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"CHI" 2003 Obituary


CHIGA  CHILDERHOSE  CHILTON  CHING  CHIRIAEFF  CHIRSTY  CHISHOLM 

CHIGA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-11 published
Pint-sized scrapper 'liked wrestling more than eating'
Stellar career in the ring was marred only by the near-miss loss of an Olympic medal
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 11, 2003 - Page R11
He was a Regina stonecutter who used his strength to good effect in the wrestling ring. Vern PETTIGREW, who has died at 95, was an athlete whose career was marred only by the near-miss loss of an Olympic medal.
Competing for Canada, Mr. PETTIGREW finished in fourth place in the featherweight division of the freestyle-wrestling competition at the Berlin Olympics in 1936. The 28-year-old stonecutter with a chiselled physique had dominated his Swedish opponent when the match suddenly ended with Mr. PETTIGREW disqualified for using an illegal hold. The Swede went on to claim the bronze medal, while Mr. PETTIGREW spent the next 67 years contemplating the unfairness of a verdict that denied him Olympic glory.
"One call made all the difference," he told The Regina Leader-Post in 1996. "You can't quarrel, but it was terrible. It was a legal hold, but they said it was illegal. I could have been standing on the podium, but you can't cry about it."
Even before the devastating verdict, Canadian wrestlers had expressed their unhappiness with the officiating at the tournament.
The team felt European officials, versed in the more rigid dictates of the Greco-Roman discipline, were unfamiliar with the rules of freestyle, or catch-as-catch-can, wrestling. For instance, the Canadians relied heavily on leg holds, only to discover the judges did not award points for the manoeuvre. Canada claimed only one of 18 freestyle medals awarded at the 1936 Games, a bronze for Joseph SCHLEIMER, a lightweight from Toronto.
Mr. PETTIGREW retained his amateur status after returning from the Games, continuing to dominate his weight class in Canada. He stepped away from the mat as a competitor in 1940, having won five national championships. He was also known as an eager participant in exhibition matches, willing to take on all comers.
"I liked wrestling more than eating," he once said.
John Vernon PETTIGREW was born on March 30, 1908, in Durham, Ontario He moved with his family to Biggar, Saskatchewan., two years later, before settling in Regina in 1919.
Wrestling was perhaps a natural sport for a pint-sized boy born as part of a baker's dozen brood of PETTIGREWs. He learned the formal rules and tactics of the sport at the old Young Men's Christian Association in Regina, "a stinkin' Y with a pool as big as my kitchen," he told the Leader-Post.
Wrestling was conducted in a small basement room reached by a long flight of stairs. "It was never washed. No wonder we got big scabs on our knees."
He claimed his first Dominion featherweight crown in 1933 and dominated his weight division in Saskatchewan, where he won 10 provincial championships.
He was accompanied on the long journey by train and ocean liner to Germany in 1936 by fellow Regina wrestler George CHIGA. A 210-pound (95-kilogram) heavyweight, Mr. CHIGA dwarfed his featherweight friend, who weighed closer to 134 pounds (61 kilograms).
One of the more memorable experiences in the athlete's camp was Mr. PETTIGREW's first viewing of that science-fiction dream called television. He also met the great American track athlete Jesse OWENS, whose humility and friendliness in trying circumstances Mr. PETTIGREW never forgot. Like many of the athletes, however, Mr. PETTIGREW remained unaware of, or unconcerned about, the intentions of the Nazi regime, for which the Games were a propaganda exercise.
A first-round victory over Karel KVACEK of Czechoslovakia impressed Canadian Press correspondent Elmer DULMAGE, who wrote that Mr. PETTIGREW "gives a pretty fair imitation of lightning."
The Regina wrestler defeated Marco GAVELLI of Italy and Hector RISKE of Belgium, but was pinned at two minutes, 13 seconds of a fourth-round match by Francis MILLARD of the United States. The controversial disqualification against Gosta JONSSON of Sweden eliminated Mr. PETTIGREW from the medals. Kustaa PIHLAJAMAKI of Finland won the featherweight gold, while Mr. MILLARD took silver and Mr. JONSSON got bronze.
