to him and he only wanted to talk about other people, not about what he had done."
Nova Scotia Premier John HAMM praised Mr. MILES for bringing international attention to his home province.
"We will always remember with pride his athletic accomplishments at the Boston Marathon and numerous other competitions as well as his success in business and accomplishments in life," the Premier said Monday.
In 2001, Boston Marathon officials celebrated the 75th anniversary of his startling 1926 win -- but at the age of 95, Mr. MILES said his health prevented him from attending the festivities. However, he promised to try to attend the 75th anniversary of his last Boston triumph.
Will CLONEY, long-time Boston Marathon official, had only praise for Mr. MILES. " There hasn't been a Johnny MILES in Boston since Johnny MILES."
Now there never will be.
Kevin COX is Atlantic correspondent of The Globe and Mail. He has completed 50 marathons -- including the Johhny Miles Marathon and the Boston Marathon.

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COTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
HILLEN, James
The family regrets to announce the death of James HILLEN, formerly of Montreal and Ottawa, in Bermuda on June 12, 2003. Born April 20, 1920, Belfast, he died peacefully after a short illness and was buried on the 17th June, 2003. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Margaret (FINLAYSON) Bermuda. A sister, Susan (J. D. McSHANE) Ottawa. His daughter Susan, (Dr. Simon COTE) United Arab Emirates. His son, Douglas (Allison MAITLAND) Bermuda. His grandchildren, Georges COTE, Montreal. Amy CÔTÉ (Emmanuel DAVALOS) Montreal. James, Christian, and Samantha HILLEN, Bermuda. His great-grand_son, Loic DAVALOS, Montreal. Mr. HILLEN joined the Black Watch Royal Highland Regiment of Canada in 1936 and served overseas from 1940-1945. He was captured at Dieppe and was detained for over two years as a prisoner-of-war in Germany. After his repatriation to Canada he studied at McGill University, graduating with a C.A. degree in 1955. He was a life member of both the Quebec and Ontario Order of Chartered Accountants as well as the Canadian Institute. He began his career with Cunnard Steamship Co. and then worked for a group of shipping interests and was instrumental in their relocation to Bermuda in 1961. In Bermuda he also worked for the Bermuda Hospitals Board and Ancon. A keen golfer, he was also a 20 year member of the Lions Club and an active member of Christ Church, Warwick. He will be sadly missed by his family and Friends.
Died This Day -- Louis Hémon, 1913
Monday, July 7, 2003 - Page R5
Novelist born in Brest, France, on October 12, 1880; 1911, immigrated to Montreal; moved to the Lac-St-Jean region of Quebec to work on backwoods farm; used experience to write Maria Chapdelaine, a classic account of Quebec habitant life; killed in a railway accident in Northern Ontario; book published posthumously.

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CÔTÉ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
HILLEN, James
The family regrets to announce the death of James HILLEN, formerly of Montreal and Ottawa, in Bermuda on June 12, 2003. Born April 20, 1920, Belfast, he died peacefully after a short illness and was buried on the 17th June, 2003. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Margaret (FINLAYSON) Bermuda. A sister, Susan (J. D. McSHANE) Ottawa. His daughter Susan, (Dr. Simon COTE) United Arab Emirates. His son, Douglas (Allison MAITLAND) Bermuda. His grandchildren, Georges COTE, Montreal. Amy CÔTÉ (Emmanuel DAVALOS) Montreal. James, Christian, and Samantha HILLEN, Bermuda. His great-grand_son, Loic DAVALOS, Montreal. Mr. HILLEN joined the Black Watch Royal Highland Regiment of Canada in 1936 and served overseas from 1940-1945. He was captured at Dieppe and was detained for over two years as a prisoner-of-war in Germany. After his repatriation to Canada he studied at McGill University, graduating with a C.A. degree in 1955. He was a life member of both the Quebec and Ontario Order of Chartered Accountants as well as the Canadian Institute. He began his career with Cunnard Steamship Co. and then worked for a group of shipping interests and was instrumental in their relocation to Bermuda in 1961. In Bermuda he also worked for the Bermuda Hospitals Board and Ancon. A keen golfer, he was also a 20 year member of the Lions Club and an active member of Christ Church, Warwick. He will be sadly missed by his family and Friends.
Died This Day -- Louis Hémon, 1913
Monday, July 7, 2003 - Page R5
Novelist born in Brest, France, on October 12, 1880; 1911, immigrated to Montreal; moved to the Lac-St-Jean region of Quebec to work on backwoods farm; used experience to write Maria Chapdelaine, a classic account of Quebec habitant life; killed in a railway accident in Northern Ontario; book published posthumously.

