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"CHE" 2003 Obituary


CHEADLE  CHEECHOO  CHEETHAM  CHEN  CHENEY  CHENIER/CHENÉ  CHERNENKOFF  CHERRY  CHEUNG  CHEW 

CHEADLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-01 published
CHEADLE, Molly Elizabeth June 29, 1956 - July 28, 2003
It is with great sadness that our family announces the death of our beloved Molly. Daughter of Eric and Audrey, sister of Susan CRAIG and her husband Brad of Owen Sound, Ontario, Dianne DEVEREUX and her husband Bruce of Courtenay, British Columbia, Bruce CHEADLE and his wife Karen of Ottawa, and Norman CHEADLE of Sudbury, Ontario. She died peacefully at the Hospice at May Court in Ottawa. She is survived by the above, and three sons, Will HARRIS, his partner Aiyana and grand_son Theo, Robin HARRIS of Owen Sound, Ben HARRIS and his partner Danielle of Ottawa. A Memorial Service will be held at St. George's Anglican Church in Owen Sound on August 9 at 2 p.m. A Memorial Service also will be held at St. George's Anglican Church in Ottawa (Metcalfe and Gloucester) on August 16 at 1: 30 p.m. Memorial donations may be made to the Hospice at May Court, 114 Cameron Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1S 0X1, or to a charity of your choice.

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CHEADLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-26 published
CHEADLE, Eric Bruce, February 5, 1931-August 24, 2003
Piper, Teacher, Sailor, died peacefully at his home in Owen Sound surrounded by his family on Sunday, August 24, 2003 in his 73rd year. He will be forever missed by his wife Audrey (née BUDGEON,) children Norman of Sudbury, Dianne and her husband Bruce DEVEREUX of Courtenay, British Columbia, Susan and her husband Brad CRAIG of Owen Sound, and Bruce and Karen of Ottawa and grandchildren Will, Robin and Ben HARRIS, Dylan, Brodie and Nick CRAIG, Wilder LEDUC, Sam and Arden CHEADLE, Keiran and Chance DEVEREUX and his great-grand_son Theo. Predeceased by his daughter Molly CHEADLE. Visitation will be held at the Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home on Friday, August 29, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Memorial service will be held at St. George's Anglican Church on Saturday, August 30, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. Archdeacon Christopher PRATT officiating. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

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CHEECHOO o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-30 published
CHEECHOO
-In loving memory of a dear son and brother Michael, who passed away May 3, 1998.
We remember you in silence.
We so often speak your name,
We feel again the bitter blow,
That never should have came.
Mornings when we wake,
And remember you have gone.
No one knows the heartache,
But you want us to carry on.
Our hearts still feel the sadness,
And secret tears still flow.
What it meant to lose you,
No one will ever know.
Our thoughts remain with you,
The void no one can fill.
In life we loved you dearly,
In death we love you still.
It is said that time heals everything,
But we know it isn't so.
Because it hurts as much today,
As it did five years ago.
-Always lovingly remembered and dearly missed by Mom and brother Christopher.

