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"COS" 2003 Obituary


COSBY  COSTA  COSTAIN  COSTAKIS  COSTELLO  COSTIGANE 

COSBY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
COSBY--In loving memory of our dear mother and grandmother Phyllis.
We continue to remember all
the memories we made
throughout your special life,
Of the phone ringing intently,
missing your voice say "I
called just to say good day,
How are all of you?" On this
day we would like to return
all those caring calls and ring
this bell. In hope that our
true angel received her well
deserved wings.
--Always remembered: Charlie, Diane, Michael, Matthew and Alicia.

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COSBY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
COSBY
-In loving memory of a dear wife, mother and grandmother,
Phyllis, who passed away Mother's Day May 12, 2002.
A year has sadly passed
Since you left us
Always remembered for your love, caring and kindness.
Now our Guardian Angel.
--Sadly missed and loved forever by husband Willard, daughter and
family Janis, Don, Brad, Allison and Amanda.

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COSBY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-06 published
Margaret "Maggie" BOND
In Ottawa, Wednesday, July 20, 2003. Maggie BOND age 41. Beloved wife of Brian FLEGEL.
Dear daughter of Shirley BOND and the late Albert BOND. Sister of Douglas BOND (friend Diane) and Diane (Charles COSBY.) Maggie will be fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews, family and Friends. A service of memory of Maggie was held in the Chapel of the Kelly Funeral Home, 1255 Walkley Road (Ottawa) Sunday, August 3rd at 11 am. Kelly Funeral Home (613) 235-6712.

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COSTA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-05 published
COSTA, (GREGOR) Val
The beloved wife of Tibor GREGOR died peacefully on December 3rd, 2003 after a courageous battle with cancer. She will be fondly remembered by her husband, daughters Tania, Stacy and her fiancé Nelson WHITFORD and her family in Australia. She will be missed by Jan GREGOR, Anne Gregor ROSE, Fred and Martha ROSE and by her life-long friend Val THOMAS and her numerous other Friends. Val was a member of the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Royal Ontario Museum and a ballet enthusiast. A celebration of Val's rich life will be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W. (2 stop lights west of Yonge St.) on Tuesday December 9th at 1: 00 p.m. with a reception to follow at the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital would be appreciated by the family.

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COSTAIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
COSTAIN, Robert Anthony (Tony)
Passed away peacefully at the William Osler Health Center (Georgetown) on Thursday, March 6, 2003. Dear husband and best friend of Jan and much-loved father of Robert (Jennifer), Tom (Amy) and Mark. Tony was the owner of RAC Nutrition and will be greatly missed by his many Friends and colleagues. He will always be remembered for his wonderful sense of humour and great storytelling. Friends will be received at the J.S. Jones and son Funeral Home, 11582 Trafalgar Road, north of Maple Ave., Georgetown 905-877-3631 on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Monday Marchg 10th at 11: 0-0 a.m. Cremation follows. In lieu of flowers, a donations to the Hospital for Sick Children would be greatly appreciated.

