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"COL" 2003 Obituary


COLBOURNE  COLDWELL  COLE  COLEMAN  COLICOS  COLLA  COLLIER  COLLINS  COLOMBO  COLQUHOUN  COLTHART 

COLBOURNE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-21 published
COLBOURNE, Don
Died of a heart attack on February 19th shortly after returning to Toronto from an extended holiday. He is survived by Marion, his wife of over 46 years, three wonderful daughters, their great spouses and super grandchildren: Trish and Robert (Steven and Lauren), Jacquie and Ken (Tyler, Teri and Donald), Sandy and Larry (Greg and Natalie). Those who will also greatly miss him are his sister Betty ROGERS and brothers Gord and Doug and many special nephews, nieces and Friends. Don's work has always revolved around construction, initially subdivisions in and around Toronto and then in environmental containment for landfills. This later work allowed him to enjoy life in both Canada and the U.S. A memorial service will be held at 3: 00 pm Saturday at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue W., (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.) Toronto.

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COLDWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-27 published
Died This Day -- M.J. COLDWELL, 1974
Wednesday, August 27, 2003 - Page R5
Teacher, politician, founder of Co-operative Commonwealth Federation party, born December 1, 1888, at Seaton, England; 1910, came to Canada as a teacher; 1924-34, led teachers' organizations 1932, elected leader of Saskatchewan provincial Farmer-Labour Party; 1935, elected to Parliament; 1942, succeeded J.S. WOODSWORTH as Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation leader; led Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation in five general elections until 1962 died in Ottawa.

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COLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
Gordon Kenneth FLEMING/FLEMMING
By Jack FORTIN Thursday, February 13, 2003, Page A30
Musician, husband, father. Born August 3, 1931, in Winnipeg. Died August 31, 2002, in Scarborough, Ontario, following a stroke, aged 71.
Gordie FLEMING/FLEMMING was a remarkable music talent, known internationally as a master of the accordion, especially in the jazz idiom. He was a life member of Local 149 of the Toronto Musicians' Association.
In show-business vernacular, Gordie was "born in a trunk." He began playing accordion when his older brother gave him lessons. His musical ability was such that he began performing publicly at the age of five. His schoolteachers often saw him being whisked away in a taxi to perform at theatres and radio stations in Winnipeg. By the age of 10, he was a working member of various bands in that city.
In 1949, Gordie lost his accordion in a fire at a Winnipeg hotel. With the insurance money, he headed for the bright lights of Montreal where he soon became an important part of that city's musical life. His accordion ability was complemented by the fact that he was also a gifted arranger and composer.
He had a marvellous ability to improvise and could string out complex bebop lines, leaving his listeners in awe. He often slipped a jazz phrase into ballads or commercial tunes, confirming that jazz was indeed his first love.
One of Montreal's busiest musicians, he wrote for local orchestras, shows, radio and television. He had perfect pitch and often wrote without reference to a keyboard. He was at home in every type of music from classics to jazz. For several years, he worked at the National Film Board as a composer and musician.
In Montreal, Gordie performed with many show business headliners: there was a wealth of home-grown talent in Montreal, such as Oscar PETERSON and Maynard FERGUSON, as well as other jazz musicians who were beginning to be noticed.
Gordie had said that when when he first heard bebop it was like entering another world. As his career indicates, he had no trouble in that world. He worked with many personalities including: Charlie PARKER, Mel TORMÉ, Hank SNOW, Lena HORNE, Englebert HUMPERDINCK, Dennis DAY, Gordon MacRAE, Cab CALLOWAY, Nat King COLE, Cat STEVENS, Rich LITTLE, Billy ECKSTEIN, Pee Wee HUNT, Arthur GODFREY and Buddy DEFRANCO.
He also performed with Tommy AMBROSE, Allan MILLS, Wally KOSTER, Tommy HUNTER, Bert NIOSI, Wayne and Shuster, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation jazz shows with Al BACULIS, and many other Canadian jazz musicians.
On Montreal's French music scene, Gordie performed on radio and television with Emile GENEST, Ti-Jean CARIGNAN, André GAGNON and Ginette RENO. He was a featured soloist with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on several occasions.
Internationally, Gordie toured France in 1952 and performed with Edith PIAF and Tino ROSSI. He had the honour to perform for former prime minister Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU at a Commonwealth Conference.
He participated with other top Canadian musicians in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation tour to entertain Canadian and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Europe in 1952 and 1968.
For me, a memorable experience was playing in a group with Gordie for several winters in Florida. A popular member of the Panama City Beach family of musicians, Gordie looked forward to his winter trek south. Many of the American musicians will miss him, as will the many snowbirds who looked forward to hearing him each year.
His extensive repertoire allowed Gordie to author a book called Music of the World, in which he wrote the music to 280 songs from more than 30 countries.
Gordie leaves his wife of 47 years, Joanne, and seven children.
Jack FORTIN is Gordie's friend.

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COLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-01 published
PEEBLES, David, Canadian Forces Decoration
Died at the Toronto General Hospital on February 27, 2003, after a brief illness. Born in Scotland in 1906, he lived most of his life in Montreal, where he was active in business and sports. He served in the Canadian Army during World War 2 and retired with the rank of Major from the Royal Montreal Regiment. He is survived by his wife Mary, his son Ross and his daughter- in-law Judith COLE. At his request there will be no funeral service. If desired donations may be made to the Salvation Army.

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COLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
CHANDRAN, Beverley Anne
On Friday, March 7, 2003, in her 50th year, Beverley was called to, once again, be one with the Creator of Creation. She went with a blazing smile of glory in her soul, while giving her unselfish, unstoppable gratitude in peace, tranquility, and a twinkle in her eye. At home in Erin, Ontario with her loved ones. In their 29th year of marriage, ever beloved part of Clarence; eternally loving mother of sons Justin (23) and his wife Jennifer; Liam (21) and Keddy (19.) Only daughter of Ambrose and Theresa CARROLL and sister of Gary (Marlene), D'Arcy (Pam) and Paul (Harriet). Only daughter-in-law of Geoff and Lena CHANDRAN and sister-in-law of Brinda McLAUGHLIN (John.) Permanent thanks to dearest and giving Friends, old and new. And special thanks to: Dr. Alan FRIEDMAN and staff, Dr. Henry FRIEDMAN of Duke University Medical Center; Dr. Stephen TREMONT and staff of Rex Hospital Cancer Clinic Dr. Julian ROSENMAN and staff of University of North Carolina Radiation Oncology Clinic; Dr. Lew STOCKS and staff, Dr. Mike DELISSIO and staff, Dr. Robert ALLEN and staff, Dr. Donald BROWN, all of Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina, U.S.A. Dr. Peter COLE of Orangeville, Ontario, and the nursing staff of Robertson and Brown of Kitchener, Ontario. Visitation and a Celebration of Beverley's life will take place at her home: #4998, 10th Sideroad of Erin, Ontario (north of Ballinafad Road, south of 5th Sideroad). Visitation for family and Friends will be held on Sunday, March 9, 2003, from 2 pm to 8 pm. On Monday, March 10, 2003, there will be a private family Funeral Mass, after which, Friends and family are invited to participate in a Celebration of Beverley's life from 3 pm. to 8 pm. In lieu of flowers, the family respectfully requests donations be made to the American Cancer Society (P.O. Box 102454, Atlanta, Georgia 303068-2454) or The Canadian Cancer Society (Wellington County Unit, 214 Speedvale Avenue, W. Unit 4A, Guelph, Ontario N1H 1C4) Arrangements entrusted to Butcher Family Funeral Home, 5399 Main Street, South, Erin, Ontario, Canada. For more information call 519-833-2231.