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CHEETHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
CASEY, Francis (Frank) J. b. 1912 (London, England)
On June 15th, 2003, in his 92nd year, Frank Casey died peacefully. He lived life well and joyfully, and leaves a remarkable legacy of family, business, and service to his church and community. Frank's career in insurance began in 1934 with Lloyd's in London, England. In 1937, he married Frances PETERS. Their long and happy marriage was a true partnership. Frank served as a Sergeant Major in the British Army in the Second World War before emigrating to Canada in 1948 and settling with his family in Toronto. He was the founder and president of Frank J. Casey Insurance Brokers, which for more than fifty years has been a north Toronto institution. His personal approach and dedication to the well-being of his clients made many of them into life-long Friends. He was a stalwart of his parish, St. Monica's, where he was a long-time member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society; and in the greater community he served as the first president of Sancta Maria House, which provides shelter, counselling and support for at-risk teenage girls. Frank took enormous pride and pleasure in his family, and he will be greatly missed by us all. Loving father of Patricia BINGHAM and her husband Richard; the late Catherine BOUWMEISTER and her husband John; Dr. John CASEY and his wife Therese; Anne CHEETHAM and her late husband Francis; Frank G. CASEY; and Angela BRANSCOMBE and her husband Harley. Devoted grandfather to Richard, Christopher and Deirdre BINGHAM; Paul, Janet, John Mark and Michael BOUWMEISTER; Clare, Stephanie, and Daniel CHEETHAM; and Paul, Jean, Marta-Marie and Phillippe CASEY. Great-grandfather to Andrew, Francesca-Anne, Brendan, Caitlin, Thomas and Liam. The family thanks his many caregivers and the staff at Central Park Lodge. Friends may call at the Trull Funeral Home, 2704 Yonge Street, Tuesday, June 17th from 2-4 p.m. and from 7-9 p.m. Mass of Christian burial at St. Monica's Catholic Church, 44 Broadway Avenue, on Wednesday, June 18th at 1: 30 p.m. Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery. If desired, a remembrance may be made to Sancta Maria House, 102 Bernard Avenue, Toronto M5R 1R9; (416) 925-7333. He always believed himself to be a blessed and lucky man. We were blessed to have had him.

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CHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-26 published
'She wore a smile all the time'
A nursing 'hero' cared for severe acute respiratory syndrome victims, became one herself and died not knowing the fate of her husband
By Allison LAWLOR Saturday, July 26, 2003 - Page F10
'I don't think she worried about it," Michael TANG says of his mother. "She was very invincible."
But Tecla LIN knew the risks far better than most people. She was among the first to volunteer when West Park Healthcare Centre, where she was a part-time nurse, set up a special unit to treat Toronto health-care workers stricken in the city's initial outbreak of sudden acute respiratory syndrome.
It was dangerous duty, but she knew what to watch for -- especially the high fever so closely associated with the mysterious disease. So, whenever she went to sleep, a thermometer could be found with the face creams and makeup on her bedside table.
Then, on April 4, she realized she had sudden acute respiratory syndrome symptoms and immediately checked herself into Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
"We didn't think much of it the first week or so," recalls Mr. TANG, 32. "We remained optimistic."
But Ms. LIN's health started to deteriorate and soon she required an oxygen mask. For three months she remained in hospital, and "it got harder and harder for her to breathe," her son says.
Last month she was transferred to the William Osler Health Centre in Etobicoke, where she died last Saturday morning at the age of 58.
She probably knew the end was near. What she didn't know was that Chi Sui LIN, the husband she had infected, had passed away just three weeks after she went into Sunnybrook.
Mr. TANG says he and his brother Wilson decided to keep their stepfather's death from their mother, feeling she needed all her strength to fight her own illness.
Born on December 18, 1944, in Hong Kong, Tecla Lai Yin WONG was the eldest of four children. Her father died while she was still young, and she became largely responsible for supporting the family.
"There was a great deal of obligation to help the family and to help others," Mr. TANG says.
After graduating from the Government School of Nursing, she began her career in Kowloon, Hong Kong, in 1968, spending five years as an operating-room nurse at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital.
