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"CAS" 2003 Obituary


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CASE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Captain Lynn Gerald FREEMAN, 1930-2003
"We all must sail sometimes with the wind and sometimes against it, but we must sail and not drift nor lie at anchor"
It is with sadness and regret that we announce the passing of our dad, Lynn Gerald FREEMAN, after a lengthy illness, on Saturday, January 11, 2003, with his family at his side, at the Hotel Dieu hospital in St. Catharines. Lynn was born in Tehkummah, the son of the late Mildred (RUSSELL) and Ernest FREEMAN.
Lynn is survived by: the mother of his children, Sandra FREEMAN and his kids, Jerry, Cindy, Mark, Angela and Kim, his grandchildren who he loved very much: Sandra, Christa, Natacha, Mark Jr. and Jake, his brothers and sisters: Earl (Effie,) Gelena HOPKIN, Lorraine EADIE (Ted), Marion CASE (Harold), Dick (Lois), Betty LAWSON, Margaret DIBONAVENTURA, Conrad (Judy), Myrna BEATON (Ken) and Brenda ROBINSON. Lynn was predeceased by his brother Larry.
Besides his family, Lynn's passion in life was sailing on the Great Lakes. He was at home on the water and took great pride in the ships he sailed for some 45 years. He will be remembered and missed by those who sailed with him during those years. Until Lynn became ill he was current with all traffic in the Welland Canal. At Lynn's request, cremation will take place with a private family service. A memorial service will take place on Manitoulin Island at a later date.

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CASE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
Roy Allen GREEN " Squirt"
In loving memory of Roy Allen GREEN on Monday, April 7, 2003,at the age of 54 years.
Cherished husband of Darlene (née OLIVER.) Loved by children Lori and husband Terry CASE of Little Current, Jeff and Tanya of Sault Ste. Marie, Derek and fiancée Lesley of Espanola. Special grandpa of Braedan and Brady CASE. Will be greatly missed by sister Linda and husband Ron BOWERMAN of Sheguiandah, brother Gary and wife Nicole of Little Current, predeceased by sister Norma LLOYD (husband Gerald,) and brother Ronnie (wife Carol WESSEL.) Predeceased by parents Charles and Edna. Fondly remembered by parents-in-law Ting and Pee Wee OLIVER and brothers and sisters-in-law Mike and wife Betty OLIVER, Wanda & husband Lou TROVARELLO, predeceased by Roger OLIVER (wife June.) Uncle to numerous nephews and nieces.
Visitation was from 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm Wednesday, April 9, 2003. Funeral Service was held at 2: 00 pm Thursday, April 10, 2003, both at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Little Current.
Cremation with burial in Holy Trinity Cemetery at a later date.

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CASE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Orma "Laureen" ROBINSON
In loving memory of Orma "Laureen" ROBINSON who passed away peacefully at the Manitoulin Health Centre on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 at the age of 74 years.
Predeceased by dear husband Seward (Nov. 9, 1998). Loving mother of Beverly MONTGOMERY of Sudbury, Larry and Debra of Manitowaning, Jimmy and Mary of Little Current, Perry and Angela of Manitowaning. Cherished grandmother of David (wife Jenny), Danny (fiancée Catherine), Devon, Amanda, Crystal, Paige and Taylor. Special great grandmother of Jarred, Joshua and Eric. Will be missed by brothers and sisters Glenna and (husband Raymond predeceased) Wilkin, Harold and Marion CASE, Effie and Earl FREEMAN, Thelma, Harry and Jean CASE, Lyman (predeceased) and Gretta CASE, Les and Pat CASE and Albert and Margaret CASE.

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CASE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Margaret Ann (FREEMAN) DI_BONAVERNTURA
Peacefully at Mindemoya Hospital on Tuesday, June 3, 2003 at the age of 67 years.
Margaret was born in Tehkummah to Ernest and Mildred FREEMAN (both predeceased). She moved to Toronto in 1955. She owned her own flower shop on Eglington Avenue in Toronto for several years. In 1973 she started working at the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce and retired from there in 2001. Margaret enjoyed traveling, shopping for bargains, good food and her family and Friends. Dear sister of Gelena (husband Morley predeceased) HOPKIN of Tehkummah, Earl and wife Effie FREEMAN of Little Current, Marion and husband Harold CASE of The Slash, Lorraine and husband Ted EADIE of Little Current, Dick and wife Lois FREEMAN of Goderich, Conrad and wife Judy FREEMAN of Merickville. Betty (husband Ed predeceased) LAWSON of Deseronto. Myrna and husband Ken BEATON of Toronto, Brenda (husband Randy predeceased) ROBINSON of Tehkummah. Predeceased by two brothers Larry and Lynn FREEMAN. Will be missed by many nieces and nephews and great great nieces and nephews. Memorial Funeral Mass will be held on Saturday June 14, 2003 at 3: 00 p.m. in the Mindemoya Catholic Church. Burial of ashes in Hilly Grove Cemetery.