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COLEMAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Deacon David Roland COLEMAN TRUDEAU
In loving memory of Deacon David Roland COLEMAN TRUDEAU at the age of 78 years Thirty years of sobriety. Died peacefully surrounded by his wife and family at the Manitoulin Health Centre on Wednesday evening December 10, 2003.
Beloved husband of Clara (FOX) TRUDEAU of Wikwemikong and first wife the late Tillie KUBUNT of Newberry, Michigan. Dear son of the late Dominic and Angeline (WASSEGIJIG) TRUDEAU of Wikwemikong. Dear step-father to Bill TUCKER, Sharon (husband Ray) Wynn and Bob TUCKER of Newberry, Michigan, Lindell MATHEWS of Wikwemikong, Annie KAY (friend Eric EADIE,) Mathew and Linda MATHEWS (predeceased.) Loving grandfather to Billy, Karen, Jimmy, Linda (friend Wayne), Ronald (friend Tracy), Maxwell, Lindsay, Michael, Darla and a few more from Newberry, Michigan (names unknown at time of printing). Predeceased by two grandchildren Linda Marie and Lucy Marie. One great granddaughter Deanna MATHEWS. Loving brother of Stella (Jim predeceased) PAVLOT of Sault, Michigan, Ursula (Bob) SCHUPP of Meza, Arizona, Elsie (John predeceased) BOWES of Shorter, Alabama. Predeceased by brothers and sisters and in-laws Tony (Margaret) TRUDEAU, Isadore (Marge) WEMIGWANS, Lena (Bova) GRENIER, and Francis (Nestor) KARMINSKI. Will be sadly missed by Godchildren Jonathon DEBASSIGE, Alison RECOLLET, Darcy SPANISH, and many nieces, nephews and cousins.
Rested at St. Ignatius Church, Buzwah. Funeral Mass was held at Holy Cross Mission, Wikwemikong on Monday, December 15, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Doug McCarthy s.j. officiating. Cremation at the Sagamok Anishnawbek First Nations Crematorium. Lougheed Funeral Home.