Mr. PETTIGREW retired from wrestling not long after joining the Regina fire department in 1939. He retired as battalion fire chief in 1973. He then worked part-time at a local funeral home, which years later would handle his remains.
Mr. PETTIGREW, who died in Regina on October 29, leaves a daughter and two sons. He was predeceased by his wife Jean; by his eldest son, Robert; and by all 12 of his siblings.
In all the years since leaving Berlin, he never quite overcame the sense that he had been robbed of a chance for an Olympic medal. "It always bugs you," he said.

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CHILDERHOSE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-05 published
Leota Pauline McIVOR
In loving memory of Leota Pauline McIVOR who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Health Centre on Tuesday, February 25, 2003 at the age of 76 years.
Predeceased by beloved husband William "Bill" McIVOR (May 27, 1981.) Cherished mother of Dan and wife Kirt (Kirsten). Loved grandmother of Denise and special great grandmother of Karissa. Remembered by brother and sisters: Blossom ALLEMS, Max McGOVERN and Mary Ann CHILDERHOSE. Predeceased by Dell, Grant, Maurice McGOVERN, Helen DURDLE and Vida McGOVERN. Funeral Service was held on Thursday, February 27, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Burial at Mountainview Cemetery in the spring.

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CHILDERHOSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-07 published
Keith Donald CHILDERHOSE

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CHILTON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Mary CHAMBERS McQUAY
In loving memory of Mary Chambers McQUAY, April 9, 1916 to May 3, 2003.
Mary McQuay, a resident of Mindemoya, died at her residence on Saturday, May 3, 2003 at the age of 87 years. She was born in Peterborough, daughter of the late George and Mabel (FOLEY) TURNBULL.
Mary graduated as a Registered Nurse in 1942 and worked in hospitals in Kingston, where she met Jack McQUAY, who was an intern at the same hospital. They married in 1944, and lived in Kingston before moving to Mindemoya in 1947. Jack began his medical practice in Mindemoya and Mary assisted for many years running the office. Mary had a warm, friendly manner and enjoyed socializing with her many Friends. She will be remembered for her dedication to her family and to her community. Mary participated in and supported many community activities over the years. She was accomplished in sewing, knitting and baking, and often contributed her home-made items to bazaars and bake sales. She volunteered for the Red Cross, the Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary, Meals on Wheels, and the ambulance service. She enjoyed gardening, and participated in the Mindemoya Horticultural Society flower shows in years past. She was active in the local Women's Institute. An enthusiastic member of the Mindemoya Curling Club, she continued curling until she was well into her 80s, while in the summer she enjoyed golfing. She was an avid bridge player in the local bridge club. She was a member of St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church, where she sang in the choir for many years, and participated in the life of the parish through the Anglican Church Women's group. Always interested in crafts, she created many beautiful pieces in pottery and paper tole crafts.
Dearly loved and loving wife of Dr. Jack McQUAY. Loved mother of Marilyn (husband Martin CHILTON) of Kingston, Paul (fiancée Marion CARROLL) of Fort McMurray, Alta, Janice McQUAY of Toronto and Mindemoya and Betty McQUAY of Toronto. Also survived by Athena McQUAY of Edmonton. Proud grandmother of Peter McQUAY, Jane HOEKSTRA (husband Terry,) Stephen McQUAY and Jim CHILTON and great grandchildren Ethan, Sydney and Liam. Dear sister of Reta CONRAN, Gladys MITCHELL (husband Charlie,) Bruce TURNBULL (wife Alice,) Norma RAYCRAFT (husband Glen,) Billie McNEIL and brother-in-law Earl HARMAN. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sisters and brothers Marjorie McLEOD, Walter (Bud) TURNBULL, Ted TURNBULL, Gwen HARMAN and sister-in-law and brothers-in-law Marie TURNBULL, Alan McLEOD, Harold CONRAN and Gene McNEIL. Friends called the Saint Francis of Assisi Church in Mindemoya on Monday, May 5, 2003. The funeral service was held on Tuesday, May 6, 2003 with Reverend Canon Bain Peever officiating. Interment in Mindemoya Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home

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CHILTON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
John BATEMAN McQUAY
In loving memory of John BATEMAN McQUAY, October 11, 1921 to December 12, 2003.