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CASE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-25 published
CASE -
- In memory of our Dad Wilfred March 20th, 1999, our Mother Maizie May 20th, 2001, and our brother Jim June 28th, 1999.
Time will never heal the pain
Nor will it bring them back again
Precious memories we keep in our hearts
With those we'll never part
-Missed and loved always,
Larry and Roberta CRESS and family

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CASE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-25 published
CASE-
-In loving memory of a dear husband and father, Jim, who left this earth June 28th, 1999.
As I wake up every morning, I always think of you,
The way you loved that time of day, an adventure, all brand new.
We had so many different plans, and things we had to do,
We never even thought about, living our life without you.
Our little grandchildren that you longed so much to see,
Are beautiful and precious, and now they number three.
I wish so much that you could see, their dimples when they smile,
And listen to their stories that they try so hard to tell.
I hope they each inherit your twinkling eyes, your ready grin,
Your strength and gentle manner, and the kindness you had within.
Please pass to them your values, we all hold with high regard
The hands you took in Friendship, and the way you worked so hard.
Please let them know the value of each friend they've ever had,
Teach them the way you saw the good and overlooked the bad.
I pray that you can pass along the way you loved to live,
And teach them how to cherish all the treasures life can give.
Please watch over and take care of them from your place in Heaven up above,
And when they feel alone and scared, let them feel their Grandpa's love.
But most of all, please share with them the love that we have known,
And let them know as we all do, they'll never walk through life alone.
And God take special care of him, give him a great big hug
Let him know how much we miss him and we're sending all our love.
-You are still very much a part of our lives, we miss and love you
more than words can say,
Lori, Matthew, Leanne, Noah, Christy, Mike, Connor, Mandy, Brock,
Becky, Ryan, Ella and Chief

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CASE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-26 published
Howard Kenneth HOLMES
In loving memory of Howard Kenneth HOLMES who died unexpectedly at home on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 at the age 72 years.
Beloved husband of Joyce (née VINEY.) Loved father of Bonny and husband Douglas KILGOUR of Fort McMurray, Kenneth and wife Evelina of Longlac, Joe and wife Joyce of Bidwell Rd., Manitowaning, Diana HOLMES and friend Williard PYETTE of Tehkummah, Sharon and Robert Case of the Slash, and predeceased by son Douglas (1957). Cherished grandfather of Allison KILGOUR and friend Jason, Heather and husband Gopal BRUGALETTE, Kenny HOLMES and friend Sarah, Crystal and husband Rob PERIGO, Nick HOLMES and friend Melanie, Pam SHEAN, Pat SHEAN, Scott CASE, Brock CASE. Forever remembered by four great grandchildren Jazzlynn, Taylor, Faith and Nikaila. Will be missed by brother Clarence and wife Guelda of Mitchell and sister Dorothy and husband Gordon GERMAN of Crossfield, Alberta and in-laws Harry VINEY of Gore Bay, Charlie (wife Lillian predeceased) VINEY of Wikwemikong Manor, Glenn and wife Margaret VINEY of Kinmount, Gladys (predeceased) and husband Harry JAGGARD of Manitowaning. Predeceased by Grace and husband Carmen HUNTER, Ruth and husband Bill and Loretta and husband Neil McGILLIS. Visitation was held on Thursday, November 20. Funeral service was held on Friday, November 21, 2003 all at Island Funeral Home. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery.