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COLICOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-11 published
Creator of Savage God
Theatre director was a Canadian nationalist, a fan of the avant garde and a champion of playwright George Ryga. He was also seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, October 11, 2003 - Page F9
John JULIANI was a provocateur in life as on stage. A man passionate about the possibilities of theatre, he roused reverence in some, antipathy in others.
His most infamous act was to challenge the Stratford Festival's newly hired artistic director to a duel. Robin PHILLIPS's offence was that he is British when Mr. JULIANI and others were certain a land as grand as Canada was capable of producing a director for its Shakespearean theatre.
What he called a "romantic gesture with tongue in cheek" earned cheers from Canadian theatre directors and sneers from much of the theatre establishment.
Mr. JULIANI, who has died at the age of 63, was an unabashed Canadian nationalist, a dedicated fan of the avant garde, an ardent defender of the right of actors to a decent living, a champion of playwright George Ryga and a tireless figure so commanding as to develop an intense loyalty among acolytes.
At the same time, he was seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter. One critic called him "the Tiger Williams of Canadian theatre," his pugnacious approach earning him comparison to a notorious hockey goon. In his defence, Mr. JULIANI explained that he was merely a "true believer" with opinions on controversial subjects.
Mr. JULIANI's credits were long and varied, including spontaneous Sixties street happenings such as the staging of his own wedding as a theatrical performance and brief appearances on such 1990s television dramas as The X-Files.
From 1982 until 1997, Mr. JULIANI was executive producer of radio drama for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver. He helped to bring to air many celebrated productions, including the brilliant and provocative Dim Sum Diaries by playwright Mark LEIREN- YOUNG.
Mr. JULIANI also possessed a head-turning beauty, with a profile as striking as a Roman bust. Radio host Bill RICHARDSON commented on his handsomeness at a raucous memorial after his death, calling him a "hunka hunka burnin' love." Some said he had the looks and bearing of a Shakespearean king.
John Charles JULIANI was born in Montreal on March 24, 1940. Raised in a working-class neighbourhood, he attended Loyola College and was an early graduate from the fledgling National Theatre School.
He spent two seasons as an actor at Stratford before being hired as a theatre teacher at Simon Fraser University in 1966. The new university atop Burnaby Mountain east of Vancouver was a hotbed of radicalism in politics and the arts. Mr. JULIANI bristled at an imposed curriculum and so infuriated the administration that he was banned from the campus in 1969.
Mr. JULIANI was heavily influenced by the writing of Antonin Artaud, a Surrealist who championed a theatre based on the imagination. He long sought to erase the barrier between scripted text and sensory impression, between performer and audience, to mixed success.
After moving to the West Coast, Mr. JULIANI launched a series of experiments in theatre. He credited these productions to Savage God, which was less a troupe in the traditional sense than a title granted to any performance involving Mr. JULIANI. The name came from William Butler Yeats's awestruck reaction to Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi: "After us, the Savage God?"
Savage God defied explanation, though many tried and even Mr. JULIANI offered suggestions. Savage God was "an anthology of question marks," he once said. (It was, after all, the 1960s.) "Savage God is simply the Imagination," he told the Vancouver Sun, "insatiable, unrelenting, fiercely energetic, wary of categorization, fond of contradiction and inveterately iconoclastic."
In January, 1970, Mr. JULIANI married dancer Donna WONG, a ceremony conducted as a Savage God performance at the Vancouver Art Gallery. He repeated the process at the christening of his son. Ms. WONG- JULIANI would be his domestic and drama partner for more than three decades.
In 1971, the streets of Vancouver were the scene of several spontaneous and sometimes incomprehensible -- performances under the aegis of PACET ("pilot alternative complement to existing theatre.") The $18,000 project, funded by the federal government, incorporated Gestalt therapy sessions in street performances.
Theatrical events took place willy-nilly across the city, including malls, the airport, the library and Stanley Park. Admission was not charged, nor did all spectators appreciate their role as audience to avant-garde performance. A scene in which bicyclists wearing gas masks pedalled along city streets left many scratching their heads in puzzlement.
In 1974, Mr. JULIANI moved to Toronto to set up a graduate theatre-studies program at York University.
He called the program PEAK (" Performance, Example, Animation, Katharsis") and perhaps should have found an acronym for PEEK, as the instructor and his class stripped naked to protest against a lack of classroom space.
The challenge to the new Stratford artistic director in 1974 was written on a piece of parchment and delivered in London by Don RUBIN, a York colleague. Alas, Mr. RUBIN could not find a proper gauntlet and wound up ceremoniously striking Mr. PHILLIPS with a red rubber glove, an absurd note to a theatrical protest.
In 1978, Mr. JULIANI took the stage in a Toronto production of Children of Night, portraying Janusz Korczak, a doctor and teacher who ran an orphanage in the Warsaw ghetto. The critics were appalled.
Gina MALLET of the Toronto Star said Mr. JULIANI's performance sullied Dr. Korczak's memory. Jay SCOTT of The Globe and Mail, noting "the dreadfulness" of Mr. JULIANI's acting, said the production robbed the dead of their dignity.
From the stage, Mr. JULIANI challenged the Star's critic to a public debate on the aesthetics of theatre. He also wrote a letter to the editor, noting that Holocaust survivors in the audience had wholeheartedly embraced the production.
Mr. JULIANI wound up in Edmonton, where he continued to condemn the "exorbitance, elitism and museum theatre" of the establishment.
In 1982, he directed and co-wrote Latitude 55°, a feature film with just two characters -- a slick woman from the city and a Polish potato farmer -- set in a snowbound cabin. "It is filled with a passionate conviction that evaporates in pretentious pronouncements," The Globe's Carole CORBEIL wrote, "filled with truthful moments that evaporate in the desire to use every narcissistic trick in the book."
In a 1983 book examining the alternative theatre movement in Canada, author Renate USMIANI devoted most of a chapter to Mr. JULIANI, a decision that got her a scathing rebuke from a reviewer who considered him worthy of little more than a footnote.
"His works are curiosities; at best, they are worthy experiments in Artaudian theory," Boyd NEIL wrote in a Globe review. "But they are neither popular... nor influential."
Mr. JULIANI's years at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver were both productive and successful. Among the many projects he directed was a three-part adaptation of Margaret Laurence's The Diviners; King Lear, starring John COLICOS; a 13-part series titled, Disaster! Acts of God or Acts of Man?" and, famously, Ryga's The Ecstasy of Rita Joe, with Leonard GEORGE portraying a role once assumed on stage by his late father, Chief Dan GEORGE. The surprise selection of Mr. GEORGE was typical of Mr. JULIANI's often brilliant casting.
Mr. JULIANI directed a 1989 production of The Glass Menagerie at the Vancouver Playhouse with Jennifer Phipps and Morris Panych. Globe reviewer Liam LACEY praised a production that "opens up the play like an old treasure chest, and lets in some fresh air without rearranging or disturbing the work's original grandeurs and caprices."
Four years later, Mr. JULIANI was directing a production of the mystery thriller Sleepwalker when actor Peter HAWORTH took sick shortly before opening night. The director suddenly found himself as the male lead. "Not even the most colossal egotist would want to do this," he said.
Dim Sum Diaries, a series of monologues written by Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG, received protests when aired by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in 1991. One episode, entitled The Sequoia, in which the white vendor of a luxury home launches a tirade against the Hong Kong immigrant who cuts down two rare and spectacular trees on the property, was accused of being racist. The playwright's well-intentioned exploration of stereotyping was charged with fostering those very prejudices.
After directing Dim Sum Diaries, Mr. JULIANI urged the playwright to tackle an issue that was dividing his church. Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG remembers replying: "You're talking same-sex marriage in the Anglican church and you want a straight Jewish guy to write this?"
The resulting play, titled Articles of Faith: The Battle of St. Alban's, was staged at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Vancouver to great acclaim.
The collaborations between young playwright and veteran director succeeded in achieving Mr. JULIANI's goal of inspiring dialogue through theatre.
Mr. JULIANI had a reputation as a demanding taskmaster for novice and veteran actors alike. Rehearsals were jokingly called "Savage God Boot Camp."
He maintained a breakneck pace, both in the theatre and in the boardroom. He was artistic co-director of Opera Breve, a small company dedicated to nurturing young singers; president of the Union of British Columbia Performers (Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists); and, a former national president of the Directors Guild of Canada, among many boards on which he served.
Feeling fatigued in early August, Mr. JULIANI was diagnosed with liver cancer. The end came swiftly. He died on August 21 at Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver.
He leaves his wife of 33 years, Donna WONG- JULIANI, and a son, Alessandro JULIANI, an actor. He also leaves brothers Richard and Norman.
(Wit was long a part of the JULIANI mystique. The family pet, a canine named Beau Beau, was referred to in the family's paid obituary notice as a Savage Dog.)
For one who roused such passions, Mr. JULIANI felt that he led a conservative life. "I have always been a square," he once said.
A theatrical farewell to Mr. JULIANI attracted hundreds to St. Andrew's Wesley Church in Vancouver on Labour Day, a Monday and traditionally a quiet date on the theatre calendar. Those in attendance were encouraged to write remembrances on Post-It notes, which were then stuck to the church's pillars.
The City of Vancouver has declared next March 24, which would have been Mr. JULIANI's 64th birthday, to be Savage God Day.