John Bateman McQUAY, a resident of Mindemoya, died peacefully on Friday, December 12, 2003, in Mindemoya Hospital, at the age of 82 years.
He was born in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba, son of the late Doctor Russell and Gladys (SAUNDERS) McQUAY. The family moved to Mindemoya in 1934, where Russell set up a medical practice. Following his father's footsteps, John graduated as a medical doctor from the Faculty of Medicine at Queen's University in 1944. He married Mary TURNBULL in the same year, and interned in Kingston. In 1947 they moved to Mindemoya, where he joined his father's medical practice. He quickly became known and loved as "Doctor Jack". After his father became disabled in 1949, Doctor Jack served as the only doctor in the area until 1970, when other doctors began to arrive. He continued faithfully serving the community in full-time practice until 1991, easing into retirement over the next decade. Doctor Jack loved his vocation as family practitioner, and was dedicated to his patients. He worked long hours, making hospital rounds in the morning, seeing patients in the afternoon and sometimes in the evening, and calmly handling emergencies at any hour of the day or night. For many years he held a weekly clinic in West Bay. He often visited patients in their homes, and in the days before ambulance service, even brought patients to the hospital himself. He was a skilled physician who performed many kinds of surgery, but his greatest enjoyment was delivering babies, and he estimated he delivered over 2000 babies in his career. He also served as coroner for Manitoulin and the North Shore for 20 years. In 1991 the College of Family Physicians of Canada presented him with a Special Recognition Award for his outstanding service.
Doctor Jack will also be remembered for his dedication to his community. As Chair of the Board of Central Manitoulin High School, he worked to establish the Manitoulin Secondary School, serving all of the Island. As founding member of the Manitoulin Centennial Board, he helped set up the Manor in Little Current. He served as President of the Mindemoya Area Chamber of Commerce in the 1960s. He was a founding member of the Central Manitoulin Lions Club, and later received the Lions' Melvin Jones Fellow award for dedicated humanitarian services. He was a modest person, but he greatly appreciated this recognition. He was also a founding member of the Mindemoya Curling Club. In 1994, the Carnarvon Township named him as Citizen of the Year, and in September 2003, in ill health, he was particularly pleased when Central Manitoulin Township presented him with its Senior of the Year award. He and his wife Mary were members of St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church. For relaxation, Jack and Mary very much enjoyed curling, playing bridge, and golfing. He loved playing the piano, and his other hobbies included photography, stamp collecting, gardening, swimming and sailing on Lake Mindemoya, and rug hooking. Doctor Jack was devoted to his family, who will remember his encouragement and loving support. Dearly loved and loving husband of Mary McQUAY (predeceased.) Loved father of Marilyn (husband Martin CHILTON) of Kingston, Paul (wife Marion CARROLL) of Fort McMurray, Alta, Janice McQUAY of Mindemoya and Betty McQUAY of Toronto. Also survived by Athena McQUAY of Edmonton. Proud grandfather of Peter McQUAY, Jane HOEKSTRA (husband Terry), Stephen McQUAY and Jim CHILTON and great grandchildren Ethan, Sydney and Liam. Dear brother of Mary Alice THACKER of Ottawa, Ann GAGE (husband James) of Hartford, Conn., Thomas McQUAY, wife Barbara of Mindemoya. Predeceased by sister Margaret KYDD and her husband Gordon, and brother-in-law Doug THACKER. Also survived by many nieces and nephews.