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CASE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-17 published
CASE, Helen Francis McBean

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CASE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
SHIRRIFF, Barbara Jean (née SLOAN)
Died peacefully at home in Toronto, on Tuesday, May 27, 2003, having recently turned 81. Predeceased by her beloved husband Francis Colin SHIRRIFF. Dear mother of Susan, Cathie Shirriff FORSTMANN, Janet, Joan VAUGHAN (the late Steven VAUGHAN) and Barbara. Loving grandmother of Diana CABLE (Warren), Allyson WOODROOFFE (Roger PEPLER) and Kelly FORSTMANN. Great-grandmother of Kate and Julia PEPLER and Hayley, Stephanie and Scott CABLE. Survived by brothers Manson and Frank, and sisters Neva PAUL and Mary PARKER. Barbara's love, encouragement, strength and ''joie de vivre'' will be cherished always. Our very special thanks to Dr. Wendy BROWN, Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and The Temmy Latner Palliative Care Team, Ella CASE and the Victorian Order of Nurses, and caregivers Ramona and Helen. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 3-6 p.m. on Thursday, May 29. A celebration of Barbara's life will be held at Saint John's Anglican Church York Mills, 19 Don Ridge Drive at 2 p.m. on Friday, May 30. If desired, donations to The Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care, 700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Suite 3000 Toronto M5G 1Z5 will be much appreciated by the family.

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CASE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
BLOCK, Matthew Alexander
Tragically died of injuries sustained when struck by a car on Hallowe'en evening. Matthew passed away peacefully with his family by his side at the McMaster Medical Centre on Saturday, November 1, 2003. He was 12 years old.
Matthew BLOCK (Cambridge, Ontario) is the cherished son of Kelly (née FLOOD) and Robert BROOK, dear brother of Stephen, Kevin, Andrew, Caitlin and Jenny, friend of Brent, and precious grand_son of Ellen and Denis CASE, Dennis and Patricia FLOOD, Stanley and Evelyn BROOK. He will also be sadly missed by his great aunts and uncles.
Loved nephew of Sheryl FLOOD and Douglas RITCHIE, Christopher CASE, Leslie (née CASE) and Rodney GIEBLER, Debbie and Jerry and Dave and Denise; and cousins Nicole and Alexander. Special friend of Keith, Lena, Zeo and Matthew BENNETT; Ted and Joe GIBBONS Doreen BROWN and Lloyd STEWARD/STEWART/STUART; and all of his many Friends and their families.
Matthew was a student at St. Joseph's School in Cambridge, and he enjoyed playing left wing with Hespler Minor Hockey. Matthew was also an aspiring chef who shared his passion for cooking with all who knew him.
We wish to thank all those who have given us their love and support, and we offer our heartfelt gratitude to the staff at Cambridge Memorial Hospital, McMaster Medical Centre, and specifically Dr. Holly SMITH, Nancy FRAM, and Chaplin Steve. We were comforted to know that Matthew gave the gift of life to seven families through organ donation.
Our dear Matthew will be greatly missed by all who knew him. It was a great joy and honour to have shared 12 years with him.
Friends will be received on Tuesday and Wednesday from 6: 00-9:00 p.m. at Littles Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 223 Main Street East, Cambridge www.funeralscanada.com Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Clements R.C. Church, 745 Duke Street, Cambridge on Thursday, November 6th at 10: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. In memory of Matthew, donations would be appreciated to ''Kids Can Play'' and to the school that he loved, St. Joseph's in Preston, for any educational needs.

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CASEY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
Robert Thomas COULTER
In loving memory of Robert Thomas COULTER who passed away Sunday Morning, June 29th ,2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital - Memorial Site at the age of 59 years.
Beloved husband of Lenna (CASEY) COULTER predeceased 1999. Cherished son of Lloyd and Elsie COULTER predeceased. Loving brother of Ernest (wife Marilyn) COULTER of Parry Sound, Mary FRASER (husband Don predeceased) of Falconbridge. Dear brother-in-law of Joan LAFAIVRE (husband Len) of Haileybury. Sadly missed by loving nieces and nephews and their families. Funeral Service in the R. J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury, Wednesday, July 2nd, 2003 at 1 pm. Friends may call after 12 noon on Wednesday. Cremation at the Parklawn Crematorium.
also linked as linked as LEFEBVRE