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COLLA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-07 published
Nathan Nauson LEVINNE
By Marsha COLLA and Wilma FREEDMAN Wednesday, May 7, 2003 - Page A20
Doctor, husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather, friend. Born June 30, 1917, in Toronto. Died Feb 1, 2003, in Toronto, of cancer, aged 85.
Nathan LEVINNE was a gentle giant.
This 6-foot, 4-inch tall, handsome family doctor had retired from Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital, following a 52-year career of being devoted to caring for patients and their families with incredible compassion, sensitivity and a unique sense of humour.
Nathan Nauson LEVINNE was born on Toronto's Niagara Street. After graduating from Oakwood Collegiate, he completed his medical degree at the University of Toronto. (He actually later became a professor emeritus at this same university.) Upon seeing a beautiful blonde woman at a fraternity party and mentioning to a friend, "That's the gal I intend to marry, Evelyn STEIN and Nate were wed in Toronto on December 28, 1941.
Immediately after getting married, they left for St. Louis, Missouri, where he completed his internship.
On returning to Canada, he enlisted in the army, served as a medical officer (attaining the rank of captain), and was decorated by both the Dutch and Canadian governments.
After his stint in the army, Dr. LEVINNE set up his first family-practice office on Lakeview Ave. in Toronto. He was a very skilled diagnostician and gave advice with great wisdom and compassion.
In 1966, the first Family Practice Unit was established at Mount Sinai Hospital with Dr. Nathan LEVINNE as its chief. He also was instrumental in organizing Ambulatory Care Services and was the director of Occupational Health and Safety.
He was chief of staff and chairman of the Medical Advisory Committee from 1979 to 1981. He made a tremendous contribution to health care.
It was on his 80th birthday that he retired from active practise, always maintaining that it was important to recognize when to stop. However, he continued to give back to the community.
He participated in a mentoring program for young students who were interested in pursuing medical careers, helped at the Canadian National Institute for the Blind by walking with a non-sighted gentleman once a week, and spent time at The Baycrest Home for the Aged talking to the lonely elderly who had no families with whom to visit.
And, being a very spiritual human being, he would enjoy studying the Bible in his quiet times.
Most importantly, Nathan LEVINNE was a real family man. A devoted, loyal and loving life partner to his wife of 61 years, he was happiest when surrounded by his five grandchildren, for whom he became a great source of life experience and support. For his new little great-grand_son, he was able to provide a big cuddly lap in which to snuggle.
And what an extraordinary father figure he was for me and my sister. He let us play hairdresser on his thick silvery locks, taught us how to swallow capsule pills by likening them to toboggans on the backs of our tongues, and he stayed home with us on Saturday nights if we didn't have dates -- and that added up to a lot of Saturday nights!
Nathan LEVINNE was a father, a friend and a hero. He went through many medical challenges in his life, never allowing anyone to see or feel his pain, protecting his family right until the end.
Dad always joked and encouraged us to ramble on for hours when there was a captive audience but we will stop now, so that he can rest in peace. His memory will beat on in our hearts forever.
Marsha COLLA and Wilma FREEDMAN are Nathan LEVINNE's daughters.

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COLLIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-24 published
Composer, jazz musician worked with Ellington
By Mark MILLER, Friday, October 24, 2003 - Page R11
Toronto -- Ron COLLIER, a well-respected composer and teacher in the Canadian jazz community, died in Toronto on Wednesday of cancer. He was 73.
Mr. COLLIER, who was born in Coleman, Alberta., played trombone during his teens with the Kitsilano Boys Band in Vancouver then moved in 1950 to Toronto.
While working in local dance bands and studio orchestras there, he was involved with Gordon DELAMONT, Norman SYMONDS, Fred STONE and others in the late 1950s as a performer and composer in "third-stream" jazz, an idiom that framed jazz improvisation in such classical forms as fugue, sonata and concerto.
Mr. COLLIER turned exclusively to composition in 1967, the year that he led a studio orchestra for the LP Duke Ellington North of the Border with the noted American pianist as guest soloist. Mr. COLLIER subsequently collaborated personally with Ellington on a ballet, The River, in 1970, and a symphonic work, Celebration, in 1972, although his contributions went largely unacknowledged. He also wrote for ballet, radio, television and film and completed arrangements for recordings by Moe Koffman and the Boss Brass his last major work was a big-band setting of Oscar Peterson's Canadiana Suit/, premiered in 1997.
Mr. COLLIER, a warm, direct man, taught for many years in Toronto at Humber College, where his influence was felt by at least two generations of musicians now active on the Canadian jazz scene.

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COLLINS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-05 published
COLLINS
-In fond and loving memory of my grand_son
Brent COLLINS January 20, 1989
Jane DURDLE August 12, 1989
and John G. EADIE April 23, 1990.
Gone but not forgotten.
Dear loved ones:
I believe that God reaches out
in love to each and every one of us.
Heaven is invisible
But it waits nearby.
Almost as close
As a river is to its bank.
Our loved ones abide there in perfect peace
awaiting a reunion
at Journey's end.
look around your garden Lord
they won't be hard to find.
Their faces are so full of love
and hearts that are good and kind
tell them that we love them
and when they turn and smile
Place your arms around them Lord
and hold them for a while.
We talk about them often
I think about them still
they haven't been forgotten Lord
and they never, ever will.
-Forever loved and remembered by Grandma TAILOR/TAYLOR, Justin DURDLE and the rest of the members of the family
Doreen TAILOR/TAYLOR

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COLLINS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
Wesley " Wes" Edward HALL
In loving memory of Wesley "Wes" Edward HALL who passed away on Sunday, October 26, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital, St. Joseph's Health Centre at the age of 70 years.
Beloved husband of Lucille (FORTIER) HALL predeceased 1995. Loving father of Wesley (wife Valerie) of Toronto, Michael (wife Colleen) of Ottawa, Allison (husband Alvin LANDRY) of Oshawa, John (wife Marie-Anne) of Ponty Pool, Sharon (husband Danny GIRARD) of Arlington, Texas and Sherri-Lynn (husband Joseph BORLAND) of Milan, Mich. Cherished grandfather of Jennifer, Samantha, Jessica, Kaela, Kaitlyn, Bradley, Rebecca, Nicholas and Ashley. Dear son of Harold and Florence HALL, both predeceased. Dear brother of Harold predeceased (wife Valerie) of Cambridge, Kenneth (wife Eleanor) of Grimsby, Bruce of Toronto, Inez (husband Harold COLLINS predeceased) of Sarnia and Beverley predeceased (husband David ARMSTRONG predeceased). Funeral service was held in the RJ Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch St. Sudbury on Thursday, October 30, 2003. Cremation in the Parklawn Crematorium.

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COLLINS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-26 published
COLLINS
-In loving memory of George.
We have this one thought to keep
You are with us still, you do not sleep
We do not think of you as gone
You are with us still, in each new dawn.
In our thoughts daily...
-Love Alison, Marco, Maggie and Hank.

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COLLINS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-26 published
COLLINS
-In loving memory of a dear husband, George.
I watched you suffer,
Heard you sigh,
And all I could do
Was stand by.
But when the time came,
I suffered too.
You never deserved
What you went through.
God took your hand
We had to part.
He eased your pain
But broke my heart.
Although I smile,
And seem carefree
No one misses you
More than me.
-Always remembered and sadly missed by Rona, James, Chris, Alison, step-grandchildren and grandchildren.