In June, 1968, she married Augustine TANG, the father of Wilson and Michael. Five years later, the couple (who divorced in the mid-1980s) brought their family to Canada, settling in Toronto and opening a Chinese restaurant.
Ms. LIN worked in the struggling restaurant with her husband but in 1977 landed a job at the Doctors Hospital, where she worked there for more than 20 years. In that time, she became a specialist in dealing with high-maintenance patients. She also went back to school, to earn her nursing degree from Ryerson University and to complete a certificate in critical-care nursing.
She started to work part-time at West Park Healthcare Centre in October, 1999, mainly in the rehabilitation centre's respiratory-services unit. She also worked part-time at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, often on the night shift.
By working at night, she could spend the day doing the other things that she enjoyed. She regularly went to the Chinese Community Centre of Ontario in downtown Toronto with Mr. LIN, whom she had married after her divorce from Mr. TANG in the mid-1980s.
"They were very devoted to each other," says Donald CHEN, president of the community centre, where Ms. LIN became an executive director.
"The two of them would come in together and enjoy the company of others."
Almost 20 years his wife's senior, Mr. LIN had lived in Taiwan before coming to Canada. He served in the air force, Mr. CHEN said, and went on to become a teacher and then the head of an elementary school.
"We called him 'Principal,' " he said.
Mr. LIN was in his mid-70s when he died, and had long been retired. His own children live in Taiwan, according to Mr. TANG, who says he was not close to his stepfather.
At the centre, Ms. LIN organized such activities for the women as tai chi, gardening and dancing. But she also had a passion for mahjong, the popular Chinese tile game, often taking on some of the seniors at the centre.
"She could play all night," Mr. TANG said.
Friendly and outgoing, "she wore a smile all the time," Mr. CHEN says. "She was very sweet and very friendly," enjoyed the company of others, and treated people at the centre as "sisters and mothers."
Mr. TANG agrees, saying: "She liked to chat."
She also liked to help. In March, she traded her part-time duties in West Park's respiratory services for a full-time job in the new sudden acute respiratory syndrome unit. Fourteen staff members from Scarborough Hospital (Grace Division), the initial sudden acute respiratory syndrome epicentre, had been infected and transferred to the ward for treatment.
The caregivers managed to fight off the infection until last month, when June, Nelia LAROZA, 51, of North York General Hospital, became the first nurse to die. Ms. LIN was the second. Her death brought the sudden acute respiratory syndrome fatalities in Canada to 41, all in Ontario.
Colleagues at West Park Healthcare Centre are in mourning. Last weekend, the hospital lowered its flag to half-mast, and later issued a statement saying that Ms. LIN, "like everyone else who had worked to contain sudden acute respiratory syndrome and care for patients under stressful and extreme circumstances, was considered a hero."
Barbara WAHL, president of the Ontario Nurses' Association, says that "I certainly heard outstanding things about her nursing care. She was totally dedicated."
Her death, Ms. WAHL adds, "is a terrible blow to her colleagues," and to her profession.
Those co-workers remember her compassion and generosity.
"Tecla provided a unique mix of skilled nursing and unwavering compassion for her patients and fellow staff members," the statement says. "Popular, hard working and beloved by many, she would even sometimes bring lunch for her colleagues."
She was also, her son says, "known for her resilience and strength."
Even while confined to her hospital bed, she was trying to plan a wedding -- Wilson, 34, is to be married in September. "She was really looking forward to it," brother Michael says.
A private funeral service for family, Friends and invited guests will be held at 10 a.m. on Tuesday at the Hong Kong Funeral Home, located at 8088 Yonge Street, in Thornhill, Ontario
The public will be received at the funeral home tomorrow from 2 to 6 p.m. and Monday from 5 to 9 p.m.
Tomorrow afternoon at 3, the Chinese Community Centre, located at 84 Augusta Ave., will conduct a special memorial service for Mr. and Ms. LIN, who leaves her mother, a sister and two brothers in Hong Kong, as well as her sons.
Ms. LIN was an animal lover with two cats. Her family asks that memorial donations be sent to the Toronto Humane Society.