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CASEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
CASEY, Francis (Frank) J. b. 1912 (London, England)
On June 15th, 2003, in his 92nd year, Frank Casey died peacefully. He lived life well and joyfully, and leaves a remarkable legacy of family, business, and service to his church and community. Frank's career in insurance began in 1934 with Lloyd's in London, England. In 1937, he married Frances PETERS. Their long and happy marriage was a true partnership. Frank served as a Sergeant Major in the British Army in the Second World War before emigrating to Canada in 1948 and settling with his family in Toronto. He was the founder and president of Frank J. Casey Insurance Brokers, which for more than fifty years has been a north Toronto institution. His personal approach and dedication to the well-being of his clients made many of them into life-long Friends. He was a stalwart of his parish, St. Monica's, where he was a long-time member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society; and in the greater community he served as the first president of Sancta Maria House, which provides shelter, counselling and support for at-risk teenage girls. Frank took enormous pride and pleasure in his family, and he will be greatly missed by us all. Loving father of Patricia BINGHAM and her husband Richard; the late Catherine BOUWMEISTER and her husband John; Dr. John CASEY and his wife Therese; Anne CHEETHAM and her late husband Francis; Frank G. CASEY; and Angela BRANSCOMBE and her husband Harley. Devoted grandfather to Richard, Christopher and Deirdre BINGHAM; Paul, Janet, John Mark and Michael BOUWMEISTER; Clare, Stephanie, and Daniel CHEETHAM; and Paul, Jean, Marta-Marie and Phillippe CASEY. Great-grandfather to Andrew, Francesca-Anne, Brendan, Caitlin, Thomas and Liam. The family thanks his many caregivers and the staff at Central Park Lodge. Friends may call at the Trull Funeral Home, 2704 Yonge Street, Tuesday, June 17th from 2-4 p.m. and from 7-9 p.m. Mass of Christian burial at St. Monica's Catholic Church, 44 Broadway Avenue, on Wednesday, June 18th at 1: 30 p.m. Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery. If desired, a remembrance may be made to Sancta Maria House, 102 Bernard Avenue, Toronto M5R 1R9; (416) 925-7333. He always believed himself to be a blessed and lucky man. We were blessed to have had him.