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COLLINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-16 published
Bluesman made his mark
Canadian harpist's brush with greatness was frustrated by his battle with the bottle
By Bruce Farley MOWAT Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, January 16, 2003, Page R9
He will be remembered for creating some of the high water marks in the history of popular music in Canada. Blues harpist Richard NEWELL, also known as King Biscuit Boy, has died. He was found dead at his house in Hamilton on January 5.
Richard NEWELL's story is the stuff of legend, but not legendary. The Oxford Canadian Dictionary defines legend as "a traditional story sometimes popularly regarded as historical, but unauthenticated."
Nearly all the career anecdotes surrounding King Biscuit Boy have been verified. Yes, he really was recruited for the Allman Brothers in 1969, for Janis JOPLIN's Full Tilt Boogie Band in 1970 and for a mid-seventies session with Aretha FRANKLIN. The stellar Houston blues guitarist, Albert COLLINS was recording a version of Mr. NEWELL's Mean Old Lady, before he died in 1994.
Mr. NEWELL, though, would rarely volunteer to offer up such information, unless you prodded him for it. He didn't think it was important.
He was born the son of Lily and Walter (Dick) NEWELL, an Royal Air Force airman stationed in Canada during the Second World War. Richard NEWELL developed an early interest in music, from the country of Hank WILLIAMS Sr. to the jump blues of Louis JORDAN, to the frenetic sounds of such original rock 'n' rollers as Little Richard. At age 12, he purchased his first harmonica after discovering the blues via late-night AM radio.
Mr. NEWELL spent seven years rehearsing his ever-expanding collection of blues 45s, which he purchased on regular hitchhiking forays to Buffalo. Few of his Friends at the time were even aware that he played harmonica and guitar.
In 1963, Ronnie COPPLE's sock-hop rock 'n' roll group, the Barons, recruited Mr. NEWELL as its lead singer. Mr. NEWELL had heard a recording of their instrumental original, Bottleneck, and came by with an record by the prototypical American electric blues slide guitarist, Elmore JAMES.
Within weeks of his joining, the group was transfigured into the flat-out, deep blues band, The Chessmen Featuring son Richard. The sound was guitar driven and harmonica-heavy, certainly not the type of thing you'd find at the average mid-sixties Southern Ontario teen dance. The band made it to Europe the following summer, playing successful shows at U.S. Army bases to predominantly black audiences.
Back in Canada, Mr. NEWELL would go on to become the lead singer of Richie Knight and The Mid Knights in 1966. He also made his debut professional recording at this time, as a session harmonica player on a recording by country singer, Dallas HARMS, best known for writing such hits as Paper Rosie for American country singer Gene WATSON.
When ex-Mid Knight and future Full Tilt Boogie band member Rick BELL was recruited for the Ronnie HAWKINS band in 1968, Mr. NEWELL's name came up. After one audition, he was hired on the spot and rechristened with the royal King Biscuit Boy moniker, a title he was never totally comfortable with.
Back in his native Arkansas, HAWKINS had rehearsed in the basement of the old KFFA radio station where blues harpist, Sonny Boy Williamson 2nd (Rice MILLER,) did his King Biscuit Flour Hour broadcasts. To HAWKINS, Mr. NEWELL must have sounded like a letter from home.
When JOPLIN scooped BELL and guitarist John TILL from HAWKINS's band early in 1970, Mr. NEWELL and drummer Larry ATAMANUIK were left with the task of re-assembling the band. That group would become the first King Biscuit Boy-led outfit, Crowbar. In a fit of pique, HAWKINS had inadvertently given the band its name in an exchange of parting shots at the Grange Tavern in Hamilton. "You guys are so dumb," he yelled, "you could fuck up the moving parts of a crowbar."
As the bandleader, singer, harmonica player and guitarist on Official Music, Mr. NEWELL was responsible for building a razor-sharp and singularly intense sound. The rehearsals for these sessions were apparently tension-laden affairs, but the payoff came when the album muscled its way on to the Canadian charts, (without the benefit of Canadian-content regulations), the fastest-selling domestic release to date.
Mr. NEWELL and the band would part ways after King Biscuit Boy and Crowbar had scored on the singles chart with the traditional piece, Corrina, Corrina. In 1971, Crowbar (without King Biscuit Boy) earned a place on the bestseller charts with a song that was to become a perennial Canuck rock anthem. Oh, What a Feeling was the first domestic single to take advantage of the newly legislated Canadian-content rules for broadcasting.
Fate intervened throughout the following years to rob Mr. NEWELL of his career momentum. The backing band he assembled to promote Good 'Uns, the 1971 followup to Official Music, was beginning to work on a third album, when the funding for it ran out.
With the momentum lost, that unit disintegrated, with guitarist Earl JOHNSON leaving to form the hard-rock outfit, Moxy.
In 1974, sessions produced by Allen TOUSSAINT, the architect of many a New Orleans Rhythm and Blues classic, would culminate in the Epic label release of a self-titled recording. Mr. NEWELL would tour the United States the following year with The Meters (featuring future members of the Neville Brothers) as his backup band. When the Epic label cleaned house later that year, though, he was one of the acts dropped.
In 1972, Mr. NEWELL wed Jacqueline WILLETTS but found that married life did not curb his increasingly frequent drinking binges. The couple divorced in 1979. Alcoholism was also the source of most of his professional woes for the better part of his life, as key shows were either cancelled, or worse, rendered into shambles. Musicians who worked with him tended to admire him, but found it incredibly frustrating that such an enormous talent was being squandered.
At several junctures in his career, Mr. NEWELL managed to quit drinking. Of the three albums he recorded and released in the eighties and nineties, two were the direct dividends of his abstinence. Those recordings earned him Juno nominations, in 1988 for Richard NEWELL aka King Biscuit Boy,and in 1996 for Urban Blues Re: NEWELL. The latter is still in print on Holger Peterson's Stony Plain label. Official Music, along with Good'Uns and Badly Bent, a best-of compilation, are available on the Unidisc label (http://www.unidisc.com). The rest of the King Biscuit Boy catalogue, including the 1980 Mouth of Steel album, is out of print.
In 2000, Mr. NEWELL's mother died and he left regular stage work, preferring the seclusion of his home in the central Mountain neighbourhood of Hamilton. His last recordings include a version of Blue Christmas, available on the Hamilton Hometown Christmas Compact Disk compilation assembled by saxophonist and long-time friend, Sonny DEL RIO. An original composition, Two Hound Blues, along with material recorded by DEL RIO and Mr. NEWELL in the late seventies (the Biscuit With Gravy sessions) is planned for release this year.
Mr. NEWELL, who leaves his father Dick, brother Walter (Randy,) and son Richard James Oddie, made his last public performance in a cameo appearance with The Little Red Blues Gang on September 12, 2002, at Mermaids Lounge in Hamilton. The 60 or so audience members present were treated to a version of his hit, Corrina, Corrina, which is strange, because he never particularly cared for that song.
Richard Alfred NEWELL, musician; born March 9, 1944, in Hamilton died in Hamilton, January 5, 2003.