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COSTAKIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
Diplomat shaped cultural policy
Art-loving ambassador to Moscow and Bucharest also served as Trudeau's press secretary and as a director of the Canada Council
By Bill GLADSTONE, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - Page R7
Peter ROBERTS, a former press secretary to Pierre Trudeau who served as Canada's ambassador to Moscow and Bucharest and as director of the Canada Council, is being remembered as a major shaper of Canadian cultural policy and a late representative of an older generation of broadly based, multitalented diplomats that has all but vanished from the scene.
A native Albertan, Mr. ROBERTS died in Ottawa on November 21 after a varied career that stretched over four decades and included stints in Washington, Hong Kong, Saigon and Brussels. He was 76.
As assistant undersecretary of state responsible for cultural affairs from 1973 to 1979, he helped Ottawa develop protective policies toward the domestic film and book-publishing industries, and was instrumental in drafting the government's nationalistic Bill C-58, which applied tariffs to American magazines sold on Canadian newsstands. He also helped to establish the National Arts Centre.
"He was a superb civil servant because he had a capacity to listen to ministers, understand their viewpoints and help them achieve what they wanted to achieve," said John ROBERTS (no relation,) who was Secretary of State when Peter ROBERTS was undersecretary. "But at the same time, he had an extraordinary passion for the arts and for culture. So he did have his own ideas about things that should be done. He stimulated you to think and to adapt your thinking."
As ambassador to the Soviet Union, Mr. ROBERTS took a keen interest in George COSTAKIS, a former junior employee of the Canadian embassy who had spent a lifetime amassing an outstanding but illegal collection of modern art, both Russian and international. Mr. ROBERTS helped arrange a major exhibition of the collection at the Musée des beaux-arts in Montreal and later wrote a full-length biography, George Costakis: A Russian Life in Art, published by Carleton University Press in 1994.
Raising Eyebrows, a book of memoirs and character sketches, was published in 2000. He also wrote a book-length profile of former Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, whom he met often during his posting in Bucharest from 1979 to 1983, and who was executed in 1989. The book, Revenge on Christmas Day: Fact and Fiction in Bucharest, is slated for publication in 2004.
"Peter was a multifaceted person who bridged the cultural world, the literary world, the academic world and the world of the foreign service," said Allan GOTLIEB, a former ambassador to Washington. "If you go back to the golden age of Canadian diplomacy, you find examples of these very broadly engaged minds. Peter joined a little later, in the 1950s, but he still seemed a part of that era."
Peter McLaren ROBERTS was born in Calgary on July 5, 1927, and grew up in Lethbridge, Alberta. His father was a locally stationed federal tax official, his mother a schoolteacher. A brilliant student, he earned an M.A. in English literature from the University of Alberta in 1951, as well as a Rhodes scholarship that enabled him to study for three years at Oxford.
Afterward, he went down to London with a group of Friends, including Mr. GOTLIEB, who convinced him to write the Canadian foreign-service exam. He did so on a whim -- and passed. He taught English literature for a year at Bishop's University in Lennoxville, Quebec, and joined the foreign service in 1955.
Initially stationed in Ottawa, Mr. ROBERTS began studying German in anticipation of a posting in Bonn or Vienna. "The department had just then begun to realize that it was an advantage for a foreign-service officer, and for Canada, if the officer knew the language of the country where he or she was working," he noted in Raising Eyebrows.
"I hear you're learning German," the personnel manager remarked to him one day.
"Yes."
"You must be interested in languages."
"Yes."
"How'd you like to learn Russian?"
Several months later he travelled by ship and train to Moscow, where he served as third-in-command of the Canadian embassy from 1955 to 1958. He was posted to Hong Kong and Vietnam in the early 1960s and to Washington for the rest of that tumultuous decade.
In 1970, the Prime Minister's Office essentially borrowed him from the Department of External Affairs, as it was then known, so he could serve as assistant press secretary to Prime Minister Pierre TRUDEAU. Returning to Canada after a nine-year absence that had included a dreary stint working for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Brussels, Mr. ROBERTS showed up for his first day of work -- just as the Front de libération du Québec hostage crisis was erupting. Marc LALONDE, Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary, asked him to represent him at a strategy-planning meeting with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
"I had been long enough in diplomacy to know that this was a situation in which one did not speak without instructions," Mr. ROBERTS would recall. "I had no instructions, and I hadn't the faintest idea what the prime minister's views were on this abrupt development. I promised I would listen, make notes, report, and phone everyone. That I did, but I was glad that I had not ventured to predict which way TRUDEAU would jump. It was only a few days later that the troops were in Montreal, suspects rounded up and in jail, the War Measures Act proclaimed, and the prime minister saying to the press, 'Just watch me.' By that time I was veteran and expert."
After that baptism by fire, Mr. ROBERTS became full press secretary and met daily with Mr. TRUDEAU, often advising him on issues that the Prime Minister may have considered unimportant, and sometimes having the sobering thrill of hearing his words repeated verbatim to reporters later in the day. It was Mr. ROBERTS himself who announced the Prime Minister's marriage to an "incredulous" press gallery on March 4, 1971, and the birth of a son on Christmas Day.
External Affairs reclaimed Mr. ROBERTS in 1972 and parachuted him into the cultural division of the Department of the Secretary of State. The new assistant undersecretary awoke at 4 every morning and studied for three hours before going to work, but even with a "marvellous staff" who "filled in for me when I was stupid or ignorant," he sometimes found the learning curve excessively steep.
"Gradually my diplomatic experience came into play," he would write. "Diplomacy is partly a matter of faking. If you don't know the answer, if you don't know who someone is, don't let on. Smile enigmatically, and change the subject to the situation in Peru. I did a lot of that at the Secretary of State."
Mr. ROBERTS learned Romanian before becoming that country's ambassador in 1979, and found that the effort had been worthwhile because it gave him exceptionally good access to Mr. Ceausescu, who seemed flattered that a Canadian could speak his language; the leader would dismiss his retinue of advisers and translators and meet with Mr. ROBERTS alone to discuss a variety of political issues ranging from the situation in Poland to the situation in Quebec. Mr. ROBERTS enjoyed the meetings but understood that he was dealing with "the most desperate dictator and tyrant in Europe" and one who was becoming increasingly unhinged.
Among the visitors to Bucharest during that time was Allan GOTLIEB, by then undersecretary of state for External Affairs, who recalled being feted with Mr. ROBERTS by their Romanian hosts at a deluxe and crowded restaurant, where they washed down wonderful steaks with equally wonderful wines. The next evening, seeking a place for dinner, he suggested they return to the same establishment. "He told me, 'It's not there any more -- it's not real,' " Mr. GOTLIEB recalled. "He said, 'They opened it just for you.' He took me back there and it was all boarded up. There wasn't a soul there. It was like one of those Russian Potemkin villages you hear about."
As Soviet ambassador, Mr. ROBERTS joined Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY's entourage for the funeral of general secretary Konstantin Chernenko in Moscow in 1985. Like most other world leaders present, Mr. MULRONEY was keenly interested in meeting the incoming general secretary, Mikhail Gorbachev, and so was "predictably enraged" when the appointment was abruptly cancelled because an inept bureaucrat had overfilled Mr. Gorbachev's daybook with appointments. Persuading Mr. MULRONEY to be patient, Mr. ROBERTS quickly convinced the Soviets to rectify the error, and the meeting occurred in the Kremlin as originally planned.
Six months later, Mr. MULRONEY expressed his gratitude to Mr. ROBERTS by summoning him back to Ottawa to head the Canada Council. Fascinated as always by the Soviets, Mr. ROBERTS was reluctant to go, but realized he could not refuse.
"He was sad because Gorbachev had just come to power, and things were just beginning to show signs of change," recalls his wife, Glenna ROBERTS.
"He left with a great deal of regret, because he was really interested in seeing those changes."
Mr. ROBERTS retired from the Canada Council in 1989 and was an adjunct research professor of political science at Ottawa's Carleton University from 1990. He was diagnosed about 10 years ago with the cancer that increasingly incapacitated him over the past year.
He leaves his second wife Glenna, children Frances and Jeremy and their families, sister Mary, stepchildren Graham, Brendan and Hannah REID.