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CASS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
The Globe was his church'
The editor-in-chief was mentor to journalists, defender of social policies, respected by those criticized in print, and described as a man with a 'warm human touch'
By Michael VALPY Thursday, April 10, 2003 - Page R11
In his two decades as editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, former senator Richard (Dic) James DOYLE wielded a journalistic influence in Canadian public life matched only by that of George BROWN, the newspaper's founder.
He died yesterday in Toronto, one month past his 80th birthday. His wife of 50 years, Florence, passed away on March 20.
Senator DOYLE -- editor from 1963 to 1983 -- gave the newspaper a boldly independent voice, loosening up its then lock-step support for the Progressive Conservative Party.
Under his direction, the newspaper would praise a government one day and lambaste it the next. He was a passionate defender of civil liberties, intensely engaged in the development of Canada's social policies throughout the 1960s and 1970s and as much concerned with the powerless in Canadian society as the powerful.
"In the time I've been editor," he once said, "we've not supported any party in office. I think we make whomever we support uncomfortable. We're the kind of friend you could do without."
He once said he felt more intellectually comfortable with Pierre TRUDEAU than all the prime ministers he knew, and one of his favourite editorial cartoons was one he suggested after overhearing his daughter Judith talking to a friend in her bedroom. It showed two teenage girls sitting on a bed under a poster of Mr. TRUDEAU. One girl says to the other: "He's not 50 like your father's 50."
His views, although stamped on the editorial page, were never imposed on his reporters. He was concerned with a story's news value -- not the fallout -- and he expected his staff to act with the same concern.
He wanted The Globe to be a writer's newspaper and gave his writers autonomy, even when their views went against his own philosophies. He had a special place in his heart for columnists who expressed contradictory opinions.
The young writers invited to attend the buffet lunches he gave regularly for prime ministers, premiers and cabinet ministers, bank presidents and giants of the arts were treated to superb tutorials in the life of their nation that left an indelible mark on their minds.
Warm, funny, theatrical and gregarious, he was a mentor and model for many of Canada's best-known journalists -- among them, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Michael ENRIGHT and Don NEWMAN, former Globe and Maclean's managing editor Geoffrey STEVENS, his successor as Globe editor Norman WEBSTER, and former foreign correspondent, dance critic and now master of the University of Toronto's Massey College, John FRASER.
"He was absolutely fearless," Mr. STEVENS said yesterday. "He did tough stuff. He did important stuff. And he refused to bow to pressure from business, from politicians and for that matter from journalists. I didn't always agree with him, but I always, always respected what he said."
Mr. FRASER said: "He was an editor who made young journalists' dreams come true. Like many who came under his spell at The Globe and Mail, I will go to my grave grateful for the horizons he opened up to me."
George BAIN, for years The Globe's Ottawa columnist, recalled the only time Senator DOYLE actually complained about something Mr. BAIN had written was when he filed an end-piece to a royal tour and suggested that the institution wasn't appropriate to the Canadian circumstances.
"Dic, as a devoted monarchist, was moved to say, 'Did you have to?' The fact is I felt I did -- and he, despite strong feelings, didn't say, 'You can't.' "
When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY appointed him to the Senate in 1985, he decided to sit as a Conservative out of courtesy.
Mr. MULRONEY described him yesterday as "a marvellous man, rigorous, thoughtful, with a disciplined approach to life and a very warm human touch to everything he did.
"When he cut people up, including me, there was no malice to it, no ad hominem attack, he was never bitter or partisan in any way.'The full impact of Senator DOYLE's presence as editor was probably first felt by The Globe's readers on March 20, 1964, when a front-page editorial appeared under the heading, Bill of Wrongs.
It was prompted by legislation proposed by Ontario's Conservative attorney-general, Frederick CASS, which empowered the Ontario Police Commission to summon any person for questioning in secret deprive him of legal advice; and keep him in prison indefinitely if he refused to answer.
"For the public good," the editorial stated, the Ontario Government "proposes to trample upon the Magna Carta, Habeas Corpus, the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Rule of Law.
"Are we in... the Canada of 1964 -- or in the Germany of 1934?
"This legislation is supposed to be directed against organized crime. In fact, it is directed against every man and woman in the province."
Soon after, Mr. CASS resigned.
Senator DOYLE's skills as a writer were particularly evident on an election night when the paper would present an editorial on the results between editions. Alastair LAWRIE, now retired as an editorial writer, recalled that once the results were known, Senator DOYLE would stand in silent thought for maybe a minute and a half and then start to dictate. In a matter of a few minutes, he would complete a reasoned editorial that scarcely required the addition of a comma.