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COLLINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
DALGLEISH, Gordon John
Peacefully in his son's arms, at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, on March 4, 2003. Dear husband and best friend of Suzanne (née MORRISON) and devoted father of Cameron and Suzanne Jane. Beloved brother-in-law of Sheila COLLINS and dear uncle of Catherine and Julie CIEPLY. Best buddy to MacTavish. Gord cherished the many Friends he made throughout his life. Gord's family deeply appreciates the care, love and Friendship of cardiologist Dr. Donald PEAT, Dr. Bruce MERRICK, Dr. Tom STANTON and nurses Nancy DAHMER and Patti FRANKLIN gave him so generously. For many years Gord was an enthusiastic member of the Canadian Ski Patrol, Canadian Ski Instructors Alliance and he was a ski instructor at Mansfield Skiways. Friends will be received at Saint John's United Church, 262 Randall Street, Oakville, (905) 845-0551, on Saturday, March 8, 2003 at 11 a.m. until the time of the funeral service at 12 p.m. Reception to follow the funeral service. Burial to take place at Trafalgar Lawn Cemetery, Oakville. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Heart Function Clinic at the Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital.

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COLLINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-11 published
COLLINS, Betty (née Margaret Elizabeth MacMINN)
Born in Truro, Nova Scotia on 26 November 1923, died at home in Victoria on 7 March, 2003 after bravely fighting two strokes. Beloved of husband Alan, son David (Jacquie), grand_son Nicholas, brother George MacMINN (Louise,) sister Gene McMORRIS (George,) and predeceased by her grand_son, Alan. Betty will be greatly missed by all who knew and loved her. The family would like to thank Hospice P.R.T., her caregivers and the Home Care Service of the Vancouver Island Health Authority for their professional and abundant care. The funeral service will be held at St. Mathias Church, corner of Richardson and Richmond, in Victoria, on Thursday, 13 March at 2 p.m.

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COLLINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-29 published
Kenneth Fawcett COLLINS
By Alan RAYBURN Thursday, May 29, 2003 - Page A26
Husband, father, grandfather, veteran, volunteer, family historian. Born November 23, 1916, in Haverhill, Massachusetts. Died February 19, in Ottawa, of cancer, aged 86.
Ken COLLINS was born close to the New Hampshire border, into a family with very deep New England roots. His father Bernard (Bern) traced his roots back to the 1600s in that area, while his mother, Eleanor (Elly) McPHERSON, came from Grand Valley in Dufferin County, Ontario Elly's mother, Elizabeth Adaline FAWCETT, was the source of Ken's second name. Bern and Elly emigrated from the United States to Montreal in 1926, and then, in 1930, moved to North Bay, Ontario
In 1941, Ken graduated from Queen's University in Kingston with a degree in chemical engineering and worked in the Welland Chemical Works in Niagara Falls for two years. He then joined the Canadian army's Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, and rose to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. Ken's pride as a commandant of "Reemee" was revealed in his car licence plate: CREME.
Ken served overseas from 1943 to 1946, and was a Normandy veteran. After the war, he held various staff and regimental appointments, mostly in Ottawa. Upon retiring from the army in 1967, Ken was engaged by Carleton University to administer the department of planning and construction until 1982.
During his Queen's graduation week, Ken married Evalyn ROBLIN, who had been raised west of Kingston in Adolphustown Township, Lennox and Addington County. After he discovered that local historians had been mistaken about which of two ancestral Roblin roots were Evalyn's, he vigorously launched into a search of his own family roots. Over a period of some 60 years he accumulated 24 thick binders on family connections. He was able to trace back 18 generations, with King Edward 4th among his ancestors in the 1400s.
Ken and Evalyn had three children, Marianne, Bruce (a fireman who was killed in a fire in 1972), and Elizabeth; also, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Family was very important to Ken; he was very proud of his offspring.
For almost a quarter of a century, Ken was a Friday evening volunteer at the Family History Centre of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on Ottawa's Prince of Wales Drive. There he guided both experienced and novice family historians to find their ancestral records.
Recognizing the value of working with others involved in genealogy (right up there in North American hobby popularity, right after stamp collecting), Ken joined the Ontario Genealogical Society and its Ottawa Branch in 1972. After serving as the chair of the branch in the mid-1970s, he rose through the ranks to become the president of the Ontario Genealogical Society from 1977 to Ken was a prime mover of recording gravestone inscriptions in Ontario's cemeteries. As the Ontario Genealogical Society cemetery inscription coordinator from 1974 to 1992, he saw the number of recorded cemeteries rise from 1,800 to more than 5,000. A spinoff from the cemetery recordings is the much-used Ontario Cemetery Finding Aid on the Internet, which publishes the indexes of the cemetery recordings.
Ken was a member of Rideau Park United Church in the Alta Vista area of Ottawa, and had worked there for 36 years with the Boy Scouts. When his grand_son, John BAIRD (now an Ontario cabinet minister) became a teenager, he guided him to become a Queen's Scout.
Ken COLLINS was a great mentor, friend and gentleman: his contributions to family history studies, cemetery recordings and Scouting will long serve many Ottawa and Ontario generations to come.
Alan RAYBURN is a friend of Ken COLLINS; Edward KIPP contributed to the article.

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COLLINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-24 published
Died This Day -- Dorothy COLLINS, 1994
Thursday, July 24, 2003 - Page R7
Singer and actor born Marjorie CHANDLER in Windsor, Ontario, on November 18, 1926; in 1950s, performed on television's Your Hit Parade; sang trademark Be Happy, Go Lucky for sponsor Lucky Strike cigarettes; later performed weekly top hits; in the 1960s, demonstrated flair for comedy in helping set up gags on unwitting victims for Allen Funt's Candid Camera; married to bandleader/composer Raymond SCOTT, with whom she ran a record label; starred in original Broadway cast of Stephen Sondheim's Follies; regarded as one of finest vocalists of her era; died of heart attack in New York.

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COLLINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-18 published
HOPE, Ann Leslie (née McCULLOCH)
In Charlottetown on Tuesday, September 16th, 2003 aged 77 years. Daughter of Hugh Leslie and Barbara McCULLOCH of Galt, Ontario. Ann died peacefully after a brief illness. Predeceased by her husband Frank. Survived by her three children, Robin (Robert PATERSON), William (Amanda PARFITT) and Barclay (Lindsay COLLINS) and seven grandchildren.