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COSTELLO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-16 published
MURPHY, C. Francis, Q.C.
Frank MURPHY died August 13, 2003 at St. Paul's Hospital from complications following pneumonia. He is survived by his loving wife, Jean, and his children, Caroline, Elizabeth, Adrienne (Peter HOLMGREN,) John (Leslie LEE,) Frances and Sarah, and his grandchildren, Anna HOLMGREN, Jacqueline MURPHY and Robert MURPHY. Frank and Robert were special companions. Frank is survived as well by his brothers Bud, Cal and Louis, his sister Josie BENZ, and many nephews and nieces. He was predeceased by his parents and his sisters, Mary COSTELLO and Pat MURPHY. Frank was devoted to his family and deeply committed to his community. Frank was born in 1929 in Calgary and lived most of his life in Vancouver. He loved Vancouver for its beauty and the opportunities it presented. He graduated from high school at Vancouver College in 1945, and graduated from the University of British Columbia with a Bachelor of Laws in 1950. He articled at and then practised with Campney, Owen, Murphy and Owen from 1951 to 1958. He then joined Farris, Stultz, Bull and Farris, which evolved into the firm Farris, Vaughan, Wills and Murphy. He was the managing partner there from 1978 until his retirement in 1992. He remained as associate counsel until his death. He was appointed Queen's Counsel in 1984. Frank practised primarily in areas of corporate and commercial law. He particularly enjoyed his involvement in the Greater Vancouver Regional District. He sat on many corporate boards, including British Columbia Gas Inc., Mitsui Company of Canada Ltd., Northwest Life Assurance Company, Pacific Petroleum Ltd., Westcoast Transmission, Kelly Douglas, Alberta Distillers, and Loomis (Mayne Nickless). Frank was on the board of many non-profit organizations, including the Vancouver Art Gallery, Canadian Red Cross Society, Convent of the Sacred Heart, Holy Family Hospital and St. Paul's Hospital. Frank was for many years on the board of the Catholic Children's Aid Society, serving as president from 1973 until 1980. It was an association of which he was particularly proud. Frank was active in the Canadian Bar Association and was president of the Commercial Law Section for two years. He was heavily involved in the International Bar Association and from 1972 to 1982 he was the Canadian representative to its Council. Frank's work with this organization gave Jean and him great opportunities to travel. Frank was a student of the world, interested and knowledgeable about history and world affairs. Each of his children has fond memories of trips, both at home and abroad, taken with their father. From 1995 to 2000, Frank served on the International Joint Commission, a binational Canada-United States organization. This experience gave him further opportunity to travel, including to many smaller communities in both the United States and Canada, which were experiences he enjoyed just as he did his trips to those destinations that are more traditionally favoured. In keeping with his great interest in his community, Frank was involved in politics and government affairs. He was of a liberal mind and was a member of the Liberal Party of Canada. He participated at all levels of the political process side by side with Jean and Friends, more frequently at the federal level and in particular in the riding of Vancouver-Quadra. Frank's greatest love was his family. He was a loyal and supportive son, brother, husband, father and grandfather. Frank's house at Point Roberts, certainly his favourite place on this earth, is a site of especially treasured memories. Frank was keenly involved with his children's activities. He inspired his children and others with his curiosity, his physical and intellectual energy and his commitment to principle. He lived life fully and fearlessly. He met his final illnesses and challenges in the same manner. He died within the rites of his church and with the love of his family. He is greatly missed. The MURPHY family is greatly appreciative of the care and support Frank and his family received from the staff at the I.C.U., in particular from his final nurse, David BOOTH. The Mass of Christian Burial for Frank will take place at 11: 00 a.m. on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 at Sts. Peter and Paul's Church, 1430 West 38th Avenue, with a reception to follow at noon at Shaughnessy Golf and Country Club, 4300 Southwest Marine Drive. The interment will follow the reception. Prayers will take place at Sts. Peter and Paul on Monday, August 18, 2003 at 7: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the St. Paul's Hospital Foundation at Ste 164, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver British Columbia, V6Z 1Y6, Charitable Registration No. 11925 7939 RR0001.