Senator DOYLE preferred to work in anonymity, only accepting honorary degrees and later the seat in the Senate near the end of his newspaper career.
He sat on no boards, belonged to no important clubs, almost never appeared on television or radio, didn't sign petitions and seldom gave speeches. When he met a politician, there were usually witnesses.
He didn't hold a driver's licence and for years arrived at the old Globe office on King Street by streetcar. When The Globe moved to its present office on Front Street, Senator DOYLE took a taxi.
Retired Ottawa Citizen publisher Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and a close friend of Senator DOYLE, suspected "he didn't trust his Irish temper [to drive] and that was probably to the common good."
Mr. DAVEY said Senator DOYLE's low public profile "was part of his own protection against conflicts on his own part. The Globe was his church. Journalism was his religion.
"I think that Dic, in the context of his time, probably had a greater influence on Canadian journalism than any other single individual," Mr. DAVEY said.
"It was Dic's execution that made the Report on Business what it became and is. He was the moving force from within The Globe often unseen -- in the whole question of conflicts of interest as they affected journalists.
"He was really the wellspring of that kind of thinking and, of course, what The Globe did affected very directly what a lot of other organizations did."
Born in Toronto on March 10, 1923, Dic DOYLE seemed destined to get ink on his hands. He said in 1985 that he had decided on a newspaper career at age 7 and joined the Chatham Daily News as a sports reporter after he graduated from Chatham Collegiate Institute. He was promoted to sports editor, city editor and then news editor.
During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and served with the 115 (Bomber) Squadron (Royal Air Force) at Ely, near Cambridge in England. He was discharged at the end of the war with the rank of flying officer.
He was 23 and felt that life was passing him by, so rather than attending university, as other returning air-force officers were doing, he returned to the Chatham paper. It was a decision he said he later regretted.
He came to The Globe in 1951, initially as a copy editor, the only job available. His first byline appeared in The Globe in December of 1952 over a story about milk bottles.
In the same year, he also wrote a book called The Royal Story, a labour of love that proved to be a standard treatment of the monarchy, and which he was the first to acknowledge, replowed already well-tilled soil.
(The Royal family had a special status at The Globe under Senator DOYLE. One former senior editor, the legendary Martin LYNCH, told of being taken off the front-page layout after he replaced a picture of Princess Margaret, which appeared in early editions, with a photograph of a prize-winning pig.
When The Globe decided to publish a weekly supplement in 1957, Senator DOYLE became its first editor, with a staff that had no experience in the weekly field. The paper was laid out on the carpet of the managing editor's office after he had gone home.
It shrunk over the years because, Mr. DOYLE said, it was ahead of its time. It died in 1971.
From there, in 1959, he became managing editor of the newspaper and then editor in 1963. He stepped aside in 1983 to take on the role of editor emeritus and to write a column -- an experience, he said two years later, that left him chastened. "The guy [columnist] out there has his problems."
Former Globe publisher A. Roy MEGARRY, said, "In my opinion, no one -- including the seven publishers that Dic has served with during his time at the paper -- had made a more positive and lasting impression on The Globe than he has."
Likely among the greatest tributes paid to him as an editor came from the Kent Commission established by the federal government in 1980 to investigate the ownership of Canada's daily newspapers after the Ottawa Journal and the Winnipeg Tribune folded in virtually simultaneous moves by the Thomson and Southam chains.
In its report, the commission credited Senator DOYLE with "adhering to an ideal of press freedom that often tends to get lost in the management of newspapers....
"To a great extent, the editor-in-chief of The Globe belongs to a breed which unfortunately is on its way to extinction.
"The Globe and Mail testifies to the influence that continues to be exerted by a newspaper with a clearly defined idea of its role and substantial editorial resources. It is read by almost three-quarters of the country's most important decision-makers in all parts of Canada and at all levels of government. More than 90 per cent of media executives read it regularly and it tends to set the pace for other news organizations."
The Globe and Mail was bought by Thomson Newspapers in 1980. Senator DOYLE made no secret of the fact that he would have preferred having the newspaper bought by R. Howard Webster, who owned it before it became part of the Financial Post chain. However, in 1985 he said that Thomson was the best alternative among the others in the field.
When Prime Minister MULRONEY named him to the Senate, he became the first active Globe journalist to receive such an appointment since George BROWN in 1873. As an editor and a columnist, Senator DOYLE had often preached Senate reform and had opposed patronage appointments.
His acceptance prompted a flow of letters to the editor that favoured and disapproved of the appointment in about equal measure.Senator DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. Funeral arrangements have not been announced.