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COLLINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-23 published
COLLINS, Joyce Amanda (formerly WHITING, née JOHNSON)
Died October 21, 2003 at St. Joseph's Villa, Dundas in her 83rd year. She was born on February 1, 1921 in Maidstone, Saskatchewan to Frank and Amanda JOHNSON, the youngest of 6 children. She is predeceased by her brothers Fred and Enos, sisters Ruth, Elma and Hilda. Joyce is also predeceased by her first husband Frank WHITING. Survived by her husband William and her sons Robert WHITING (Lan Wei), Kenneth WHITING (Jane), Douglas WHITING (Darlene) and daughters Margaret (Fraser FLETCHER,) Susan WHITING (Alan DESCHNER) and step-daughter Patti (Randy SKINNER.) Also survived by 11 grandchildren and a great-grand_son. Special thanks to Bonnie Bon for her special care and love during the past few years. Joyce was a graduate from the College of Household Sciences (1941), University of Saskatchewan and practiced as a hospital dietitian in Ottawa and Fredericton. Cremation. A Celebration of Joyce's Life will be held on Saturday, October 25 at Binkley United Church, 1570 Main Street West, Hamilton at 2 o'clock. Private inurnment White Chapel Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to Joyce Collins Bursary c/o University of Saskatchewan, Sasktoon S7N 5C9.
catteleatonandchambers.ca

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COLLINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
FOGELL, David 1923-2003
Born December 22, 1923 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died October 27, 2003 at home with his family in Vancouver, British Columbia. He was predeceased by his parents Melach and Surka, brother, Ben and sisters Dora and Netty. Dave is mourned by his wife, Estelle, children, Melanie and her husband Ken GOLDSTEIN, Wayne and Mark. He will be greatly missed by his grandchildren Carie and her husband Stuart, Daniel, Sarah, Kylie; Sammy, Benji and their mother Dorothy ULLMAN as well as great-grand_son, Kade. He will never be forgotten by his many relatives and Friends. Dave was an incredibly charismatic and an intensely joyful human being. He felt deeply and loved unquestioningly. Those who were fortunate enough to be part of his life will be forever enriched by having known him. Dave approached everything in his life with meticulous attention. He had very humble beginnings yet he always remembered those who helped him throughout his life. He had a rare passion for living extending to everything and everyone. His seemingly endless energy led to numerous accomplishments and successes. He will be remembered most for his ability to make those around him feel loved. The funeral is Wednesday, October 29, 2003 at the Beth Israel Cemetary, 1721 Willingdon, Burnaby, at 12 noon. The pallbearers are Sammy and Benji FOGELL, Daniel GOLDSTEIN, Lanny GOULD, Howard DINER and Joel ALTMAN. Honourary pallbearers are Zivey FELDMAN and Harry GELFANT. The family would like to thank caregivers Denyse TREPANIER and Bryan WALKER as well as Dr. Larry COLLINS and Dr. Victoria BERNSTEIN. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Fund or the Jewish Family Service Agency.

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COLOMBO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
He founded Readers' Club of Canada
Nationalist visionary struggled financially to publish Canadian writers
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page R7
In the early 1960s, when writers asked Peter and Carol MARTIN where to publish their manuscripts on Canada, the couple realized how few choices there were. Inspired, the Martins, both voracious readers, staunch nationalists and founders of the Readers' Club of Canada, decided to start their own press. In 1965, Peter Martin Associates came into being. Last month, Peter MARTIN died of lung cancer in Ottawa.
In an industry overshadowed by American companies, Peter MARTIN Associates was among the first in a wave of independent publishing houses to open during a time of rising Canadian nationalism.
Launched in a downtown Toronto basement on a shoestring budget, skeleton staff, idealism and enthusiasm, the company flew by the seat of its pants. Its employees were often young and new to the business. But many, including Peter CARVER, Michael SOLOMON and Valerie WYATT, went on to become Canadian mainstays.
"It really was a time of Canadian nationalism and those of us who believed in that cause could see what Peter and Carol were doing," said Ms. WYATT, a children's editor who spent four years with the company in the seventies.
During the 16 years before its sale in 1981, Peter Martin Associates published approximately 170 works, mainly non-fiction. Its presses put out I, Nuligak, the autobiography of an Inuit man; The Boyd Gang by Marjorie LAMB and Barry PEARSON; Trapping is My Life by John TETSO; and the Handbook of Canadian Film by Eleanor BEATTIE. Others who came through their doors included Hugh HOOD, Robert FULFORD, John Robert COLOMBO, Douglas FETHERLING and Mary Alice DOWNIE -- all to have their works published.
Started with small amounts of seed money from private investors and no government funding, Peter Martin Associates constantly struggled financially. At one point, for a bit of extra cash, the office became the designated nuclear-fallout shelter for the street. Pat DACEY, once the firm's book designer, lugged suitcases of books up the street to sell at Britnell's bookstore with summer employee Bronwyn DRAINIE.
Working at Peter Martin Associates was always fun, Ms. WYATT said. "You went in to work happy and you stayed happy all day."
Still, in a time when Canadian works received little recognition, she remembers finding it difficult to get media interviews for the author of Martin-published book.
Yet another title caused trouble with its subject. The company was putting out a collection of previously published sayings of former prime minister John DIEFENBAKER, called I Never Say Anything Provocative, edited by Margaret WENTE. Mr. DIEFENBAKER heard about the project, called Mr. MARTIN and threatened to sue. Mr. MARTIN stood firm.
"He handled it with such élan," said writer Tim WYNNE- JONES, then in the art department. "He was suitably dutiful, but not in awe. Mr. DIEFENBAKER was just over the top, as was his wont."
The book went to press and Mr. DIEFENBAKER did not go to court.
Once listed along with Peter GZOWSKI in a Maclean's magazine article on "Young Men to Watch," Mr. MARTIN was born on April 26, 1934 in Ottawa to a dentist father and a mother who drove an ambulance in the First World War. The younger of two sons, he attended Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario and the University of Toronto, where he earned a degree in philosophy.
During a year in Ottawa as the president of the National Federation of University Students, Mr. MARTIN met his first wife Carol. They married in 1956 and moved to Toronto. Three years later, they founded the Readers' Club in Featuring one Canadian book a month, it distributed works by Mordecai RICHLER, Irving LAYTON, Morley CALLAGHAN and Brian MOORE among others, and supplied its members with coupons. While continuing to run the Readers' Club (sold in 1978 to Saturday Night Magazine and closed in 1981), the MARTINs started Peter Martin Associates.
Throughout his career, Mr. MARTIN spoke out for Canadian publishing. Alarmed by the sale of Ryerson Press and Gage Educational Press in 1970 to American firms, he called a meeting of publishers to discuss problems in the industry. Named the Independent Publishers Association, the group started in 1971 with 16 members and with Mr. MARTIN as its first president. In 1976, it was renamed the Association of Canadian Publishers and continues today with 140 members. As a result of the group's efforts, Canadian publishing began to receive federal and provincial funding.
In the late 1970s, the MARTINs went their separate ways. Afterward, Mr. MARTIN published a small newspaper, The Downtowner, and owned a cookbook store with his second wife, Maggie NIEMI. In 1983, they moved near Sudbury, Ontario, where Mr. MARTIN did freelance book and theatre reviews, then moved to Ottawa in 1985 to work as president for Balmuir Books, publisher of the magazine International Perspectives and consulting editor for the University of Ottawa Press.
After a spinal-cord injury in 1997, Mr. MARTIN was left a quadriplegic, except for limited use of his left arm. Even so, he remained active, maintained a heavy e-mail correspondence and spent time in the park reading while seated in a bright-yellow wheelchair.
Mr. MARTIN leaves his children Pamela, Christopher and Jeremy and his wife Maggie NIEMI. He died on March 15.