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CHENEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-08 published
Man dies of injuries from plunge over Bluffs
Monday, September 8, 2003 - Page A12
Peter CHENEY -- A man whose car plunged more than 20 metres over Scarborough Bluffs has died of his injuries.
Kelly DOYLE of Scarborough died at St. Michael's Hospital yesterday, four days after the crash.
Mr. DOYLE, 40, suffered serious chest and leg injuries after his 1989 Lincoln Town Car went through a guard rail at the foot of a dead-end street.

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CHENIER/CHENÉ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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CHERNENKOFF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-20 published
MILLMAN, Doris A. (NEWMAN) (née ARNETT)
Always to be lovingly remembered by her large extended family, Doris Angelina (née ARNETT) (NEWMAN) MILLMAN died Sunday, March 9, 2003, at Lindenwood Manor, Winnipeg, at the age of 96. The second oldest of the four children of the late T.L. and Leila ARNETT (née GRANT,) Doris Angelina was born December 1, 1906 in Souris, Manitoba. In 1923 her father moved his appliance manufacturing business to Winnipeg. Doris attended Wesley College, then part of the University of Manitoba, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1927. She played competitive ice hockey for the university women's team, and was an avid tennis player. After university, Doris worked for the Royal Bank of Canada where she met Lincoln R. NEWMAN, also of Winnipeg. They married in 1934. During the Second World War, his career took them, and their two sons, to Calgary and Toronto, and, at the end of the war, to England where Linc ran Royal Bank of Canada's London office and Doris re-established the family. In 1950 they returned to Canada to live in Montreal. After her husband's death in 1955, Doris returned to Winnipeg with family. She became an active member of the University Women's Club. In 1963, Doris married H.T. (Ted) MILLMAN, a widower, engineer, and builder of Canada Safeway stores across Western Canada. After their marriage, his three children became an important part of her life. Doris maintained her home for nearly two decades after Ted's death in 1984. Just three months ago, she moved successfully to an apartment at Lindenwood Manor, where she was happy. While highly capable and independent, Doris always appreciated the care and support of her sister, Frances BOWLES, and her brother-in-law, the late Richard S. BOWLES, former Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba; and since Ted MILLMAN's death, the continued devotion of his youngest child, Alison KENNEDY, whom Doris raised as her own daughter. Doris is also survived by her sons, print journalist Roger NEWMAN (Janice,) Gimli, Manitoba journalist and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television broadcaster, Don NEWMAN, (Shannon DAY,) Ottawa, Ontario; stepsons, architect Hartley Vance MILLMAN (Claudia,) Ottawa, and retired school principal Bob MILLMAN (Linda CHERNENKOFF,) Winnipeg; sisters-in- law Joyce NEWMAN and Bernie ARNETT, Winnipeg; ten grandchildren; ten great-grandchildren and numerous also treasured nieces and nephews. Her memorial service was held in Winnipeg, Wednesday, March 19th, at Westminster United Church where Doris was a member for nearly 40 years. She died on her way to a church service. Doris was cremated and buried at Brookfield Cemetery between her beloved husbands. She was also predeceased by her cherished parents and brothers Tom and Sheldon ARNETT; brothers- and sisters-in-law; daughter-in-law Audrey-Ann NEWMAN and grand_son Lincoln Taylor NEWMAN. Doris Angelina Arnett Newman MILLMAN will be remembered by her family as a cheerful, positive, intelligent, independent and nurturing person. She was caring and compassionate no matter what the circumstances. In lieu of flowers, donations in Doris Millman's memory may be made to the Lincoln Taylor Newman Bursary Fund to assist promising students in need; cheques payable to Queen's University, and sent to the attention of the L.T. Newman Fund, Queen's Office of Advancement, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6.
''Love never ends.'' (1 Corinthians 13: 8)

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CHERRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
CHERRY, Elizabeth Tiffin (née WALKER) 1917-2003
Died peacefully on Tuesday, October 14, 2003, after a wonderful summer season and Thanksgiving celebration at her beloved Clovelly cottage on Boskung Lake in the Haliburton Highlands. Wife of the late H.W. (Bud) CHERRY. She will be sadly missed by her sister Mary HARRISON, sons Bill and Paul, daughters-in-law Linda and Shelley and grandchildren Warren, Meghan, Clayton and Cameron. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Friday. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Saturday, October 18, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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CHEUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-12 published
Cecilia Pik-Ling TAM
Just over a week after being diagnosed with cancer, died peacefully at Scarborough General Hospital with her loving family at her side on February 9, 2003. She was 54. She will be sadly missed by her husband Paul and children Janice and Anthony. Dear sister to Paulson LEE and his wife Winifred WONG, Anita LEE and her husband Choy Ping YIN, Leslie LEE and her husband Gilbert HUNG, Antonia LEE and her husband Norman TU, Josephine LEE and her husband William CHAN, Bernard LEE and his wife Happy SHEE. Predeceased by her parents LEE Chun Kwok and LO Kwei Yuen as well as her siblings LEE Pik Kwan, Betty LEE, Elsie LEE and her husband Chau Kai Hang, and LEE Pik Shan. Francis LEE, Betty LEE's husband, will also miss Ceci. Loving sister-in-law to Peter TAM and his wife Julianna CHEUNG, Alice TAM and her husband Charles YAM, Henry TAM and his wife Teresa TSANG. Her many relatives and Friends will miss her kindness and beauty. She passed away with extraordinary grace, courage, and faith. Surely God was on her side. Her selfless devotion will be remembered by all the people she has touched during her shortened lifetime. Family and Friends may visit at the Jerrett Funeral Home ­ North York Chapel, 6191 Yonge Street, North York (2 lights South of Steeles Ave.) on Wednesday from 6 ­ 9 p.m. and Thursday from 2 ­ 4 and 6 ­ 9 p.m. There will be no visitation on Friday. The Funeral Mass will be on Saturday February 15, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. at St. Bonaventure Roman Catholic Church, 1300 Leslie St. (at Lawrence Ave. East.). Private burial for family members only. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Cecilia TAM Memorial Fund at 42 Fulham Street, Scarborough, Ontario, M1S 2A5.