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CASSIDY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Donald Arthur CASSIDY
In loving memory of Donald Arthur CASSIDY " Hop" at Manitoulin Health Centre in Little Current on Monday January 6, 2003 in his 75th year.
Beloved husband of Lillian (née FLAHERTY.) Predeceased by parents Ernest and Helen CASSIDY. Brother of Eunice SCOBIE of Dundas and Beatrice WHITE/WHYTE of Columbia, South Carolina. Predeceased by brother Leonard and sister Madeline. Cherished father of Janice BOOKER of Ridgeway, William (Bill) of Port Colborne, Ruth WILSON (Bruce) of Little Current, Beverly CASSIDY (Scott MURRAY) of Welland and Roger of Little Current.
Beloved grandfather of Derek, Tammy, Scott, Gregory, Joshua, Sarah, Valerie, Brett, and Brian. Great grandfather of three. Uncle of many nieces and nephews. Visitation from 2: 00 until Memorial service at 3: 30 p.m. Wednesday January 8, 2003 at Grace Bible Church.

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CASSIDY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-25 published
'Death has never fazed me'
Joyful teenager taught children and parents how to live with cancer
By Michael VALPY Saturday, January 25, 2003, Page F11
Cory MAESTRELLO didn't just have cancer, he was a philosopher of cancer. This week he left life celebrated, something he would have considered appropriate for every young person inflicted with his disease.
He was a month short of his 18th birthday. He believed cancer was a gift that had enriched his life.
He died remembered for his infectious enthusiasm, his joy, his grin, his insights into living with a terminal illness, the love he showed to other sufferers, his toughness and his inclination to do impromptu Riverdance imitations in hospital elevators.
On Tuesday afternoon, lying in a hospital bed in Sudbury, Ontario, with pneumonia, he told his father Art: "I'm going to beat this." He was dead a few hours later.
His Sudbury high school, St. Benedict Catholic Secondary School, cancelled exams, declared a "Cory Day" and allowed its students to go home.
The lead singer of a student band in which he had once played composed a song for him. Students from high schools across the city turned up to sign a Cory poster in St. Benedict's chapel.
CJOH-Television, the Canadian Television Network outlet in Ottawa, broadcast a 3½-minute tribute to him on its 6 o'clock news, part of a documentary-in-the-making of his life that now will never be completed. The station's vice-president of news and public affairs, Max KEEPING, was to attend Cory's funeral mass today.
Many members of the Ottawa Senators hockey team planned to attend a memorial service for him at Ottawa's Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario.
Parents of other children with cancer being treated at the hospital were devastated by the news that he had died, said palliative care nurse Marilyn CASSIDY. " There have been so many families calling."
Cory had befriended and counselled them. He had taught them, parents and children, how to live with cancer and the process of dying.
Interviewed last November for a Globe and Mail Focus article on how to live life at the edge of death, he said: "Death has never fazed me. The only thing that's fazed me is not getting the chance to live this life . . . and I've lived more in two years [with cancer] than most people will live in their entire life, and I appreciate that."
Cory MAESTRELLO, the son of a retired mine worker, revelled in living for his last two years.
"I feel there's a path out there for me," he said. "Be it by God or whatever the higher power is, I always feel there's a path set out for me."
He visited with dying children in the hospital, even after doctors told him that he himself was beyond treatment. He spoke at dead children's memorial services.
He approached Mr. KEEPING last year and asked if he could appear on CJOH's annual fundraising telethon for the hospital. Mr. KEEPING agreed.
Cory was on air for an hour, talking about what it was like to have cancer and showing photographs of Serge, his closest friend at the hospital, who had died. Mr. KEEPING called his presence "compelling."
Cory said excitedly afterward: "Working on the telethon was a blast. The words that I said helped people. It's given me the tools to help people. I don't care if I die tomorrow."
He talked to his Globe and Mail interviewer about the joy he felt with life. "Your very best day is probably my worst day," he said.
He talked about the importance of each day. "I always let everyone know I love them," he said, "just in case I don't get the chance to. I've got to say everything that I need to say today. I may not be here tomorrow to say it."
Said Ms. CASSIDY: " You sometimes found yourself asking if he was too good to be true. He was the real thing, big-time. He was a very special kid" -- a hero to other youngsters with cancer, she said, who faced his own adversity with inner strength and inner ability.
Cory and Max KEEPING became Friends after the CJOH telethon. The station executive took him to Senators' games and introduced him to the players. People introduced to Cory rarely, if ever, forgot him.
He had a delightful, buzzy energy, with an intelligence that measured off the Richter scale, said Nic BATTIGELLI, one of Cory's St. Benedict teachers who gave a eulogy for him at his funeral.
He was charming, and attractive to girls -- frequently girls older than himself. Mr. BATTIGELLI recalled him taking a beautiful Grade 13 student to an event while he was still in Grade 9.
Mr. KEEPING recalled taking Cory to a party for his 30th anniversary as a television broadcaster just before Christmas (Cory was living at the children's hospital's Ronald McDonald House; he went home to Sudbury at Christmas and never returned).
At 2 a.m., Mr. KEEPING suggested to Cory that it was maybe time to to leave. Cory replied that there were still two people at the party, and as long as someone was partying, he wanted to party.
Mr. KEEPING said: "I feel so good that even in six months this kid could teach me how important today is . . . that what's important is what you do with today. He turned on a light and, I know I shouldn't say this, but the light's gone out. It's sad for me. But how enriched I've been -- and I said that on air."
Mr. BATTIGELLI and Cory had developed a bond even before the boy was diagnosed with cancer. Cory wanted to become a teacher, and told Mr. BATTIGELLI shortly after he met him: "You're the teacher I want to be."
Mr. BATTIGELLI said Cory, as a 14-year-old Grade 9 student, asked to join an anti-violence peer-meditation program the teacher ran at the school, and later asked to accompany Mr. BATTIGELLI on a similar conflict resolution project he had started in a nearby first nations community. He said Cory was superb at it.
"He just was a kid who was not a kid," Mr. BATTIGELLI said. "I think God has truly picked up an angel. God sends us signposts. I think he will be my guardian angel for the rest of my teaching career."
St. Benedict principal Teresa STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, when she cancelled exams this week, said: "This is a time for Cory."