Friends called the St. Francis of Assisi Church, Mindemoya on Tuesday, December 16. The funeral service will be conducted at the church on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 at 2 p.m. with Reverend Canon Bain Peever officiating. Culgin Funeral Home

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CHING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
OXTOBY, Willard Gurdon
Professor Emeritus of Comparative Religion at Trinity College, the University of Toronto. Widely respected for his contribution to the understanding of other faiths, Will contributed to and edited the widely read book World Religions. Born in 1933 in Marin County, California, Will graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University and earned his Ph.D. in Near Eastern Studies at Princeton, with post-doctoral studies at Harvard Divinity School. After working for two years in Jerusalem with the team translating and interpreting the Dead Sea Scrolls, Will received his ordination from the Presbyterian Church in California. In his more than 40-year career as a professor, he taught at McGill, Yale, the University of Toronto, and the College of William and Mary. At the U of T, he launched the Graduate Centre for the Study of Religion in 1976. Will married Layla JURJI in 1958, and together they had two children, David and Susan OXTOBY. Subsequent to Layla's death from cancer in 1980, Will married Julia CHING, a renowned scholar of Chinese philosophy and religion, and recipient of the Order of Canada. Julia, the adoptive mother of John CHING, who died of cancer in 2001. Will's loving care for both Layla and Julia during their illnesses will be long remembered. Willard OXTOBY died of cancer on March 6 in Toronto, at age 69. He will be greatly missed by his daughters-in-law Julie SCOTT and Helen CHING, by grandchildren Duke and Tessa OXTOBY and Erica and Michelle CHING, and by his brother Lowell and sister Louise and their families. Will touched the lives of many Friends and colleagues, and will be remembered fondly by many former students. The family will receive visitors at Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W., on Sunday, March 9 from 2-5 p.m. Funeral Service will beheld at Trinity College Chapel, 6 Hoskin Ave., on Wednesday, March 12 at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in memory of Willard G.Oxtoby, c/o The Hospital for Sick Children Foundation supporting Neurosurgery, 555 University Ave. Toronto, M5G 1X8 or online at www.sickkids.ca.

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CHING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-31 published
Scholar was 'hooked' on religion
Director of Centre for Religious Studies at the University of Toronto was lauded for important introductory works
By Ron CSILLAG Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, March 31, 2003 - Page R7
Like members of the clergy and their early epiphanies, scholars of religion can often pinpoint the instant they decided to pursue their calling.
For Willard OXTOBY, one of the world's foremost students of comparative religion and founding director of the University of Toronto's Centre for Religious Studies, a defining moment came at the tender age of five, when his father, a teacher of Old Testament at a Presbyterian seminary, taught his son to memorize the 23rd psalm, in Hebrew. One night, while an advanced Hebrew class met at the Oxtoby home, young Willard was summoned, in his pyjamas, to recite the psalm.
"See?" his father told the class. "Even a kid can do Hebrew, so get on with it."
A decade later, another breakthrough: While accompanying his father on a preaching visit, the elder OXTOBY recounted one of Jesus's parables, and then interrupted his exposition to say, "Of course that was just a story. Can a thing be true that never happened?"
About a year before his March 6 death in Toronto of colon cancer at age 69, the son remembered the father's blunt words as a turning point: "I can still recall the colour of paint on the wall at that instant. And thanks to the right question coming at the right time in my life, I've never had a problem personally handling the symbolic dimensions of religion."
He did more than merely handle. Through over 40 years of probing, analyzing, observing and writing in quantities that left colleagues astonished, Prof. OXTOBY bequeathed a legacy of scholarship that's been described as passionate and exuberant. From Anabaptism to Zoroastrianism, he dove headlong into all the world's major and minor religious traditions and had the ability, so often demonstrated, of connecting the dots between them.
"His command of detail was amazing," eulogized his former student, Alan SEGAL, who now teaches Jewish studies at Barnard College in New York, "all with specific knowledge of how it made religions fit together and help explain what religion was all about."
A fixture at the University of Toronto's religion department for 28 years, Prof. OXTOBY was a vocal proponent of interfaith dialogue, believing, as his friend, the Swiss Catholic renegade Hans KUNG, that there will be no peace on the planet until there is peace among its inhabitants' religions. In the specific case of Islam, he called for the need to understand the faith's diversity: "Lumping people of any group together, as if they're all alike, is one basic strategy of prejudice."