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CHEW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-19 published
DRISCOLL, Father Joseph Vincent Philip Mary "Jakie"
The Jesuits of Winnipeg and the rest of Canada both mourn the loss and celebrate the life and Faith of Father Joseph Vincent Philip Mary (Jakie) DRISCOLL, S.J., who died suddenly at St. Ignatius Parish Rectory on Sunday, December 14th in his 71st year of religious life. The third son of William Francis DRISCOLL and Elizabeth (Lilly) Frances MORRISSEY, he was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A. in 1916, Father DRISCOLL first encountered the Jesuits at Boston College High School where he graduated in 1933. Experiencing and responding positively to a call to be a Jesuit priest himself he entered the novitiate in Guelph, Ontario immediately after completing his high school studies. As a young Jesuit he followed the long and thorough academic program at Guelph and Toronto, taught at Regiopolis college in Kingston, Ontario and was ordained a priest in 1946. He returned to work in Regiopolis in 1974 as well as served as the chaplain of the Royal Military College in Kingston. From 1954-58 he was a Director of the Jean Mance School of Nursing at the Hotel Dièu Hospital in Kingston which was followed by a brief period of Jesuit administration duties in Toronto. With the exception of summers spent in graduate studies at Catholic University in Washington, D.C., and three years in charge of a retreat house near Montreal (1963-66,) from 1959 on until his death Father DRISCOLL devoted his time, talent and spirit to the people of Manitoba. He served in a variety of capacities including university chaplain, fundraiser for St. Paul's High School and St. Paul's College, and a member of the Board of Directors of the St. Boniface Hospital School of Nursing. He was appointed pastor of Saint John Brebeuf Parish in Winnipeg in 1972, serving in that capacity until 1980, was Rector of both St. Paul's High School (1966-72) and of St. Paul's College (1981-84). He played an active role in organizing the 1984 papal visit to Manitoba and assisted the wider community as a member of the B'Nai Brith, Mayor Norrie Award Committee in 1985 and as the Honorary Vice-President of the Canadian Bible Society in 1986. Towards the end of his life he worked in the marriage tribunal of the Archdiocese of Winnipeg and as the Archivist of the Archdiocese. As well, he was actively involved in both the College and the High School, including assignments as alumni chaplain to both, and archivist to the High School.
In addition to the Jesuits of Winnipeg and the rest of Canada, Jakie will be missed by many others including Dr. Donald and Rosemary (niece) CHEW of Niagara Falls, Ontario and Charles CRESINO (cousin) of Ashburn, Virginia. Friends who will mourn the loss of Fr. DRISCOLL come from every generation and sector of life in Winnipeg and beyond. Active until the very end of his life, he brought to all those who knew him a personal integrity and commitment to the Catholic Church and to other faith communities that will be missed.
Prayer services and Funeral Mass were celebrated in Winnipeg. Those wishing to do so may make a donation in Fr. DRISCOLL's memory to the Father Driscoll Legacy Endowment Fund of St. Paul's College, 70 Dysart Rd., Winnipeg, R3T 2M6 or to the Fr. Driscoll Founders' Fund, St. Paul's High School, 2200 Grant Ave., Winnipeg, R3P 0P8.
'God Bless'

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