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COLQUHOUN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
COLQUHOUN, Stephen Murray
It is with great sadness that we announce that Stephen Murray COLQUHOUN died suddenly on Wednesday, June 18th, 2003 in Thunder Bay, Ontario. Steve will be sorely missed and always cherished by his wife Maria (née SALATINO,) sons Stevie and Jamie, his sisters Liz (Mike EVANS), Marg (Brian WEBSTER), Mary Louise (Paul RADDEN,) and brother Bob (Judy COLQUHOUN.) He died too young. First and foremost in Stevie's life was always Maria and his boys. He will also be missed by his in-laws Maria and Giacomo SALATINO, his wife's sisters Rosa (Cheslan CHOMYCZ,) Anna (Chris KELOS), Gina (Dan CHAMPAGNE), Aunt and Uncle Jim and Cappy COLQUHOUN. A funeral was held at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church on Monday, June 23, 2003. In lieu of flowers, a donation to a trust fund for his children, c/o any branch of the Bank of Nova Scotia, account #006870000485 would be greatly appreciated.

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COLTHART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-26 published
COLTHART, John Marshall M.D.
Born March 31, 1916 in Rodney, Ontario, died April 24, 2003 in Uxbridge, Ontario. Graduate University of Western Ontario Medicine '42, Major in Royal Canadian Army Medical Corp World War 2 overseas, family physician in East York 1946-1954, industrial physician with Bell Canada in Toronto 1954-1965, Western Electric/American Telephone and Telegraph in Chicago 1965-1969, Xerox in Rochester, New York 1969-1980 before retiring to Beaverton, Ontario and Clearwater, Florida. John was predeceased by his parents, James and Jeanie (THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON) COLTHART, and his wife, Shirley Mae (FITCH) M.D., University of Western Ontario Medicine '42. Father (father-in-law) of Jim of San Diego, California, Doctors Carol (Bob) BROCK in North York, Ontario, Peggy (Bob) McCALLA in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Alice (Rick) DANIEL in Calgary, Alberta and Joan (Dave) ROBERTSON in Shortsville, New York; grandfather of Christie COLTHART, Lisa (Andrew) SCHNEPPENHEIM, John Michael COLTHART, Mike BROCK, Heather (Tom) WHEELER, Catherine BROCK, Andy McCALLA, Matt (Jen) McCALLA, Jen (Dan) BEDETTE, James ROBERTSON, Shirley and Sarah DANIEL and great-grandfather of Christie's son, Kyle BURGESS. He was loved, respected and treasured by family, Friends and patients alike. A celebration of his life will be held at Markham Bible Chapel, 50 Cairns Drive, Markham, Ontario, west of McGowan Road, south from 16th Avenue, on Monday, May 5, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. In remembrance, donations can be made to the Shirley M. Colthart Fund (c/o John P. Robarts Research Institute, P.O. Box 5015, London, Ontario N6A 5K8), or the Trans-Canada Trail Foundation or a charity of your choice. Arrangements by Mangan Funeral Home, Beaverton, Ontario (705) 426-5777.

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COLTHART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-08 published
John Marshall COLTHART
By Alice DANIEL Tuesday, July 8, 2003 - Page A18
Doctor, golfer, storyteller, husband, father. Born March 31, 1916, in Rodney, Ontario Died April 24, in Uxbridge, Ontario, of cancer complications, aged 87.
son of James and Jeanie (THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON) COLTHART, both devoted parents, John always had fond memories of his youth. Growing up in such a close-knit community also generated great stories involving: classmates and teachers at Rodney/Dutton schools, baseball, music, Boy Scouts, learning how to drive on the country roads with his Dad's model T Ford, and helping his Dad construct homes and other buildings, including raising a barn in one day. He proceeded to medical school at the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, where he met Shirley Mae FITCH. One can only imagine the upheaval in their lives during 1942 as both graduated from University of Western Ontario Medicine, were married April 4, and interned together at Toronto East General Hospital. In the same year, John joined the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps and Shirley began working at a major psychiatric hospital in Toronto.
After some training at Camp Borden and a brief leave with Shirley in Nova Scotia, John sailed overseas in a convoy. He witnessed many demoralizing traumas during the Second World War, which he rarely talked about. However, John recognized and shared how much the experience furthered his medical education, enhancing both his surgical skills and bedside manner; he was honoured to serve as a Major in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corp until months after the official armistice. As an only child, he appreciated the intense camaraderie of his army buddies, just as he enjoyed a broad spectrum of classmates, colleagues and neighbours throughout his life.
He returned to Shirley in Toronto in 1946 and saw his son Jim, by then aged 22 months, for the first time. As the family expanded with the addition of four daughters (Carol, Peggy, Alice and Joan) to his flock, he established himself as a family physician in East York, a practice he continued until 1954.
John then served as an industrial physician with Bell Canada in Toronto 1954-65, Western Electric/American Telephone and Telegraph in Chicago 1965-69, Xerox in Rochester, New York 1969-80 before he retired to Beaverton, Ontario, Clearwater, Florida, and Shortsville, N.Y.
Both John and Shirley enjoyed travelling to visit Friends and family near and far, or keeping in touch by telephone. They also remained active supporters of their medical societies, Denison University, University of Western Ontario and the Robarts Research Foundation; John established the Shirley M. Colthart fund at Robarts after Shirley died on September 26, 1995. On his own the past seven years, John got around still (and not just around the golf course). His travels took him as far as Australia. His mobility was particularly remarkable since he started struggling with cancer in 2000.
It is unfortunate that this physician, who was so respected by his patients for his healing ways, his clinical acumen, his encouragement and his generosity, would have had his own cancer diagnosis and treatment delayed a year by apparent misdiagnosis. He then benefited from the masterly care of a number of doctors, volunteers, and many others.
John considered it a miracle that he survived the first year of treatment. He was relatively well for nearly two years, but ended up in the Markham-Stouffville Hospital with an infection in mid-March. He did not have severe acute respiratory syndrome, but was in quarantine there and moved to the Uxbridge Hospital, extending his quarantine for a total of 19 days. His 87th birthday passed with the family unable to see him.
Once the quarantine was lifted, his family members took turns staying at his side, but it was clear it would be tough for him to turn things around.
Alice DANIEL is John's daughter.

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