Prof. OXTOBY knew his share of grief -- he was twice married and twice widowed -- but he never lost his own footing. "He was optimistic and curious about everything until his final day, " said his son David, an executive with Ontario Power Generation Inc.
Willard Gurdon OXTOBY was born July 29, 1933, in Kentfield, Calif., just across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco, into a family of scholars. Both his father and grandfather were ministers and teachers of the Old Testament, and he spent a year between high school and college accompanying his father on a sabbatical to Europe and the Middle East. "I was hooked," he would recall. "The world of the Bible, both its archeology and its current events, came alive vividly."
After graduating from Stanford University with a degree in philosophy, he completed masters and doctoral degrees within a year of each other at Princeton, specializing in pre-Islamic Arabic inscriptions. In 1958, he married Layla JURJI, the daughter of one of his Princeton professors, and the couple spent two years in Jerusalem, with Prof. OXTOBY as part of the team that studied the Dead Sea Scrolls.
His first teaching job was in Montreal, where he launched McGill University's inaugural course on Judaism. But after a few years, he realized he needed to explore the influence of modern-day Iran on the religion of the Hebrews following their Babylonian exile. He returned to school, this time to Harvard, to study Zoroastrianism, an ancient faith born in Persia, possibly the world's first monotheistic religion. So expert would he become that he was made an honorary member of the Zoroastrian Society of Ontario.
He taught at Yale University for five years before accepting a full professorship at the University of Toronto's Trinity College in 1971, a relationship that would last until his retirement in 1999. In between were a slew of visiting professorships, appointments, awards and fellowships, and authorship of dozens of entries for dictionaries and encyclopedias on world religions.
Reprising his travels with his father, Prof. OXTOBY took his wife and teenage son and daughter, Susan, on an around-the-world sabbatical beginning in 1976 to study Zoroastrians in the diaspora. The clan lived in London, India and southeast Asia. The experience "definitely changed my perspective on the transient nature of North American culture," recalled Susan, director of programming at Cinematheque Ontario.
Cancer claimed Prof. OXTOBY's first wife in 1980. The following year, he married Julia CHING, a Shanghai-born onetime Catholic nun and formidable scholar of Chinese religions and neo-Confucian philosophy. The two formed an academic partnership at University of Toronto that produced a slew of monographs and articles, before cancer took Prof. CHING in October, 2001.
Prof. OXTOBY was probably best known for two introductory volumes he edited, World Religions: Western Traditions and World Religions: Eastern Traditions, in which he wrote chapters on Christianity, Sikhism, Zoroastrianism and general entries. Both have been hailed for their lucidity -- examples of his ability to render complex matters accessible without dumbing them down. He was working on a condensed, one-volume version of the books at the time of his death, along with a multitude of other projects.
In all, he travelled to more than 100 countries and studied over a dozen languages, including Arabic, Ugaritic and Sanskrit.
He was fond of recounting several humorous firsts in his career: That he was ordained a Presbyterian minister without actually attending divinity school; that he gathered the inscriptional data for his dissertation in one day; and that he smuggled pork sausages into Israel.
A deeply religious man personally and a biblical scholar too, Prof. OXTOBY never thought of himself as anything other than a Christian -- but as a comparatavist, never an exclusivist: "At no time have I ever supposed that God could not also reach out to other persons in their traditions and communities as fully and as satisfyingly as He has to me in mine," he concluded in his 1983 book, The Meaning of Other Faiths. "My Christianity, including my sense of Christian ministry, has commanded that I be open to learn from the faith of others."
He extended that openness to his own funeral: "He wanted it to be non-eucharistic," his son David said. "He wanted everyone to feel welcome."
Prof. OXTOBY even had a snappy comeback to pious Christians who asked whether he'd been saved: "Well, I'll be damned if I'm not."