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CASTONGUAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-07 published
COSTELLO, Mary Paula Christine (née CASTONGUAY)
Born October 15, 1919, died November 6, 2003 at Formosa, Ontario. Lovingly remembered by her three children Michael COSTELLO, Mary KNOX and her husband Brian, Bob COSTELLO and his wife Brenda sadly missed by her grandchildren Riley and Jessie KNOX; Allie, Darryl and Dru COSTELLO. Predeceased by her husband Robert E. E. COSTELLO and infant son Patrick William Gerard. Visitation at Cameron Funeral Home, Walkerton, Ontario. Funeral mass 11 am Saturday, November 8, 2003 at Immaculate Conception Church, Formosa, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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CASTRO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-22 published
DE CASTRO, Mhairi Angela McLeod (née FENTON- McEUEN)
November 30, 1918 - March 19, 2003 Mhairi lived in Ste-Agathe, Quebec with her parents until she was five, when her mother died. Her uncle and aunt in Scotland, Dr. and Mrs. Stuart McEUEN, took her back with them to St. Andrews, Fife. On the death of her grandfather Dr. HUNTINGTON in St. Andrews, the McEuens returned to Quebec, Montreal, and Lac Ouimet in the Mont Tremlant area. Mhairi was educated in Montreal and Ottawa, where she was a pupil at Elmwood School for a while before finishing her education at a private school in Scotland. She left the United Kingdom at the outbreak of World War 2, but not before having an adventure in France driving ambulances. In 1937 Mhairi accompanied the McEUENs to the Canadian Arctic. Her uncle was conducting research into the health of the Native people in that area. During World War 2 Mhairi spent much of her time helping her aunt, Dolly McEUEN, run the Ajax Club for British sailors in Halifax. Many comforts, and brief holiday respites were made available to the sailors in private homes. As well, the club provided a place to go when they had leave from their duties on board ship. After the war the success of this venture produced enough funds to create fifteen scholarships for young men from the United Kingdom These young men were unable to attend university because of their service in the navy during the war. Now, the McEuen Scholarship would provide them with an opportunity to continue their education at McGill University. The McEUENs knew all these scholars well, meeting them at the dock when they first set foot in Canada. For many of them the McEUEN House became a home away from home. After the war Mhairi lived at 'Ottir', the house the McEUENs built on the side of a mountain overlooking Lac Ouimet, Quebec, until the late sixties when she and her aunt moved to Ottawa. Mhairi married her beloved Henry DE CASTRO in 1976, he died in 1989. Mhairi and her aunt created another scholarship for a Canadian to attend St. Andrews University in Fife, Scotland, and this will continue indefinitely. She cared a lot about these students and loved to hear from them, their progress and successes while at university and afterwards. Mhairi also maintained her interest in the Fraser Highlanders of which she was a member. Mhairi will be remembered for her generosity in providing donations of Canadian artifacts to Government House and to the Museum of Civilization in Ottawa, as well as to the Louisburg Fortress and Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in Nova Scotia. Over the last years after Alzheimer Disease took away the life she loved, Mhairi has been cared for by Luci PEREIRA, her employee, friend, and loving caregiver, since the seventies. Luci headed the team charged with attending Mhairi, and deserves our thanks and praise for her devotion. Also appreciated is the compassion and nurturing of the nurses, staff, and doctors in the Villa Marguerite. The Funeral Service will be held at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, 125 Mackay Street, Ottawa, Ontario on Tuesday, March 25, 2003, at 11 a.m. Arrangements in care of the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair & McGarry, Ottawa. In lieu of flowers we request that you may think of making a donation to the Villa Marguerite or the McEuen Scholarship Foundation.

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CASWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-04 published
CASWELL, Moira Lenore (Justice of the Superior Court of Ontario)
Suddenly at Craigleith Ski Club doing what she loved. She will be greatly missed by her husband Ralph, daughter Steise, son Thomas, daughter-in-law Faye and grand_son Conor. Beloved Sister of Michael, Deirdre and David MUNGOVAN. Friends may call at the Trull Funeral Home and Cremation Centre 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence) on Wednesday from 4 to 6 and 7 to 9 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at Blessed Sacrament Church (Yonge street, one block south of Lawrence) on Thursday morning at 11 o'clock. Interment Mount Pleasant Cemetery. If desired, remembrances may be made to the charity of your choice.

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