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COSTELLO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-07 published
COSTELLO, Mary Paula Christine (née CASTONGUAY)
Born October 15, 1919, died November 6, 2003 at Formosa, Ontario. Lovingly remembered by her three children Michael COSTELLO, Mary KNOX and her husband Brian, Bob COSTELLO and his wife Brenda sadly missed by her grandchildren Riley and Jessie KNOX; Allie, Darryl and Dru COSTELLO. Predeceased by her husband Robert E. E. COSTELLO and infant son Patrick William Gerard. Visitation at Cameron Funeral Home, Walkerton, Ontario. Funeral mass 11 am Saturday, November 8, 2003 at Immaculate Conception Church, Formosa, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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COSTIGANE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
Henry Roger JOWETT
Born Melbourne, Australia, on July 2, 1926. Died 10: 15 a.m., May 25, 2003. It is with great sadness that his family announces his passing. Educated at Shaftesbury Grammar School in London, England, Roger served as an officer with the British Army from 1945 to 1947, until being transferred to British Intelligence. After living in Egypt, Sweden, Hong Kong and Singapore, he moved to Canada and joined the Canadian Army where he was stationed at Camp Borden from 1954 to 1957, and was promoted Captain Staff Quarter Master. In 1969, Roger became a professor of Photography and later the Chair of Visual Arts at Sheridan College, Oakville, until retiring in 1991. A proud and devoted father, brilliant photographer, and wonderfully eccentric man. Roger was an avid sailor and sportsman who was still winning on the tennis court at the age of 73. He will be missed by many of his close Friends and colleagues, and forever by his beloved children Nicola, Alexander and Andrew and his sisters Diana and Cynthia. Roger was predeceased by his brother Anthony. With the help of family and Friends he was able to spend his last days at home in comfort. Nicola, Alexander and Andrew would like to express sincere thanks to Dr. Karen PAPE, Brian MAGEE Sr., Steve JOHNSON, Bill COSTIGANE, Sandy and John DUNN, Dr. Matthew DISTEFANO, Gillian, Sylvie and Kate HAND and to his caregiver Eric NOFTLE. In keeping with Roger's spirit a 'Pimm's Party' will be held to celebrate his life at The Oakville Club, 56 Water Street, on July 2nd from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, gifts may be made to a memorial charitable trust established in his memory to assist palliative care patients in their wishes to die at home in dignity. Donations can be sent to 'The Roger Jowett Charitable Trust', 45-1534 Lancaster Drive, Oakville, On L6H 2Z3. The trust is currently applying for registered status with the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency.

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