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CHIRIAEFF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
Linda STEARNS: 1937-2003
As ballet mistress and artistic director of the esteemed Montreal company, she nurtured personality, flair and a risk-taking approach to dance
By Paula CITRON Wednesday, August 6, 2003 - Page R5
In the cutthroat, competitive world of dance, Linda STEARNS was an anomaly. As artistic director of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, she never played games or held grudges. Whether good or bad news, she bluntly told her dancers what they had to hear, and in return, her open-door policy allowed them to vent their own feelings. National Ballet of Canada artistic director James KUDELKA, who spent almost a decade as a member of Les Grands Ballets, likens her approach to wearing an invisible raincoat upon which unhappy dancers spewed their venom. At the end of their tirades, she would serenely remove the garment and say, "Now let's talk."
Linda STEARNS died at her home in Toronto on July 4, at age 65.
She was born into privilege on October 22, 1937. Her father, Marshal, was an investment broker; her mother, Helen, was heavily involved in charity work. The family lived in the posh Poplar Plains area of central Toronto, where Ms. STEARNS attended Branksome Hall.
Despite their wealth, the STEARNS children (Linda, Nora and Marshal) were expected to earn their own livings. Helen STEARNS had studied dance in her youth, but a career was never an option. When eldest daughter Linda showed a strong talent, history might have repeated itself had not Marshal Sr. set aside his reservations after seeing his daughter perform.
After graduating from high school, Ms. STEARNS went to London and New York for advanced training. It was the great Alexandra Danilova, one of Ms. STEARNS's New York teachers, who pointed the young dancer in the direction of the upstart Les Grands Ballets Canadiens. Ms. STEARNS joined Les Grands in 1961, and was promoted to soloist in 1964. In a Who's Who of Entertainment entry, Ms. STEARNS was once listed as joining the company in 1861, and she liked to joke that, at 103 years, she held the record for the longest time spent in the corps de ballet. In fact, one of Ms. STEARNS's hallmarks was her sense of humour, much of it at her own expense.
Les Grands was known for taking dancers who did not necessarily have perfect ballet bodies, but had personality and flair, a policy Ms. STEARNS continued during her own administration.
Although Ms. STEARNS had very unballetic, low-arched feet, she was a fine classical dancer. She excelled, however, in the dramatic repertoire: Mother Courage in Richard Kuch's The Brood, or the title role in Brydon Paige's Medea. In later years, while teaching and coaching, Ms. STEARNS wore high heels to conceal her hated low arches -- while showing off her attractive ankles.
Her performing career was cut short in 1966 when artistic director Ludmilla CHIRIAEFF recognized that Ms. STEARNS would make a brilliant ballet mistress, and by 1969, Ms. STEARNS was exclusively in the studio. In fact, giving up performing was one of the great disappointments of her life, although she did in time acknowledge that she had found her true destiny. Ms. STEARNS's astonishingly keen eye allowed her to single out, in a corps de ballet of moving bodies, every limb that was out of position. She could also sing every piece of music, which saved a lot of time, because she didn't have to keep putting on the tape recorder. Because of her intense musicality, Ms. STEARNS also insisted that the dancers not just be on the count, but fill every note with movement.
Ms. STEARNS loved playing with words -- she was a crossword-puzzle addict, for example -- and gave the dancers nicknames, whether they liked them or not. Catherine LAFORTUNE was Katrink, Kathy BIEVER was Little Frog, Rosemary NEVILLE was Rosie Posie, Betsy BARON was Boops, and Benjamin HATCHER was Benjamino, to name but a few. One who escaped this fate was Gioconda BARBUTO, simply because Ms. STEARNS loved rolling out the word "G-I-O-C-O-N-D-A" in its full Italian glory. The dancers, in turn, called her Lulubelle, Mme. Gozonga and La Stearnova or, if they were feeling tired, cranky and hostile -- and were out of earshot -- Spoons (for her non-arched feet) and even less flattering names. As reluctantly as she became ballet mistress, Ms. STEARNS became artistic director, first as one of a triumvirate in 1978 with Danny JACKSON and Colin McINTYRE (when Les Grands and Brian MacDONALD came to an abrupt parting of the ways;) then with Jeanne RENAUD in 1985 and finally on her own in 1987. She retired from Les Grands in 1989. Both Mr. JACKSON and Mr. McINTRYE still refer to Ms. STEARNS as the company's backbone.