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COTÉ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-10 published
RAFUSE, Guy Albert
Guy ''Ray'' RAFUSE died peacefully at Saint Mary's hospital on December 8, 2003, after a brief illness, 6 days after his 94th birthday. Ray was born and spent his early years in Conqueral Bank, Nova Scotia. At the age of 16, he moved to New York City and worked at the Bell Labs. During the depression, he returned to Bridgewater, Nova Scotia where he ran his own Photographic studio. At the beginning of the war, he moved to Montreal to work with Northern Electric, where he met Fernande (COTÉ,) who was to become his beloved wife, his constant companion, and his closest friend. He and Fern were married after the war, and enjoyed over 57 years of happiness together. Together they raised a son, Robert, to whom they gave all the opportunities they never had. Ray retired from the Northern in 1970, enjoyed a long and active retirement, and only recently moved into a retirement home with Fern. He is survived by his loving wife, his son Robert, and his daughter-in-law Judy. The family would like to thank the staff of the Griffith-McConnell Residence, as well as the nurses and doctors at Saint Mary's who comforted him in his final days. At Ray's own request, there will be no service of visitation. For all those who knew Ray, please take time to remember him as he was: strong, quiet, private, determined; a great father, and a loving husband.

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COTTIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-05 published
COTTIER, Roy Thomas
At home in London, Ontario, on November 29, 2003, Roy Thomas COTTIER, aged 82. He is survived by two daughters, Candyce Bebensee COTTIER and Sherris Cottier SHANK, one son, Derek Lee COTTIER, and five grandchildren. He was the beloved husband of Jean Bebensee COTTIER, who died December 29, 1998 at the age of 79. Mr. COTTIER held senior executive positions with a number of prominent North American companies, including W.R. Grace and Co., Molson Companies Limited and Massey-Ferguson Ltd. From 1973 until his retirement in 1985, Mr. COTTIER served as a senior executive of Northern Telecom Limited, now known as Nortel Networks Corp., retiring as Senior Vice President - Corporate Relations. In that position, he had global responsibility for the direction of all corporate and financial communications, investor relations, government relations and public affairs. He was also a member of the corporation's executive council, the senior management body which established corporate policies, objectives and strategies. Upon his retirement, Mr. COTTIER served as a consultant to the Department of International Trade of the Government of Canada and director of the International Trade Advisory Committee. Mr. COTTIER was also a director of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, the International Business Council of Canada, the Institute for Political Involvement and the Ontario Association of Art Galleries, as well as a member of the advisory boards of the University of Toronto Business School and the Canadian Music Centre. Mr. COTTIER was born in Portsmouth, England, and educated in English private schools. He joined the army of the United Kingdom in 1939, serving as a Commando and attaining the rank of Lieutenant. After surviving four years as a prisoner of war, he was demobilized in 1946 and immigrated to Canada. Interment will be at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London, Ontario; family only. No flowers please, but memorial contributions to the Parkwood Hospital Foundation for the Jean Bebensee Cottier and Roy Cottier Award for Rehabilitation Staff Development are welcomed and encouraged. Contributions may be forwarded to the Parkwood Hospital Foundation, 801 Commissioners Road, E., London, Ontario N6C 5J1. For further information concerning the Foundation or the Award, please contact Michelle CAMPBELL, Executive Director of the Foundation, at (519) 685-4030.

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COTTREAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-13 published
Weekend plane crashes kill four
Canadian Press, Monday, October 13, 2003 - Page A7
Airplane crashes claimed four lives in Quebec and Ontario over the weekend, including two people killed yesterday after an ultralight plane crashed in fog.
The ultralight-crash victims, a man and a woman, were taken to hospital with serious injuries after the aircraft plunged into a field yesterday morning in St-Felix-De-Valois, a town 60 kilometres northeast of Montreal, Quebec provincial police said. The victims died later in the day.
"There was thick fog," police spokeswoman Manon GAIGNARD said. "A witness heard a noise around 10 a.m. but couldn't tell where the noise came from because of the fog."
The witness called police later in the morning after she saw the aircraft's wing poking through the fog, Ms. GAIGNARD said. The victims' identities were not released.
Investigators will try to discover whether the fog contributed to the crash, Ms. GAIGNARD said.
Nearly 23,000 Hydro-Quebec customers lost power on Saturday after a single-engine Cessna aircraft crashed into a power line in Repentigny, east of Montreal.
The passenger suffered broken arms and legs when the aircraft plunged into a ditch next to a highway. The pilot was slightly injured. The aircraft, on a night training flight, reported a loss of power before it lost altitude in smog. As of Sunday afternoon, service had not been restored to about 6,800 Hydro-Quebec customers.
In Ontario, Gerard RIDDLE, 66, and his wife, Patricia, 61, of Brantford, Ontario, died Saturday after crashing shortly after taking off in a single-engine Piper Comanche from a small airport near the town of Delhi.
About 10 minutes after takeoff, the plane was returning to the airport, flying low. It made a turn but crashed into a field short of the runway. The two were the only ones in the plane.
Ontario Provincial Police and an official from the Transportation Safety Board investigated the crash.
"The aircraft has been examined and we do have the data that we need," said Transportation Safety Board spokesman John COTTREAU on Saturday. He said it is too early to know whether a more detailed investigation is necessary.
On Thursday, two small airplanes crashed in Toronto. All on board each aircraft were relatively unscathed. The engine of a Piper Cherokee 140 sputtered as the pilot flew toward Toronto's City Centre airport, but the pilot brought the craft down onto the water. Two hours later, on the city's northern limits, a Cessna 172 crashed shortly after taking off from Buttonvile Airport.

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