These were the famous creative years that included the works of Mr. KUDELKA, Paul Taylor, Lar Lubovitch, Nacho Duato and George Balanchine. Les Grands toured the world performing one of the most exciting and eclectic repertoires in ballet. It was a company that nurtured dancers and choreographers, many of whom reflected Ms. STEARNS's risk-taking, innovative esthetic.
She also had time to mentor choreographers outside the company, including acclaimed solo artist Margie GILLIS. Her post-Grands career included writing assessments for the Canada Council, setting works on ballet companies, coaching figure skating, and most recently, becoming ballet mistress for the Toronto-based Ballet Jörgen. When she was diagnosed with both ovarian and breast cancer two years ago, she continued her obligations to Ballet Jörgen until she was no longer able, never letting the dancers know how ill she was.
Ms. STEARNS loved huge dogs -- or what Ms. GILLIS refers to as mountains with fur -- and always had at least two. Her gardens were magnificent, as was her cooking. Her generosity was legendary, whether inviting 20 people for Christmas dinner, or hosting the wedding reception for dancers Andrea BOARDMAN and Jean-Hugues ROCHETTE at her tastefully decorated Westmount home. After leaving Montreal, whether, first, at her horse farm in Harrow, Ontario, or at the one-room schoolhouse she lovingly renovated near Campbellville, northwest of Toronto, former colleagues were always welcome.
She continued to keep in touch with her dancers, sending notes in her beautiful, distinctive handwriting. Her love of sports never left her, and after a hard day in the studio, she would relax watching the hockey game. Religion also filled her postdance life, with Toronto's Anglican Grace-Church-on-the-Hill at its epicentre. Ms. STEARNS was very discreet in her private life, although another disappointment is that neither of two long relationships resulted in marriage or children.
Ms. STEARNS was always ruthlessly self-critical, always striving for perfection, never convinced she had rehearsed a work to its full potential. As a result, she never made herself the centre of her own story. Her homes, for example, did not contain photographs glorifying the career of Linda STEARNS. Only at the end of her days, as she faced death with the same grace with which she had faced life, was she finally able to appreciate how many lives she had touched, and accept her outstanding achievements with Les Grands Ballets. Linde HOWE- BECK, former dance critic for the Montreal Gazette, sums up Ms. STEARNS perfectly when she says that she was all about love -- for her Friends and family, for life, but most of all, for dance.
Paula CITRON is dance critic for The Globe and Mail.

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CHIRSTY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-14 published
CARLIN, Agnes Kathryn
Died quietly at home surrounded by her family on Sunday, October 12, 2003 at age 56. Agnes is survived by her husband Richard LATHWELL, her sister Eva CHIRSTY and her brother Steve GRISZBACHER. Resting at the Ogden Funeral Home, 646 St. Clair Avenue West (West of Bathurst) on Wednesday afternoon from 4-8 p.m. Funeral Mass on Thursday morning at 11 a.m. in St. Clare Catholic Church (St. Clair. East of Dufferin). Cremation to follow.

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CHISHOLM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
CHISHOLM, Thomas Huston
Died, after a short battle with cancer, at the Grey Bruce Regional Health Centre, Owen Sound, on Tuesday, December 23, 2003. Tom CHISHOLM of Southampton at the age of 37 years. Beloved son of Marjorie CHISHOLM (née HUSTON) of Southampton and the late Bruce CHISHOLM. Dear brother of Susan and her husband Greg SCHULTZ of Burlington. Proud uncle of Mackenzie and Huston. Tom will be sadly missed by his family and by his many Friends of the community. Cremation. No visitation. Private Family Services will be conducted through the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton, (519) 797-2085. Tom's family wish to extend their extreme gratitude to those who cared for Tom with much love and compassion. Expressions of Remembrance to the Bruce County Museum and Archives, Southampton Ontario. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com.

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